Indebted sentence examples

indebted
  • However much Walton was indebted to his helpers.

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    54
  • peopled entirely by merchants and tradesmen, and is wholly indebted for its present size and importance to its commercial prosperity.

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  • The marriage took place in the autumn of 1709, and on February 9, 1710/1, was born at his house at Reigate, in Surrey, his only child and heir, the fourth earl, to whose manuscript accounts we are in great part indebted for the details of his father's life.

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  • The `EAXnvucwv OEpairEvruo lraen,uhTwv (De Curandis Graecorum Affectionibus) - written before 438 - is of an historical and apologetic character, very largely indebted to Clement of Alexandria and Eusebius; it aims at showing the advantages of Christianity as compared with " the moribund but still militant " Hellenism of the day, and deals with the assaults of pagan adversaries.

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  • In 1746 and 1748 he published in the Memoirs of the Academy of Berlin "Recherches sur le calcul integral," a branch of mathematical science which is greatly indebted to him.

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  • Formerly indebted to him for my life, yes.

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  • The scenery of Formosa is frequently of majestic beauty, and to this it is indebted for its European name, happily bestowed by the early Spanish navigators.

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  • For maps of the Balkan Peninsula we are still largely indebted to the rapid surveys carried on by Austrian and Russian officers.

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  • He was followed by a Spanish mission under Garcia de Silva, who wrote an interesting account of his travels; and to Sir Dormer Cotton's mission, in 1628, we are indebted for Sir Thomas Herbert's charming narrative.

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  • He struck out a new line for himself, and was indebted for his inspiration to no previous writer, whether Turk or Persian.

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  • But in writing that history Cassiodorus was himself indebted to the work of a certain Ablabius.

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  • Marcus himself says, "To the gods I am indebted for having good grandfathers, good parents, a good sister, good teachers, good associates, good kinsmen and friends, nearly everything good."

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  • Among the Arabian and later alchemists we find attempts made to collate compounds by specific properties, and it is to these writers that we are mainly indebted for such terms as "alkali," " sal," &c. The mineral acids, hydrochloric, nitric and sulphuric acids, and also aqua regia (a mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids) were discovered, and the vitriols, alum, saltpetre, sal-ammoniac, ammonium carbonate, silver nitrate (lunar caustic) became better known.

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  • To the same firm we are indebted for Petermann's Mitteilungen, started in 1855 by A.

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    5
  • The table on the following page, for which the writer is indebted to the kindness of Carolidi Effendi, formerly professor of history in the university of Athens, and in 1910 deputy for Smyrna in the Turkish parliament, shows the various races of the Ottoman Empire, the regions which they inhabit, and the religions which they profess.

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    5
  • To Lagrange, perhaps more than to any other, the theory of differential equations is indebted for its position as a science, rather than a collection of ingenious artifices for the solution of particular problems. To the calculus of finite differences he contributed the beautiful formula of interpolation which bears his name; although substantially the same result seems to have been previously obtained by Euler.

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  • He quotes Aristotle, Heraclides Ponticus, Aeschines Socraticus, Idomeneus of Lampsacus and Duris of Samos, and is also indebted through some Alexandrine intermediary to Ephorus and Theopompus.

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    9
  • For the latest edition we are indebted to the late Carl Muller (Paris, 1883-1906) to whom we are likewise indebted for an edition of the Geographi graeci minores (1855-1861).

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    4
  • It appears to have been used by James Bradley, but for its practical development we are mainly indebted to Sir William Rowan Hamilton, who published an account of it in the Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, 1846.

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    4
  • Other cosmographers of distinction were Pedro Reinel (1504-1542), Nuno Garcia de Toreno (1520), to whom we are indebted for 21 charts, illustrating Magellan's voyage, Diogo Ribero (maps of the world 1527, 1529), 2 Alonzo de Santa Cruz, of Seville, whose Isolario general includes charts of all parts of the world (1541), John Rotz or Rut (1542), Sebastian Cabot (1544), as also Nicolas Desliens, Pierre Desceliers, G.

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  • Glockedon, the author of an interesting road-map of central Europe (1soi), Sebastian Munster (1489-1552), Elias Camerarius, whose map of the mark of Brandenburg won the praise of Mercator; Wolfgang Latz von Lazius, to whom we are indebted for maps of Austria and Hungary (1561), and Philip Apianus, who made a survey of Bavaria (1553-1563), which was published 1568 on the reduced scale of 1:144,000, and is fairly described as the topographical masterpiece of the 16th century.

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  • Father Braun, to whose kindness the writer is indebted for the above account of the causes of the ritual changes in the Carolingian epoch, adds that the papacy was never narrowminded in its attitude towards local rites, and that it was not until the close of the middle ages, when diversity had become confusion and worse, that it began to insist upon uniformity.

