Incense sentence example

incense
  • The commonest incense in ancient India was probably frankincense.
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  • They continued, and Deidre's attention went to a small shop behind the tents, from which incense drifted.
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  • The work derives its name from the picturesque story of the cave where Adam deposited the treasure of gold, myrrh and incense which he had brought away from paradise: the cave was used as a burying-place by him and his descendants until the deluge.
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  • The censer used was a hemispherical cup or bowl of bronze, supported by a long handle, fashioned at one end like an open hand, in which the bowl was, as it were, held, while the other end within which the pastils of incense were kept was shaped into the hawk's head crowned with a disk, as the symbol of Re.'
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  • They probably carried the incense in the sacred bag so frequently seen in their hands and in those also of the common priests.
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  • Despite her fury and fear, she found his presence oddly calming, like sitting in a spa surrounded by incense with her feet in a salt bath.
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  • 13, and many other passages, to denote the process by which the "savour of satisfaction" in any burnt-offering, whether of flesh or of incense, is produced.
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  • The "incense tree" of America is the Icica guianensis, and the "incense wood" of the same continent I.
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  • The Ramayana and Mahabharata afford evidence of the employment of incense by the Hindus, in the worship of the gods and the burning of the dead, from the remotest antiquity.
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  • Now, however, the incense in commonest use in India is benzoin.
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  • One of the most ancient forms of home fragrance is incense.
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  • Incense fragrances are often very strong, however.
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  • Generally he holds in one hand the censer, and with the other casts the pastils or osselets of incense into it: sometimes he offers incense in one hand and makes the libation of wine with the other.
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  • Incense is used by many cultures and civilizations and is recognized to have many special qualities.
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  • On the second an offering of incense was made twice a day.
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  • Korah and his associates maintained that the other tribes, belonging as they did to a holy people, had as much right as the Levites to approach Yahweh directly, without the mediation of any Levite, and offer sacrifices and even incense to Yahweh.
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  • The third narrative is P 2, which relates how Korah at the head of 250 Levites protested against the priestly privileges of Aaron, claiming that all the Levites had as much right to sacrifice and offer incense to Yahweh as Aaron and his sons had.
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  • It is to be noticed that in both P 1 and 1 32 incense is burned in pans or censers, so that even the author of P 2 knew nothing about an altar of incense.
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  • If so, parliament was told that temporal possessions ruin the church and drive out the Christian graces of faith, hope and charity; that the priesthood of the church in communion with Rome was not the priesthood Christ gave to his apostles; that the monk's vow of celibacy had for its consequence unnatural lust, and should not be imposed; that transubstantiation was a feigned miracle, and led people to idolatry; that prayers made over wine, bread, water, oil, salt, wax, incense, altars of stone, church walls, vestments, mitres, crosses, staves, were magical and should not be allowed; that kings should possess the jus episcopale, and bring good government into the church; that no special prayers should be made for the dead; that auricular confession made to the clergy, and declared to be necessary for salvation, was the root of clerical arrogance and the cause of indulgences and other abuses in pardoning sin; that all wars were against the principles of the New Testament, and were but murdering and plundering the poor to win glory for kings; that the vows of chastity laid upon nuns led to child murder; that many of the trades practised in the commonwealth, such as those of goldsmiths and armourers, were unnecessary and led to luxury and waste.
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  • The incense of " Dofar " is alluded to by Camoens, Os Lusiadas, x.
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  • On the sacrificial use and import of frankincense and similar substances see Incense.
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  • Common frankincense is an ingredient in some ointments and plasters, and on account of its pleasant odour when burned has been used in incense as a substitute for olibanum.
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  • 250, evaded the consequences of their Christian belief by procuring documents (libelli) which certified that they had satisfied the authorities of their submission to the edict requiring them to offer incense or sacrifice to the imperial gods.
