In-turn sentence examples

  • He glanced at their joined hands, then at Lisa and Howard in turn.

  • He looked at each of us in turn.

  • Betsy leapt to her feet and high-fived everyone in turn.

  • She looked at each of us in turn.

  • "I'm pleased to meet you," said Miss Molly as she shook each of our hands in turn.

  • Lydia did all but ignore Cynthia who in turn was equally cool to the visitor.

  • Lori sat down with her food and looked at each of them in turn.

  • She hated her husband who in turn despised her.

  • She in turn called her sister in Toledo, then Fred O'Connor because the occupants seemed to be watching his house.

  • Carmen looked at Alex and Felipa in turn.

  • He held out a hand to Darian, who in turn held his fist out to Xander.

  • When the usurper was in turn driven out by a Cyprian noble, Evagoras, fearing that his life was in danger, fled to Cilicia.

  • He in turn referred it to the bishops of Spires and Worms, who gave decision in March 1514 in favour of Reuchlin.

  • But Hepburn, prior of St Andrews, having obtained the vote of the chapter, expelled him, and was himself in turn expelled by Forman, bishop of Moray, who had been nominated by the pope.

  • It had been exercised from the division of 1329 by both branches in turn.

  • During the Macedonian supremacy the town passed in turn from Cassander and Demetrius Poliorcetes to Antigonus Gonatas, and finally was incorporated in the Achaean League.

  • From these it is clear that the country fell in turn under the sway of the various dynasties that ruled in the Deccan, memorials of the Chalukyan dynasty, whether temples or inscriptions, being especially abundant.

  • An open fire acts by radiation; it warms the air in a room by first warming the walls, floor, ceiling and articles in the room, and these in turn warm the air.

  • Here another entrenched camp was made and from it the Moselle line (qv.) of forts darrit continues the barrier to Belfort (q.v.), another large entrenched camp, beyond which a series of fortifications at Montbliard and the Lomont range carries the line of defence to the Swiss border, which in turn is protected by works at Pontarlier and elsewhere.

  • They did not dedicate each day in turn to its astrological planet; and it is therefore precarious to assume that the Sabbath was in its origin what it is in the astrological week, the day sacred to Saturn, and that its observance is to be derived from an ancient Hebrew worship of that planet.4 The week, however, is found in various parts of the world in a form that has nothing to do with astrology or the seven planets, and with such a distribution as to make it pretty certain that it had no artificial origin, but suggested itself independently, and for natural reasons, to different races.

  • In the 4th century its political development was arrested by constant struggles between oligarchs and democrats, who in turn brought the city under the control of Sparta (4 12 -395, 39 1 -37 8), of Athens (395-39 1, 37 8 -357), and of 'the Carian dynasty of Maussollus (357-340).

  • He believed that the Union could be saved without a war, and that a policy of delay would prevent the secession of the border states, which in turn would gradually coax their more southern neighbours back into their proper relations with the Federal government.

  • The cups are placed symmetrically on the end of the arms, and it is easy to see that the wind always has the hollow of one cup presented to it; the back of the cup on the opposite end of the cross also faces the wind, but the pressure on it is naturally less, and hence a continual rotation is produced; each cup in turn as it comes round providing the necessary force.

  • The slips are passed through an ordinary Wheatstone transmitter and actuate Wheatstone receiving apparatus which in turn controls a " Creed receiving perforator."

  • Owing to the difficulty of maintaining perfect balance on duplexed cables, curb sending is not now used, but the signals are transmitted by means of an apparatus similar to the Wheatstone automatic transmitter used on land lines and differing from the latter only in regard to the alphabet employed; the signals from the transmitter actuate a relay having heavy armatures which in turn transmit the signals to the cable; this arrangement gives very firm signals, a point of great importance for good working.

  • The secondary circuit of this last is either connected between an aerial A and the earth E, or it may be again in turn connected to a second pair of spark balls and these again to a second condenser oscillation transformer and the aerial A.

  • The subscribers' lines in an exchange are arranged in groups of moo, which are divided in turn into sub-groups of 100 each.

  • of Poland and Matthias, were commanded in turn to execute the papal decree of deposition, and Matthias gladly placed his army at the disposal of the Holy See.

  • All things are said to be developed out of an original being, which is at once material (fire) and spiritual (the Deity), and in turn they will dissolve back into this primordial source.

  • Hadrian adopted, as his successor, Titus Antoninus Pius (uncle of Marcus), on condition that he in turn adopted both Marcus (then seventeen) and Lucius Ceionius Commodus, the son of Aelius Caesar, who had originally been intended by Hadrian as his successor, but had died before him.

  • Sir John Clopton destroyed the house in 1702 (as it had reverted to his family), and the mansion he built was in turn destroyed by Sir Francis Gastrell in 1759.

  • Small islands off the coast of north-west Spain, the headlands of that same coast, the Scillies, Cornwall, the British Isles as a whole, have all in turn been suggested.

  • That the fixation of the gas is carried out by the fungal organism either in the soil or in the plant, and the nitrogenous substance so produced is absorbed by the organism, which is in turn consumed by the green plant.

  • Both were in turn replaced by the Lower Mesozoic flora, which again is thought to have had its birth in the hypothetical Gondwana land, and in which Gymnosperms played the leading part formerly taken by vascular Cryptogams. The abundance of Cycadean plants is one of its most striking features.

  • It was succeeded by the sessile-fruited oak, which was in turn supplanted by the pedunculate form of the same tree.

  • The oak in turn has been almost superseded in Denmark by the beech, which, if we may trust Julius Caesar, had not reached Britain in his time, though it existed there in the pre-glacial period, but is not native in either Scotland or Ireland.

  • [the city] Bast" (B;s-t), a city better known by its later name, P-ubasti, "place of Ubasti"; thus the goddess derived her name Ubasti from her city (Bast), and in turn the city derived its name P-ubasti from that of the goddess; the Greeks, confusing the name of the city with that of the goddess, called the latter Bubastis, and the former also Bubastis (later Bubastos).

  • He left his wife for a mistress, Elizabeth Holland, was in discord with his family, and lived to see his two nieces, Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, and his son Surrey, the fiery-tempered poet, go in turn to the block.

  • Two of his sons succeeded in turn to the earldom of Nottingham, extinct on the death of Charles, the third earl in 1681.

  • As the discussion of the Law led up to the compilation of the Mishnah, so the Mishnah itself became in turn the subject of further discussion.

  • Both add notes and explanations of their own, and both have in turn formed the text of commentaries.

  • from that in the S., and must in turn be subdivided into two partsthe coniferous region and the region Df the oak forests-these being separated by a line drawn through Pskov, Kostroma, Kazan and Ufa.

  • In the earlier years of American railway building, each project was commonly the subject of a special law; then special laws were in turn succeeded by general railway laws in the several states, and these in turn have come to be succeeded in most parts of the country by jurisdiction vested in the' state railway commission.

  • These in turn converge to a pair of single lines which lead to two groups of marshalling sidings, called " gridirons " from their shape, and these again converge to single lines leading to " lower reception and departure lines " at the bottom of the slope.

  • 32) has two rows of columns connected at the top by transverse girders, which in turn carry the longitudinal girders that support the railway.

  • STEPHEN VI., pope from May 896 to July - August 897, succeeded Boniface VI., and was in turn followed by Romanus.

  • And so the old limitations of Israel's popular religion, - the same limitations that encumbered also the religions of all the neighbouring races that succumbed in turn to Assyria's invincible progress, - now began to disappear.

  • The untimely death of that monarch upon the battlefield of Megiddo (608 B.C.), followed by the inglorious reigns of the kings who succeeded him, who became puppets in turn of Egypt or of Babylonia, silenced for a while the Messianic hopes for a future king or line of kings of Davidic lineage who would rule a renovated kingdom in righteousness and peace.

  • In accordance with his general method these notes were in turn read over to him until he had completely mastered them, when they were worked up in his memory to their final shape.

  • The melting of the mountain snow-caps in the spring causes severe freshets, which in turn are followed by long seasons of drought at a time when water is most needed for agricultural purposes.

  • Hebrew religious institutions can be understood from the biblical evidence studied in the light of comparative religion; and without going afield to Babylonia, Assyria or Egypt, valuable data are furnished by the cults of Phoenicia, Syria and Arabia, and these in turn can be illustrated from excavation and from modern custom.

  • Apollonius, the commander of the Syrian garrison in Jerusalem, and Seron the commander of the army in Syria, came in turn against Judas and his bands and were defeated.

  • These in turn come from the Chaldee or Aramaean form x7t?

  • It was during his control of the Erie that he and Fisk entered into a league with the Tweed Ring, they admitted Tweed to the directorate of the Erie, and Tweed in turn arranged favourable legislation for them at Albany.

  • The soul is in turn the image or product of the vas, and the soul by its motion begets corporeal matter..

  • After doing some research work at Simancas in Spain, he became professor of history at the university of Dorpat in 1867; and was then in turn professor at Konigsberg, Bonn and Leipzig.

  • In Turgot's proposed system landed proprietors alone were to form the electorate, no distinction being made between the three orders; the members of the town and country municipalites were to elect representatives for the district municipalites, which in turn would elect to the provincial municipalites, and the latter to a grande municipalite, which should have no legislative powers, but should concern itself entirely with the administration of taxation.

  • 1831), succeeded in turn as 4th, 5th and 6th dukes of Buccleuch and 6th, 7th, and 8th dukes of Queensberry.

  • The Senatus Consultum of the 18th of May 1804 awarded to Napoleon the title of emperor, the succession (in case he had no heir) devolving in turn upon the descendants of Joseph and Louis Bonaparte (Lucien and Jerome were for the present excluded from the succession owing to their having contracted marriages displeasing to Napoleon).

  • Chambo in turn receives the waters of a larger lake - Abai, Abaya, Pagade or Regina Margherita - through the river Walo, across a plain only 2 m.

  • If a spinner is pressed by a shipper to make quotations with refusal for two or three days to give time for business to be settled by cable, it is evidently not impossible for the spinner to shift the risk involved by getting in turn from his broker refusal quotations for cotton.

  • Now it is evident that brokers in turn require some means of passing on the risks that they are bearing, or some portion of them from one to another, or of sharing them with other market experts, as they find themselves overburdened, and as their judgment of the situation changes.

  • When a power arose in Mosul, about 1130, which was able to unify Syria - when, again, in the hands of Saladin, unified Syria was in turn united to Egypt - the cause of Latin Christianity in the East was doomed.