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  • It has been held that the forms with a small number of somites marked in the posterior carapace and numerous free somites between the anterior and posterior carapace, must be considered as anterior to those in which a great number of posterior somites are traceable in the metasomatic carapace, and that those in which the traces of distinct somites in the posterior or metasomatic carapace are most completely absent must be regarded as derived from those in which somites are well marked in the posterior 1 The writer is indebted to R.

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  • Medical literature was indebted for its origin to the works of Galen and the medical school of Gondesapur.

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  • It appears to have been at some time between the dates of these two journeys that he visited Bologna and Auxerre, and began those studies in the canon law to which he was in no small degree indebted for his subsequent advancement and misfortunes.

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  • To the latter we are indebted for a valuable map of Caucasia, 1:210,000, which since the first publication (1863-1885) has undergone careful revision.

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  • Though he was much indebted to Aristotle he used the material to advantage, adding much from his own experience and historical knowledge.

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  • Fresenius, the founder of the Zeitschrift fiir analytische Chemie (1862), we are particularly indebted for perfecting and systematizing the various methods of analytical chemistry.

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  • 3 We are indebted to Strabo for nearly all we know about Greek cartographers anterior to Ptolemy, for none of their maps has been preserved.

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  • Among historians who looked upon geography as an important aid in their work are numbered Polybius (c. 210-120 B.C.), Diodorus Siculus (c. 30 B.C.) and Agathachidus of Cnidus (c. 120 B.C.) to whom we are indebted for a valuable account of the Erythrean Sea and the adjoining parts of Arabia and Ethiopia.

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  • Benrath, Lokalfiihrer durch Hamburg and Umgebungen (1904); and the consular reports by Sir William Ward, H.B.M.'s consul-general at Hamburg, to whom the author is indebted for great assistance in compiling this article.

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  • It is more than likely that he was indebted to earlier writers, whom he omits to mention, and whose works are now lost; nevertheless, but for this work, we should be led to assume that algebra was almost, if not entirely, unknown to the Greeks.

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  • Between 1847 and 1858 branch societies were formed in different parts of India, especially in Bengal, and the new society made rapid progress, for which it was largely indebted to the spread of English education and the work of Christian missionaries.

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  • To biological chemistry we have been deeply indebted during the latter half of the 19th century.

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  • The drama that has made Castro's reputation is Las Mocedades del Cid (1 599 ?), to the first part of which Corneille was largely indebted for the materials of his tragedy.

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  • Brit., and the present independent revision is in some points indebted to it.

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  • (1698-1780) the city was indebted for many of its public buildings.

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  • The writer is indebted to Dr A.

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  • He has made a deep mark on the history, not only of Scotland, but of England; and the existing Presbyterian churches in Scotland are largely indebted to him for the forms of their dogmas and their ecclesiastical organization.

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  • He here continued to render great service to Abu Salem (Ibrahim III.), Abu Inan's successor, but, having offended the prime minister, he obtained permission to emigrate to Spain, where, at Granada, he was received with great cordiality by Ibn al Ahmar, who had been greatly indebted to his good offices when an exile at the court of Abu Salem.

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  • In the Gathas he appears as a quite historical personage; it is essentially to his power and good example that the prophet is indebted for his success.

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  • Laennec, to whom we are indebted for the practice of auscultation, freely admits that the idea was suggested to him by study of Hippocrates, who, treating of the presence of morbid fluids in the thorax, gives very particular directions, by 1 " Hippocrates Cous, primus quidem ex omnibus memoria dignus, ab studio sapientiae disciplinam hanc separavit, vir et arte et facundia insignis " (Celsus, De medicina).

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  • 1106), who was indirectly indebted to Babylonian teaching.

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  • The conspiracy was honeycombed with treachery, and it was long a matter of dispute to whose information the government were indebted for Fitzgerald's arrest; but it is no longer open to doubt that the secret of his hiding place was disclosed by a Catholic barrister named Magan, to whom the stipulated reward was ultimately paid through Francis Higgins, another informer.

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  • Nevertheless, it is to Huntsman that the world is immediately indebted for the crucible process.

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    0
  • On particular authors and subjects there are many excellent monographs in the Jewish Encyclopaedia (New York, 1901-6), to which the present article is much indebted.

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  • of this Encyclopaedia, to which this article is much indebted.

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  • For a contemporary account of Simnel's imposture, see Polydore Vergil, Anglicae historiae, to which all the later narratives are indebted.

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  • Herodotus, though he once at least controverts his statements, is indebted to Hecataeus not only for facts, but also in regard of method and general scheme, but the extent of the debt depends on the genuineness of the Ns xrEp1050s.

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  • To these works the present writer is indebted for many a suggestion.

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  • Since then many have held that Descartes, Spinoza and Leibnitz were indebted to him for their main principles.

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  • He was not a man of learning, nor had he many books; for his knowledge of early Christian writers he was partly indebted to the Chronica or compilations of Sebastian Franck.

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  • Irenaeus, to whom we are indebted for this information (Haer.

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  • Praetor in 60, he obtained the governorship of Hispania Citerior (19) through the support of Caesar, to whom he was also indebted for his election to the consulship (J7).