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  • Only when he reached Gabe did he return to his Immortal form.  The death-dealer's clothing was tattered from demon strikes, his body smelling of blood sure to incense the creatures he fought.  Despite this, the assassin's speed and strikes didn't falter.  Each was sure and powerful.  Rhyn maneuvered until his back was to Gabe's, and he reached back to snatch the knife Gabe kept strapped to one thigh.  While Gabe showed no sign of slowing, Rhyn could feel the wound Kris inflicted slowing his movements.  At least Kris hadn't stabbed him with the enforcer dagger, or Rhyn would be dead.
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  • A stunning fuschia pack of 25 beautifully aromatic ' Passion ' incense sticks complete with a stylish heart-shaped aluminum incense holder.
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  • You needn't store incense burners away or hide them in a corner.
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  • The incense cedar and red cedar are both used to make pencils.
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  • I told you that what started those trumpets sounding was the angel taking the censer filled with incense and throwing it on the earth.
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  • She is sitting on a tripod, three legs going rather high over a huge chasm from which rises incense smelling heavy dense smoke.
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  • Profile: We are the sole distributor of Wild Berry premium incense in the UK.
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  • In 1934 charcoal tablets were first experimented with in order to supply the glowing ember that incense needs.
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  • Were they bringing the frankincense and the incense to make Christ an even sweeter savor to the nostrils of His heavenly Father?
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  • He fills the air with incense and strange incantations to ward off evil, but with no effect.
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  • You first burn the incense then imagine the need you want.
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  • I could smell incense then saw 6 hooded monks walk past me chanting.
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  • They come in their own protective suede bag, with Robs own hand blended cone incense.
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  • He clings with regret to the golden chalices and fragrant incense of Catholicism.
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  • He made his prison-cell fragrant with the sweet incense of prayer.
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  • Also loose incense, hand blended by us using our own gums, resins, herbs and oils.
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  • It is suitable for burning loose incense on a charcoal block, incense on a charcoal block, incense cones and tealight candles.
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  • The incense stick holder is fixed upright at the end of the box, to support the incense stick holder is fixed upright at the end of the box, to support the incense above the lid.
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  • Before the priests there are basins of burning incense tended by the Tots.
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  • This is another great way to enjoy resin incense.
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  • Based on ancient originals this brass effect incense burner features a double pagoda roof and has ample room to burn incense cones or dhoop.
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  • The scents of smoking incense mingle with rich spices to transport them to a foreign land.
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  • Dominican monks opened the first perfume factory in Florence, Italy, in 1608 where they would have made incense.
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  • And the whole multitude of the people were praying without at the time of incense.
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  • Cherry blossoms scented the air in long endless ribbons of sweet perfume, like the incense inside mortal temples.
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  • If you let your dhoop incense smolder, your cone will probably burn like this, for about 30 minutes.
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  • In the base is a compartment, with a swing door, for incense stick storage.
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  • It remains to add that throughout we must carefully distinguish in theory, however hard this may be to do in practice, between legitimate ritual understood as such, whether integral to prayer, such as its verbal forms, or accessory, such as gestures, postures, incense, oil or what not, and the formalism of religious decay, such as generally betrays itself by its meaninglessness, by its gibberish phrases, sing-song intonation and so forth.
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  • In its literal meaning the word "incense" is one with the word "perfume," the aroma given off with the smoke (per fumum2) of any odoriferous substance when burnt.
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  • But, in use, while the meaning of the word "perfume" has been extended so as to include everything sweet in smell, from smoking incense to the invisible fresh fragrance of fruits and exquisite scent of flowers, that of the word "incense," in all the languages of modern Europe in which it occurs, has, by an opposite process of limitation, been gradually restricted almost exclusively to frankincense (see Frankincense).
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  • "franc") incense (see Littre's Fr.
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  • The Indian Mussulmans indeed were rapidly degenerating into a mere sect of Hindus before the Wahabi revival, and the more recent political propaganda in support of the false caliphate of the sultans of Turkey; and we therefore find the religious use of incense among them more general than among the Mahommedans of any other country.
