How to use In-the-open in a sentence

in-the-open
  • The road remained in the trees and it seemed like hours before he was once again in the open and able to see the valley before him.

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  • Issues such as this were not resolved, but at least they were in the open instead of stewing about them and guessing what each other was thinking.

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  • If the old man was going to sulk, Dean thought, might as well get it out in the open and allow him to vent a little steam.

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  • Things haven't been right since the war, but the issues haven't been out in the open.

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  • It might have even blown in the open window from a passing car.

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  • Then let's get it out in the open.

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  • That's a fine thing to be telling us while we're riding out in the open like this.

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  • She'd rather get it out in the open and face it.

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  • It dangled in the open space at his neck, visible through the unfastened top button of his loose shirt.

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  • It lies in the open valley of the Trent, at a short distance from the river, and near the important Trent Junction on the Midland railway system.

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  • Of recent years great strides have been made in the culture of new varieties of water-lilies in the open air.

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  • But when the option is between sheltering under a tree and remaining in the open it is not so clear.

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  • If then the risk under trees exceeds that in the open in Hungary and the United States, at least five or six times as many people must remain in the open as seek shelter under trees.

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  • This is the only species which can be cultivated in the open air in Britain.

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  • It cannot be grown in the open air in Britain, as it requires protection from frost, and is more tender than the Brazilian pine.

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  • Wesley and his helpers, finding the Anglican churches closed against them, took to preaching in the open air; and this method is still followed, more or less, in the aggressive evangelistic work of all the Methodist Churches.

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  • FruitFruit-growing is general all over France, which, apart from bananas and pine-apples, produces in the open air all the ordinary species of fruit which its inhabitants consume.

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  • The kangaroo (Macro pus) lives in droves in the open grassy plains.

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  • This proved to be the last pitched battle of the war, the Danes never again venturing to attack their once more invincible enemy in the open field.

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  • The death penalty was freely awarded for theft and other crimes regarded as coming under that head; for theft involving entrance of palace or temple treasury, for illegal purchase from minor or slave, for selling stolen goods or receiving the same, for common theft in the open (in default of multiple restoration) or receiving the same, for false claim to goods, for kidnapping, for assisting or harbouring fugitive slaves, for detaining or appropriating same, for brigandage, for fraudulent sale of drink, for disorderly conduct of tavern, for delegation of personal service, for misappropriating the levy, for oppression of feudal holders, for causing death of a householder by bad building.

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  • In upper Italy cattle are principally reared in pens and stalls; in central Italy cattle are allowed to run half wild, the stall system being little practised; in the south and in the islands cattle are kept in the open air, few shelters being provided.

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  • Equally disastrous are those climatic or seasonal changes which involve temperatures in themselves not excessive but in wrong sequence; how many more useful plants could be grown in the open in the United Kingdom if the deceptively mild springs were not so often followed by frosts in May and June!

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  • On the 5th of October, while on his way to Nikolayev, he died in the open steppe, 40 m.

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  • Kerbogha in the open (June 28), but not before many of their number, including even Count Stephen of Blois, had deserted and fled.

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  • Planting crosses in the open fields he drew the people to desert the churches, and had won a great following throughout all Neustria.

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  • From the greater value of the fur, silver greys have been frequently employed to stock warrens, as they breed true to colour in the open if the ordinary wild rabbits are excluded.

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  • Maps were thus named after the material upon which they were drawn or painted, and it should be noted that even at present maps intended for use in the open air, by cyclists, military men and others, are frequently printed on cloth.

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  • Ostriches are found in the open plains; the rivers swarm with crocodiles, but hippopotami are rare.

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  • When the churches were closed against him he spoke to the Kingswood colliers in the open air, and after six memorable weeks wrote urging Wesley to come and take up the work.

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  • There is thus a minimum circulation in the greater depths causing there uniformity of temperature, an absence of the circulation of oxygen by other means than diffusion, and a protection of the sulphuretted hydrogen from the oxidation which takes place in homologous situations in the open ocean.

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  • The fact of the inclusion of his statue in the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus; the hole cut in the temple roof so that he might be worshipped in the open air as being, like Jupiter, a god of 1 Agathocles was a native of Thermae.

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  • But much the greater mass of the illustrations of his philosophy indicate that, while engaged on his poem he must have passed much of his time in the open air, exercising at once the keen observation of a naturalist and the contemplative vision of a poet.

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  • The Common Hall was the successor of the folkmote, the meetings of which were originally held in the open air at the east end of St Paul's and afterwards in the Guildhall.

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  • Two British battleships were sunk off the peninsula (" Triumph " May 25, " Majestic " May 27), and owing to the risks run by warships and transports while in the open the Allied troops on shore were thenceforward almost deprived of support from naval gunfire, while reinforcements and stores were mostly brought from Mudros to the various landing places in small craft.

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  • Submarine activity in the open Mediterranean and Aegean had no small influence in determining the final abandonment of the Gallipoli enterprise and in preventing its resumption in the later stages of the war.

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  • Though an expert climber, it is by no means confined to wooded districts, being frequently found in scrub and reeds along the banks of rivers, and even in the open pampas and prairies.

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  • In 1864 Booth went to London and continued his services in tents and in the open air, and founded a body which was successively known as the East London Revival Society, the East London Christian Mission, the Christian Mission and (in 1878) the Salvation Army.

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  • Invited to Tuscany by the Countess Matilda, he convoked a council at Piacenza in March 1095, attended by so vast a number of prelates and laymen that its sessions were held in the open air, and addressed by ambassadors of Alexis, the Byzantine emperor, who sought aid against the Mussulmans.

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  • The whole operation of thus changing a filter occupies about ten minutes, and there is no need for anyone to enter the hot cistern to detach the bags, which are removed in the open air above the mud tank.