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  • i., London, 1903), to which the present writer is much indebted; another useful treatise is that of F.

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  • Constantine was a painter and a patron of art, a literary man and a patron of literature; and herein consists his real importance, since it is to works written by or directly inspired by him that we are indebted for our chief knowledge of his times.

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  • Thus the man who was so greatly indebted to the Roman academy and to Louis XVI.

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  • It is indebted for its rise and importance to its medicinal springs, and is the principal inland watering-place in the north of England.

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  • As an actress Nell Gwyn was largely indebted to Dryden, who seems to have made a special study of her airy, irresponsible personality, and who kept her supplied with parts which suited her.

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  • The development of Talmudic Law (or Halakhah) was much indebted to this rabbi, whose influence in all branches.

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  • De Thou acknowledges himself greatly indebted to this history, praising it especially for its accuracy.

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  • Though mainly indebted for its commercial prosperity to its position on the river, the town did not begin to reap the full advantages of its situation till the opening of the railways between 1853 and 1865.

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  • This was the state of things in the time of Trajan, when the younger Pliny was appointed governor of the combined provinces (103-105 A.D.), a circumstance to which we are indebted for valuable information concerning the Roman provincial administration.

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  • For that knowledge, scanty as it was, he was indebted to Leontius Pilatus, with whose aid Boccaccio (1313-1375) became " the first of modern men " to study Greek to some purpose during the three years that Leontius spent as his guest in Florence (1360-1363).

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  • But to his wide, deep and accurate learning, to his conscientious and impartial examination of the facts and the authorities at first hand, and to "his exact quotation of the sources and works illustrating them, and careful discussion of the most minute details," all succeeding historians are indebted.

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  • In the latter branch the author is wholly indebted to Professor Amadeus W.

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  • His writings are lost, and we are indebted for information to Cicero (Acad.

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  • Within the republic there are six banks of issue, to which the government is deeply indebted.

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  • To the latter we are indebted for the substance of the following description, as well as for the 1 plan, reduced from his elucidated transcript of the original preserved in the archives of the convent.

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  • 500), who were very probably indebted to the Greeks, used 62832/20000, that is, the now familiar 3.1416.7 It was not until the 15th century that attention in Europe began to be once more directed to the subject, and after the resuscitation a considerable length of time elapsed before any progress was made.

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  • She does not appear in Homer, although according to Xanthus (regarded by some as a fictitious personage), to whom Stesichorus was indebted for much in his Oresteia, she was identical with the Homeric Laodice, and was called Electra because she remained so long unmarried ('A-MKTpa).

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  • He died about fifty years before Abu `Ubaida and al-Asma`i, to whose labours posterity is largely indebted for the arrangement, elucidation and criticism of ancient Arabian verse; and his anthology was put together between fifty and sixty years before the compilation by Abu Tammam of the Ilamasa (q.v.).

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  • He, however, like his father Alp Arslan, was indebted for his greatest fame to wise and salutary measures of their vizier, Nizam ul-Mulk.

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  • To Kolliker,ll Gegenbaur, 12 and more recently Spenger, l3 amongst German anatomists, we are indebted for epoch-making researches of the same kind.

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  • For our knowledge of this subject we are indebted chiefly to Icelandic literary men of the 12th and 13th centuries, who gave accounts of many legends which had come down to them by oral tradition, besides committing to writing a number of ancient poems. Unfortunately Icelandic history is quite unique in this respect.

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  • A little knowledge about its sources above these points was given by the savages to de la Fuente in 1759 and to Mendoza in 1764, and we are also indebted to Humboldt for some vague data.

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  • For a number of items relating to works of art near the coast of Asia Minor, and in the adjacent islands, Pliny was indebted to the general, statesman, orator and historian, Gaius Licinius Mucianus, who died before A.D.

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  • For this estimate of Reiske as a Greek scholar the writer is indebted to Prof. U.

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  • P. Thompson's valuable paper on influence machines (to which this article is much indebted) and other references given, see J.

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  • Graec. xlvii.-lxiv.); but this edition is greatly indebted to the one issued more than a century earlier (1612) by Sir Henry Savile, provost of Eton College, from a press established at Eton by himself, which Hallam (Lit.

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  • indebted governments, inherently insolvent industry and desperately mortgaged media empires.

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  • Over and above the numerous editions, there is a bulky literature of an explanatory and controversial character, for which the world is indebted to Paracelsus's followers and enemies.

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  • For his success as a writer Delavigne was in no small measure indebted to the stirring nature of the times in which he lived.

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  • Inscriptions have naturally been found in considerable numbers, and we are indebted to them for much information concerning the municipal arrangements of the town, as well as the construction of various edifices and other public works.

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  • Nevertheless he has a distinguished place in the story of precocious children, and in the much more limited chapter of children whose precocity has been followed by great performance at maturity, though he never became what is called a learned man, perhaps did not know Greek, and was pretty certainly indebted for most of his miscellaneous reading to Montaigne.