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  • It is easy to imagine how, as men grew in sensuous appreciation of pleasant perfumes, and in empirical knowledge of the sources from which these could be derived, this advance would naturally express itself, not only in their domestic habits, but also in the details of their religious ceremonial, so that the custom of adding some kind of incense to their animal sacrifices, and at length that of offering it pure and simple, would inevitably arise.
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  • The Day of Atonement is the only fast provided in the Law; it is only on this occasion that (a) the Jews are required to " afflict their souls," (b) the High Priest enters the Holy of Holies, (c) the High Priest offers incense before the mercy seat and sprinkles it with blood, and (d) the scapegoat or Azazel is sent away into the wilderness, bearing upon him all the iniquities of the people.
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  • Large cushions and rugs had been flung about and the smell of strong incense or perfume filled the air.
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  • Mmmm, the tempting aroma of fish & chips, the beguiling scents of incense & patchouli oil.
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  • Blessing sorry out of stock A sweet, harmonious incense containing cleansing ingredients like lavender and blessed thistle for spirituality.
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  • Take out your yarrow stalks; light a candle or incense.
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  • They carry all kinds of unique items like "Chucky" dolls, dragon and gargoyle fountains and goblets, vintage style t-shirts with famous rock bands and celebrities, psychedelic lava lamps, incense, and sexy, fun items.
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  • Its fragrance is spicy, balsamic, and sweet, and it is primarily used today in incense and perfumes.
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  • Though the resin is primarily used in incense and perfumery, a number of products make use of the herb's aromatic and therapeutic properties.
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  • Perform a House Cleansing or House Blessing - Burn Sage, incense or candles after someone in your family has been ill, after an argument or any other type of emotional upset.
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  • Burn incense, use soft lighting and complete the ambiance with meditative music playing in the background.
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  • For a great smelling living room, burn scented candles, use an oil burner or incense.
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  • The men's version of Just Me is a blend of lemon zest, bergamot, tangerine, blackcurrant, crushed grass, lime, clove bud, sage, lotus, redwood, patchouli, moss, incense and amber crystal.
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  • Another type of meditation timer uses incense rather than batteries.
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  • Like the other meditation timers, the soft sound will gently ease you back into your day, while enjoying the sweet scent of your favorite incense.
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  • The advantage with this type of timer of course is the use of incense which has traditionally been used to time meditations.
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  • If you have a hippie-inspired shop nearby that sells incense, old band t-shirts, and hemp jewelry, check there, too.
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  • Tributes of incense and food offerings are made to family ancestors.
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  • The proprietary Truman Cell electrostatically charges the smaller air particles, and uses dehydration, high-voltage and ionization to kill microbes.Air fresheners, candles and incense only mask the odors in your home.
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  • Moonglow has a huge selection of fragrance oils and each one is clearly labeled as to whether it is safe for soy candles, paraffin candles, body products or incense.
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  • Much has been written about the benefits of incense.
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  • There are many fragrances that help conjure up the feeling of a special Halloween atmosphere, such as herbs and spices, incense, or citrus scents.
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  • 3 Classical Latin has but one word (thus or tus) for all sorts of incense.
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  • From Meroe to Memphis the commonest subject carved or painted in the interiors of the temples is that of some contemporary Phrah or Pharaoh worshipping the presiding deity with oblations of gold and silver vessels, rich vestments, gems, the firstlings of the flock and herd, cakes, fruits, flowers, wine, anointing oil and incense.
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  • The ancient Egyptians used various substances as incense.
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  • In cold weather the Egyptians warm their rooms by placing in them a brazier, "chafing-dish," or "standing-dish," filled with charcoal, whereon incense is burnt; and in hot weather they refresh them by occasionally swinging a hand censer by a chain through them - frankincense, benzoin and aloe wood being.
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  • 2 The "incense" (ketoreth), or "incense of sweet scents" (ketoreth sammim), called, in Ex.
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  • The monuments of Persepolis and the coins of the Sassanians show that the religious use of incense was as common in ancient Persia as in Babylonia and Assyria.
