Incontestable sentence examples

incontestable
  • But the vital point is that the absolute superiority of the Hellene was recognized as incontestable on both hands.

  • Their command of fleets gave them incontestable advantages, as when, for instance, Otto II.

  • Whatever reservations may be made as to a certain interested or ambitious side of his character, Pierre d'Ailly, whose devotion to the cause of union and reform is incontestable, remains one of the leading spirits of the end of the 14th and beginning of the 15th centuries.

  • Haser: "Schdnlein has the incontestable merit of having been the first to establish in Germany the exact method of the French and the English, and to impregnate this method with the vivifying spirit of German research."

  • But as the first great master of the quartet and the symphony his claim is incontestable.

  • But could Christians sufficiently numerous to deserve a long discussion by St Epiphanius in 374-377, who upheld the Synoptists, stoutly opposed the Gnostics and Montanists, and had escaped every special designation till the bishop nicknamed them the " Alogoi " (irrational rejectors of the Logos-Gospel), dare, in such a time and country, to hold such views, had the apostolic origin been incontestable ?

  • This incontestable result had no effect, apparently, in repressing the 7r-computers.

  • In spite of the incontestable popularity enjoyed by this class of literature, we have only some half-dozen fableaux written in England, viz.

  • It only remained to take possession of this incontestable power and use it with firmness and consistency.

  • From the mode of destruction of the city these upper floors were in most cases crushed in and destroyed, and hence it was long believed that the houses for the most part had but one storey; but recent researches have in many cases brought to light incontestable evidence of the existence of an upper floor, and the frequent occurrence of a small staircase is in itself sufficient proof of the fact.

  • This feature of it is in their dogmatic the greatest of all of miracles, the incontestable proof of its divine origin.

  • From one place after another a great mortality among rats was reported, and the broad fact that they do die of plague is incontestable.

  • After the surrender of Cronje at Paardeberg (February 1900) to Lord Roberts, Presidents Kruger and Steyn offered to make peace, but on terms which should include the acknowledgment of " the incontestable independence of both republics as sovereign international states "; the Boers also sought, unavailingly, the intervention of foreign powers.

  • "Agnosco stylum Curiae Romanae," Sarpi himself pleasantly said, when his surgeon commented upon the ragged and inartistic character of the wounds, and the justice of the observation is as incontestable as its wit.

  • Much of the responsibility for this injustice rested with Leibnitz, who would never recognize the incontestable greatness of one who was constantly his adversary, and whom he dismissed as "vir parum jurisconsultus et minime philosophus."

  • " The idea," he says, " of a Supreme Being, infinite in power, goodness, and wisdom, whose workmanship we are, and upon whom we depend, and the idea of ourselves, as understanding rati as are clear in us, would, I suppose, i pursued, afford such foundations of our d as might place morality among the sciences capable of demonstration; wherein, I doubt not, but from self-evident propositions, by necessary consequences as incontestable as those in mathematics, the measure of right and wrong might be made out."

  • In all martial and chivalrous accomplishments he was already an adept; and when, a year later, he succeeded to supreme power, his superior ability was as uncontested as it was incontestable.

  • incontestable fact - simply ' how things are ', and ' how they ought to be ' .

  • incontestable proof is afforded by the fulfillment of the vision of the Seventy Weeks.

  • incontestable superiority we had over the Other Place up the A140.

  • incontestable evidence on this point.

  • incontestable logic of Darwinian evolution.

  • incontestable manner.

  • The superiorities of British naval bases are absolutely incontestable.

  • That traffic calming features frequently increase the hazards for cyclists seems incontestable.

  • Not internal criticism, but the incontestable results of objective observation have shown once and for all that the relationship between the biblical account of the earliest history (Gen.

  • Nor is the assumption contradicted by the tolerably well attested, though far from incontestable statement, that when Omar was converted (A.D.

  • How far the extraordinary corruption of private morals which has gained for the restoration period so unenviable a notoriety was owing to the king's own example of flagrant debauchery, how far to the natural reaction from an artificial Puritanism, is uncertain, but it is incontestable that Charles's cynical selfishness was the chief cause of the degradation of public life which marks his reign, and of the disgraceful and unscrupulous betrayal of the national interests which raised France to a threatening predominance and imperilled the very existence of Britain for generations.

  • In fact, pine litter is highly praised for its nearly incontestable odor absorption.

  • The evidences of this travel (which are really incontestable, though a small minority of critics still decline to admit them) consist of (1) some fine drawings, three of them dated 1494 and others undated, but plainly of the same time, in which Diirer has copied, or rather boldly translated into his own Gothic and German style, two famous engravings by Mantegna, a number of the "Tarocchi" prints of single figures which pass erroneously under that master's name, and one by yet another minor master of the North-Italian school; with another drawing dated 1495 and plainly copied from a lost original by Antonio Pollaiuolo, and yet another of an infant Christ copied in 1495 from Lorenzo di Credi, from whom also Diirer took a motive for the composition of one of his earliest Madonnas; (2) several landscape drawings done in the passes of Tirol and the Trentino, which technically will not fit in with any other period of his work, and furnish a clear record of his having crossed the Alps about this date; (3) two or three drawings of the costumes of Venetian courtesans, which he could not have made anywhere but in Venice itself, and one of which is used in his great woodcut Apocalypse series of 1498 (4) a general preoccupation which he shows for some years from this date with the problems of the female nude, treated in a manner for which Italy only could have set him the example; and (5) the clear implication contained in a letter written from Venice in 1506 that he had been there already eleven years before; when things, he says, pleased him much which at the time of writing please him no more.

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