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  • It is painful to relate that twice in the course of the year which followed the publication of this great work he was arrested and carried to sponging-houses, and that he was twice indebted for his liberty to his excellent friend Richardson.

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  • He is chiefly indebted to the popular ballads and legends of Armenia, and it is to the use of such materials that the work owes its permanent value.

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  • P. Patkanow,7 to whom we are indebted for the best text of the Geography, is of opinion that we have in it a writing of the 7th century.

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  • But Louis was perhaps still more indebted for his victory to the memorable conflict between the Swiss and the Habsburgs, the defeat of Leopold of Austria at Morgarten in 1315 striking a heavy blow at his position.

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  • The story of the war is told elsewhere (see GERMAN SOUTH-WEST AFRICA); it lasted well into 1908 and the Germans were indebted to the Cape Mounted Police for material help in bringing it to an end.

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  • He also came to know the Oxford collections of Brian Twyne to which he was greatly indebted.

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  • Such an arrange ment, for which seismologists are indebted to Professor T.

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  • In Mahomet's case this is the less wonderful because he was indebted to the instruction of Jews and Christians, whose Arabic - as the Koran pretty clearly intimates with regard to one of them - was very defective.

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  • For the following description, chiefly taken from the American form (though almost equally applicable to that of Europe) we are mainly indebted to Dr Elliott Coues's Fur-bearing Animals of North America, 1877.

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  • He was held personally responsible for the loss of a large sum of money during his administration of the state department, and after years of litigation was judged by an arbitrator to be indebted to the government for more than $49,000, which he paid at great sacrifice to himself.

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  • Some three-fourths of the materials, essentially in the same arrangement, have been appropriated from his predecessor without his being named, the other sources to which Sozomen was indebted being expressly cited.

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  • 5 It has long been agreed that biblical religion and history are indebted in some way to groups connected with Edom and North Arabia, and repeated endeavours have been made to explain the evidence in its bearing upon this lengthy period.

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  • It has been chiefly indebted to writers, who were not, or were not primarily, logicians, to Avenarius, for example, for the law of the economy of thought, to Wundt, whose system, and therewith his logic,' is a pendant to his psychology, for the volitional character of judgment, to Herbert Spencer and others.

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  • It became a town and fortress under Otto I., his successor, and speedily attained considerable wealth and importance, for a good share of which it was indebted to the pilgrimages which were made to the "arm of St Peter," preserved in one of the churches.

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  • Besides mystical theology, Boehme was indebted to the writings of Paracelsus.

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  • His father died when he was in his eighteenth year, and he was indebted for his university education to one of the members of his father's family.

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  • Rymer's Foedera was published, under the orders of the government, in twenty volumes, from 1704 to 1732; but for methodical collections of the earlier British treaties we are indebted to private enterprise, which produced three volumes in 1710-1713, republished with a fourth volume in 1732.

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  • On the one hand, it is possible that the English epic, which unquestionably derived its historical elements from Scandinavian song, may be indebted to the same source for its general plan, including the blending of history and myth.

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  • Salabat Jang, the son of the nizam ul mulk Asaf Jah, who was indebted for his elevation to the throne to the French East India Company, granted them in return for their services the district of Kondavid or Guntur, and soon afterwards the other Circars.

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  • An act of 1851 forbade servants from leaving masters to whom they were indebted, and in 1853 sheriffs were authorized in some instances to dispose of the debtor's labour to the highest bidder.

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  • Jerome does not mention the Itala, but it is plain that he was indebted to it.

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  • To Photius we are indebted for almost all w possess of Ctesias, Memnon, Conon, the lost books of Diodorus Sictlus, and the lost writings of Arrian.

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  • When the news came to the cardinal he said to his secretary Beccatelli that he had received good tidings: "Hitherto I have thought myself indebted to the divine goodness for having received my birth from one of the most noble and virtuous women in England; but henceforth my obligation will be much greater, as I understand I am now the son of a martyr.

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  • It was supposed that it had been handed down by Ezra; that it was indebted to Joshua, David or Solomon; that it was as old as Moses, to whom it had been communicated orally or in writing, complete or in its essence.

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  • The Gemara is much indebted to this pair and to Johanan b.

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  • It is only by such a tower of speculation that an 1 In this doctrine, so far as the facts go, Schopenhauer is indebted to a paper by R.

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  • 2 The fact that Spinoza nowhere mentions Bruno would not imply, according to the literary habits of those days, that he was not acquainted with his speculations and even indebted to them.

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  • In Athens about the time of Solon's legislation (594 B.C.) the bulk of the population, who had originally been small proprietors or metayers, became gradually indebted to the rich to such an extent that they were practically slaves.

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  • Naturally he starts from the old views, and is indebted to them for many of his tenets and ideas; but out of this material he builds a uniform system which bears throughout the impress of his own intellect.