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  • The Parsees still preserve in western India the pure tradition of the ritual of incense as followed by their race from probably the most ancient times.
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  • The incense sticks and pastils known all over India under the names of ud-buti (" benzoin-light") or aggar-ki-buti (" wood aloes light") are composed of benzoin, wood aloes, sandalwood, rock lichen, patchouli, rose-malloes, talispat (the leaf of Flacourtia Cataphracta of Roxburgh), mastic and sugar-candy or gum.
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  • In their funeral ceremonies, the moment the spirit has fled incense is burnt before the corpse until it is carried out to be buried.
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  • No perfectly satisfactory traces can be found of the use of incense in the ritual of the Christian Church during the first four centuries.'
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  • 13) gives distinct expression to his sense of the needlessness of any such ritual ("the Creator and Father of the universe does not require blood, nor smoke, nor even the sweet smell of flowers and incense"); and Arnobius (Adv.
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  • And less than two centuries afterwards we read an order in one of the capitularies of Hincmar of Reims, to the effect that every priest ought to be provided with a censer and incense.
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  • That in this portion of their ritual, however, the Christians of that period were not universally conscious of its direct descent from Mosaic institutions may be inferred perhaps from the "benediction of the incense" used in the days of Charlemagne, which runs as follows: "May the Lord bless this incense to the extinction of every noxious smell, and kindle it to the odour of its sweetness."
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  • The character and order of these historical notices of incense would certainly, were there nothing else to be considered, justify the conclusion hitherto generally adopted, that its use was wholly unknown in the worship of the Christian Church before the 5th century.
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  • On the other hand, we know that in the first Christian services held in the catacombs under the city of Rome, incense was burnt as a sanitary fumigation at least.
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  • Tertullian also distinctly alludes to the use of aromatics in Christian burial: "the Sabaeans will testify that more of their merchandise, and that more costly, is lavished on the burial of Christians, than in burning incense to the gods."
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  • And the whole argument from analogy is in favour of the presumption of the ceremonial use of incense by the Christians from the first.
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  • The slighting references to it by the Christian fathers are no more an argument against its existence in the primitive church than the similar denunciations by the Jewish prophets of burnt-offerings and sacrifices are any proof that there were no such rites as the offering of incense, and of the blood of bulls and fat of rams, in the worship of the temple at Jerusalem.
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  • There could be no real offence to Christians in the burning of incense.
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  • 3, 4, the image of the offering of incense with the prayers of the saints, before the throne of God, is not without its significance.
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  • The Missal of the Roman Church now enjoins incensation before the introit, at the gospel and again at the offertory, and at the elevation, in every high mass; the use of incense also occurs at the exposition of the sacrament, at consecrations of churches and the like, in processions, in the office for the burial of the dead and at the exhibition of relics.
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  • In the Church of England the use of incense was gradually abandoned after the reign of Edward VI., until the ritualistic revival of the present day.
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  • Ram, St John's, Norwich, against the use of incense in the Church of England, the archbishops of Canterbury (Dr Temple) and York (Dr Maclagan) supported the appeal.
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  • Dibdin in the 10th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and the exposition given by Sir Lewis Dibdin of the whole question of the use of incense in the Church of England may here be interpolated.
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  • There is reason to think that, notwithstanding the order for the use of incense at every celebration, it was in practice burnt only on high festivals, and then only in rich churches, down to the period of the Reformation.
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  • Incense was not burnt in private masses, so that the clergy were accustomed to celebrations without it, and would naturally forego it on any plausible ground."
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  • But it was expressly st'.ced in a rubric that the old service of the mass was to proceed without variation of any rite or ceremony until after the priest had received the sacrament, that is, until long after the last of the three occasions for the use of incense explained above.
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  • The first Prayer Book does not contain any direction to use or any mention of incense.
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  • It has been and still is a keenly controverted question whether incense did or did not continue to be in ceremonial use under the first Prayer Book or during the rest of Edward VI.'s reign.