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  • This substance absorbs and combines with water very greedily, at the same time becoming very hot, and falling into a fine dry powder,' calcium hydroxide or slaked lime, which when left in the open slowly combines with the carbon dioxide of the air and becomes calcium carbonate, from which we began.

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  • They must be well hardened off before being set out in the open.

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  • It is most abundant in the open districts of Patagonia, but also ranges on to the Argentina Pampas, where it is now scarce.

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  • All North Africa was ravaged by the invaders, who, though unable to found an empire or overthrow the settled government in the towns, forced the agricultural Berbers into the mountains, and, retaining from generation to generation their lawless and predatory habits, made order and prosperity almost impossible in the open parts of the country until its effective occupations by the French.

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  • They bloom about March or April in the open air.

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  • The hardier forms of this set thrive in the open border, but the smaller sorts, like Queen Ann's jonquil, are better taken up in autumn and replanted in February; they bloom freely about April or May.

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  • Tazetta itself, the type of the group, succeed in the open borders in light well-drained soil, but the bulbs should be deeply planted, not less than 6 or 8 in.

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  • These pheasant's-eye narcissi, of which there are several well-marked varieties, as radiiflorus, poetarum, recurvus, &c., blossom in succession during April and May, and all do well in the open borders as permanent hardy bulbs.

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  • The prophetic thought is that the daughter (population) of Zion shall not be saved by her present rulers or defensive strength; she must come down from her bulwarks and dwell in the open field; there, and not within her proud ramparts, Yahweh will grant deliverance from her enemies.

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  • In his second campaign (624-26) he penetrated into Armenia and Albania, and beat the enemy in the open field.

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  • The city is also one of the filthiest in the East, as there are no means of drainage or sewerage, and garbage of every description lies in heaps in the open streets.

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  • In spite of the increase of deep-sea soundings in the last few decades, they are still very irregularly distributed in the open ocean, and the attempt to draw isobaths (lines of equal depth) on a chart of the world is burdened with many difficulties which can only be evaded by the widest generalizations.

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  • Luksch found the disk visible as a rule to from 22 to 27 fathoms, and off the Syrian coast even to 33 fathoms. In the open Atlantic there are `great differences in transparency; Kriimmel observed a 6 ft.

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  • Schott gives the following as the result of measurements of transparency by means of a white disk at 23 stations in the open ocean, where quantitative observations of the plankton under i square metre of surface were made at the same time.

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  • We are still ignorant of the depth to.which the annual temperature wave penetrates in the open ocean, but observations in the Mediterranean enable us to form some opinion on the matter.

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  • The vertical distribution of temperature ' in the open ocean is much better known than that of salinity.

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  • Thus in the Central American Sea below 93 o fathoms, the depth on the bar, no water is found at a temperature lower than that prevailing in the open ocean at that depth, viz.

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  • Direct observations of currents in the open sea are difficult, and even when the ship is anchored the veering and rolling of the vessel produce disturbances that greatly affect the result.

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  • Regular physical exercise in the open air contributed much to his abounding vitality.

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  • It is situated in a damp, low plain in the open country in the south side of the valley of the Po, between the Secchia to the west and the Panaro to the east.

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  • When Newcastle was shut up in York, Lucas and the cavalry remained in the open country, and when Rupert's relieving army crossed the mountains into Yorkshire he was quickly joined by Newcastle's squadrons.

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  • The bulbs are placed in long shallow boxes, plunged in soil or ashes in the open air, and are later introduced as required into heat in semi-darkness, and are afterwards transferred to benches in the forcing houses where they flower.

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  • If planted in borders and shrubberies, however, they will continue to bear fairly good blossoms in the open air for several seasons.

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  • With regard to situation, the ideal would be to have the collection placed in the open country, far from centres of population.

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  • On the 3rd of June at Cold Harbor (q.v.) took place the last of Grant's "hammering" battles in the open fields.

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  • One is supposed to have lived in the forests along the stream borders, and the other in the open plains.

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  • The sprat spawns in the open sea from February to May and is only occasionally captured in the ripe condition.

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  • But however that may be, the practice of reservation of the Eucharist, either in the open church or in private, has become not uncommon in recent days.

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  • In the principal square the Landsgemeinde (or cantonal democratic assembly) is held annually in the open air on the last Sunday in April.

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  • A peculiarity of larch wood is the difficulty with which it is ignited, although so resinous; and, coated with a thin layer of plaster, beams and pillars of larch might probably be found to justify Caesar's epithet " igni impenetrabile lignum "; even the small branches are not easily kept alight, and a larch fire in the open needs considerable care.

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  • The brown hare is a night-feeding animal, remaining during the day on its "form," as the slight depression is called which it makes in the open field, usually among grass.

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  • In the same way the rearing of worms for graine in the open air, and under as far as possible natural conditions, has proved equally valuable towards the development of a hardy, vigorous and untainted stock.

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  • It is a well-known garden plant, and several other species of the genus are cultivated in the open air and as greenhouse plants.

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  • The olive and the characteristic shrubs of the northern coasts of the Mediterranean do not thrive in the open air, but the former valuable tree ripens its fruit in sheltered places at the foot of the mountains, and penetrates along the deeper valleys and the shores of the Italian lakes.

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  • The most successful mode of forming roots is to place the cuttings in a mild bottom-heat, which expedites their growth, even in the case of many hardy plants whose cuttings strike roots in the open soil.

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  • The best season for grafting apples and similar hardy subjects in the open air is in March and April; but it may be commenced as soon as the sap in the stock is fairly in motion.

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  • In the propagating house budding may be done at any season when the sap is in motion; but for fruit trees, roses, &c., in the open air, it is usually done in July or August, when the buds destined for the following year are completely formed in the axils of the leaves, and when the bark separates freely from the wood it covers.