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  • He had practically made no progress; yet Russia, in securing possession of Derbent, Baku, Shirvan, Sheki, Garja, the Talysh and M ugan, was probably indebted to gold as well as to the force of arms. At the same time Persia would not listen to the overtures of peace made to her by the governor-general who had succeeded Zizianov.

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  • Plato (Theaetetus, 15 2 E) puts him at the head of the masters of comedy, coupling his name with Homer and, according to a remark in Diogenes Laertius, Plato was indebted to Epicharmus for much of his philosophy.

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  • It is to the work of his son Richard, the Dialogus de Scaccario, that we are indebted for our knowledge of the procedure of the exchequer as it was left by Nigel.

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  • 1542), Spanish captain and explorer, often, though wrongly, called the discoverer of the Mississippi (first sighted by Alonzo de Pineda in 1519), was born at Jerez de los Caballeros, in Extremadura, of an impoverished family of good position, and was indebted to the favour of Pedrarias d'Avila for the means of pursuing his studies at the university.

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  • The law of contracts, the law of torts, the mercantile law, the law relating to shipping and insurance, not to mention other subjects, are practically identical with those of England; and even the criminal law is virtually the 1 For the sections here incorporated on South African law and language we are indebted to the late J.

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  • 5 a treasury was deeply indebted, had a capital of £1,500,000, and a monopoly of note issue in continental Portugal, but the notes of the Ultramarine Bank circulated in the colonies.

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  • The three histories together became known in the West from the 6th century through the selection which Cassiodorus caused to be made from them, and it is to this selection (if we leave Rufinus and Jerome out of account) that the middle ages were mainly indebted for all they knew of the Arian controversies, and of the period generally between the Councils of Nice and Ephesus.

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  • He is greatly indebted to oral tradition and to the testimony of eye-witnesses, especially of members of the Novatian community in Constantinople; some things also he has set down from personal knowledge.

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  • In his History he betrays great sympathy with that body, has gone with exactness into its history in Constantinople and Phrygia, and is indebted for much of the material of his work to Novatianist tradition and to his intercourse with prominent members of the sect.

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  • He was also a member in 1794 of the committee on agriculture and the arts, and technical science was further indebted to him for a systematic exposition of the principles of dyeing - Elemens de l'art de la teinture, 1791, of which he published a second edition in 1809, in association with his son, A.

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  • Collins indicates the possible extent to which the Jews may have been indebted to Chaldeans and Egyptians for their theological views, especially as great part of the Old Testament would appear to have been remodelled by Ezra; and, after dwelling on the points in which the prophecies attributed to Daniel differ from all other Old Testament predictions, he states the greater number of the arguments still used to show that the book of Daniel deals with events past and contemporaneous, and is from the pen of awriter of theMaccabean period, a view now generally accepted.

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  • The apostles were good men, to whom, after Christ, we are most indebted; but they were fairly entitled to their own private opinions, and naturally introduced these into their writings.

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  • KARL FRIEDRICH GAUSS (1777-1855), German mathematician, was born of humble parents at Brunswick on the 30th of April 1777, and was indebted for a liberal education to the notice which his talents procured him from the reigning duke.

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  • Meanwhile Sir John Shaw - to whom and to whose descendants, the Shaw-Stewarts, the town has always been indebted - by charter (dated 1741 and 1751) had empowered the householders to elect a council of nine members, which proved to be the most liberal constitution of any Scots burgh prior to the Reform Act of 1832, when Greenock was raised to the status of a parliamentary burgh with the right to return one member to parliament.

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  • Bennet," entitled The Treasury of Wit, and by his first important historical work, the Dissertation on the Origin and Progress of the Scythians or Goths, to which Gibbon acknowledged himself indebted.

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  • What he thus did was of inestimable value to his own countrymen, and all other men are indebted to him for what they know of China before his time, though all the contents of the ancient works have not come down to us.

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  • He belonged to a noble Saxon family, was bishop of Bamberg, and chancellor to the emperor Henry III., to whom he was indebted for his elevation to the papacy upon the abdication of Gregory VI.

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  • For more than twenty years altogether he reigned in tranquillity and splendour, devoting himself to the duties of government and to the composition of the works to which he is chiefly indebted for his fame.

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  • Moreover, his own marriage with Cecily Neville, though she was but the youngest daughter of Ralph, 1st earl of Westmorland, allied him to a powerful family in the north of England, to whose support both he and his son were greatly indebted.

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  • The sovereign, however, to whom Prague is most indebted is the emperor Charles IV.

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  • The adventurous orchid-hunter, however, has penetrated deeply into their recesses in search of choice varieties, and collectors of these valuable plants are largely indebted to Colombia for their specimens of Cattleya Mendelli, Warscewiczii and Trianae; Dowiana aurea; Odontoglossum crispum, Pescatorei, vexillarium, odoratum, coronarium, Harryanum, and blandum; Miltonia vexillaria; Oncidium carthaginense and Kramerianum; Masdevalliae, Epidendra, Schomburgkiae and many others.