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  • The ceremonial use of incense thus became again an undoubted part of the communion service in the Church of England.
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  • But this use of incense must be carefully distinguished from its ceremonial use.
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  • Of the same character is the use of incense carried in a perfuming pan before the sovereign at his coronation in the procession from Westminster Hall to the Abbey.
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  • In the general revival of church ceremonial which accompanied and followed the Oxford Movement incense was not forgotten, and its ceremonial use in the pre-Reformation method has been adopted in a few extreme churches since 1850.
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  • In 1868 Sir Robert Phillimore (Dean of the Arches) pronounced the ceremonial use of incense to be illegal in the suit of Martin v.
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  • The case was carried to the Privy Council on appeal, but there was no appeal on the question of incense.
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  • Again, in 1870, the ceremonial use of incense was condemned by Sir Robert Phillimore in the suit of Sumner v.
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  • Notwithstanding these decisions, it was insisted by those who defended the revival of the ceremonial use of incense that it was a legal custom of the Church of England.
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  • On the 31st of July 1899 the archbishops decided that the liturgical use of incense was illegal.
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  • Various expedients were adopted, as, e.g., the use of incense just before the beginning of service, by which it was sought to retain incense without infringing the law as laid down by the archbishops.
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  • There remained, nevertheless, a tendency on the part of the clergy who used incense, or desired to do so, to revert to the position they occupied before the Lambeth hearing - that is, to insist on the ceremonial use of incense as a part of the Catholic practice of the Church of England which it is the duty of the clergy to maintain, notwithstanding the decisions of ecclesiastical judges or the opinions or archbishops to the contrary.
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  • - For the manufacture of the incense now used in the Christian churches of Europe there is no fixed rule.
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  • The Armenian liturgy, in its benediction of the incense, speaks of "this perfume prepared from myrrh and cinnamon."
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  • The preparation of pastils of incense has probably come down in a continuous tradition from ancient Egypt, Babylonia and Phoenicia.
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  • There can be no doubt that its use throughout the East is based on sanitary considerations; and in Europe even, in the time when the dead were buried in the churches, it was recognized that the burning of incense served essentially to preserve their salubrity.
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  • Clement of Alexandria expresses this in his well-known words: "The true altar of incense is the just soul, and the perfume from it is holy prayer."
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  • The Egyptians understood the use of incense as symbolical of the purification of the soul by prayer.
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  • He pointed out that God "before all temples prefers the upright heart and pure," and must be worshipped in spirit and in truth, and not with the idolatrous accessories of incense, sandal-wood and burnt-offerings.
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  • Vestments are worn only at the ministration of the sacraments; incense is used invariably at the Eucharist and frequently at other services.
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  • In the vast untrodden forests farther east there are timber trees of many kinds, incense trees, a great wealth of rubber trees of the Hevea genus, numerous varieties of beautiful palms, sarsaparilla, vanilla, ipecacuanha and copaiba.
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  • At Teos incense was offered before the statue of a flute-player during his lifetime.
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  • There are very numerous representations on the monuments; in some the censer appears as a small cup or bowl held by a human hand to which a long handle is attached on which is a small box to hold the incense.
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  • In 1900 the archbishops again acted together, when an appeal was addressed to them by the united episcopate, to decide the vexed questions of the use of incense in divine service and of the reservation of the elements.
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  • Large quantities of benzoin are used as incense.
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  • On these occasions the Lares were crowned with garlands, and offerings of cakes and honey, wine and incense, but especially swine, were laid before them.
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  • Sacrifices and incense were offered to the gods.
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  • The names for altar (midhbaji) and sacrifice (dhibh) are common Semitic words, and the altar of incense has among other names that of miktar, as in Hebrew.
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  • An altar, furnished with lamps, was placed before the statue; the inquirer, after lighting the lamps and offering incense, placed a coin in the right hand of the god; he then whispered his question into the ear of the statue, and, stopping his own ears, left the market place.
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  • Pietas is represented on coins as a matron throwing incense on an altar, her attribute being a stork.