  • But each of the three sections of their army was routed in turn in Asia Minor by the princes of Sivas, Aleppo and Harran, in the middle of I ror; and only a few escaped to report the crushing disaster.

  • Tobacco culture, which declined after 1860 on account of the competition of Cuba and Sumatra, has revived since 1885 through the introduction of Cuban and Sumatran seed; the product of 1907 (6,937,500 lb) was more than six times that of 1899, the product in 1899 (1,125,600 lb) being more than twice that of 1889 (470,443 lb), which in turn was more than twenty times that for 1880 (21,182 lb)-the smallest production recorded for many decades.

  • In the hour of danger, the claims of religion reasserted themselves on the young soldier, and, following a custom when no priest was at hand, he made his confession to a brother officer, who in turn also confessed to him.

  • Ignatius, with his military instinct and views of obedience, intervenes with a director who gives the exercises to the person who in turn receives them.

  • Meanwhile the other independent principalities of Gondwana had in turn succumbed.

  • This spirit gave way to the physicians, who regarded " chemistry as the art of preparing medicines," a denotation which in turn succumbed to the arguments of Boyle, who regarded it as the " science of the composition of substances," a definition which adequately fits the science to-day.

  • Zincke; and his researches have led to the discovery of many chlorinated oxidation products which admit of decomposition into cyclic compounds containing fewer carbon atoms than characterize the benzene ring, and in turn yielding openchain or aliphatic compounds.

  • Still hankering after Burgundy, Charles saw his French estates again seized; but after some desultory warfare, chiefly in Normandy, peace was made in March 1365, and he returned to his work of interference in the politics of the Spanish kingdoms. In turn he made treaties with the kings of Castile and Aragon, who were at war with each other; promising to assist Peter the Cruel to regain his throne, from which he had been driven in 1366 by his half-brother Henry of Trastamara, and then assuring Henry and his ally Peter of Aragon that he would aid, them to retain Castile.

  • His Son, Alexandre Edmond Becquerel (1820-1891), was born in Paris on the 24th of March 1820, and was in turn his pupil, assistant and successor at the Musee d'Histoire Naturelle; he was also appointed professor at the short-lived Agronomic Institute at Versailles in 1849, and in 1853 received the chair of physics at the Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers.

  • In 1199-1201 he was supporting in turn Cathal Carrach and Cathal Crovderg for the native throne, but he was expelled from Limerick in 1203, and, losing his Connaught, though not his Munster estates, died in 1205.

  • The Greek version was in turn rendered into Armenian in the 5th or 6th century.

  • Spanish rule, however, came unexpectedly to an end by the retrocession of Louisiana to France in 1800; and French dominion gave way in turn in 1803 - as the result of a chain of events even more unexpected, startling, and for the United States fortunate - to the rule of the last-named country.

  • The deputation was subject in turn to the same veto of the provincial governor, and he controlled by the governor-general.

  • Their career was checked by Reshid Pasha, who persuaded the two victorious commanders to intrigue against one another, secured the division of their forces, and then fell upon each in turn.

  • The campaign of 1552 was disastrous for the Austrians; the Turks, under the command of Ahmed Pasha, defeated them at Szegedin and captured in turn Veszprem, Temesvar, Szolnok and other places.

  • In 1284 the inhabitants petitioned the burgesses of Hereford for a certified copy of the customs of the latter town, and these furnished a model for the later demands of the growing community at Cardiff from its lords, while Cardiff in turn furnished the model for the Glamorgan towns such as Neath and Kenfig.

  • The Ionians in turn succumbed to the Dorians of Argos, who, according to the legend, were led by Deiphontes; and from that time the city continued to preserve its Dorian character.

  • The heating of the latter causes great differences of pressure, which in turn set up changes of atmospheric circulation.

  • The French struggled gallantly to the close: but now a long succession of their leaders - Junot, Soult, Victor, Massena, Marmont, Joseph - had been in turn forced to recoil before 'Wellington; and while their troops fought henceforward under the depressing memory of many defeats, the Allies did so under the inspiriting influence of great successes, and with that absolute confidence in their chief which doubled their fighting power.

  • From that time it was constantly changing hands - Greeks, Bulgarians, Hungarians, replacing each other in turn.

  • In 734 it was occupied by the Moors, who in turn were driven out by Alphonso I.

  • Each discovery in turn was, according to the prevailing custom, announced to the learned world under the veil of an anagram - removed, in the case of the first, by the publication, early in 1656, of the little tract De Saturni luna observatio nova; but retained, as regards the second, until 1659, when in the Systema Saturnium the varying appearances of the so-called "triple planet" were clearly explained as the phases of a ring inclined at an angle of 28° to the ecliptic. Huygens was also in 1656 the first effective observer of the Orion nebula; he delineated the bright region still known by his name, and detected the multiple character of its nuclear star.

  • Since this surplusage is in turn derived from the Septuagint, from which the old Latin version was translated, it thus follows that the difference between the Protestant and the Roman Catholic Old Testament is, roughly speaking, traceable to the difference between the Palestinian and the Alexandrian canons of the Old Testament.

  • He soon left Paris for Toulouse, which in turn he was forced to leave owing to the hostility of the city authorities, aroused by his violent assertion of university rights.

  • Under the Lombards the civil government was in the hands of a gastaldo, under the Carolingians of a count, whose authority, by slow degrees and a course of events similar to what took place in other Italian communes, gave way to that of the bishop, whose power in turn gradually diminished and was superseded by that of the consuls and the commonwealth.

  • By the partial readmission of the riformatori and exclusion of the twelve, the permanent balia was now composed of nine priors (three of the nine, three of the people, and three of the riformatori) and of a captain of the people to be chosen from each of the three monti in turn.

  • This in turn strengthened the hands of the extreme section among the Yugosla y s, who now advanced the full ethnographic claim, involving Trieste and Gorizia as well as Dalmatia and Istria, and at the same time increased their demands against Bulgaria, Austria and Albania.

  • But eventually they may in turn become, in changed conditions, of selective value.

  • In its turn, being operated upon by the conditions of life, it would acquire a greater development of the same modification, which it would in turn transmit to its offspring.

  • Aristeas says that the first impulse came from the Arimaspi, who displaced the Issedones, who in turn fell upon the Scyths.

  • With the stragglers who remained, he held a stronghold against the Romans by dint of his native cunning, and finally, when the place was taken, persuaded forty men, who shared his hiding-place, to kill one another in turn rather than commit suicide.

  • Often, moreover, the Syriac translation became in turn the parent of a later Arabic version.

  • This was notably the case with some of the Aristotelian writings, so that in this field, as in some others, the Syriac writers handed on the torch of Greek thought to the Arabs, by whom it was in turn transmitted to medieval Europe.

  • 2), which in turn was so called from its winter frost (14Xa in the Sicel dialect; cf.

  • A charge of compressed wet guncotton may be exploded, even under water, by the detonation of a small primer of the dry and waterproofed material, which in turn can be started by a small fulminate detonator.

  • Meanwhile fresh Austrian batteries appeared against the front of the 8th division, and fresh Prussians in turn had to be engaged to save the 8th.

  • III.), which in turn has to give way to the more firm and differentiated fibrous tissue.

  • [Paulus Aegineta's] great work on surgery was early translated into Arabic, and became the foundation of the surgery of Abulcasis, which in turn was one of the chief sources of surgical knowledge to Europe in the middle ages.

  • Except in a few instances these were long ago superseded by ron-wire ropes, which in turn have p been replaced by steel because of its greater strength.

  • This entire process must, obviously, be applied in turn to each of the two surfaces of the slab of glass.

  • The Syriac is a translation from the Greek, and the Greek in turn from the Hebrew.

  • The priori were reduced to 8 (2 popolani grassi, 3 mediani and 3 artifici minuti), while the gonfaloniere was to be chosen in turn from each of those classes; the grandi were excluded from the administration, but they were still admitted to the consiglio del comune, the cinque di mercanzia, and other offices pertaining to the commune; the Ordinamenti were maintained but in a somewhat attenuated form, and certain grandi as a favour were declared to be of the popolo.

  • They are covered by marine Jurassic beds and they in turn by Cretaceous coal-bearing, terrestrial deposits, resembling those of New Zealand.

  • In the wars of 1848 and 1864 Schleswig was an important strategical point on account of its proximity to the Dannewerk and was occupied by the different contending parties in turn.

  • Owing to the dissensions among the ruling family of Riad, the towns of eastern Nejd gradually reverted to their former condition of independence, but menaced in turn by the growing power of Hail, they formed a coalition under the leadership of Zamil, sheik of Aneza, and in the spring of 1891, Aneza, Bureda, Shakra, Ras and Riad assembled their contingents to contest with Ibn Rashid the supremacy in Nejd.

  • The study of mathematics learned from Greece and India was developed by Arabian writers, who in turn became the teachers of Europe in the 16th century.

  • Innocent, determined that the Hohenstaufen should not again dominate Italy, offered the crown of Sicily in turn to Richard of Cornwall, Charles of Anjou, and Henry III.

  • They were repulsed and attacked in turn.

  • Justinian's rival Vardanes in turn sought an asylum in Khazaria, and in Leo IV.

  • New lords, or petty tyrants, rose to power in turn during this period of civil discord, but the military valour of the Pisans was not yet extinguished By sea they were almost impotent - Corsica and Sardinia were lost to them for ever; but they were still formidable by land.

  • The contest was long and doubtful, but the Russians gradually drove back Legrand and a part of Davout's corps; numerous attacks both of infantry and cavalry were made, and by the successive arrival of reinforcements each side in turn received fresh impetus.

  • In many cases it appears that only the brilliantly coloured tentacle is pecked off by the bird, and as the snail can easily regenerate a new one, this in turn becomes infected by a fresh branch of the sporocyst ramifying through the snail and thus a new supply of larvae is speedily provided (Heckert).

  • The great council consisted of 3200 citizens of blameless reputation and over twenty-five years of age, a third of the number sitting for six months in turn in the hall of the Cinquecento expressly built for the purpose.

  • This rearrangement gave place in turn to the Byzantine system of military districts (themes).

  • US kimono (garments) appeared, in which inks of several colors were made use of; but these were only employed in turn for single printings, and in no case were two of them used on the same print.

