Incisors sentence example

incisors
  • As he spoke, his incisors grew.
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  • In all cases a more or less full series of teeth is developed, these being differentiated into incisors, canines, premolars and molars, when all are present; but only a single pair of teeth in each jaw has deciduous predecessors.
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  • They were even with the teeth around them, as if his incisors had just …grown.
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  • Even in this the forward direction of the lower incisors is noticeable.
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  • The teeth are usually differentiated into incisors, canines and molars.
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  • The upper incisors are nearly equal and vertical, with the first slightly longer, narrower, and separated from the rest.
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  • Lower incisors sloping forward and upward.
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  • Xander opened his mouth to make room for his lengthening incisors.
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  • The first family is that of the true or American opossums- Didelphyidae, in which there are five pairs of upper incisors, while the feet are of the presumed primitive arboreal type, the hind foot having the four outer toes subequal and separate, with the first opposable to them all.
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  • total 46 - and in having the teeth generally developed upon an insectivorous rather than a carnivorous pattern, the upper middle incisors being larger and inclined forward, the canines relatively smaller, and the molars with broad crowns, armed with prickly tubercles.
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  • there are no external ear-conchs; and the dentition includes four pairs of upper, and three of lower, incisors, and distinctly tritubercular cheek-teeth.
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  • 8) has four pairs of upper incisors and long upper canines, while in the lower jaw there is a single pair of procumbent incisors, After Thomas.
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  • As a sub-order, the Paucituberculata are characterized by the presence of four pairs of upper and three of lower incisor teeth; the enlargement and forward inclination of the first pair of lower incisors, and the presence of four or five sharp cusps on the cheek-teeth, coupled with the absence of "syndactylism" in the hind limbs.
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  • The tail is rudimentary, the first hind-toe opposable, the first pair of upper incisors very large, but the second and third either absent or small and placed partially behind the larger pair; and only five pairs of cheek-teeth in each jaw.
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  • The lower incisors are partially inclined forwards, compressed and tapering, bevelled at the ends.
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  • They agree, for instance, with that family in the presence of a descending flange at the hinder end of each side of the lower jaw; but their dentition is of a more generalized type, comprising the full series of 44 teeth, among which the incisors and canines are of normal form, but specially enlarged, and developing roots in the usual manner.
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  • As regards the teeth, in all cases except the wombats the number of upper incisors differs from that of the corresponding lower teeth.
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  • s = 46; with the incisors small and vertical, the outer one in the upper jaw being larger than the others.
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  • Summits of the lower incisors, before they are worn, with a deep transverse groove, dividing it into an anterior and a posterior cusp. Canines long, strong and conical.
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  • With the exception of the aberrant long-snouted phalanger, the members of the family Phalangeridae have the normal number of functional incisors, in addition to which there may be one or two rudimentary pairs in the lower jaw.
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  • How had he not severed an artery or killed her with those four inch incisors?
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  • On the other hand, the considerably smaller Nototherium, characterized by its sharp and broad skull and smaller incisors, seems to have been much more wombat-like, and may perhaps have possessed similar burrowing habits.
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  • The two lower incisors are long, very slender, sharp-pointed and horizontally placed.
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  • 3; the incisors being sharp and cutting, o, 3, 3 and those of the lower jaw frequently having a scissor-like action against one another.
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  • In the lower jaw the incisors and canines are directed straight forwards, and are of small size and nearly similar form; the function of the canine being discharged by the first premolar, which is larger than the other teeth of the same series.
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  • The maximum number of teeth is 36, there being typically two pairs of incisors and three of premolars in each jaw.
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  • The sportive lemurs (Lepidolemur) are smaller than the typical species of Lemur, and the adults generally lose their upper incisors.
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  • Unlike the early horses, the later premolars are as complex as the molars; and although there is a well-marked gap between the canine and the premolars, there is only a very short one between the former and the incisors.
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  • The incisors are chisel-shaped, and the canines tend to become isolated, so as in the more specialized forms to occupy a more or less midway position in a longer or shorter gap between the incisors and premolars.
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  • The incisors are chisel-shaped; and (unlike the early Hippoidea) there is no gap between the first premolar, when present, and the second.
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  • Of the upper incisors the first and second are nearly equal, with short, broad crowns, the third is large and conical, considerably larger than the canine, which is separated from it by an interval.
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  • Lower incisors diminishing in size from the first to the third; the canine, which is in contact with the third incisor, large and conical, working against (and behind) the canine-like third upper incisor.