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  • It is related that Nezahualcoyotl, the poet-king of Tezcuco, built a ninestoried temple with a starry roof above, in honour of the invisible deity called Tloquenahuaque, " he who is all in himself," or Ipalnemoani, " he by whom we live," who had no image, and was propitiated, not by bloody sacrifices, but by incense and flowers.
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  • Incense was constantly used, especially the copalli (copal) well known to us for varnish; little terra-cotta censers are among the commonest of Mexican antiquities.
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  • Old women were employed as go-betweens, and the marriage ceremony was conducted by a priest who after moral exhortations united the young couple by tying their garments together in a knot, after which they walked seven times round the fire, casting incense into it; after the performance of the marriage ceremony, the pair entered together on a four days' fast and penance before the marriage was completed..
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  • The question of the legality of reservation was brought before the two archbishops in 1899, under circumstances analogous to those in the Lambeth Hearing on Incense.
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  • Often the word thus extruded is irrecoverable; Ginevra, 125 sqq., "The matin winds from the expanded flowers I Scatter their hoarded incense and awaken I The earth, until the dewy sleep is shaken From every living heart which it possesses I Through seas and winds, cities and wildernesses"; the second "winds" is a repetition of the first, but what should stand in its place, - "lands" or "strands" or "waves" or something else - no one can say.
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  • The hard transparent resins, such as the copals, dammars, mastic and sandarach, are principally used for varnishes and cement, while the softer odoriferous oleo-resins (frankincense, turpentine, copaiba) and gum-resins containing essential oils (ammoniacum, asafoetida, gamboge, myrrh, scammony) are more largely used for therapeutic purposes and incense.
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  • Sandalwood (Santalum album or freycinetianum) was once abundant on rugged and rather inaccessible heights, but so great a demand arose for it in China,' where it was used for incense and for the manufacture of fancy articles, that the supply was nearly exhausted between 1802 and 1836; since then some young trees have sprung up, but the number is relatively small.
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  • Northward and far back in the foot-hills is the Ptolemaic temple of Deir el Medina, and beyond under the cliffs of Deir el Bahri the terrace temple of Queen Hatshepsut, the walls of which are adorned with scenes from her expedition to Puoni (Somaliland) in search of incense trees, and many other subjects.
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  • He strained every nerve to induce his clergy to accept his ruling on the questions of the reservation of the Sacrament and of the ceremonial use of incense in accordance with the archbishop's judgment in the Lincoln case; but when, during his last illness, a prosecutor brought proceedings against the clergy of five recalcitrant churches, the bishop, on the advice of his archdeacons, interposed his veto.
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  • Cedar wood was brought from the forests of Lebanon, ivory, leopard skins and gold from the south, all kinds of spices and ingredients of incense from Somaliland and Arabia, fine linen and beautifully worked vessels from Syria and the islands.
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  • As to the manual rites of the daily cult, all that can here be said is that incense, purifications and anointings with various Oils played a large part; the sacrifices consisted chiefly of slaughtered oxen and geese; burnt offerings were a very late innovation.
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  • The famous sculptures of the great expedition by water to Puoni, the land of incense on the Somali coast, are also here, with many others.
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  • 2 For (I) the altar of incense is here mentioned for the first time, and was apparently unknown to the author of ch.
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  • It has been conjectured that some of the oldest trade routes were created for traffic in salt; at; any E1-ate salt and incense, the chief economic and religious necessaries of the ancient world, play a great part in all that we know of the ancient highways of commerce.
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  • In the first centuries of the Christian era, apostasy was most commonly induced by persecution, and was indicated by some outward act, such as offering incense to a heathen deity or blaspheming the name of Christ.'
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  • The ceremony of the first day took place in Rome itself, in the house of the magister or his deputy, or on the Palatine in the temple of the emperors, where at sunrise fruits and incense were offered to the goddess.