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  • Standard trees, however, are budded on a sturdy young shoot close to the top. In either case the stocks should have been carefully planted at least the previous November when the work is to be done in the open air the following July or August.

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  • The training of standard and bush trees in the open ground has been already referred to under the section Pruning.

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  • The hardy annuals may be sown in the open ground during the latter part of March or beginning of April, as the season may determine, for the weather should be dry and open, and the soil in a free-working condition before sowing is attempted.

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  • The best time for planting fruit trees in the open air is from the end of September till the end of November in open weather.

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  • The work is carried on from October till the end of March and April, after which, with the exception of melons, the cultures are carried on in the open air.

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  • So on throughout the year with other crops, this system of intercropping or overlapping of one crop with another is carried out in a most ingenious manner, not only under glass lights, but also in the open air.

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  • Stake up peas; blanch sea-kale and rhubarb in the open air by covering with straw or leaves.

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  • Remove the coverings from all tender plants in the open air.

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  • Force asparagus, rhubarb and sea-kale, in the mushroomhouse, in pits, or in the open border under boxes or cases surrounded and covered by well-fermented stable dung and leaves.

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  • Unless one has space under glass, or in hotbeds, in which the plants may be transplanted before they are set in the open ground, it is well not to start the seeds too early, inasmuch as the plants are likely to become too large or to be pot-bound, or to become drawn.

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  • When the greenhouse is not to be used during the summer months, camellias, azaleas and plants of that character should be set out of doors under partial shade; but most of the other plants usually grown in the conservatory or window garden in winter may be set in the open border.

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  • Cabbages that have headed may usually be preserved against injury by frost until the middle of next month, by simply pulling them up and packing them closely in a dry spot in the open field with the heads down and roots up. On approach of cold weather in December they should be covered up with leaves as high as the tops of the roots, or, if the soil is light, it may be thrown over them, if leaves are not convenient.

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  • If the pig iron is to follow path 2, the purification which converts it into wrought iron or steel consists chiefly in oxidizing and thereby removing its carbon, phosphorus and other impurities, while it is molten, either by means of the oxygen of atmospheric air blown through it as in the Bessemer process, or by the oxygen of iron ore stirred into it as in the puddling and Bell-Krupp processes, or by both together as in the open hearth process.

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  • Wild shrewdly realized that it was safer, and in most cases more profitable, to dispose of such property by returning it to its legitimate owners than to sell it, with the attendant risks, in the open market, and he thus built up an immense business, posing as a recoverer of stolen goods, the thieves receiving a commission on the price paid for recovery.

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  • The latter had a class of burgher called Pfahlburger, men who lived in the open country outside the Pfahle, or palisades of the town, but who could claim the protection of the municipal authorities.

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  • It is divided by the river into East Looe and West Looe; and is sheltered so completely by the surrounding hills that myrtles, geraniums, fuchsias and other delicate plants flourish at all seasons in the open air.

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  • Apart from the sea and river ports and the towns in Yorubaland, the chief centres of population are in the open plains east of the Niger.

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  • The modern town lies in the open treeless valley of the Sajur, a tributary of the Euphrates, and on the right bank, 65 m.

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  • A unique scene in a tomb of the IVth Dynasty, however, shows men and women exchanging commodities against each otherfish, fish-hooks, fans, necklaces, &c. Probably this was a market in the open air such as is held weekly at the present time in every considerable village.

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  • Twice during this period Denmark and Sweden measured their strength in the open field, on the first occasion in the " Scandinavian Seven Years' War " (1562-70), on the second in the " Kalmar War " (1611-13), and on both occasions Denmark prevailed, though the temporary advantage she gained was more than neutralized by the intense feeling of hostility which the unnatural wars, between the two kindred peoples of Scandinavia, left behind them.

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  • Above this belt the firs gradually disappear and are succeeded by the shortleaved Pinus montezumae, or Mexican " ocote " - one of the largest species of pine in the republic. These continue to the upper tree-line, accompanied by red and purple Pentstemon and light blue lupins in the open spaces, some ferns, and occasional masses of alpine flowers.

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  • The eastern coast is fringed with multitudes of small islands, and other islands, some of considerable size, are situated in the open towards the north and west.

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  • The treatise chiefly deals with the capture of the hare; in the author's day the approved method was to find the hare in her form by the use of dogs; when found she was either driven into nets previously set in her runs or else run down in the open.

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  • The game was sought in the open deserts which border on both sides the valley of the Nile; but (by the wealthy) sometimes in enclosed spaces into which the animals had been driven or in preserves.

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  • His early landscapes were conscientiously painted in the open air and on the spot.

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  • To the north of Pest lies the historic Rakos field, where the Hungarian diets were held in the open air from the 10th to the 14th century; and 23 m.

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  • On each alp there are several sets of huts wherein live the cow-herds and cheese-makers (the latter are called Sennen or Fruitiers), the cattle being generally left in the open.

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  • It appears at one time to have been embedded in a brick niche, and about 1891 a shed was placed over it, but in 1907 it stood in the open entirely unprotected.

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  • In Lassell's instrument (a reflector of the Newtonian type) the observer is mounted in the open air on a supplementary tower capable of motion in any azimuth about the centre of motion of the telescope, whilst an observing platform can be raised and lowered on the side of the tower.

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  • In Lord Rosse's instrument (also of the Newtonian type) the observer is suspended in a cage near the eye-piece, and the instrument is used in the open air.

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  • Public festivals also were celebrated in the open area of the agora.

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  • The representations are usually ranged round the church; sometimes they are found in the open air, especially on the ascent to some elevated church or shrine.

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  • The term "a Calvary" is applied to a sculptured representation of the Crucifixion, either inside a church, or adjoining one in the open air.