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  • Finally, in the Oligocene Colodon the last three upper premolars are like the molars, and the first pair of lower incisors is lost.
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  • In this group the incisors and canines are very variable in number and form; the lower canine being separated by only a short gap from the outer incisor (when present), but by a long one from the first premolar, which is in contact with the second.
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  • With the exception of the first lower premolar, the dentit i on is complete; the incisors being normal, but the canine rudimentary, and the last upper molar distinctly triangular.
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  • The incisors tend to become latera l, the canines are enlarged, and the last upper molar is sub-quadrangular.
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  • platyrhinus, in which two horns are combined with the presence of upper incisors and lower canines.
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  • It differs from typical rats of the genus Mus by its broader incisors, and the less distinct cusps on the molars.
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  • The tail is short or rudimentary, the incisors are short, and the outer surface of the lower jaw is marked by a distinct ridge.
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  • Other modifications are the loss of the upper incisors; the development of the canines into projecting tusks; and the loss of the anterior premolars.
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  • As regards classification, the first group is that of the Pecora, or Cotylophora, in which the cheek-teeth are selenodont, but there are no upper incisors or canine-like premolars, Pecora.
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  • Inferior incisors, three on each side with an incisiform canine in contact with them.
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  • The cheek-teeth are selenodont, and one pair of upper incisors is retained, while some of the anterior premolars assume a canine-like shape, and are separated from the rest of the cheekseries.
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  • The cheek-teeth are selenodont, as in the two preceding groups; there are no upper incisors, but there are long, narrow and pointed upper canines, which attain a large size in the males; the lower canines are incisor-like, as in the Pecora, and there are no caniniform premolars in either jaw.
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  • There is at least one pair of upper incisors, while the full series of 44 teeth may be present.
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  • Both incisors and canines are devoid of roots and grow throughout life, the canines, and in the typical species one pair of lower incisors, growing to an immense size.
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  • With the single exception of the Indian sloth-bear, all the species have forty-two teeth, of which the incisors and canines closely resemble those of purely carnivorous mammals; while the molars, and especially the one known as the " sectorial " or " carnassial," have their surfaces tuberculated so as to adapt.
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  • by the absence of one pair of upper incisors, the small size of the cheek-teeth and the very extensile character of the lips.
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  • -, c.i, p. i, m.; total 44; the upper incisors diminishing rapidly in size from the first to the third, and the lower incisors long, narrow, closely approximated, and almost horizontal in position, their tips inclining towards the middle line, the second slightly larger than the first, the third much smaller.
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  • On the other hand, resemblance to that genus is shown by the reduction of the upper incisors to a single pair.
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  • The front surface of the incisors has a broad, shallow groove.
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  • Rodents may be characterized as terrestrial, or in some cases arboreal or aquatic, placental mammals of small or medium size, with a milk and a permanent series of teeth, plantigrade or partially plantigrade, and generally five-toed, clawed (rarely nailed or semi hoofed) feet, clavicles or collar-bones (occasionally imperfect or rudimentary), no canine teeth, and a single pair of lower incisors, opposed by only one similar and functional pair in the upper jaw.
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  • In all rodents the upper incisors resemble the lower ones in growing uninterruptedly from persistent pulps, and (except in the hare group, Duplicidentata) agree with them in number.
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  • - The rodent skull is characterized by the great size of the premaxillae, which completely separate the nasals from the maxillae; by the presence of zygomatic arches; and by the wide unoccupied space existing between the incisors and the cheek-teeth; and (except in the Duplicidentata) by the antero-posteriorly elongated glenoid cavity for the articulation of the lower jaw.
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  • In t he Duplicidentata only is there more than a single pair of incisors, and in these the additional pair is small and placed behind the middle pair.
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  • In this group the enamel extends partially to the back of the incisors, but in all the rest it is restricted to the front surface, so that, by the more rapid wearing-away of the softer structures behind, a chisel-shaped edge is maintained.
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  • Both upper and lower incisors are regularly curved, the upper ones: slightly more so than the lower; and, their growth being continuous, should anything prevent the normal wear by which their length is regulated - as by the loss of one of them, or by displacement owing to a broken jaw or other cause - the unopposed incisor may gradually curve upon itself until a complete circle or more has, been formed, the tooth sometimes passing through some part of the animal's head.
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  • The tongue presents little variability in length, being short and compressed, with a blunt tip, which is never protruded beyond the incisors.