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  • Among the "harbours of incense" exploited by various Pharaohs during some twentyfive centuries it is impossible to believe that the island could be missed by the Egyptian galleys on their way to the "Land of Punt," identified by several writers with Somaliland; nor that, though the roadsteads of the African coast were perhaps oftener frequented, and for other freights besides myrrh and frankincense, the shores of Sokotra were neglected by such ardent explorers as those, for instance, of Queen Hatshepsut of the r8th dynasty.
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  • They would have found on the island, which is probably referred to under the name "Terraces of Incense" (from its step-like contours), the precious "auta trees" - whose divine dew, for use in the service of their gods, was their special quest - in greater abundance and in a larger number of species than any other country.
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  • It was subject to the king of the Incense Country, and was a meeting-place of Arabian and Indian ships.
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  • The priest lights a lamp of incense,.
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  • "The articles manufactured from jute are principally (I) gunny bags; (2) string, rope and cord; (3) kampa, a net-like bag for carrying wood or hay on bullocks; (4) chat, a strip of stuff for tying bales of cotton or cloth; (5) dola, a swing on which infants are rocked to sleep; (6) shika, a kind of hanging shelf for little earthen pots, &c.; (7) dulina, a floor-cloth; (8) beera, a small circular stand for wooden plates used particularly in poojahs; (9) painter's brush and brush for white-washing; (io) ghunsi, a waist-band worn next to the skin; (II) gochh-dari, a hair-band worn by women; (12) mukbar, a net bag used as muzzle for cattle; (13) parchula, false hair worn by players; (14) rakhi-bandhan, a slender arm-band worn at the Rakhi-poornima festival; and (15) dhup, small incense sticks burned at poojahs."
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  • But though the Jesuit Antonio Possevino was sent to Stockholm to complete John's " conversion," John would only consent to embrace Catholicism under certain conditions which were never kept, and the only result of all these subterraneous negotiations was to incense the Protestants still more against the new liturgy, the use of which by every congregation in the realm without exception was, nevertheless, decreed by the Riksdag of 1582.
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  • 24), (3) the altar of incense is distinguished from the altar of burnt-offering (as opposed to Exod.
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  • The name Thuja, which was adopted by Linnaeus from the Thuya of Tournefort, seems to be derived from the Greek word Obos, signifying sacrifice, probably because the resin procured from the plant was used as incense.
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  • Aeneas Tacticus in the following century mentions a mixture of sulphur, pitch, charcoal, incense and tow, which was packed in wooden vessels and thrown lighted upon the decks of the enemy's ships.
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  • The second altar was the altar of incense, which was in the holy place of the tabernacle.
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  • But the authenticity of the passages describing the altar of incense in the tabernacle, and the historicity of the corresponding altar in Solomon's temple, are matters of keen dispute among critics.
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  • The company offers a number of gift items, from books and games to candles and incense.
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  • Burning incense - Perform a cleansing burn after an illness or a hardship by lighting incense and placing it in the middle of the floor in each room of your home.
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  • Many Halloween candle fragrances are based on incense or incense inspired scents.
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  • Incense helps to create a Gothic atmosphere which is much loved at Halloween.
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  • The religious significance of the use of incense, or at least of its use in the Holy of Holies, is distinctly set forth in Lev.
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  • The begging fakirs also go about with a lighted stick of incense in one hand, and holding out with the other an incense-holder (literally, "incense chariot"), into which the coins of the pious are thrown.
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  • Frankincense, however, though the most common, never became the only kind of incense offered to the gods among the Greeks.
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  • Oriental musk is a fragrance blend that is used in all kinds of products, including home fragrance items, scented candles, perfumes, incense, and bath and body products.
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  • Sensia: This company carries a wide selection of bath products, including essential oils, candles, incense and body care items.
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  • Though they saw the enemy advancing upon them sword in hand they remained at worship untroubled and were slaughtered as they poured libation and burned incense, for they put their own safety second to the service of God.
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  • The power to bless in this ecclesiastical sense is reserved to priests alone; the blessing of the paschal candle on Holy Saturday by the deacon being the one exception that proves the rule, for he uses for the purpose grains of incense previously blessed by the priest at the altar.