  • His brother, Charles Washington Baird (1828-1887), a graduate of New York University (1848) and of the Union Theological Seminary (1852), and the minister in turn of a Dutch Reformed church at Brooklyn, New York, and of a Presbyterian church at Rye, New York, also was deeply interested in the history of the Huguenots, and published a scholarly work entitled The History of the Huguenot Emigration to America (2 vols., 1885), left unfinished at his death.

  • Baden suffered severely during this struggle, and both branches of the family were exiled in turn.

  • is possible that, to gain adherents, the Herodian party may have been in the habit of representing that the establishment of a Herodian dynasty would be favourable to the realization of the theocracy; and this in turn may account for Tertullian's (De praescr.) allegation that the Herodians regarded Herod himself as the Messiah.

  • It was founded in 1814 by the London publisher, Colburn, and was edited in turn by Campbell, Theodore Hook, Bulwer-Lytton and Ainsworth.

  • Here, being already pregnant, she gave birth to a daughter, who in turn bore the twins Joskeha and Tawiscara (myth of hostile brothers).

  • He sat for Southwark from 1796 to 1806, and then represented in turn Athlone (1806-1807), Bandon (1807-1812), Appleby (1812-1818), and Knaresborough (1818-1830).

  • An electrified conductor is a store of energy, and from the definition of potential it is clear that the work done in increasing the charge q of a conductor whose potential is v by a small amount dq, is vdq, and since this added charge increases in turn the potential, it is easy to prove that the work done in charging a conductor with Q units to a potential V units is z QV units of work.

  • But the rear Union divisions, though ready, were not connected, and each in turn was isolated and forced back, fighting hard, towards the Landing.

  • Arguin was occupied in turn by Portuguese, Dutch, English and French; and to France it now belongs.

  • He was succeeded in turn by his three sons, Charles Emmanuel IV., Victor Emmanuel I., and Charles Felix.

  • From Aquileia he went to Gaul (366-370), visiting in turn the principal places in that country, from Narbonne and Toulouse in the south to Treves on the north-east frontier.

  • ALEXANDER II., king of Epirus, succeeded his father Pyrrhus, 272 B.C. He attacked Antigonus Gonatas and conquered the greater part of Macedonia, but was in turn driven out of both Epirus and Macedonia by Demetrius the son of Antigonus.

  • Moseley, shortly after the discovery of the diffraction of X-rays by crystals, set to work to examine the X-ray spectrum of a number of elements each of which he made in turn the target of an X-ray tube.

  • To the incorporation of Mantineia into the Achaean League (233) Tegea replied by allying itself with the Aetolians, who in turn made it over to Cleomenes III.

  • At the time of the Turkish conquest (1458) Nikli had been superseded by a fair-sized town called Mouchli, which in turn disappeared when the new city of Tripolitsa was founded about 3 m.

  • The name of the city was taken from that of the river, which in turn is supposed to represent a corruption by the French of the original Indian name, Moingona, - the French at first using the abbreviation "moire," and calling the river "la riviere des moires" and then, the name having become associated with the Trappist monks, changing it into "la riviere des moines."

  • The divisions again advanced at different hours, the 3rd at 9 A.M., the 2nd at 12:30 P.M., and the brigades and battalions also attacked in succession from the left, thus enabling all the artillery available to unite in covering the advance of each unit in turn.

  • Thereafter it was held in turn by Genoese, Tunisians and Algerines.

  • Homage was done not only by the vassal to whom feudal lands were first granted but by every one in turn by whom they were inherited, since they were not granted absolutely but only on condition of military and other service.

  • Now modern scholars have with varying success used in turn these three hypotheses with a view to the solution of the problems of the New Testament Apocalypse.

  • It might be supposed that all possible methods had now been considered, and that a combination of the three methods which have established their validity in relation to the interpretation of the Apocalypse would be adequate to the solution of all the problems of the book, but this is not so; for even when each in turn has vindicated the provinces in the book that rightly belong to it, and brought intelligibility into these areas, there still remain outlying regions which they fail to illumine.

  • m.) with depths down to 2200 fathoms. A rise between Spitsbergen and Greenland separates the Norwegian Trough (greatest depth 2005 fathoms in 68° 21' N., 2° 5' W.) which in turn is divided from the Atlantic by the Wyville Thomson Ridge which runs between the Faeroe and Shetland islands and is covered by only 314 fathoms of water at the deepest point.

  • The last elaboration of the insulated slip water-bottle by Ekman, Nansen and Pettersson has produced an instrument of great perfection, in which the insulation is effected by layers of water between a series of concentric ebonite cylinders, all of which are closed both above and below when the apparatus encloses a sample, and each of which in turn must be warmed considerably before there is any rise of temperature in the chamber within.

  • Two of the sons of Charles IV., Wenceslaus and Sigismund, succeeded in turn to the imperial throne, and one of his nephews, Jobst, margrave of Moravia, was chosen German king in opposition to Sigismund in 1410.

  • This led to the calling of the Annapolis convention of 1786, which in turn led to the calling of the Federal convention of 1787.

  • About 235 B.C. Mantineia entered the Achaean League, from which it had obtained protection against Spartan encroachments, but soon passed in turn to the Aetolians and to Cleomenes III.

  • bestowed it on his son John the Good, who, when he became king in turn (22nd of August 1350), gave the countship to his second son Louis I., raising it to a duchy in the peerage of France by letters patent of the 25th of October 1360.

  • Similarly from the side of logic. It is not the teaching of idealism alone but of the facts which logical analysis has brought home to us that all difference in the last resort finds its ground in the quality or content of the things differentiated, and that this difference of content shows in turn a double strand, the strand of sameness and the strand of otherness - that in which and that by which they differ from one another.

  • But the influence of Cluny, even on monasteries that did not enter into its organism, was enormous; many adopted Cluny customs and practices and moulded their life and spirit after the model it set; and many such monasteries became in turn centres of revival and reform in many lands, so that during the 10th and 11th centuries arose free unions of monasteries based on a common observance derived from a central abbey.

  • He was alternetely master of the Empire, and banished and confined to Italy; at one time taking up arms in alliance with his brothers and at another fighting against them; whilst the bounds of his appointed kingdom were in turn extended and reduced.

  • Terry, who in turn was shot and killed by a United States deputy marshall appointed to defend Justice Field against the carrying out of Terry's often-expressed threats.

  • The history of Berar belongs generally to that of the Deccan, the country falling in turn under the sway of the various dynasties which successively ruled in southern India, the first authentic records showing it to have been part of the Andhra or Satavahana empire.

  • The town suffered greatly during the Thirty Years' War, being held in turn by the various belligerents.

  • Forced asunder at the outset, each would (in all probability) fall back along his own line of communication, and the gap thus made between the allies would enable the emperor to manoeuvre between them and defeat them in turn.

  • He also defeated in turn the Chola, Pandya and Kerala kings, and by 630 was beyond dispute the most powerful sovereign in the Deccan.

  • These in turn led on to the Congregational Union of England and Wales, formed in 1832, and consisting at first of " County and District Associations, together with any ministers and churches of the Congregational Order recognized by an Association."

  • The Breviarium was enlarged and continued down to the time of Justinian by Paulus Diaconus; the work of the latter was in turn enlarged by Landolfus Sagax (c. i 000), and taken down to the time of the emperor Leo the Armenian (813-820) in the Historia Miscella.

  • This in turn was the foundation of another mode of conveyance, namely, lease and release, which took the place of the deed of bargain and sale, so far as regards freehold.

  • These combination tones will in turn react on the pressure and produce new combination tones with the original tones, or with each other, and such tones may be termed of the second, third, &c., order.

  • Francis, who did something to improve the administration of his duchy, was succeeded in turn by his two sons and his two grandsons; but on the death of Julius Francis, the younger of his grandsons, in 1689 the family became extinct.

  • Rudolph was followed in 1356 by his son Rudolph II., who had fought at the battle of Crecy; and who in turn was succeeded in 1370 by his halfbrother Wenceslaus.

  • For the administration of local government the state is divided into counties (64 in 1910) and these in turn are subdivided into townships and municipal corporations.

  • Thus one New Testament type is echoed in one and another in another; or it may be several in turn.

  • Lexington succeeded Sibley as the eastern terminus of the Santa Fe trade, and was in turn displaced by Independence; it long owed its prosperity to the freighting trade up the Missouri, and at the opening of the Civil War it was the most important river town between St Louis and St Joseph and commanded the approach by water to Fort Leavenworth.

  • He still, however, had no lack of patrons - he never had - though his perversity made him quarrel with all in turn.

  • It is now known, however, that" Siam "or" Sayam "is one of the most ancient names of the country, and that at least a thousand years ago it was in common use, such titles as Swankalok-Sukhotai, Shahr-i-nao, Dwarapuri, Ayuthia, the last sometimes corrupted to" Judea,"by which the kingdom has been known at various periods of its history, being no more than the names of the different capital cities whose rulers in turn brought the land under their sway.

  • From this contact came Ialdabaoth the Demiurgos, who in turn produced six powers and with them created the seven heavens and from the dregs of matter the Nous of serpent form, from whom are spirit and soul, evil and death.

  • He has many moods and each mood imprints itself in turn on his.

  • The tariff history of Germany, up to the foundation of the German Empire, is the history of the Zollverein or German customs union; and this in turn is closely connected with the tariff history of Prussia.

  • He proposed to divide the country into five circles, corresponding to the five provinces, each of which was to undertake to defend the realm in turn should occasion arise.

  • was in turn deposed in the following August and replaced by his brother, Abdul Hamid II.

  • This method was followed by that proposed by Gay-Lussac and Thenard, who decomposed molten caustic soda with red-hot iron; and this in turn was succeeded by Brunner's process of igniting sodium carbonate with charcoal.

  • A war of manoeuvre followed, each side being reduced in turn by successive detachments sent to aid Rosecrans and Bragg in the struggle for Tennessee.

  • In October Lee attempted a third Bull Run campaign on the same lines as the second, but Meade's steadiness foiled him, and he retired to the Rapidan again, where he in turn repulsed Meade's attempt to surprise him (Mine Run, November 26-28, 1863).

  • A red-hot iron rod may also be used to set off the magnesium, which in turn ignites the thermit.

  • Josephus in turn has another story wherein Moses leads the Egyptians against Ethiopia (Ant.

  • Andronicus Palaeologus Comnenus was Great Domestic under Theodore Lascaris and John Vatatzes; his eldest son by Irene Palaeologina, Michael (q.v.), became the eighth emperor of that name in 1260, and was in turn followed by his son Andronicus II.

  • The Uighurs, and in the 12th century the Kara-Khitai, took possession of it in turn.