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  • We are indebted to Humboldt for our earliest geographical descriptions of the northern part of the continent, but to the Italian, Augustin Codazzi, who became a Colombian after the War of Independence, Colombia is indebted for the first systematic exploration of her territory.

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  • He was much indebted to an uncommon memory, which seemed to retain every idea that was conveyed to it, either from reading or meditation.

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  • We are indebted to the Local Government Board for having traced to such causes certain epidemics of typhoid, and there can be no manner of doubt that the evil has been very general.

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  • He won great successes in Spain and more espec;ally in the East, but for these he was no doubt partly indebted to what others had already done.

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  • On his recovery he found his private affairs in some confusion, and he was at the same time deeply indebted to the government for public funds which had been lost through the mismanagement or dishonesty of a confidential clerk, and for which he was responsible as district-attorney.

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  • The Roscommon - the one breed of modern sheep native to Ireland - is indebted for its good qualities largely to the use of Leicester blood.

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  • To Xenophanes, the founder of Eleaticism - whom he must have known, even if he was never in any strict sense of the word his disciple - Parmenides was, perhaps, more deeply indebted, as the theological speculations of that thinker unquestionably suggested to him the theory of Being and Not-Being, of the One and the Many, by which he sought to reconcile Ionian " monism," or rather " henism," with Italiote dualism.

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  • For his education he was chiefly indebted to his elder brother.

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  • was largely indebted to him for the English crown.

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  • They were obviously indebted for office to the favor of the queen, and not to the support of parliament.

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  • There was no doubt that through the whole of the negotiations the Italians were large.ly indebted to the labors of Lord John Russell.

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  • The Munich collection was presented to the king of Bavaria by Clot Bey, the chief physician in the Egyptian army during its occupation of Syria; and for a number of the other manuscripts we are indebted to the elder Niebuhr.

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  • None of the family was akin to Benjamin for genius and character, except Sarah, to whom he was deeply indebted for a wise, unswerving and sympathetic devotion, when, in his earlier days, he needed it most.

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  • The town also possesses a library of 50,000 volumes, several high-grade schools, and is the seat of a great number of commercial and intellectual associations; but to nothing is it more indebted for its celebrity than to the Academy of Painting.

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  • These works were indebted for their facts to Ari's labours, and to sagas written since Ari's death; but the style and treatment of them are Snorri's own.

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  • 1648), we are indebted for transcripts of many lost MSS.

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  • To him the human race is indebted, in large measure, for the maritime exploration, within one century (1420-1522), of more than half the globe, and especially of the great waterways from Europe to Asia both by east and by west.

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  • From the College de la Marche he removed to the College de Montaigu, 2 where the atmosphere was more ecclesiastical and where he had for instructor a Spaniard who is described as a man of learning and to whom Calvin was indebted for some sound training in dialectics and the scholastic philosophy.

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  • It is obvious that Plato, Spinoza and Kant had contributed characteristic elements of their thought to this system, and directly or indirectly it was largely indebted to Schelling for fundamental conceptions.

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  • A list of all the fossils of the island known in 1895, but omitting the vertebrates above mentioned, included 1 For most of the information here given on the geology the writer is indebted ' to Captain Mouneyres, chef de services des mines, and the Rev. R.

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  • The second pretender, Perkin Warbeck, was also much indebted to her support; but he seems to have entered on his career at first without it.

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  • For the fullness with which the events are recorded the writers were probably indebted to local stories.

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  • Luther, to whose Die Israeliten and ihre Nachbarsteimme (1906) the present writer is indebted for many valuable suggestions and hints.

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  • Still, the logic of Albertus Magnus and succeeding doctors was largely indebted to him for its formulae.

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  • Keil's commentary on i and 2 Macc. is very largely indebted to Grimm.

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  • In musical skill and invention he already vied with the best professors of the art in Italy; his personal taste would have led him to choose painting as his profession, and one of the most eminent artists of his day, Lodovico Cigoli, owned that to his judgment and counsel he was mainly indebted for the success of his works.

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  • ii.; " Etude sur les fausses decretales," in Revue d'histoire ecclesiastique de Louvain (1906, 1907), to which the above article is greatly indebted.

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  • 4) do not carry us any farther back, is of opinion that the Semitic peoples as a whole were indebted forl the horse to the lands of Iran.

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  • But the Norman horses included many varieties, and there is no doubt that to the Conquest the inhabitants of Britain were indebted for a decided improvement in the native horse, as well as for the introduction of several varieties previously unknown.

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  • But the greatest Greek writer on the conic sections was Apollonius of Perga, and it is to his Conic Sections that we are indebted for a review of the early history of this subject.

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  • autograph manuscript of article entitled " To whom are we indebted for the Railroad Ticket System?

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  • I am much indebted to you, sir, for a scotch bonnet is fitted neither to my years nor my gravity.

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  • equity as collateral makes me richer, just much more indebted.

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  • indebted for this information to Mr. F. Underhill of Didcot.

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  • How did heavily indebted poor countries become heavily indebted poor countries become heavily indebted?