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  • She heard the blaring trance music before she opened the car door and smelled the unmistakable scent of marijuana mixed with incense and body odor.
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  • When they came into a hot climate the fire of the sacrifices and domestic cookery was removed out of the house; but the dead were probably still for a while buried in or near it, and the tulsi was planted over their graves, at once for the salubrious fragrance it diffuses and to represent the burning of incense on the altar of the family Lar.
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  • He became a Salian priest at the age of eight, and soon knew by heart all the forms and liturgical order of the official worship, and even the sacred music. In the earliest statue we have he is a youth offering incense; he is a priest at the sacrificial altar in the latest triumphal reliefs.
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  • 1.5), and a justification for it was found in the prophecy of Malachi, "In every place incense is offered unto my name and a pure offering; for my name is great among the Gentiles, saith the Lord of hosts" (Mal.
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  • In the authorized version of the Bible, the word "incense" translates two wholly distinct Hebrew words.
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  • Large "incense trees" resembling our Christmas trees, formed of incense-sticks and pastils and osselets, and alight all over, are borne by the Shiah Mussulmans in the solennial procession of the Mohurrum, in commemoration of the martyrdom of the sons of Ali.
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  • Acerra (Incense Box) >>
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  • The chief luxuries of the ancient world, silks, jewels, pearls, perfumes, incense and the like, were drawn from India, China and southern Arabia.
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  • Balsam of Tolu, produced by Myroxylon toluiferum, a native of Venezuela and New Granada; balsam of Peru, derived from Myroxylon Pereirae, a native of San Salvador in Central America; Mexican and Brazilian elemi, produced by various species of Icica or "incense trees," and the liquid exudation of an American species of Liquidambar, are all used as incense in America.
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  • (1533 B.C.) on the breast of the Sphinx at Gizeh.l The tablet represents Tethmosis before his guardian deity, the sun-god Re, pouring a libation of wine on one side and offering incense on the other.
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  • The temple is now in ruins, but the entire series of gorgeous pictures recording the expedition to "the balsam land of Punt," from its leaving to its returning to Thebes, still remains intact and undefaced.4 These are the only authenticated instances of the export of incense trees from the Somali country until Colonel Playfair, then political agent at Aden, in 1862-1864, collected and sent to Bombay the specimens from which Sir George Birdwood prepared his descriptions of them for the Linnean Society in 1868.
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  • The kings of Assyria united in themselves the royal and priestly offices, and on the monuments they erected they are generally represented as offering incense and pouring out wine to the Tree of Life.
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  • The wood, which in Indian temples is burnt as incense, is yellowish-red, close-grained, tough, hard, readily worked, durable, and equal in quality to that of the deodar.
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  • An aromatic earth, found on the coast of Cutch, is used as incense in the temples of western India.
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  • Probably nowhere can the actual historical progress from the primitive use of animal sacrifices to the later refinement of burning incense be more clearly traced than in the pages of the Old Testament, where no mention of the latter rite occurs before the period of the Mosaic legislation; but in the monuments of ancient Egypt the authentic traces of the use of incense that still exist carry us back to a much earlier date.
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  • Hindus, the Egyptians have maintained to the present day; and, although they have changed their religion, the use of incense among them continues to be as familiar and formal as ever.
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  • A trench was dug, in which a fire was lighted; a victim was sacrificed, and its blood poured into the trench; the body, upon which incense and fruits, honey and wine were thrown, was then cast into the fire.
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  • Five times a day the priests of the Persians (Zoroastrians) burnt incense on their sacred fire altars.
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  • At length the sun's rays have attained the right angle, and warm winds blow up mist and rain and melt the snowbanks, and the sun, dispersing the mist, smiles on a checkered landscape of russet and white smoking with incense, through which the traveller picks his way from islet to islet, cheered by the music of a thousand tinkling rills and rivulets whose veins are filled with the blood of winter which they are bearing off.
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