  • Four years later, this in turn was divided into three counties, Jefferson, Lincoln and Fayette, but the name Kentucky was revived in 1782 and was given to the judicial district which was then organized for these three counties.

  • To obviate this the cunning workman devised a circular table, turning on a pivot, with seats affixed, at which the guests sat the one half in turn within, the other without, the hall "man against man."

  • They in turn are much hunted for the sake of their delicate flesh.

  • His sermons attracted wide attention in that community, and he gained a considerable reputation as a theologian and a controversialist by his publication in 1814 of a volume entitled Defence of Christianity, written in answer to a work, The Grounds of Christianity Examined (1813), by George Bethune English (1787-1828), an adventurer, who, born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was in turn a student of law and of theology, an editor of a newspaper, and a soldier of fortune in Egypt.

  • It was conquered by the Moors in 712, but these invaders were in turn dispossessed by the Spaniards and the troops of Charlemagne in 788.

  • He agreed to receive a British resident, and was in turn to receive a subsidy and support against foreign attack.

  • This magic bond was too strong for him until Ragnarok (Judgment Day), when he escaped and swallowed Odin and was in turn slain by Vidar, the latter's son.

  • He showed that from each individual shell of an ammonite the entire ancestral series may be reconstructed, and that, while the earlier shell-whorls retain the characters of the adults of preceding members of the series, a shell in its own adult stage adds a new character, which in turn becomes the pre-adult character of the types which will succeed it; finally, that this comparison between the revolutions of the life of an individual and the life of the entire order of ammonites is wonderfully harmonious and precise.

  • He was in turn vicar at Ware, Hertfordshire (1627-1633), and at Marston St Lawrence, Northamptonshire (1633-1637).

  • Two of his sons, Robert and Baldwin, became in turn emperors of Constantinople.

  • in a small piece of soft iron, as in the case of the corresponding ammeters, and this in turn may be made to displace an indicating needle over a scale so that corresponding to every given potential difference between the terminals of the instrument there is a corresponding fixed position of the needle on the scale.

  • In the first two centuries the rite is spoken of as an offering and as a bloodless sacrifice; but it is God's own creations, the bread and wine, alms and first-fruits, which, offered with a pure conscience, he receives as from friends, and bestows in turn on the poor; it is the praise and prayers which are the sacrifice.

  • In the East, even now, one who wishes to create a blood tie between himself and his followers and cement them to himself, makes under his left breast an incision from which they each in turn suck his blood.

  • The gens in turn was regarded as an expansion of the family, as was the state of the gens; and members of these larger units by worship of common ancestors - usually mythical - kept alive the feeling that they were a single organic whole animated by a common soul and joined in consanguinity.

  • I, 2) upon the power of the Federal government to lay direct taxes has been interpreted by the Supreme Court, by a bare majority, in such a way as to make very difficult, if not impossible, the imposition of an income tax (although, it may be added, such taxes had been unanimously held constitutional by the court in earlier decisions, which rested in turn upon interpretations of the constitutional provision just referred to given by the court when it counted among its members justices who had been members of the convention that framed the constitution).

  • Three Indian villages bore the name Chillicothe, each being in turn the chief town of the Chillicothe, one of the four tribal divisions of the Shawnee, in their retreat before the whites; the village near what is now Oldtown in Greene county was destro y ed by George Rogers Clark in 1780; that in Miami county, where Piqua is now, was destroyed by Clark in 1782; and the Indian village near the present Chillicothe was destroyed in 1787 by Kentuckians.

  • The Dominion government makes in turn to one of the chief local agricultural exhibition societies a grant of $50,000 for the purposes of the national representation of agriculture and live-stock.

  • The woollen trade once promised to reach considerable dimensions, but towards the end of the 18th century was superseded by the linen (for which flax came to be largely grown); and when this in turn collapsed before the products of the mills of Dundee, Dunfermline and Glasgow, straw-plaiting was taken up, though only to be killed in due time by the competition of the south.

  • is called the Chattooga; this unites with the Tallulah to form the Tugaloo, which in turn unites with the Kiowee to form the Savannah proper.

  • But the king required his courtiers, and his courtiers in turn needed their servants in permanent attendance.

  • 25), transcriptions (the first form modified by reference to the etymology) of the Greek Alec-alas, (Mevias, Meador), which in turn represents the Aramaic K,47?

  • Burrard was in turn superseded by Sir Hew Dalrymple, and the campaign ended with the convention of Cintra, which provided for the evacuation of Portugal by the French, but gave Junot's troops a free return to France.

  • californicus, form a second sub-group; while these are in turn followed by the American hare (L.

  • By this agreement the greater part of the duchy, with its capital at Celle, came to William (1535-1592), the younger of the brothers, who gave laws to his land and added to its area; and this duchy of LUneburg-Celle was subsequently ruled in turn by four of his sons: Ernest II.

  • Froude; but he in turn was compelled to suspend the issue.

  • Just as in Anglo-Saxon lands a national ideal is gradually materializing in the principle of the equalization of chances for all citizens, so in continental Europe, along with this equalization of chances, has still more rapidly developed the ideal of an equalization of obligations, which in turn leads to the claim for an enlargement of political rights co-extensive with the obligations.

  • The idea of " spheres of influence " has in turn been applied even to more settled and civilized countries, such as China and Persia.

  • The difficulty that a number of spectroscopic lines seem to involve at least an equal number of electrons may be got over by imagining that the atom may present several positions of equilibrium to the electron, which it may occupy in turn.

  • The quarterly or circuit meetings were in turn organized into twelve districts, eleven in England and one in China.

  • In the Hellenistic period Corcyra was exposed to attack from several sides; after a vain siege by Cassander it was occupied in turn by Agathocles and Pyrrhus.

  • During the break-up of the Later Roman Empire it was occupied by Genoese privateers (1197-1207) who in turn were expelled by the Venetians.

  • He therefore bought back the sheets, says Calamy, for an old song, bound them and sold them in his own shop. This in turn was complained of, and he had to beg pardon on his knees before the council-table; and the remaining copies were sentenced to be "bisked," or rubbed over with an inky brush, and sent back to the kitchen for lighting fires.

  • If Spain could gain this Alpine valley her territories would touch those of Austria, so that the Habsburgs north of the Alps could send troops to the aid of their Spanish cousins against Venice, and Spain in turn could help to subdue the Protestant princes of Germany in the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648).

  • Economic distress increased the number of highway robberies, these in turn lamed commercial intercourse.

  • About that time parts of a confederation of tribes which had taken the name of Shammar from a moun tain in their neighbourhood, moved northwards from Central Arabia in search of better pasture, &c. Successfully displacing their forerunners, they made themselves at home in the Syrian steppe - until their possession was in turn disputed by a later emigrant from Arabia, for whom they finally made room by moving on into Mesopotamia, over which they spread, driving before them their predecessors the Tai (whose name the Mesopotamian Aramaeans had adopted as a designation for Arab in general), partly north of the Sinjar, partly over the Tigris.

  • To the great powers Phoenician ships and sailors were indispensable; Sennacherib, Psammetichus and Necho, Xerxes, Alexander, all in turn employed them for their transports and sea-fights.

  • In the present article, periscopes for land service and those forming part of the equipment of submarines will be described in turn.

  • seen that each stud is in turn both a field plate and a carrier having a charge induced on it, and then passing on in turn induces further charges on other studs.

  • It was an electrostatic and electromagnetic machine combined, driven by an electric current and producing in turn electrostatic charges of electricity.

  • Mr Beach told his local M.P., who in turn told the Home Secretary, and the latter asked Mr Beach to arrange for further information.

  • Upon these clay-lands (kwelders) horses, cattle and sheep are at last able to pasture at low tide, and in course of time they are in turn endiked.

  • It is therefore very improper that one man should be considered fit to discharge the duties of both, and that by this means the ecclesiastical order should interfere with the monastic life, and the rule of the monastic life in turn interfere with the interests of the churches."

  • Indeed it was the use of water-power that gave the smith pressure strong enough to force his blast up through a longer column of ore and fuel, and thus enabled him to increase the height of his forge, enlarge the scale of his operations, and in turn save fuel and labour.

  • Both created a great demand for iron, not only for themselves but for the industries which they in turn stimulated; and both directly aided the iron master: the steam engine by giving him powerful and convenient tools, and the railroad by assembling his materials and distributing his products.

  • The tenacity or tensile strength increases till the carbon-content reaches about 1.25%, and the cementite about 19%, and then in turn falls, a result by no means surprising.

  • As the temperature now falls past 690°, this hardenite mother-metal in turn splits up, after the fashion of eutectics, into alternate layers of ferrite and cementite grouped together as pearlite, so that the mass as a whole now becomes a mixture of pearlite with cementite.

  • Again, as the temperature in turn falls past Ar l this hardenite mother-metal splits up into cementite and ferrite grouped together as pearlite, with the resulting recalescence, and the mass, as shown in Alloys, Pl., fig.

  • Below this level the solid charge descends easily, because it consists of coke alone or nearly alone, and this in turn because the temperature here is so high as to melt not only the iron now deoxidized and brought to the metallic state, but also the gangue of the ore and the limestone, which here unite to form the molten slag, and run freely down between the lumps of coke.

  • To this objection it may in turn be answered that, though this degree of freedom of descent may suffice for a slowrunning furnace, particularly if the slag is given such a composition that it passes quickly from the solid state to one of decided fluidity, yet it is not enough for swift-running ones, especially if the composition of the slag is such that, in melting, it remains long in a very sticky condition.

  • Moreover, the quality of the resultant steel depends upon the temperature of the process, and this in turn depends upon the proportion of silicon, the combustion of which is the chief source of the heat developed.

  • This bloom is immediately rolled down into a long flat bar, called " muck bar," and this in turn is cut into short lengths which, piled one on another, are reheated and again rolled down, sometimes with repeated cutting, FIG.

  • 16) in which this wonderful process is carried out is a huge retort, lined with clay, dolomite or other refractory material, hung aloft and turned on trunnions, DD, through the right-hand one of which the blast is carried to the gooseneck E, which in turn delivers it to the tuyeres Q at the bottom.

  • Later, when most of it has been oxidized, the carbon begins to oxidize to carbonic oxide, which in turn burns.

  • Mushet's aid was certainly valuable, but not more than Goransson's, who, besides thus offering a preventive of redshortness, further helped the process on by raising its temperature by the simple expedient of further subdividing the blast, thus increasing the surface of contact between blast and metal, and thus in turn hastening the oxidation.