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  • The towns from an early date made it their policy to suppress the exercise of all handicrafts in the open country.

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  • The object of the thimbleshaped dome was to keep moisture from the stem from which the pith balls were supported, so that the apparatus could be used in the open air even in the rainy weather.

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  • The uniform result of all experiments has only been to demonstrate the scientific soundness of the ordinary process of water-retting, and all the proposed improvements of recent times seek to obviate the tediousness, difficulties and uncertainties of the process as carried on in the open air.

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  • The sambar, or one or other of its subspecies, has also been naturalized in Mauritius, and in the Marianne Islands in the open Pacific.

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  • Until then the gipsies had been treated as slaves and owned by the Church or by private landowners; they had been bought and sold in the open market.

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  • In inner Persia the air is exceptionally dry, and in many districts polished steel may be exposed in the open during a great part of the year without becoming tarnished.

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  • In front of the couch, which was placed in the open street, a meal was set out on a table.

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  • The lack of posts and telegrams prevents much of the excitement which they would have upon shore, the space for exercise is limited, food is abundant and appetite is supplied by the stimulus of constant exposure in the open air.

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  • In order that the voyage should be satisfactory, however, it must be sufficiently long, and the weather must be sufficiently warm to allow the patient to stay in the open air the whole day long.

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  • Potatoes are also grown largely in hooped beds on a warm border in the open ground.

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  • There are localities in the open country and on exposed elevations where healthy conditions prevail, but the greater part of this region is considered unhealthy.

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  • Two corps were left in the open in observation, one at St Ninian's to watch the lower course of the burn, one to guard the point at which the Falkirk-Stirling road crosses the burn.

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  • The Patio process, sometimes named the American-heap-amalgamation process, which is carried out principally in Mexico, aims at amalgamating the silver in the open in a circular enclosure termed a torta, the floor of which is generally built of flagstones.

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  • It lies in the open lowland of Denge Marsh.

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  • In 1476 Mahomet again invaded Moldavia, but, though successful in the open field, the Turks were sorely harassed by Stephen's guerilla onslaughts, and, being thinned by pestilence, were again constrained to retire.

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  • The Poles avoided an encounter in the open field, but harried the Germans so successfully around Breslau that the plain was covered with corpses, which Henry had to leave to the dogs on his disastrous retreat; hence the scene of the action was known as "the field of dogs."

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  • His body was brought to Amesbury for interment; the funeral services were held in the open air, and conducted after the simple rites of the Friends, in the presence of a large concourse, certain of whom " spake as they were moved " in tribute to the bard.

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  • Large ships have to anchor outside in the open roadstead.

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  • North of the equator the surface circulation is under the control of the monsoons, and changes with them, the currents consisting chiefly of north-east and south-west drifts in the open sea, and induced streams following the coasts.

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  • As the clergy did not welcome him to their pulpits, he began to preach in the open air.

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  • The second class consisted of larger tables destined for burnt sacrifice; these were placed in the open air, and, if connected with a temple, in front of the entrance.

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  • A few weeks later Alfred had issued from Athelney, had collected a large army in Seiwood, and went out to meet the enemy in the open field.

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  • Next day the rebel leaders again invited the king to a conference, in the open space of Smithfield, and laid before him a programme very different from that propounded at Mile End.

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  • The aqueduct of Justinian, the Crooked aqueduct, in the open country, and the aqueduct of Valens that spans the valley between the 4th and 3rd hills of the city, still carry on their beneficent work, and afford evidence of the attention given to the water-supply of the capital during the Byzantine period.

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  • At Meran his patriotic deeds of heroism are the subject of a festival play celebrated annually in the open air.

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  • Otters are common along the rivers; chamois may very rarely be seen on the least accessible peaks; roe-deer, red-deer, squirrels and rabbits people the lower woodlands; and hares abound in the open.

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  • Instruction was probably given in the open air.

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  • Such training as the Egyptian troops had received, and their artillery, gave them a marked superiority in the open field.

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  • He easily defeated the Greeks in the open field, and though the siege of Missolonghi proved costly to his own troops and to the Turks who operated with him, he brought it to a successful termination on the 24th of April 1826.

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  • For long these movements continued, always in the same direction, from north to south and from east to west; though, of course, more rapid changes took place in the open country, especially in the great eastern highway from north to south, than in the forest area.

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  • The lion, leopard, giraffe and various kinds of antelope are found in the prairies and in the open woods.

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  • Pisani stationed the galleys under his command in the open sea outside Brondolo, and during the rest of the year blockaded the enemy closely.

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  • The climate is very warm, lemon and orange trees, magnolias and palms growing in the open air; but it is at the same time extremely wet and changeable.

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  • By continuing the walls of the hearth above the tuyere, into a shaft or stack either of the same or some other section, we obtain a furnace of increased capacity, but with no greater power of consuming fuel, in which the material to be treated can be heated up gradually by loading it into the stack, alternately with layers of fuel, the charge descending regularly to the point of combustion, and absorbing a proportion of the heat of the flame that went to waste in the open fire.

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  • He remained standing in the open vehicle, holding on to the roll bar for support, looking like a parade politician as he waved to the strolling women.

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  • I felt bold enough to try it solo in the open boat, thinking I would have Lesley for company.

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  • A Malabar Whistling Thrush was out in the open as we approached the spring, but a party of Grey-headed bulbuls was more elusive.

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  • The sunlight when outside in the open also helps the rabbit to absorb dietary calcium.

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  • The height finder was mounted in the open area to the foreground with the predictor in the open area to the rear.

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  • But the initiative has drawn flak from some quarters in the open source community, judging from the responses posted on Port 25 blogs.

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  • On a jetty we spotted an odd heron like bird in the open.

