Incumbents sentence example

incumbents
  • In the American Protestant Episcopal Church the incumbents of churches are called rectors.
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  • (6) Rare cases of personal or special tithes, offerings or pensions claimed by incumbents of benefices.
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  • Bishops and beneficed incumbents (cures) must be regularly tried; and where the Church is established the canonical courts are recognized.
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  • The system of pluralities carried with it, as a necessary consequence, systematic non-residence on the part of many incumbents, and delegation of their spiritual duties in respect of their cures of souls to assistant curates.
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  • Benefices may be exchanged by agreement between incumbents with the consent of the ordinary, and they may, with the consent of the patron and ordinary, be united or dissolved after being united.
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  • The governor and the lieutenant-governor was elected for a term of two years, and the qualifications for both offices require that the incumbents shall be at least thirty years of age and shall have been for two years immediately before their election residents of the state.
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  • These men naturally acquired more and more as time passed the control and leadership of the Church in all its activities, and out of what was in the beginning more or less informal and temporary grew fixed and permanent offices, the incumbents of which were recognized as having a right to rule over the Church, a right which once given could not lawfully be taken away unless they were unfaithful to their trust.
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  • Even a certain number of the monastic establishments came in this way into the possession of the feudal landowners, who nominated abbots and abbesses as they appointed the incumbents of their churches.
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  • Their general tendency was distinctly in a Catholic as opposed to a Puritan direction, and the two thousand Puritan incumbents who vacated their benefices on St Bartholomew's Day rather than accept the altered Prayer Book bear eloquent testimony to that fact.
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  • pensions to incumbents who have resigned, &c.) imposed on the benefices by the pope.
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  • c. loo), which fixed a period of prescription against claims of tithe by laymen or corporations aggregate, of thirty years during which there had been no payment of tithes or a modus or composition had existed, in the absence of contrary evidence, and in any case of sixty years; and against corporations sole, of sixty years or the tenures of two successive incumbents and three years after the entry of a third.
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  • He refused to report to the president of the province appointments of incumbents; he refused also to allow the government commissioners to inspect the seminaries for priests, and when he was summoned before the new court refused to appear.
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  • It was therefore for every reason desirable to remedy a state of things by which so many parishes were left without incumbents, a condition the result of which must be either to diminish the hold of Christianity over the people, or to confirm in them the belief that the government was the real enemy.
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  • He was also rector of Otmore (or Otmoor), near Oxford, a living which involved him in a trying but successful litigation, whereof later incumbents reaped the benefit.
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  • Some 330 out of a possible total of 520 incumbents were now ejected in South Wales and Monmouthshire, and there is every reason to suppose that the beneficed clergy of North Wales suffered equally under the new system.
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  • At the Restoration all the ejected clergy who survived were reinstated in their old benefices under the Act of Uniformity of 1662, whilst certain Puritan incumbents were in their turn dismissed for refusing to comply with various requirements of that act.
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  • There were 14,029 incumbents (rectors, vicars, and perpetual curates), 7500 curates, i.e.
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  • (1689), the presbyterian polity was established in the kirk, the effect of which on its ecclesiastical status is a matter of theological opinion, but the Comprehension Act of 1690 allowed episcopalian incumbents, on taking the Oath of Allegiance, to retain their benefices, though excluding them from any share in the government without a further declaration of presbyterian principles.
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  • But matters were still complicated by a considerable, though declining, number of episcopalian incumbents holding the parish churches.
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  • Conformably with the traditions of the administrative monarchy in 1673, the king wanted to extend to the new additions to the kingdom his rights of receiving the revenues of vacant bishoprics and making appointments to their benefices, including taking oaths of fidelity from the new incumbents.
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  • Certainly, over this period, the incumbents included graduates of both universities, apparently in strict alternation.
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  • The ranks of the clergy had been so much depleted that was impossible to find incumbents for the vacant benefices.
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  • The service would apparently compete most heavily with three wireless carriers rather than with wired incumbents because of the mobile voice potential.
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  • With a new intake of students each year, such courses benefit from the previous incumbents ' efforts.
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  • Actually, on that description it could be any of the current incumbents.
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  • The last two chapters are devoted to the present incumbents.
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  • incumbents of Important benefices, are fortunate enough to live in such exotic palaces.. .
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  • Simon Cawdell sounds like the incumbents ' shop steward.
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  • To assist these commissioners in their task of inquiry and ejectment, a body of twenty-five " Approvers " was likewise constituted, with the object of selecting itinerant preachers to replace the dismissed incumbents; and amongst the Approvers are conspicuous the names of Walter Cradock (d.
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  • 1779), who is still affectionately remembered in Wales as the donor of " Madam Bevan's Charity," Griffith Jones was enabled to extend his scheme of educating the people throughout South Wales, where numerous " circulating charity schools," as they were called, were set up in many parishes with the approval of their incumbents.
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  • saw the invasion of England by the friars, originally the moral reformers of their day, who preached the superiority of the missionary life over the merely contemplative life of the old religious orders, and came, preaching holy poverty, to minister to souls neglected by worldly incumbents and political prelates (see MENDICANT MOVEMENT).
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