  • Let us consider these in turn.

  • This in turn is in part because of the greater care which can be used in making these small lots, but probably in chief part because the crucible process excludes the atmospheric nitrogen, which injures the metal, and because it gives a good opportunity for the suspended slag and iron oxide to rise to the surface.

  • Of these several qualities which cast iron may have, fluidity is given by keeping the sulphur-content low and phosphoruscontent high; and this latter element must be kept low if shock is to be resisted; but strength, hardness, endurance of shock, density and expansion in solidifying are controlled essentially by the distribution of the carbon between the states of graphite and cementite, and this in turn is controlled chiefly by the proportion of silicon, manganese and sulphur present, and in many cases by the rate of cooling.

  • 3), increases with the carboncontent till this reaches about 1.25%, and then in turn decreases (fig.

  • To sum this up, as graphite is replaced by carbon combined as cementite, the hardness, brittleness and density increase, and the expansion in solidification decreases, in both cases continuously, while the tensile strength increases till the combined carbon-content rises a little above I %, and then in turn decreases.

  • This in turn is because the direct pull of the pincers on the protruding end of the wire is much stronger than the forward-drawing pull due to the friction of the cold rolls on the wire, which is necessarily cold because of its small section.

  • As this in turn has been due to the very men who have developed the iron industry, it can hardly be questioned that, on further analysis, this development must in considerable part be referred to racial qualities.

  • The slopes below Velletri, on the other hand, derive much of their moisture from the space between the inner and outer ring of the Alban volcano, which it was impossible to drain: and this in turn receives much moisture from the basin of the extinct inner crater.'

  • He entered into relations with the eastern empire, and swore a "perpetual peace" with the emperor Heraclius; and it is probable that the two sovereigns took common measures against the Slav and Bulgarian tribes, which ravaged in turn the Byzantine state and the German territories subject to the Franks.

  • It was supposed that Moab, having expelled the aboriginal giants, was in turn displaced by the Amorite king Sihon, who forced Moab south of the Arnon (Wadi MOjib, a natural boundary) and drove Ammon beyond the Jabbok.

  • The right of presentation may be exercised by its owner whether he be an infant, executors, trustees, coparceners (who, if they cannot agree, present in turn in order of age) or mortgagee (who must present the nominee of the mortgagor), or a bankrupt (who, although the advowson belongs to his creditors, yet has the right to present to a vacancy).

  • and Charles IV., succeeded in turn to the throne of France, and a daughter, Isabella, married Edward II.

  • (six truck loads); these are rapidly hoisted to the surface, where their contents are automatically dumped into side-tipping trucks, and these in turn are drawn away in a continual procession by an endless wire rope along the tram lines leading to the vast " distributing floors."

  • It consists mainly of maxims which may be described in turn as moral, utilitarian and secular.

  • This conception led Kekule to his "closed-chain" or "ring" theory of the constitution of benzene which has been called the "most brilliant piece of prediction to be found in the whole range of organic chemistry," and this in turn led in particular to the elucidation of the constitution of the "aromatic compounds," and in general to new methods of chemical synthesis and decomposition, and to a deeper insight into the composition of numberless organic bodies and their mutual relations.

  • 21 sqq.), in which it is formally laid down that the tithe is a tribute paid to the Levites, who in turn pay a tithe of it to the priests.

  • By her he had four sons, two of whom, Louis and Henry Raspe, succeeded their father in turn as landgrave.

  • Within the next few days large numbers of Confederate volunteers assembled here; and Harper was succeeded in command (27th April) by "Stonewall" Jackson, who was in turn succeeded by Brigadier-General Joseph E.

  • The cycloid was a famous curve in those days; it had been discussed by Galileo, Descartes, Fermat, Roberval and Torricelli, who had in turn exhausted their skill upon it.

  • Near the present site in 1643 colonists from Sweden built Fort Elfsborg; but the Swedish settlers in 1655 submitted to the Dutch at New Amsterdam, and the latter in turn surrendered to the English in 1664.

  • Never before had a pope ventured to take so bold a step. It was ~ithin the memory even of young men that a German king had dismissed three popes, and had raised in turn four of his own prelates to the Roman see.

  • Of the numerous groups composing the German parliament no one ever secured a majority, and in the absence of such a majority the imperial government, practically independent of parliament, knew how to secure its assent to its measures by a process of bargaining with each group in turn.

  • Marie's one attempt to interfere in politics, an effort to prevent the disgrace of the duke of Bourbon, was the beginning of her husband's alienation from her; and after the birth of her seventh child Louise, Marie was practically deserted by Louis, who openly avowed his liaison with Louise de Nesle, comtesse de Mailly, who was replaced in turn by her sisters Pauline marquise de Vintimille, and Marie Anne, duchess de Chateauroux, and these by Madame de Pompadour.

  • On the disintegration of the empire, it fell into the hands of the Visigoths, who, in spite of the attacks of the Franks, especially in 585, retained possession till 724, when they were expelled by the Arabs, destined in turn to yield before long to Pippin the Short.

  • As in India, the village with its lands and cultivation was constituted the unit of assessment, and the provinces were divided into districts under native headmen responsible for the collection of the tax, and its payment to the paramount chief, who in turn rendered the assigned share to district and village chiefs, to the officers of state recognized by government and to the government itself.

  • From 1018 the relations of C, D, E become too complicated to be expressed by any formula; sometimes all three agree together, sometimes all three are independent; in other places each pair in turn agree against the third.

  • This was largely based on Gibson's edition, and was in turn the basis of Dr Giles' translation, published in 1847, and often reprinted.

  • Lacerta in turn has become, in Spanish, lagarto, which, with the article, el lagarto, is the origin of the term "alligator."

  • In each temple the priests were divided into four orders (until Ptolemy Euergetes added a fifth), each of which served in turn.

  • Aided by an Athenian force, Inaros slew the satrap Achaemenes at the battle of Papremis and destroyed his army; but the garrison of Memphis held out, and a fresh host from Persia raised the siege and in turn besieged the Greek and Egyptian forces on the island of Papremis.

  • Hagar in turn personifies a people found to the east of Gilead (1 Chron.

  • 2 So Hitzig (Ostern and Pfcngsten im zweiten Dekalog, Heidelberg, 1838), independently of a previous suggestion of Goethe in 1783, who in turn appears to.

  • From a comparison of those Euchlorophyceae which have been most closely investigated, it appears probable that sexual reproductive cells have in the course of evolution arisen as the result of specialization among asexual reproductive cells, and that in turn oogamous reproduction has arisen as the result of differentiation of the two conjugating cells into the smaller male gamete and the larger male gamete.

  • In a few minutes the surplus hydrated calcium sulphate is deposited from the solution, and the water is capable again of dissolving 2CaS04 H 2 O, which in turn is fully hydrated and deposited as CaS04.2H20.

  • The burgraviate of Magdeburg was held by several countly families in turn until 1269, when it was purchased by Archbishop Conrad II., who, however, soon sold it.

  • South-eastern Greece and the Peloponnesus show (in their sequence of pottery fabrics): (i.) An Early Bronze Age culture (black-varnish ware, Urfirnis) similar to that of the Cyclades and Crete but of meaner development, which was dominated in turn by (ii.) its more progressive neighbours of the Cyclades (dull-paint ware, Mattmalerei) and perhaps of Asia (Minyan ware), and ultimately (iii.) of Crete (Mycenaean).

  • The raj was founded in 1657 by Abu Ra Kapur, of the Kapur Khatri family of Kotli in Lahore, Punjab, whose descendants served in turn the Mogul emperors and the British government.

  • Begun in 1818 it was completed in 1822, and in 1849 was vested in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company, which in turn was absorbed by the North British Railway Company in 1865.

  • The town lay below the modern high-road and was laid out on a rectangular plan divided by main streets into eight quarters, and these in turn into blocks or insulae.

  • Later the Portiuncula church at Assisi displaced all other religious resorts, with the exception of Rome; but in the 15th century it was overshadowed in turn by the "Holy House" at Loretto on the Adriatic. According to an extravagant legend, the house of Joseph and Mary in Nazareth was transported by angels, on the night of the 9th - 10th of May 1291 to Dalmatia, then brought to the Italian coast opposite (Dec. 10, 1294), till, on the 7th of September 1295 it found rest on its present site.

  • The members are elected by the various diocesan conferences, which are in turn elected by the laity of their respective parishes or rural deaneries.

  • Above the mouth of the Daule the river is known as the Bodegas, which in turn is formed by the confluence of the Babahoyo and the Vinces.

  • Considerations of weight had long prevented Lavoisier from accepting this doctrine, but he was now able to explain the process fully, showing that the hydrogen evolved did not come from the metal itself, but was one product of the decomposition of the water of the dilute acid, the other product, oxygen, combining with the metal to form an oxide which in turn united with the acid.

  • A paper discovered many years after his death showed that he had anticipated later thinkers in explaining the cyclical process of animal and vegetable life, for he pointed out that plants derive their food from the air, from water, and in general from the mineral kingdom, and animals in turn feed on plants or on other animals fed by plants, while the materials thus taken up by plants and animals are restored to the mineral kingdom by the breaking-down processes of fermentation, putrefaction and combustion.

  • He flattered in turn Saint Just and the Terrorists, the Thermidorians and the Directors, and played always for his own hand - a strange egoist who rose to fame as the leader of an idealist and sentimental crusade.

  • This cathedral was in turn destroyed by Saladin.

  • It seems therefore consonant alike with prudence and reverence to refrain from attempting to combine afresh into a single picture the materials derivable from the various documents, and to endeavour instead to describe the main contents of the sources from which our knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ as an historical personage is ultimately drawn, and to observe the picture of Him which each writer in turn has offered to us.

  • When they refused to answer His question as to the authority of John the Baptist He in turn refused to tell them His own.

  • - We have now examined in turn the two earliest pictures which have been preserved to us of the life of Jesus Christ.

  • This in turn is followed by the most characteristic section of his Gospel (ix.

  • In section the isle is seen to possess a threefold character: there is first a basement of tufa, from which rise, secondly, colonnades of basalt in pillars forming the faces and walls of the principal caves, and these in turn are overlaid, thirdly, by a mass of amorphous basalt.

  • That the Greek was in turn derived from a Semitic original was denied by Hilgenfeld, Volkmar and others.