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  • Thus the changes in the open flux and cosmogenic isotopes do not appear to be linked to the 100-year drift in TSI.

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  • The engine then languished in the open air, slowly deteriorating until under cover storage was provided about 15 years later.

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  • The friendly household pet may prove a killer in the open countryside.

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  • In the first year some of the cows already in calf gave birth in the open prairie.

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  • So I turned around and could only see an old pram with no wheels left by someone to go rusty in the open air.

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  • We anchored in the open roadstead of Horta, half a mile from the shore.

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  • It spreads rapidly by sucker ing, to form dense thickets beneath woodland trees or out in the open.

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  • Around the screens an American Bittern was found, standing out in the open and apparently unconcerned by its admirers.

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  • In this system, the compost feedstock is formed into long windrows, in the open air.

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  • With a view to this, it has become increasingly common of late years to publish not the voltages actually observed, but values deduced from them for the potential gradient in the open in volts per metre.

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  • Observations are made at a given height over level open ground near the observatory, and a comparison with the simultaneous results from the self-recording electrograph enables the records from the latter to be expressed as potential gradients in the open.

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  • In Hungary (67), during the three years 1901 to 1903, 15% of the total deaths by lightning occurred under trees, as against 57% wholly in the open.

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  • In the United States (68) in 1900, only Io% of the deaths where the precise conditions were ascertained occurred under trees, as against 52% in the open.

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  • There are many other important points of crane construction too numerous to mention here, but it may be said generally that the advent of electricity has tended to increase speeds, and in consequence great attention is paid to all details that reduce friction and wear, such as roller and ball bearings and improved methods of lubrication; and, as in all other quick-running machinery, great stress has to be laid on accuracy of workmanship. The machinery, thus being of a higher class, requires more protection, and cranes that work in the open are now fitted with elaborate crane-houses or cabins, furnished with weather-tight doors and windows, and more care is taken to provide proper platforms, hand-rails and ladders of access, and also guards for the revolving parts of gearing.

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  • He wandered from village to village and town to town, preaching to enormous audiences, always in the open air; the earnestness and straightforward eloquence with which he insisted that true repentance came from the heart, that pious pilgrimages and the absolution of the Church were mere outward symbols, appealed to all classes.

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  • The alternative is to fish all stages of the medusa in its growth in the open sea, a slow and laborious method in which the chance of error is very great, unless the series of stages is very complete.

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  • The same authorities recommend a powder, composed of larvicide (an aniline substance), chrysanthemum flowers, and valerian root, to be burnt in bedrooms. Anointing the skin with strong-smelling substances is of little use in the open air, but more effective in the house; turpentine appears to be the best.

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  • By the 1st of November firewood would not ignite in the open air, and the soldiers warmed themselves over big bonfires of straw.

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  • The central idea of his teaching was that naval supremacy is the condition precedent of all vigorous military offensive across the seas, and, conversely, that no vigorous military offensive can be undertaken across the seas until the naval force of the enemy has been accounted for - either destroyed or defeated and compelled to withdraw to the shelter of its own ports, or at least driven from the seas by the menace of a force it dare not encounter in the open.

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  • Yet even now Sigismund, at the head of his Magyars, thrice (1422-1424, 1426-1427, and 1430-1431) encountered the Turks, not ingloriously, in the open field, till, recognizing that Hungary must thenceforth rely entirely on her own resources in any future struggle with Islam, he elaborately fortified the whole southern frontier, and converted the little fort of Nandorfehervar, later Belgrade, at the junction of the Danube and Save, into an enormous first-class fortress, which proved strong enough to repel all the attacks of the Turks for more than a century.

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  • Their flavour is considered superior to that of the cod taken in the open sea.

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  • Instead of the close protection from the outer air, the respirators, and the fancy diets of our fathers, the modern poitrinaire camps out in the open air in all weathers, is fed with solid food, and in his exercise and otherwise is ruled with minute particularity according to the indications of the clinical thermometer and other symptoms. The almost reckless reliance on climate, which, at Davos for instance, marked the transition from the older to the modern methods, has of late been sobered, and supplemented by more systematic attention to all that concerns the mode of life of the invalid.

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  • Then, as the fortune of war turned against the Hungarians, Klapka, after serving for a short time as minister of war, took command at Komarom, from which fortress he conducted a number of successful expeditions until the capitulation of Vilagos in August put an end to the war in the open field.

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  • Aime estimated this depth at 150-200 fathoms, while the observations of the Austrian expedition in the eastern Mediterranean found it to be from 200 to nearly 400 fathoms. In the Red Sea, where a similar seasonal change occurs, the depth to which the surface layer warms up is about 275 fathoms. The great difference in salinity between the surface and the deep water excludes the possibility of effective convection in the seas of northern Europe, and in the open ocean the currents which are felt everywhere, and especially those with a vertical component, must exercise a very disturbing influence on convection.

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  • The snows are therefore very light, and are quickly swept from the prairies by the high winds, so that cattle may graze in the open plains throughout the year.

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  • There are various herbaceous plants which may be similarly treated, such as sea-kale and horseradish, and, among ornamental plants, the beautiful autumn-blooming Anemone japonica, Bocconia cordata, Dictamnus Fraxinella - the burning bush; the sea hollies (Eryngium), the globe thistle (Echinops ritro), the Oriental poppy (Papaver orientale), the sea lavender (Statice latifolia), Senecio pulcher, &c. The sea-kale and horseradish require to be treated in the open garden, where the cut portions should be planted in lines in wellworked soil; but the roots of the others should be planted in pots and kept in a close frame with a little warmth till the young shoots have started.

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  • William, in his turn, with an army wholly insufficient to meet the French in the open field, was able to persuade wag gi s h his countrymen to open the dikes and by flooding the land to prevent its occupation by the enemy.