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  • indebted nations control only 3% of the votes on both Boards.

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  • indebted households somewhat.

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  • indebted consumer will react to multiple rate rises.

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  • indebted poor country initiative.

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  • He has also returned the once heavily indebted weekly to profit.

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  • To all of these I am most deeply indebted.

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  • Frontier is greatly indebted to Olympus, our loyal sponsor.

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  • The City Council is hugely indebted to the continuing support from its major sponsor, Technip.

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  • I am thus forever indebted to the person who first thought up syndication.

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  • Some 30% of the loans made to the highly indebted nations is spent on arms.

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  • I remain indebted to others ' skills for an engine refit at that year's close.

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  • Most of the time I feel indebted to people like you.

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  • Without becoming much indebted, people can easily get themselves the comforts of life.

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  • Semiramis is not doing much of anything, nor are those figures of Puvis's which seem most indebted to Piero.

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  • The New Labor government has reneged on its anti-vivisectionist vote-catching rhetoric because they are so heavily indebted to and entrenched with the pharmaceutical multinationals.

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  • I am indebted to my brother (in the other National Trust) for this glaringly simple nostrum.

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  • Other than some kind of rational assessment, what can one invoke here that is not already indebted to reason for its own rectitude?

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  • The indebted countries also have to agree to implement economic reforms.

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  • stealthy taxes can put an indebted family on the wrong side of Micawber's rule of finance.

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  • I am indebted to Norman for going to collect two swarms that I had received notice of.

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  • It still appears uncertain about how the indebted consumer will react to multiple rate rises.

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  • No man dared utter a truth to which he felt himself indebted to his Soul alone.

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  • The real meaning of Lotze's teaching is reached only by patient study, and those who in a larger or narrower sense call themselves his followers will probably feel themselves indebted to him more for the general direction he has given to their thoughts, for the tone he has imparted to their inner life, for the seriousness with which he has taught them to consider even small affairs and practical duties, and for the indestructible confidence with which his philosophy permits them to disregard the materialism of science, the scepticism of shallow culture, the disquieting results of philosophical and historical criticism.

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  • In the later years of his life he turned to the study of the earlier phases of the science which he did so much to advance, and students of chemical history are greatly indebted to him for his book on Les Origines de l'alchimie (1885) and his Introduction a l'etude de la chimie des anciens et du moyen age (1889), as well as for publishing translations of various old Greek, Syriac and Arabic treatises on alchemy and chemistry (Collection des anciens alchimistes grecs, 1887-1888, and La Chimie au moyen age, 1893).

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  • Budaeus was his friend, Rabelais his faithful secretary and doctor; men of letters, like Etienne Dolet, and the poet Salmon Macrin, were indebted to him for assistance.

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  • For its subsequent importance it was indebted to the elector Charles Philip, who, owing to ecclesiastical disputes, transferred his residence from Heidelberg to Mannheim in 1720.

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  • He shared this with Lessing; in this case, at all events, it is probable that the latter was indebted to Mendelssohn.

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  • To Merula we are indebted for the editio princeps of Plautus (1472), of the Scriptores rei rusticae, Cato, Varro, Columella, Palladius (1472) and possibly of Martial (1471).

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  • Colding, who in 1843 presented to the Royal Society of Copenhagen a paper entitled "Theses concerning Force," which clearly stated the "principle of the perpetuity of energy," and who also performed a series of experiments for the purpose of determining the heat developed by the compression of various bodies, which entitle him to be mentioned among the founders of the modern theory of energy, we come to Dr James Prescott Joule of Manchester, to whom we are indebted more than to any other for the establishment of the principle of the conservation of energy on the broad basis on which it has since stood.

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  • seq.; probably the older form) is curiously indebted to material which seems to have belonged to the history of the work of Nehemiah (cf.

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  • It is to him that the world is indebted for the introduction of methods which have already worked wonders, and bid fair to render possible the preventive treatment of all infectious diseases.

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  • To Dr Cabanis we are indebted for the ornithological results of Richard Schomburgh's researches given in the third volume (pp. 662-765) of the latter's Reisen im Britisch-Guiana (8vo, 1848), and then in Leotaud's Oiseaux de file de la Trinidad (8vo, 1866).

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  • Prior Richard is not the only author to whom John is indebted; he incorporates in the annal of 1138 two other narratives of the battle of the Standard, one in verse by the monk Serlo, another in prose by Abbot Ailred of Rievaux; and also a poem, by a Glasgow clerk, on the death of Sumerled of the Isles.

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  • For maps of Switzerland we are indebted to Konrad Tiirst (1495-1497), Johann Stumpf (1548) and Aegidius Tschudi (1538).

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  • John Walker, to whose initiative the charts published by the admiralty are indebted for the perspicuous, firm and yet artistic execution, which facilitate their use by the mariner, was also the author of the maps published by the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (1829-1840).

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  • Israel must needs be indebted to the influence of the prophet (cf.