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  • The mouth is divided into two cavities communicating by a narrow orifice, the anterior one containing the incisors and the posterior the molars, the hairy skin of the face being continued inwards behind the incisors.
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  • These lead on to the sousliks, Spermophilus (or Citellus), in which the incisors (as in the following genera) differ from those of all the squirrels in not being compressed.
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  • Incisors broad and powerful.
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  • The first of these, or Geomyinae, is characterized as follows: Incisors broad; mastoid not appearing on the top of the skull; eyes small; ears rudimentary; limbs short, subequal.
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  • Geomys bursaries, the "red pocket-gopher" of North America, with deeply grooved incisors, inhabits the plains of the Mississippi, living in burrows like the mole.
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  • Thomomys talpoides, with plain incisors.
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  • The following are the characters of the second sub-family, Heteromyinae: Incisors narrow; mastoid appearing largely on the top of the skull; eyes and ears moderate or large; hind-limbs and tail elongated.
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  • In the typical jerboas, Jaculus (or Dipus), ranging from North Africa to Persia, Russia and Central Asia, there are only three hind toes, the incisors are grooved, and the premolars are generally wanting.
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  • The other genera have five toes, of which only the middle three are functional, and smooth incisors.
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  • The incisors are very large; and the palate of the skull is narrow.
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  • hispidus), oryzonzys, Rhithrodontomys (with grooved incisors), Ichthyomys and Anotomys (fish-eating, aquatic forms, from the mountains of South America), Acodon, and the North American wood-rats, or Neotonza, in which the molars have a structure simulating that of the under-mentioned Microtinae.
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  • upper incisors and the presence of distinct enamel-loops on the outer side of the lower molars.
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  • - Upper the typical characters of the group, the of Mus (A) and Crice- incisors being narrow and smooth, the tus (B).
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  • The genus Nesocia is like Mus, but with the incisors and molars broader, and the transverse laminae of the latter more clearly defined.
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  • Golunda, from India and Africa, is like Mus, but with grooved upper incisors.
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  • Echinothrix is a rat with an extremely elongated muzzle, all the bones of the face being much produced, and the incisors faintly grooved, the only species, E.
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  • Here also may be noticed the huge Philippine long-haired rats of the genus Phlaeomys, characterized by their broad incisors, transversely laminated molars and large claws.
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  • They hay e large heads, projecting incisors, no ears, almost functionless eyes and moderately long tails; the skin, with the exception of a few hairs on the body and frinr-es on the feet, being naked.
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  • The remaining and more typical members of the family, one of which is aquatic, are characterized by their short incisors, the strong masseteric ridges on the sides of the lower jaw, the long and curved par-occipitals and the palate contracted in front.
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  • The jugal is without an inferior angle, and extends forwards to the lachrymal; the palate is contracted in front and deeply emarginate behind; the incisors are short, and the molars divided by continuous folds into transverse plates; and the two halves of the lower jaw are welded together in front.
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  • in length, being the largest member of the group. It has a long tail, brown fur and red incisors, and lives in burrows near water, feeding on aquatic plants.
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  • The African cane-rats, Thryonomys, are large terrestrial rodents, ranging from the centre of the continent to the Cape, easily recognized by their deeply fluted incisors.
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  • The remaining rodents, which include two families - the picas (Ochotonidae) and the hares and rabbits (Leporidae) - constitute a second sub-order, the Duplicidentata, differing from all the foregoing groups in possessing two pairs of incisors in the upper jaw (of which the second is small, and placed directly behind the large first pair), the enamel of which extends round to their postericr surfaces.
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  • At birth there are three pairs of incisors, but the outer one is soon lost.
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  • g, and there is a gap between the incisors and the cheek-teeth, are more nearly related to modern rodents than the American types, and may indeed belong to the same order.
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  • On the other hand, the American forms, which have one pair of large chisel-like incisors in the lower jaw, also possess a lower canine, and show no marked gap in front of the cheek-teeth, nor any indication of the characteristic rodent backwards movement of the lower jaw.
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  • The teeth form a continuous even series, the small canines being crowded between the incisors and premolars; the crowns of the cheek-series are tall (hypsodont), with a distinctive pattern of their own.
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  • As regards the recent forms, the dentition in the fully adult animal consists only of incisors and cheek-teeth, the formula being i.