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  • A dyke of syenite granite here crosses the valley, so hard that the river had nowhere scoured a deep channel through it, and so it was found possible to construct the dam entirely in the open air, without the r t000 Acres 1800 Acr s '?

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  • The climate of Denmark does not differ materially from that of Great Britain in the same latitude; but whilst the summer is a little warmer, the winter is colder, so that most of the evergreens which adorn an English garden in the winter cannot be grown in the open in Denmark.

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  • It gave the English king, less opposed by his nobles since his favourite, Gaveston, was slain, time to muster a large army, which Bruce must meet, if at all, in the open field.

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  • The fiery blasts of summer, furnace-heated over the red-hot Kizil Kum, are hardly less to be feared than the ice-cold shamshir (or north-western blizzard) of winter, which freezes men when it finds them in the open desert, and frequently destroys whole caravans.

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  • In a short time he was free and in the open air.

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  • At last, we know not what it is to live in the open air, and our lives are domestic in more senses than we think.

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  • I would rather sit in the open air, for no dust gathers on the grass, unless where man has broken ground.

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  • I used to start them in the open land also, where they had come out of the woods at sunset to "bud" the wild apple trees.

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  • Kutuzov's face as he stood in the open doorway remained perfectly immobile for a few moments.

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  • Readers may detect how the injustice still rankles 30 years on, but I feel much better now it 's out in the open.

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  • Provided that they are properly maintained, counterbalance springs and similar counterbalance or ratchet devices to hold them in the open position are acceptable.

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  • Heat haze is a problem, especially at the Restinga shorebird area and it is hard trying to stalk birds in the open.

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  • Second, it would be held in the open air, not in the sometimes stultifying heat and congestion of a marquee.

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  • It is best to urinate out in the open.

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  • The smell of bread and kebabs wafted in the open air and tho there was great activity the atmosphere was quite relaxed.

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  • In order to deter pick-pocketers, don't count money in the open and, for women, keep your purse in plain view at all times.

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  • Display the things that make you love - get a book shelf and have the books you love to read out in the open or your favorite music on display and let your personality shine through.

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  • While you should be generous with the amount of linens available, try to pare down on fussy hand towels and wash clothes that are out in the open.

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  • Fill the home with knick-knacks and accent pieces that speak to you, leaving them out in the open to become part of the room's design.

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  • You can put your decorative serving items in the open cabinets and make an attractive and room enlarging display.

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  • Bringing up the subject on a regular basis in a casual manner will help both you and your teen to get things out in the open.

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  • A. vitifolium is a handsome plant in mild districts, and several sorts may be grown in the open air in gardens in warm sea-shore districts.

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  • Seeds should be sown in frames in March, and the seedlings planted at the end of April or early in May in a warm border; or the seeds may be sown in the open ground in fine rich soil at the end of April.

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  • It should have the sunniest position available, and is suitable for a hot bank in gardens where it can thrive in the open.

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  • They grow well in loam or leaf mould, but are not hardy enough for permanent cultivation in the open air.

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  • The bright colors of many are more intense in the open air than when the plants are cramped in pots in a greenhouse.

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  • The seeds may be sown in the open air, the plant being treated as a hardy annual.

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  • On east or west walls they flower freely; while in the southern counties, at least, they do well in the open.

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  • Both in the open air and under glass it blooms in late autumn and winter, the flowers small, and resembling golden catkins.

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  • Many varieties are in catalogues, but in the open air their growth is not satisfactory save in favoured spots.

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  • A few kinds are found to thrive in the open air in Devon and Dorset.

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  • In the south seed may be sown at once in the open border.

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  • L. Jacobaeus, a tender species with almost black flowers, succeeds in the open air in summer, and is all the better for planting out.

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  • Blue-bell Creeper (Sollya) - Beautiful evergreen climbing shrubs from Australia, mostly grown under glass but hardy in the open air in the warmest parts of the south-west of England, Wales, and Ireland.

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  • Boronia - These are usually treated as greenhouse plants, but succeed in the open in the southwest, according to Mr Fitzherbert.

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  • These bulbs may be planted from October until December, and in mild localities will pass the winter in the open unprotected.

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  • B. elata has usually been regarded only as a beautiful pot-plant, but it does well in the open air, either in a bed by itself or in large patches with other things.

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  • It is hardy near London, though it does not flourish so well in the open as on a wall, where it will stand any amount of sun-heat and even long periods of drought.

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  • It may be sown in September and pricked off into pots for winter for transplanting in spring, or again in the open ground in March and April, the seedlings being thinned out about 1 foot apart.

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  • They are naturally perennial, but in the open air must be treated as half-hardy annuals.

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  • As seedlings do not transplant well, seed should be sown in the open in March, and the plants well thinned out.

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  • T. jasminoides (once known as Rhynchospermum) was formerly much grown under glass, but has done well in the open air in the south and south-west of England and Ireland.

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  • Christmas Rose (Helleborus) - One of the most valuable classes of hardy perennials we have, as they flower in the open air when there is little else in bloom.

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  • When the blooming season is over it should be protected by a frame until genial weather permits it to be plunged in the open air.

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  • Club Palm (Cordyline) - Fine-leaved shrub plants common in green-houses, but only in the mildest parts of England and Ireland can they be grown well in the open air.

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  • But, in far less favoured places, it is often seen thriving for years in the open air, though it is not worth trying in cold, high, and inland places, especially on clay soils.

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  • A few kinds of these pretty-leaved plants, of the Sage order, succeed in the open air in summer.

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  • Though there is a host of varieties, few succeed in the open air.

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  • Colletia are often neglected and placed against walls, but it will be found that the hardiest one is much better in the open sun, and best, perhaps, in sandy or stony ground, in which it is very effective in autumn.