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  • A monument in the Bockenheim Anlage, dated 1837, preserves the memory of Guiollett, the burgomaster, to whom the town is mainly indebted for the beautiful promenades which occupy the site of the old fortifications; and similar monuments have been reared to Senckenberg (1863), Schopenhauer, Klemens Brentano the poet and Samuel Thomas Sommerring (1755-1830), the anatomist and inventor of an electric telegraph.

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  • For what remains of this version, which owing to its character is of the greatest value to the textual critic, we have until recently been indebted to Origen's Hexapla (see below); for, though Jerome mentions a secunda editio, no MS. of Aquila's translation has survived.

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  • P.) 1 The writer is indebted to the courtesy of Father Braun for the following note: - "That the Syrian phaina was formerly a closed mantle of the type of the bell chasuble is clearly proved by the evidence of the miniatures of a Syrian pontifical (dated 1239) in the Bibliotheque Nationale at Paris (cf.

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  • The play Philotus, a poor example in a genre rarely attempted in the north, is indebted to the south for more than its subject.

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  • We pass over the wellstocked sections of philosophy, ethics and politics, of theology, law and SufIsm, of mathematics and astronomy, of medicine (the oldest thesaurus of which is the Treasure of the sMh of Khwarizam, i ~ Io), of Arabic, Persian and Turkish grammar and lexicography, and only cast a parting glance at the rich collection of old Indian folk-lore and fables preserved in the Persian version of Kalilah u Dimnak (see RUDAG!), of the Sindbdndma, the Tiltinama, or Tales of a Parrot, and others, and at the translations of standard works of Sanskrit literature, the epopees of the Ramdyana and Mahbhdrala, the B/ia gavad-Gita, the Yoga- Vasishtha, and numerous Purdnas and Upanishads, for which we are mostly indebted to the emperor Akbars indefatigable zeal.

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  • But we are most of all indebted to Herbart for the enormous advance psychology has been enabled to make, thanks to his fruitful treatment of it, albeit as yet but few among the many who have appropriated and improved his materials have ventured to adopt his metaphysical and mathematical foundations.

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  • To the other friend I am also deeply indebted.

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  • Gordon Brown 's stealthy taxes can put an indebted family on the wrong side of Micawber 's rule of finance.

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  • For the suggestion of slaying children, Marcus was indebted to savage and uncivilized nations.

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  • I am deeply indebted to my parents for never compromising on this, but there were times when I absolutely hated going to Greek school because it seemed like I was "missing out on life just because I am Greek."

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  • June-flowering or Bearded (Iris) - These are the noblest of a great race: moderns for which gardeners are indebted to enthusiasts like the late Professor Foster and Mr Bliss, who, happily, is still continuing the good work.

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  • Until the second half of this century only white, rose, salmon, and lilac sorts were known; and we are indebted to Mr Fortune for his Chinese varieties, most of which have scarlet, violet, and magenta flowers.

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  • In the vast majority of cases, the family is running more smoothly and everyone remains indebted to Jo for her help.

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  • Though Europeans may be indebted to China for some mechanical inventions, she was too distant to produce much direct effect, and the influence of India has been mainly directed towards the East.

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  • The writer of this article is much indebted to the works of Schmoller, particularly his Grundris der allgemeinen Volkswirtschaftslehre (1900), and Adolph Wagner, particularly his Grundlegung der politischen Okonomie.

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  • His theological views have a considerable similarity to those of Frederick Denison Maurice, who acknowledges having been indebted to him for his first true conception of the meaning of Christ's sacrifice.

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  • To portions of these Aristotle has been supposed to have been indebted for his doctrine of the categories and some of his chief ethical theories.

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  • The last distinctive epithet was derived from the little hamlet in the vicinity which furnished shelter, not only to the workmen, but to the monks of St Jerome who were afterwards to be in possession of the monastery; and the hamlet itself is generally but perhaps erroneously supposed to be indebted for its name to the scoriae or dross of certain old iron mines.

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  • i., Cambridge, 1898) (a very comprehensive work, to which the writer of this article is in many ways indebted); and the Encyclopadie d.

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  • On the 8th of March about 1 p.m., the "Merrimac," commanded by Commodore Franklin Buchanan (1795-1871), steamed down the Elizabeth accompanied by two one-gun gun-boats, to engage the wooden fleet of the Federals, consisting of the frigate "Congress," 50 guns, and the sloop "Cumberland," 30 guns, both sailing vessels, anchored off Newport News, and 1 For the idea of the low free-board and the revolving turret Ericsson was indebted to Theodore R.

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  • Magyar history is indebted to Paul Jaszay for his careful working out of certain special periods, as, for instance, in his A Magyar nemzet napjai a legregibb idOtOl az arany bullaig (Days of the Hungarian nation from the earliest times to the date of the Golden Bull).

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  • Although saline springs are mentioned here as early as the 13th century, the first attempt to bore for salt was not made until 1839, while the systematic exploitation of the salt-beds, to which the town is indebted for its prosperity, dates only from 1856.

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