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  • The upper incisors have persistent pulps, and are curved longitudinally, forming a semicircle as in rodents; they are, however, not flattened from before backwards as in that order, but prismatic, with an antero-external, an anterointernal and a posterior surface, the first two only being covered with enamel; their tips are consequently not chisel-shaped, but sharp-pointed.
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  • The lower incisors have long tapering roots, but not of persistent growth; and are straight, directed somewhat forwards, with awlshaped, tri-lobed crowns.
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  • Behind the incisors is a considerable gap, followed by the cheek-teeth, which are all contiguous, and formed almost exactly on the pattern of some of the perissodactyle ungulates.
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  • The milk-dentition includes three pairs of incisors and one of canines in eachaw.
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  • The more typical members of the genus are terrestrial in their habits, and their cheek-teeth have nearly the same pattern as in rhinoceroses; while the interval between the upper incisors is less than the width of the teeth; and the lower incisors are only slightly notched at the cutting edge.
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  • In a second section the molar teeth have the same pattern as in Palaeotherium (except that the third lower molar has but two lobes); the interval between the upper incisors exceeds the width of the teeth; and the lower incisors have distinctly trilobed crowns.
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  • On the other hand, the two outer pairs of incisors were in contact with one another and with the canines, so as to form on each side a series continuous with the cheek-teeth.
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  • These are regarded as representing a distinct family, the Saghatheriidae, characterized by the possession of the full series of twenty-two teeth in the upper jaw, among which the first pair of incisors was modified to form trihedral rootless tusks, while the two remaining pairs were separated from one another and from the teeth in front by gaps.
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  • The members of this genus were small or medium-sized ungulates with single-rooted incisors.
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  • On the other hand, the representatives of the contemporary genus Megalohyrax were approximately as large as Pliohyrax, and in some instances had double roots to the second and third incisors.
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  • The earlier forms had the full series of 44 teeth, with the premolars simpler than the molars; but in the later types the canines and some of the incisors disappear, and at least the hinder premolars become molar-like.
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  • In all cases the first upper incisors are large and rootless.
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  • The most remarkable feature, however, consists in the front part of the lower jaw being bent downwards and bearing two tusk-like incisors also directed downwards and backwards.
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  • The most important function they have to perform, that of seizing and holding firmly animals of considerable size and strength, violently struggling for life, is provided for by the great, sharp-pointed and sharp-edged canines, placed wide apart at the angles of the mouth, the incisors between them being greatly reduced in size and kept back nearly to the same level, so as not to interfere with their action.
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  • down as fast as they grew, but that changed conditions of life have rendered them unnecessary, and they now develop into a monstrous form, just as the incisors of the beaver and rabbit will go on growing if the opposite teeth do not wear them away.
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  • On the other hand, Palaeosyops is connected with Titanotherium by means of Telmatotherium of the upper Bridger and Washakia Eocene, a larger animal, with a longer and flatter skull, showing rudiments of horn-cores, only two pairs of lower incisors, and a general approximation in dental character to Titanotherium.
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  • Pecora, or true ruminants as they may be conveniently called, have complex stomachs and chew the cud; they have no upper incisor teeth; and the lower canines are approximated to the outer incisors in such a manner that the three incisors and the one canine of the two sides collectively form a continuous semicircle of four pairs of nearly similar teeth.
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  • Another important feature is that the lower canine has a cleft or two-lobed crown, so that it is unlike the incisors to which it is approximated.
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  • In the deer-tribe, or Cervidae, the lower canine, as in the two following families, is simple and similar to the incisors.
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  • being differentiated from the long, horizontal and spatulate incisors; in form they are sub-erect and pointed.
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  • Of these the first upper premolar is a simple tooth placed close behind the premaxilla and separated by a long gap from the two other teeth of the same series; while the lower incisors, of which the outermost is the largest, are directed partially forwards.
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  • In the lower jaw the three incisors are long, spatulate and horizontal, with the outer one the smallest.
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  • In this creature, which was not larger than a European hare, there was the full number of 44 teeth, which formed a regular series, without any long gaps, and with the canines but little taller than the incisors, while the hinder cheek-teeth, although of the crescentic type, were low-crowned.
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  • In the skull the socket of the eye is surrounded by bone; while the dentition begins to approximate to the camel type - notably by the circumstance that the lower canine is either separated by a gap from the outermost incisors, or that its crown assumes a backwardly curved shape.