  • From 1876 almost until his death he was connected with the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, being in turn a fellow, an associate in history (1878-1883), an associate professor (1883-1891) and after 1891 professor of American and institutional history.

  • Syria could control the situation, and it in turn was influenced by the ambitions of Assyria, to whose advantage it was when the small states were rent by mutual suspicion and hostility.

  • As a matter of fact the prophets Jeremiah and Ezekiel by no means regarded the population lying to the north of Judah as strangers, and the latter in turn were ready to share the Judaean distress at the fall of Jerusalem (Jer.

  • Bribery, fraud, even violence, have in turn been employed to serve the end in view: and churches, chapels and monasteries, most of them in the worst architectural taste, have sprung up like mushrooms over the surface of the country, and are perpetuating the memory of pseudo-sanctuaries which from every point of view were best relegated to oblivion.

  • Kanem, a country north of Bagirmi and subject in turn to it and to Wadai, was at the same time brought under French control.

  • When pressed in turn by their old foes the Argives were among the first to call in Philip of Macedon, who reinstated them in Cynuria after becoming master of Greece.

  • By this elevation "Madagascar would join the Seychelles, which in turn ...

  • These editions were based in part upon the editor's personal investigations of manuscript sources in France and elsewhere, and supplanted the well-known, long serviceable, but less accurate edition of Jared Sparks (Boston, 1836-1840); they have in turn been supplanted by the edition of A.

  • As they proceed southwards, their best marked ranges are in turn known as the Safed Koh, the Suliman and the Hala mountains.

  • In 272 B.C. he in turn was succeeded by Asoka, the Buddhist emperor, the religious side of whose reign has already been described.

  • 642 the Pallavas defeated in turn Pulikesin II.

  • These, falling in turn on the lens of the human eye, are converged by it and form an image on the retina.

  • in diameter, should be raised and lowered by water power, under control of the observer by means of electric keys which act on secondary mechanism that in turn works the valves and reversing gear of the water engines.

  • Innocent IV., in his determination to crush the Hohenstaufens, offered the kingdom in turn to Richard, earl of Cornwall, to Edward, son of Henry III.

  • After being sacked in turn by Mansfeld, Tilly and the Spaniards, it was taken by Oxenstierna in 1632, who held a convention here with his German allies.

  • GEORGE LOCKHART (1673-1731), of Carnwath, Scottish writer and politician, was a member of a Lanarkshire family tracing descent from Sir Simon Locard (the name being originally territorial, de Loch Ard), who is said to have accompanied Sir James Douglas on his expedition to the East with the heart of Bruce, which relic, according to Froissart, Locard brought home from Spain when Douglas fell in battle against the Moors, and buried in Melrose Abbey; this incident was the origin of the "man's heart within a fetterlock" borne on the Lockhart shield, which in turn perhaps led to the altered spelling of the surname.

  • Under the terms of this the consuls, who were optimates, bound themselves to betray their party by securing, apparently fraudulently, the election of the candidates while they in turn bound themselves to procure two ex-consuls who would swear that they were present in the senate when supplies were voted for the consular provinces, though no meeting of the senate had been held, and three augurs who would swear that a lex curiata had been passed, though the comitia curiata had not been convened (Att.

  • This led to the Annapolis convention of 1786, and that in turn led to the Philadelphia convention of 1787.

  • Less familiar to modern ears is the contention that proof needs a standard or criterion, while this standard or criterion in turn needs proof.

  • 3 Does the existence of God in turn call for proof?

  • It rested these in turn upon a general induction enumerative in character of enormous and practically infinite range and always uncontradicted.

  • The limitations of this in turn cause a contradiction to emerge, and the process needs repetition.

  • It was then discharged through the regenerator, depositing heat for the next charge of air in turn to take up. The indicator diagram approximated to a form made up of two isothermal lines and two lines of constant pressure.

  • In the following year he returned to Baden and took a conspicuous part in the more serious operations of the second outbreak under General Louis Mieroslawski (1814-1878.) Sigel subsequently lived in Switzerland, England and the United States, whither he emigrated in 1852, the usual life of a political exile, working in turn as journalist and schoolmaster, and both at New York and St Louis, whither he removed in 1858, he conducted military journals.

  • Day, who in turn was followed in September 1898 by John Hay; secretary of the treasury, Lyman J.

  • 3 In Egypt, he superseded the sage Imhotep at Memphis, and at the temple sacred to Aesculapius and Hygieia at Ptolemais the money-box has been found with the upper part in the form of a great snake .4 Finally among the Phoenicians he was identified with Eshmun, an earlier god of healing, who in turn was already closely associated with Dionysus and with Caelestis-Astarte.'

  • The shrine is famous for its cures, and when the saint has his serpent-festival on the first Thursday in May, Serpari or serpent-men carry coils of live reptiles in procession before his image, which in turn is hung with serpents of all sizes.

  • The Old Testament, allegorically explained, became the substitute for the outgrown mythology; intellectual activity revived; the new facts gained predominant influence in philosophy, and in turn were shaped according to its canons.

  • After this plague only appeared in the south-east of Europe, where in turn it gradually died away during the first half of the 19th century.

  • The argument of these books, however, depends in turn upon the assumption of a benevolent Creator desirous of communicating with His creatures for their good; and the Natural Theology, by applying the argument from design to prove the existence of such a Deity, becomes the foundation of the argumentative edifice.

  • The government of the country was in the hands of the London Company, which in turn committed administrative and local affairs to a governor and council who were to reside in the colony.

  • The governor called an extra session of the legislature soon after the Federal election, and this in turn called a Convention to meet on the 13th of February 1861.

  • 91 or 92) may be found,by considering each fixed in turn and then tracing out the locus of the instantaneous axis.

  • In 288 Lysimachus and Pyrrhus in turn invaded Macedonia, and drove Demetrius out of the country.

  • casecchino), rather than vice versa, and this in turn from an Arabic kazayand (Pers.

  • One night, having quitted a festive company because, from want of skill, he could not comply with the demand made of each guest in turn to sing to the harp, he sought his bed and fell asleep. He dreamed that there appeared to him a stranger, who addressed him by his name, and commanded him to sing of "the beginning of created things."

  • These in turn split into two principal groups - the Adoptianists and the Modalists - the former holding Christ to be the man chosen of God, on whom the Holy Spirit rested in a quite unique sense, and who after toil and suffering, through His oneness of will with God, became divine, the latter maintaining Christ to be a manifestation of God Himself.

  • Thomson also developed this hypothesis in a profoundly interesting manner, and we may therefore summarize very briefly the views held on the nature of electricity and matter at the beginning of the 10th century by saying that the term electricity had come to be regarded, in part at least, as a collective name for electrons, which in turn must be considered as constituents of the chemical atom, furthermore as centres of certain lines of self-locked and permanent strain existing in the universal aether or electromagnetic medium.

  • Coleman in turn informed the duke, and he, since the immediate exposure of the plot was of the utmost consequence to him, induced Charles to compel Oates to appear (28th September) before the privy council.

  • There were two type beds and two inking tables, which travelled backwards and forwards, and one platen only, situated in the middle of the machine, which in turn gave the needful impression as the type-formes passed underneath.

  • The results from this press were, at the time, considered fairly satisfactory, the number of copies (about 8000) printed per hour from one type-forme having been materially increased by the employing of the eight different stations to feed the sheets in, all of which in turn were printed from the same single type surface.

  • After the impression is made the sheet is seized by another set of fingers and is transferred to a second and smaller cylinder over the larger one, and this smaller cylinder or drum delivers the sheet to the " flyer," or delivery apparatus, which in turn deposits it upon the table.

  • With this object he formed a national party among the Hindus of the Deccan, and opposed in turn the vassal power of Bijapur and the imperial armies of the Mogul of Delhi.

  • They were slain by a dragon, which was in turn destroyed by Cadmus; and by the instructions of Athena he sowed its teeth in the ground, from which there sprang a race of fierce armed men, called Sparti (sown).

  • In addition to the prerogatives commonly invested in his office, the president is authorized to supervise the judiciary, to nominate candidates for the higher ecclesiastical offices, to intervene in the enforcement of ecclesiastical decrees, papal bulls, &c., to exercise supervisory police powers, and to appoint the intendants of provinces and the governors of departments, who in turn appoint the sub-delegates and inspectors of subordinate political divisions.

  • the combatants in turn seemed at one time sure to be the final conqueror.

  • Azad was no longer in a position to oppose him in the field, and he in turn became master of every place of importance in the province, while Azad had to seek assistance in vainfirst from the pasha of Baghdad, and then from his former enemy, the tsar of Georgia.

  • This depression was in considerable measure due to, and was largely aggravated by, the comparative inactivity of the Rand mines, and that inactivity was due in turn to the insufficiency of native labour - Kaffirs being employed to do all the unskilled work on the mines.

  • In the Peloponnesian War the Thebans, embittered by the support which Athens gave to the smaller Boeotian towns, and especially to Plataea, which they vainly attempted to reduce in 431, were firm allies of Sparta, which in turn helped them to besiege Plataea and allowed them to destroy the town after capture (427).

  • When Warwick was in turn defeated by the king's forces at Stamford.

  • Orestes, according to Zielinski, is the son of the sky-god Zeus-Agamemnon, who overcomes his wife the earth-goddess Gaia-Clytaemnestra; with the assistance of the dragon Aegisthus, she slays her husband, whose murder is in turn avenged by his son.

  • For the world which has grown up will in turn decay.

  • For this the Stoics substituted four summa genera, all subordinate, so that each in turn is more precisely determined by the next.

  • As yet, no doubt, the rapporteur only gave his opinion on the case which he had prepared, but after 1336 all those who formed part of the chamber were put on the same footing, taking it in turn to report and giving judgment as a whole.

  • It had no definite membership, but the conseillers lais served in it in turn.

  • The Bolivian general was now in turn to invade Peru, when Chile again interfered to prevent him.

  • If We Assume M A Tx.E.Vz.A", We Have, Considering In Turn Length, Time And Mass, Y 3Z U=O, 2X 2Y=O, X Z=I; So That Y= X, Z =1 X, U=3 2X.

  • Lucullus in the government of Cilicia and the command of the war against Mithradates, but as he did absolutely nothing and was unable to control the soldiery, he was in turn superseded by Pompey according to the provisions of the Manilian law.

  • The revolt of the Jews under Trajan, and earthquakes in the time of Constantius and Constantine the Great helped in turn to destroy it.

  • For purposes of local government the state is divided into eighty-three counties, each of which is in turn divided regularly by N.