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  • It is the Tree Karamee of the Maoris, and when grown in the open forms a wide, bushy head.

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  • This is the only bushy Coronilla that can be well grown in the open air in England, but in mild districts C. glauca, a beautiful shrub with glaucous foliage and yellow flowers, usually grown in greenhouses, may be grown out of doors.

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  • It rarely flowers in the open air, but it is of service both in the flower garden and conservatory.

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  • Planted in rich soil, and placed in a warm, sheltered position in the open air at the end of May, it grows well in summer.

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  • Dictamnus (Dittany of Crete) is a pretty plant, somewhat tender, and best grown under glass rather than in the open air, though during mild winters it may survive.

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  • In March and April the seed should be sown in the open ground in a free soil and an open situation; but if the plants are intended for pot culture, the sowing should be two months earlier.

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  • Siberia, it is hardy in the open air, requires no protection during winter, and we have never known it fail to bear freely its charming and fragrant flowers.

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  • In the southern counties they may also be sown in the open air in May on warm borders in good soil.

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  • Sown in the open in April, it should have a light, well-prepared soil.

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  • Although these tiny Filmy Ferns are hardy and beautiful, yet the conditions for their successful culture occur so seldom that in a general sense they cannot be used with effect in the open air.

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  • It forms densely matted tufts in the open air, best perhaps on level spots in the rock garden.

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  • Owing to the time the blossoms expand, when in the open ground, very little forcing is necessary to have them in bloom quite early.

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  • Gum Tree (Eucalyptus) - Large and handsome Australian trees and shrubs, of which, in the south of England and Ireland, a few of the species live in the open air.

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  • It blooms freely in the open border of the Rev.

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  • A wet soil is good in summer, but injurious in winter, and to prevent surface wet from injuring old plants left in the open ground, remove the mould round their necks, filling up with about 6 inches of white sand.

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  • Much used indoors; is seldom good in the open garden, partly because it does badly in heavy and poor soils.

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  • S. flava, the hardiest species next to S. purpurea, is rarely satisfactory in the open air, but does well in favoured spots.

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  • Other species, including Drummondi, psittacina, rubra, and variolaris, do well in the open air in some parts of Ireland if covered with a thick layer of moss in hard weather.

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  • Hyacinths in the open air are generally the refuse, as it were, of the forced bulbs of preceding years, but even these make a good display in suitable positions.

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  • Hyacinths in the open air seldom require artificial watering, the natural moisture of the soil and the strength of the manure mixed with it being sufficient.

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  • It seldom exists from year to year in the open air.

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  • The seeds should be sown in spring in pots in the open border in ordinary soil.

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  • Messrs Back-house have it in perfection in the open air, in a quiet deep gorge of rocks, where it obtains sufficient moisture without being washed by rains.

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  • Division, or seeds, which should be sown as soon as gathered either in pots or in the open ground, they will vegetate in the following spring.

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  • It was raised in France, and does not yet seem to have been tried in the open air with us.

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  • Its large evergreen leaves are handsome, and in warm districts it flowers, the blossoms white, but it does not fruit in the open air in England.

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  • Seeds should be sown in spring or autumn, in the open border in light soil.

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  • Along the south coast it makes a beautiful wall-covering, reaching a height of 20 feet or more, but its inconspicuous purple flowers are seldom borne in the open air.

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  • The flowers are in loose spikes, each blossom being about 1 inch in length; the color varies from light scarlet to a shade verging closely on crimson, and when seen in the open air, especially in sunshine, dazzles the eye by its brilliancy.

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  • Small groups are beautiful in the open spaces that should exist in every shrubbery or Rhododendron bed.

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  • Wherever it can be grown in the open air, it would be valuable for association with the finer bedding and sub-tropical plants.

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  • All are natives of the cool regions of Peru and Brazil, and can be grown in the open air during summer.

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  • Ferns, for the most part tropical, and requiring artificial heat; but in mild parts two or three thrive in the open air.

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  • Lomaria Procera - A handsome large-growing Fern, thriving in the open air in the milder parts of Britain, particularly where the atmosphere is moist, as in Ireland and the south-west of England.

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  • L. longifolia, an Australian species, planted out in a bed of Rhododendrons at Forest Hill, near London, grew luxuriantly in the open air, flowering and bearing seed, and only twice cut to the ground by frost during twenty years.

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  • It thrives in the open air in summer, and is a beautiful plant for festooning old stumps, or for trailing over dead branches placed against a warm south wall.

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  • Seed may be sown in autumn or spring in the open air, on or in a slightly heated frame.

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  • May be planted in the open border without much fear of failure.

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  • M. fragrans, another species, has sweet-scented flowers, and, under similar conditions, thrives in the open air in summer.

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  • These two may be grown in the open ground.

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  • It thrives in the open as well as in the shade, and may be used with good effect as an edging to a sheltered border.

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  • Seed sown in the open ground in March or April produces in a few weeks flowering plants, which continue to bloom till late in autumn.

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  • Napoleons Bell (Lapageria) - A beautiful climber usually grown in the greenhouse, but hardy and flowering well in the open air in Cornwall and the south of Ireland; with care it would be found to do over a larger area round the coast.

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  • Seed should be sown in heat in early spring or in the open air about the end of March, and the seedlings should be transplanted in May.

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  • America is a noble plant in the summer garden, but will not stand our winters in the open.

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  • Perpetual Carnations In The Open Air - For open-air gardening these have the decided advantage of continuous flowering over the border types of Carnations, and for bedding out are increasing in popularity.

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  • Lyalli is hardy without a wall, but seldom flowers so well in the open.

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  • It merely requires to be sown in ordinary soil in the open border either in autumn or spring; but the seedlings should be well thinned out.