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  • Here the metacarpals and metatarsals have partially united to form cannonbones, the skull has assumed the elongated form characteristic of modern camels, with the loss of the first and second pairs of upper incisors, and the development of gaps in front of and behind each of the next three teeth, that is to say, the third incisor, the canine and the first cheek-tooth.
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  • The species of Camelops were probably fully as large as llamas, and some, at any rate, resembled these animals as regards the number of teeth, the incisors being reduced to one upper and three lower pairs, and the cheekteeth to four or five in the upper and four in the lower jaw; the total number of teeth thus being 28 or 30 in place of the 44 of Poebrotherium.
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  • In the Miocene Agriochoerus, which typifies a second sub-family (Agriochoerinae), there is no gland-pit in the skull, of which the orbit is open behind; while the upper incisors are wanting in the adult and the terminal toe-bones are claw-like rather than of the hoofed type.
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  • The incisors are large and chisel-like, much as in rodents.
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  • The dental formula, when completely developed, is incisors i, canines o, premolars 31 molars - on each side, giving a total of 34 teeth.
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  • The three incisors of the upper jaw are arranged in a continuous arched series, and have crowns with broad cutting edges; the first or middle incisor is often larger than the others.
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  • Owing to the slight union of the two halves of the lower jaw in front in many species the two lower incisors work together like the blades of a pair of scissors.
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  • In Macropus giganteus and its immediate allies, the premolars and sometimes the first molar are shed, so that in old examples only the two posterior molars and the incisors are found in place.
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  • The milk-dentition, as in other marsupials, is confined to a single tooth on each side of each jaw, the other molars and incisors being never changed.
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  • The dentition of the kangaroos, functionally considered, thus consists of sharp-edged incisors, most developed near the median line of the mouth, for the purpose of cropping herbage, and ridged or tuberculated molars for crushing.
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  • - Skull and teeth of Bennett's Wallaby (Macropus ruficollis bennettii): i l, i 2, i 3, first, second and third upper incisors; pm, second premolar (the first having been already shed); m l, m 2, m 3, m4, last premolar and three molars.
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  • The skull has a remarkably narrow and pointed muzzle and much inflated auditory bullae; while the two halves of the lower jaw are firmly welded together at their junction, thus effectually preventing the scissor-like action of the lower incisors distinctive of Macropus and its immediate allies.
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  • The body is ornamented with red clay and the lower incisors are often extracted.
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  • Its large size, aquatic habits, partially webbed hind-toes, and the smooth, broad, orange-coloured incisors, are sufficient to distinguish this rodent from the other members of the family Capromyidae.
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  • Pentelikon, Attica, shows the absence in the adult state of upper and lower incisors and upper canines, much the same condition being indicated in an Indian skull.
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  • They are called " incisors."
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  • Of the five teeth between the incisors and molars the most anterior, or the one usually situated close behind the premaxillary suture, very generally assumes a lengthened and pointed form, and constitutes the " canine " of the Carnivora, the tusk of the boar, &c. It is customary, therefore, to call this tooth, whatever its size or form, the " canine."
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  • With regard to the lower teeth the difficulties are greater, owing to the absence of any suture corresponding to that which defines the incisors above; but since the number of the teeth is the same, since the corresponding teeth are preceded by milk-teeth, and since in the large majority of cases it is the fourth tooth of the series which is modified in the same way as the canine (or fourth tooth) of the upper jaw, it is reasonable to adopt the same divisions as with the upper series, and to call the first three, which are implanted in the part of the mandible opposite to the premaxilla, the incisors, the next the canine, the next four the premolars, and the last three the molars.
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  • For the sake of brevity the complete dentition is described by the following formula, the numbers above the line representing the teeth of the upper, those below the line those of the lower jaw: incisors 3-31-1 4-4 3-3 _ 11-11 total 44.
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  • When, as is the case among nearly all existing mammals with the exception of the members of the genera Sus (pigs), Gymnura (ratshrew), Talpa (moles) and Myogale (desmans) the number of teeth is reduced below the typical forty-four, it appears to be an almost universal rule that if one of the incisors is missing it is the second, or middle one, while the premolars commence to disappear from the front end of the series and the molars from the hinder end.
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  • With the marsupials the case is, however, somewhat different; the whole number not being limited to 44, owing largely to the fact that the number of upper incisors may exceed three pairs, reaching indeed in some instances to as many as five.
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  • Moreover, with the exception of the wombats, the number of pairs of incisors in the upper always exceeds those in the lower.