  • The fire assay for copper ores was abandoned years ago and the electrolytic method took its place; this in turn is now largely replaced by volumetric methods.

  • The classical purity of his style, the eloquence of his speeches, the skill with which he depicted the play of emotion, and his masterly portraiture of great men, are all in turn warmly commended, and in our own day we question if any ancient historian is either more readable or more widely read.

  • Chilperic, king at Paris, and King Gontran of Burgundy, sought alliance with Childebert, who was adopted by both in turn.

  • The Latin argentum is cognate with the Greek iip y yupos, silver, which in turn is derived from ap-yos, shining.

  • It communicates with the Grand Parade and this in turn with Great George's Street, to the west, and the South Mall to the east, the last containing the principal banks, the County Club house, and good commercial buildings.

  • He achieved little success, but made himself detested by his insolence and profligacy, and was in turn replaced by Chares.

  • The Mesozoic rocks of New South Wales begin with the Narrabeen Shales; they are covered by the Hawkesbury Sandstones, which are well exposed around Sydney; and they in turn are covered by the Wianamatta Shales.

  • The movements to be registered are transferred to the style or pen by one or more levers, and the pen in turn transfers them to the cylinder, where they appear as legible tracings.

  • Here the cork, in falling, acts upon the feathers (which are to all 'f intents and purposes wings), g and these in turn act upon FIG.

  • This detachment in turn followed up its advantage until as Francis himself expressed it, "the whole camp turned out" to aid the landsknechts and "hunted out" the Swiss.

  • The waters of City Creek were at first diverted and a canal was built; and the results were encouraging, though in the summer of 1848 crops were destroyed by a swarm of black crickets; but in turn this pest was devoured by sea-gulls, and the phrase " gulls and crickets " has become one of peculiar historic significance in Utah.

  • Though the nominal commanders of the army which captured Delhi were in turn Barnard, Reed and Wilson, the policy thus stated by Canning and Lawrence was really carried out by their subordinates - Baird Smith, Nicholson and Chamberlain.

  • After the cambium has been active for some time producing secondary xylem and phloem, the latter consisting of sievetubes, phloem-parenchyma and frequently thick-walled fibres, a second cambium is developed in the pericycle; this produces a second vascular zone, which is in turn followed by a third cambium, and so on, until several hollow cylinders are developed.

  • In order to recover the original text, it is from time to time necessary to retranslate the Ethiopic into Greek, and the latter in turn into Aramaic or Hebrew.

  • But the work there was not to his liking, and after a short time he gave it up for an instructorship in natural science at the university of Wooster, Ohio, which in turn he resigned in order to return to Troy as assistant professor of physics.

  • Women hold spinning-parties at which the leader begins a ballad, and each in turn contributes a verse.

  • A scion of the rival Cantacuzenian family was elected by the pasha's orders, and he, after exhausting the principality for the benefit of the Divan, was in turn deposed and executed in 1716.

  • He was a member in turn of the universities of Oxford and Paris, and finally settled in Lombardy, where, thanks to the favour of Gian Galeazzo Visconti, he became bishop, first of Piacenza, then of Vincenza, then of Novara, and afterwards archbishop of Milan.

  • These are overlain, perhaps unconformably, by a great thickness of lavas and volcanic breccias (Pniel volcanic series, Beer Vley and Zeekoe Baard amygdaloids), and these in turn by the quartzites, grits and shales of the Black Reef series.

  • Mecca in fact lies in the heart of a mass of rough hills, intersected by a labyrinth of narrow valleys and passes, and projecting into the Tehama or low country on the Red Sea, in front of the great mountain wall that divides the coast-lands from the central plateau, though in turn they are themselves separated from the sea by a second curtain of hills forming the western wall of the great Wadi Marr.

  • the kin of Ghalib and the house of Ibn`Aun - to assert the right of designating or removing the sherif, to whom in turn he owed the possibility of maintaining, with the aid of considerable pensions, the semblance of his much-prized lordship over the holy cities.

  • As the uppermost compartment fills, the weights end of the beam rises, and by means of a vertical rod suc - cessively operates on detents connected with the rotation of the two brushes, and stops them in turn.

  • These latter are in turn embraced by the couples of the tertiary cycle of mesenteries, and new septa are formed in the exocoeles on either side of them, and so forth.

  • C. Rives in 1831, by which France had bound herself to pay an indemnity of twenty-five millions of francs for French spoliations of American shipping chiefly under the Berlin and Milan decrees, and the United States in turn agreed to pay to France 1,500,000 francs in satisfaction of French claims. Livingston's negotiations were conducted with excellent judgment, but the French Chamber of Deputies refused to make an appropriation to pay the first instalment due under the treaty in 1833, relations between the two governments became strained, and Livingston was finally instructed to close the legation and return to America.

  • of Jones's Falls is known as East Baltimore, and is in turn nominally divided into Fells' Point to the S.

  • in 1292, which in turn was superseded in 1535 by the valuation, made by commissioners appointed by Henry VIII., known as the King's Books, which was confirmed on the accession of Elizabeth and is still that by which the clergy are rated.

  • 1) which makes the prophet a contemporary of King Josiah (c. 637), and this in turn appears to agree (a) with the internal conditions (i.

  • It is generally supposed that it was in turn adopted by the Turks after the capture of Constantinople in 1453, either as a badge of triumph, or to commemorate a partial eclipse of the moon on the night of the final attack.

  • the first was to keep his own position safe by playing off France against the Empire and Spain; the second was to get commercial advantages by dangling his alliance before each power in turn.

  • And it is pointed out that during the years of the cardinals ascendancy the alliance of England was sought in turn by the great princes of the continent, and proved the make-weight in the scales.

  • They in turn petitioned the crown to abandon the Spanish alliance, which they regarded as the source of all the mischief.

  • Charles, who might reasonably have exerted himself to secure a fair liberty for all opinions, promoted these unpopular divines to bishoprics and livings, and the divines in turn exalted the royal prerogative above parliamentary rights.

  • Then followed two years of fruitless negotiation, in which after the Scots abandoned the king to the English parliament, the army took him out of the hands of the parliament, whilst each in turn tried to find some basis of arrangement on which he might reign without ruling.

  • In this way, the majority felt an interest in supporting the men who embodied their own opinions, and fell in turn under the influence of those who held them with greater prudence or ability than fell to the lot of the average members of the House.

  • The increasing weight of taxation gave rise in 1780 to a great meeting of the freeholders of Yorkshire, which in turn gave the signal for a general agitation for the reduction of unnecessary expense in the government.

  • North of the Aland Haf a ridge defines the southern edge of another depression, the Bothnian Sea, which in turn is separated from the most northerly division, the Gulf of Bothnia, by a ridge across the narrow Quarken or Kvarken Strait.

  • In Douglas Street is an unpretentious building used in turn as a church, a raadzaal, a court-house and a museum.

  • When the Church in turn began to produce a theology of her own she was imitating as well as guarding against those wayward spirits.

  • To this policy of dependence upon Rome Antipater adhered, and he succeeded in commending himself to Mark Antony and Caesar in turn.

  • In 1042 Melfi was chosen as the Norman capital, and in September of that year the Normans elected as their count William " Iron Arm," who was succeeded in turn by his brothers Drogo, " comes Normannorum totius Apuliae et Calabriae," and.

  • appointed him to the bishopric of Oxford in 1686, and he in turn forwarded the king's policy, especially by defending; the royal right to appoint Roman Catholics to office.

  • The estate, originally called "Little Hunting Creek Plantation," was devised in 1676 by John Washington (the first of the family in America) to his son, Lawrence, who in turn devised it to his daughter, Mildred, by whom (and her husband Roger Gregory) it was deeded in 1726 to her brother Augustine (George Washington's father).

  • The harbour, originally constructed and maintained by the abbots, by an agreement between the burgesses and John Gedy, the abbot in 1394, was replaced by one more commodious in 1725, which in turn was enlarged and improved in 1844.

  • They were preparing to storm the fortified houses when they were in turn attacked and driven off by a force of militia.

  • The tribesmen owed fealty only to their chiefs, who in turn owed a kind of conditional allegiance to the over-king, depending a good deal upon the ability of the latter to enforce it.

  • The latter in turn acted in similar capacities with the Irish-Norwegian chiefs, Irish tribes often forming part of the Scandinavian armies in Britain.

  • In the middle section the Santee river is formed by the confluence of the Wateree, which is known in North Carolina as the Catawba, and the Congaree, which is in turn formed by the Broad and the Saluda, and the basin of this system embraces about one-half the area of the state.

  • On the Georgia border the Chattooga river, rising in the Blue Ridge, becomes tributary to the Tugaloo, which in turn becomes tributary to the Savannah.

  • The marshes which line the Save below Sissek are often impassable except at Brod and Mitrovica, and the river is constantly scooping out fresh channels in the soft soil, only to abandon each in turn.

  • These were in turn expelled from Croatia by the Croats, a Slavonic people from the western Carpathians, who, according to some authorities, had occupied the territories of the Marcomanni in Bohemia, and been driven thence in the 6th century by the Czechs.

  • 396 Alaric destroyed the city and at a later period Laconia was invaded and settled by Slavonic tribes, especially the Melings and Ezerits, who in turn had to give way before the advance of the Byzantine power, though preserving a partial independence in the mountainous regions.

  • It is formed by a widening out of the eastern axis of high ground, which becomes subdivided into a number of zones running north and south and consisting in turn of ranges, tablelands and depressions.

  • The latter, having vanquished the two former at Latofao in 596, was in turn beaten by them at Dormelles in 600, and a year later a fresh fratricidal struggle broke out between the two grandsons of the agedBrunhilda.

  • It follows then that if a stream of light be incident at the polarizing angle on a pile of parallel transparent plates of the same nature, each surface in turn will be met by the light at the polarizing angle and will give rise to a reflected portion polarized in the plane of incidence.

  • c. 1), they were henceforward accepted, and passed in turn into the later canonical collections.

  • It drains by the Avon Dhu to Loch Ard, which is drained in turn by the Laggan.

  • The Moors decimated the native population; when they in turn were expelled, the country lost not only a numerically large section of its inhabitants, but the section best able to develop its natural wealth.

  • Sigeric - - - 415 His murderer, promptly mur dered in turn.

  • - 53 1548 An Ostrogoth, general of Theodo nc. Murdered Amalaric, and was murdered in turn at Seville by Theudigesil.