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  • My great surprise has been in its well doing to such an extent in the open ground that I have now no fear for it at all, and during the worst frost we have had here during the last twenty or thirty years it was entirely uninjured.

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  • With choice kinds it is better to sow the seed in pans or rough wooden boxes, but for ordinary purposes a bed of finely-pulverised soil in the open air will suffice.

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  • They are hardy, herbaceous perennials, and succeed will in the open border in rich, light soil.

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  • The plants sow themselves freely, and may be sown in the open ground either in spring or autumn.

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  • B. maxima is one of the handsomest, growing 12 to 18 inches high; may be sown in the open in March in any garden soil, is quite hardy and graceful while growing, and useful for decoration either green or dried.

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  • It may also be grown in pots plunged in sand in the open air, and in frames in winter, but it becomes "drawn" and delicate under glass.

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  • If sown in April or May, in light, warm, rich soil in the open border, it flowers in July and August, and may also be sown in pots, but the ball of earth must not be broken, as the plant will not bear transplanting.

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  • It is of easy culture in warm positions on the rock garden and the choice border, and where the climate is too cold to grow it in the open air it may be grown in a cold frame or in baskets in the greenhouse.

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  • In the extreme south it may thrive in the open.

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  • It may be placed in the open air, in the southern and milder districts, from the end of May till the end of September.

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  • This exists in the open air throughout the winter in the warmest parts of Britain, growing fully hardy and making a fair growth where the climate at all resembles that of Chili.

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  • Grown in tubs in the conservatory in winter, and placed in the open air in summer, it is useful for grouping with the hardier palms.

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  • S. speciosa will succeed if sown in the open in April.

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  • The Chinese A. indica, the ordinary Azalea of greenhouses, is hardy in many places, especially the white variety, which, even in mid-Sussex, thrives in the open air.

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  • A. lophantha, though not hardy, grows freely in the open air in summer, and gives graceful verdure among flowers.

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  • In Cornish and South Devon gardens various kinds thrive in the open air.

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  • Tricuspidaria - T. lanceolata is a lovely flowering shrub from Chili, which has flowered in the open air at Castlewellan and in other sheltered seaside gardens for several years past.

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  • T. dependens bears white bell-shaped flowers fringed around the mouth, drooping gracefully from the under side of the branches of an elegant evergreen shrub, which thrives in the open air in our warmest coast gardens.

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  • Tuberose (Polianthes) - P. tuberosa is a native of the East Indies, but strong imported bulbs of this deliciously fragrant plant, if inserted in warm soil, will flower well in the open air during August.

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  • These are hardy annuals, and may be sown either in autumn or in spring in the open border, in good friable soil.

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  • Wigandia - Fine-leaved plants of the tropics, which succeed in the open air in summer in a few warm southern gardens.

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  • Wild Irishman (Discaria) - Spiny shrubs allied to Colletia an Ceanothus, and only hardy in the open in the more favoured parts of the south and south-west, though thriving against walls near London and farther north.

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  • I have seen it flower strongly in the Garden of Plants at Paris; it remained out all the winter in a fountain basin in a sheltered and warm nook in the open air.

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  • This type is built to stand alone in the open.

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  • Designed to mount under the cabinet and provide light to a counter space or another area, under-cabinet lights get the job done without being out in the open.

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  • In fact, iconic rebels such as James Dean flaunted their rebellion by wearing nothing but their tee-shirts out in the open during the 60s.

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  • Out in the open water where the fish aren't camouflaged by the mud below, you can utilize gray or brown lenses.

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  • Most times enemies will just stand out in the open while shooting at you, making for an easy kill.

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  • At best, enemies will stand halfway behind objects to avoid fire, although most of the time they'll just stand right out in the open.

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  • Unless you're standing right out in the open and directly in front of an enemy, you'll rarely take any fire.

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  • Along the way you'll uncover buried artifacts and solve puzzles that I guess maybe the Mayans left sitting out in the open.

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  • Not that they tried very hard to conceal it; their Viognier can be found in plain view, right out in the open in many wine retail shops.

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  • Freeing up cupboard space and having your glasses accessible doesn't mean you are completely free…unfortunately having your stemware out in the open means they collect dust more frequently than they would in a protected cupboard.

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  • Another benefit is access to wine that may not be distributed in the open market.

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  • The single best way to improve your signal is to simply get yourself as much in the open as possible.

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  • Recall the last time you were at a restaurant and used your phone in the open.

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  • Your sandals will quickly dry in the open air and sunshine, and you won't have to worry about the health of your feet.

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  • Gently remove the old cutter using the tweezers and place the new cutter in the open slot.

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  • The first time you play you will need to unwrap the money and cards and to pop the "Funatony" parts off of the runner and place them in the open slots on the body board.

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  • If you're cheating on your spouse or suspect you're being cheated on, get it out in the open.

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  • Lid should be able to lock in the open position.

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  • Keep the computer somewhere out in the open (such as in the living room) instead of allowing the child to play free games in a bedroom with a closed door.

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  • When the hunter heard the voice of the pig, he thought it was children playing a prank on him, and he said the person should step out in the open.

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  • Will you be running inside on the treadmill or outside in the open?

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  • Plein air painting, also known as painting en plein air, is painting in the open air.

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  • While riding outdoors gives you the benefit of being in the open air and taking in the scenery, stationary bikes can improve your fitness level when you increase the resistance or simulate rides on hills and valleys.

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  • Since lots of alcohol was involved in the 24-hour taping of the show, I had to remain aware of what I was doing since I didn't want be taped having sex out in the open.

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  • Pepe's now has several branches, but the original is a "must see" with it's cavernous coal ovens and pizza chefs working out in the open.

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  • Walk-in customers enjoy soups, salads and dishes prepared in the open wood-burning oven, all made with fresh seasonal ingredients.

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