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  • The incisors are small, so as not to interfere with the penetrating action of the tusks; and the crowns of some of the teeth of the cheek-series are modified into scissor-like blades, in order to rasp off the flesh from the bones, or to crack the bones themselves, while the later teeth of this series tend to disappear.
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  • In the insectivorous type, as exemplified in moles and shrew-mice, the middle pair of incisors in each jaw are long and pointed so as to have a forceps-like action for seizing insects, the hard coats of which are broken up by the numerous sharp cusps surmounting the cheek-teeth.
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  • In the omnivorous type, as exemplified in man and monkeys, and to a less specialized degree in swine, the incisors are of moderate and nearly equal size; the canines, if enlarged, serve for other purposes than holding prey, and such enlargement is usually confined to those of the males; while the cheek-teeth have broad flattened crowns surmounted by rounded bosses, or tubercles.
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  • In the herbivorous modification, as seen in three distinct phases in the horse, the kangaroo, and in ruminants, the incisors are generally well developed in one or both jaws, and have a nipping action, either against one another or against a toothless hard pad in the upper jaw; while the canines are usually small or absent, at least in the upper jaw, but in the lower jaw may be approximated and assimilated to the incisors.
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  • Its main features may be summed as follows: - a purely agricultural life, with the plantain, yam and manioc (the last two of American origin) as the staple food; cannibalism common; rectangular houses with ridged roofs; scar-tattooing; clothing of bark-cloth or palm-fibre; occasional chipping or extraction of upper incisors; bows with strings of cane, as the principal weapons, shields of wood or wickerwork; religion, a primitive form of fetishism with the belief that death is due to witchcraft; ordeals, secret societies, the use of masks and anthropomorphic figures, and wooden gongs.
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  • These are distinguished by circular huts with domed or conical roofs; clothing of skin or leather; occasional chipping or extraction of lower incisors; spears as the principal weapons, bows, where found, with a sinew cord, shields of hide or leather; religion, ancestor-worship with belief in the power of the magicians as rain-makers.
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  • The incisors of each jaw are placed in close contact, forming a semicircle.
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  • In the male they are compressed, pointed, and smaller than the incisors, from which they are separated by a slight interval.
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  • Up to this period the age of the horse is clearly shown by the condition of dentition, and for some time longer indications can be obtained from the wear of the incisors, though this depends to a certain extent upon the hardness of the food or other circumstances.
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  • The summits of the incisors were infolded to a small extent.
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  • The incisors are small and the canines scarcely enlarged; the latter having a gap on each side in the lower, but only one on their hinder aspect in the upper jaw.
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  • Gaze riveted to the crimson drops, he instinctively opened his mouth for his incisors to have room to emerge.
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  • Normally, he didn't dampen the pain for the Guardians, who felt the full length of his four inch incisors enter their necks.
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  • They were even with the teeth around them, as if his incisors had just …grown.
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  • Jule had zoomed it in on Xander, the look of predatory cunning – and her blood on his incisors – irritating her as much as it turned her on.
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  • Methods: Seventy-two traumatically extruded permanent incisors were studied at the Departments of Pediatric Dentistry in Belfast, Newcastle upon Tyne, and Glasgow.
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  • To the right is a picture of a rabbit with overgrown incisors which do not meet properly.
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  • Firstly, although we have incisors, they are pretty puny compared to other animals.
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  • You use teeth called incisors which are the front teeth, to bite or cut into the food.
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  • No back teeth Occasionally people have all their back teeth removed leaving just the front incisors.
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  • incisors at the front, the well-known bugs bunny look and molars at the back to graze on hay and grass with.
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  • The most commonly involved teeth are the primary maxillary central incisors.
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  • He believed that the cast displayed ante mortem loss of the central and right lateral incisors, and possibly the left lateral incisor.
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  • These are followed by the two upper central incisors.
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  • Upper and lower permanent incisors were examined for dental injuries.
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  • At this stage, the central incisors have been in wear for several years.
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  • The grinding action of the upper incisors over the lower incisors keep their length under control.
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  • incisors form long curved tusks of ivory.
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  • The permanent lateral incisors come through at approximately 3½ years of age and the permanent corner incisors at approximately 4½ years of age.
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  • incisors in the middle of the lower jaw and the first permanent molar teeth.
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  • maxillary central incisors.
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  • overgrown incisors which do not meet properly.
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  • permanent tooth be the incisors in the middle of the lower jaw and the first permanent molar teeth.