  • They are in turn skilled scientists, architects, builders, artisans, labourers and even scavengers; but collectively they are the rulers on whom the colony depends for the wonderful condition of law and order which has made the bee-community a model of good government for all mankind.

  • The spread of astrology beyond Babylonia is thus concomitant with the rise of a truly scientific astronomy in Babylonia itself, which in turn is due to the intellectual impulse afforded by the contact with new forms of culture from both the East and the West.

  • The truth of his views he rests, rather strangely, on the argument that Moses, the writer of the Pentateuch, lived long before Homer, whom he regards as the earliest Greek religious writer, and to prove this he quotes a series of synchronisms, which were made use of by many subsequent chronologers, including probably Julius Africanus, who in turn was used by Eusebius.

  • The human soul, the human intellect or spirit, the spirit of the universe, and the elements or matter are the four stages of this divine emanation, man being the immediate reflection of God, and nature in turn a reflection of man.

  • by Alp Arslan, 1071, Armenia formed part of the Seljuk empire until it split up, 1157, into petty states, ruled by Arabs, Kurds and Seljuks, who were in turn swept away by the Mongol invasion, 1235.

  • To measure the angle, the images of the crystal edges are covered in turn by one of the threads by turning the table, and the angle of rotation is read from the scale.

  • These in turn part two related narratives in xxi.

  • John Hylilas was deposed and flogged in turn.

  • 37 1, 43 6), though Louis in turn declined to accept a pension from Bonaparte, and later, in 1803, though his fortunes were at their lowest ebb, refused to abdicate at his suggestion and accept an indemnity.

  • the comte d'Artois, who was in turn under the influence of Calonne).

  • In addition to the dichasial form there are others where more than two lateral axes are produced from the primary floral axis, each of which in turn (From Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Botanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.) FIG.

  • Rector is also still the title of the heads of the Scottish universities (Lord Rector), who are elected for three years, and of the German universities (Rector Magnificus), in which the office is held for a year by a representative of each faculty in turn.

  • This dynasty lasted about ninety years; it was supplanted by that of the Abbasids, who removed the seat of empire to Mesopotamia; and Damascus passed through a period of unrest in which it was captured and ravaged by Egyptians, Carmathians and Seljuks in turn.

  • The inter-relations of the Phoenicians with the early Hellenes were frequent and farreaching, and in the Greek presentation of the legends concerning constellations a distinct Phoenician, and in turn Euphratean, element appears.

  • In the course of further centuries these books in turn were superseded by new treatises; and in one school at least, that of the Maha-yana (great vehicle) there was eventually developed a system of metaphysics.

  • The Greek in turn is derived from the Hebrew, for unintelligible expressions in the Syriac can be explained and the text restored by retranslation into Hebrew.

  • The Syriac in these passages is a stock rendering of SucacouvOac, and this in turn of pis.

  • The two currents are therefore added in one wire and subtracted in the other, and produce a differential heating effect which causes unequal expansion, and this in turn is made to tilt a 1 H.

  • If they were successful in turning a normal pig into a vamp-pig, and that vamp-pig could in turn bite say, a human or another animal, and transfer the vamp bug, then you've potentially got a new tool you can use to transform the human population into vamps.

  • Dean in turn suspected the Dawkins, one or more or all, although he was hard pressed to find a plausible reason for them to do so, or a reasonable scenario of how they might have pulled off the switch.

  • A red headed con man who impregnated a young girl and then either skipped or got caught, most likely by an irate father, who in turn also exited town.

  • What small maternal instincts a demon could have had led her to destroy the man who took her son; then she in turn was killed by Andre.

  • He wanted to believe the woman he-- and Anshan-- chose would in turn choose them, but he began to see what Ne'Rin and Mansr had warned him of: she was not one of theirs and would not accept the duties she knew nothing about.

  • He is, of course, in turn directly accountable to the Council for the actions of the officers.

  • The release of CRH triggers the pituitary gland's discharge of adrenocorticotropic hormone, which in turn stimulates the adrenal gland to secrete cortisol.

  • adrenocorticotropic hormone, which in turn stimulates the adrenal gland to secrete cortisol.

  • These companies help preserve local culture through the maintenance of community pubs which in turn prevents social alienation.

  • This in turn should improve artificial limb fitting, comfort and quality of life for below-knee amputees.

  • This requires shareholder approval, which in turn requires the production of a circular.

  • Rarely, however, an epileptic seizure may induce a cardiac arrhythmia which in turn leads to syncope.

  • This in turn decreases the resistance in the afferent arteriole which results in an increase in renal blood flow.

  • This in turn allows decisions to be made on how often various points about Jesus are independently attested.

  • attuned empathic experience in turn allows for psychical growth in both analyst and analysand.

  • Which in turn will result in a huge electoral backlash against the DUP.

  • The A-Team find Massey, and in turn they are also captured by some Mexican drug bandits aided by a rebel army.

  • bend each knee up in turn.

  • Problems occur because these sticky patches can catch any debris in the blood which in turn makes the plaques bigger.

  • brainstem nuclei, which in turn affects RSA.

  • These are supplied with air by small bronchioles, which are in turn supplied by bronchi that are fed from the trachea.

  • This was in turn followed by the dot.com bubble which popped in 2000.

  • calculated using the banding of the property which in turn is based on the value of the property.

  • calculated radiation spectra were used in further calculations of detector response, which in turn improved our understanding of dosimetry for cancer therapy.

  • But laissez-faire capitalism in turn depends on comprehensive property rights and the rule of law.

  • This is in essence a crisis of state monopoly capitalism in Britain, which is in turn part of the general crisis of imperialism.

  • Along its path, an individual projectile may create fast recoil atoms which in turn may initiate collision cascades of moving target atoms.

  • Bacterial chemotaxis is brought about by alterations in the direction that the motor rotates in, this in turn is controlled by phosphorylation.

  • A generous chunk of crystallized stem ginger sits in the middle of each cookie, which in turn is dipped in dark chocolate.

  • This in turn has plunged party coffers into crisis.

  • collide with other nuclei, causing them in turn to split, releasing further neutrons.

  • construct computer models of the ocean's changes which in turn may help predict future developments.

  • A digital crossover feeds the multiple digital to analog converters, whose outputs in turn feed the integral power amplifiers.

  • These lead to fits which in turn become delirium tremens or DTs - violent delirium with hallucinations.

  • This in turn will simplify the derivation of design principles based on these variables.

  • He will then leave more descendants who in turn do not act for the group.

  • Starter strains had less virulence determinants than food strains, which in turn had less than the pathogenic strains.

  • dissociation of DNA molecules which in turn can lead to gene mutations.

  • This in turn involves bond dissociation, gain of an electron by the halogen, and hydration of the halide ion.

  • To the side is a gated access opening onto to a brick pavia driveway, in turn leading to a single garage.

  • earthworm density in turn dictates the territory size - there must be several good feeding grounds for the group.

  • This in turn caused the Volkswagen to collide with the Fiat being driven eastbound by Mr McLaren, who died at the scene.

  • Carbon monoxide related cerebral edema can cause irreversible damage to the brain which in turn can effect the nervous system.

  • His own castle at Inverey was in turn also burnt down and he had many escapades.

  • excretory ducts that drain the secretary acini empty into larger intercalated ducts which in turn open into striated ducts.

  • These proteins convert plasminogen to plasmin, which in turn degrades fibrin, the main component of the clot.

  • Link can also collect Seashells now, which in turn can be traded in for collectible figurines.

  • freeze frame or an image from each story in turn.

  • Subsequent hypohydration impairs gastric emptying and can cause gastric upset, nausea or vomiting, which in turn limit further ability to drink.

  • From this movement in turn is derived the articulatory gesture, the utterance relating to the perceived object.

  • This in turn was expected to attract electrons, making the quark glob metallic and opaque.

  • This in turn stimulates the liver to produce glucose and the pancreas to produce glucagon and insulin.

  • Both areas are reached by gondolas from either end of the village, which are in turn linked by a regular ski bus service.

  • Switches mark the packet headers of these flows to inform the destination device of the congestion which in turn notifies the source device.

  • This in turn will put upward pressure on inflation and may make the MPC more hesitant to cut interest rates.

  • hutch floor which in turn can end up stuck to their feet.

  • These in turn lead to further economic problems, and eventually to the german hyperinflation of the mid twenties.

  • This enhances job satisfaction and thus in turn creates a vastly improved service to the customer.

  • This added weight creates more rotational inertia, which in turn enables the disk to spin with more constant torque.

  • injected through the catheter and down the coronary arteries in turn â X-ray pictures are then taken.

  • This in turn is followed by a short section with the full band before a nice little keyboard interlude.

  • The students spent a full twelve hours in the fields, working in turn on the plots of several families of close king in turn on the plots of several families of close kin.

  • They in turn feed the electric blue kingfisher, which has disappeared throughout much of this country.

  • This in turn leads to inflammatory substances being released into the blood, which supplies the sensitive laminae of the cow's feet.

  • The conglomerate is in turn overlain by Carboniferous limestone.

  • Branches within the primary lobule give rise to alveolar ducts, which in turn give off alveoli.

  • locker bank is run by the third party, their computer in turn will be updated.

  • Sunlight triggers oxidative damage in the eye, which in turn can cause macular degeneration.

  • memS design is strongly coupled to the packaging requirements, which in turn are dictated by the application environment.

  • Dame Edna then metamorphosed into a very convincing Billy Connolly, who in turn took off the cast Dad's Army with attitude!

  • The monastery went on to become a minster, which in turn became the St. Peter's Church we know today.

  • mitochondrionmitochondria may lead to production of lactic acid at low exercise levels, which in turn limits muscle performance.

  • On the other hand, these norms in turn define the modality of social co-operation.

  • These in turn produce the number and variety of butterflies and day-flying moths which are such a feature of the reserve in summer.

  • This in turn stimulated the new field of cognitive neuropsychiatry.

  • The enzyme absorbs nitrogen which in turn has lowered the air pressure.

  • observable behavior or are stimuli selected by representations of behavior which are in turn activated by intentional subsystems?

  • These concerns in turn have a bearing on the widespread evangelical opposition to his personal views on homosexuality.

  • Sugar stimulates the pancreas to release insulin, which in turn causes extra calcium to be excreted in the urine.

  • This in turn increases peristalsis and stool weight and reduces the transit time of the stool in through the bowel.

  • So maybe warming thaws the permafrost, which in turn produces more greenhouse gases, and more warming.

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