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  • toothse tend to be the incisors in the middle of the lower jaw and the first permanent molar teeth.
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  • tooth jaws bore small chisel like incisors, small canines, and low-crowned cheek teeth with rounded conical cusps.
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  • Its upper incisors form long curved tusks of ivory.
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  • 28 a to the dimensions characteristic of elephants, with the loss of the lower incisors (or with temporary retention of rudimentary ones), while at the same time a true elephant-like trunk must have been developed by the shortening of the lower lip and the prolongation of the combined upper lip and nose.
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  • - The Polyprotodonts are characterized by their numerous, small, sub-equal incisors, of which there are either five or four pairs in the upper and always three in the lower jaw, (fig.
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  • Nearly allied is the Australian family Dasyuridae, characterized by the presence of only four pairs of upper incisors, the generally small and rudimentary condition of the first hind toe, which can but seldom be opposed to the rest, and the absence of prehensile power in the tail; the pouch being either present or absent, and the fore feet always five-toed.
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  • g; total, 48; the upper incisors being small, with short, broad crowns; the lower incisors moderate, narrow, proclivous; canines well developed.
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  • There are never more than three pairs of upper and one of lower incisors, of which the middle upper and the single lower pair are large and chisel-like (fig.
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  • g, total 24; all the teeth growing from persistent pulps, and the incisors large and chisel-like, with enamel only on the front surface.
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  • Upper incisors crowded together, cylindroidal, the first much larger than the others, with a bevelled cutting edge (fig.
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  • notatus) from Borneo, characterized by its finely grooved incisors (see Groove-Toothed Squirrel).
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  • The masseteric ridge of the lower jaw is obsolete, the palate broad, the incisors long and the molars semi-rooted, with external and internal enamel-folds (see Agouti).
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  • The African cane-rats, Thryonomys (or Aulacodus), are large terrestrial rodents, ranging from the centre of the continent to the Cape, easily recognized by their deeply fluted incisors (see Co yp u).
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  • The more typical representatives of the group constitute the subfamily Macropodinae, in which the cutting-edges of the upper incisors are nearly level, or the first pair but slightly longer than the others (fig.
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  • Here the removal of the lower incisors is common, and circumcision entirely absent.
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  • The incisors were scarcely, if at all, infolded, and there is a rudiment of the fifth metacarpal (fig.
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  • But using one 's own incisors to complete the process is an integral part of the sellotape experience.
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  • The jaws bore small chisel like incisors, small canines, and low-crowned cheek teeth with rounded conical cusps.
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  • Upper and lower central incisors (front teeth)-Typically between five and eight months old.
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  • If a child's permanent lower incisors erupt behind each other, braces may be required at a young age.
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  • A deep overbite can cause significant pain and bone damage and may contribute to excessive wear on the incisors.
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  • Once a child's lower baby incisors have erupted, an orthodontist can measure the child's jaw and tooth size, project their growth rate, and possibly predict whether the child will have orthodontic problems with their permanent teeth.
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  • They consist of wires and springs that are held in place by small brackets glued to the outside surfaces of the incisors and sometimes the premolars.
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  • Headgear and Herbst appliances can significantly reduce protrusion of the four top incisors and enable the growing lower jaw to catch up with the upper jaw, eliminating swallowing problems.
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  • Deep bite-A closed bite; a deep or excessive overbite in which the lower incisors bite too closely to or into the gum tissue or palate behind the upper teeth.
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  • Localized juvenile periodontitis usually affects the molars (back grinding teeth) and incisors.
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  • The incisors in the upper jaw are the most commonly injured teeth.
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  • Cats, with their needle-like incisors and carnassial teeth, typically cause puncture wounds.
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  • A Pisces/Scorpio Match: Artistic Pisceans often bring out the lighter side of Scorpio, and their fairly easy-going nature works as a kind of file on Scorpio's sharp incisors.
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  • It struck her that the red eyes weren't contacts and the four inch incisors weren't implants.
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  • His incisors grew unbidden; he didn't stop them this time.
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  • pair of large cutting incisors situated close to the middle line, and one great, cutting, compressed premolar, on each side above and below.
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  • The tail is long and in some cases prehensile; the first hind-toe may be either large, small or absent; the dentition usually includes three pairs of upper and one of lower incisors, and six or seven pairs of cheekteeth in each jaw; the stomach is either simple or sadculated, without a cardiac gland; and there are four teats.
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