How to use In-the-eyes-of in a sentence

in-the-eyes-of
  • They say that beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.

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  • My Betsy is fine looking woman, beautiful in my mind and in the eyes of most, but even I have to admit she lacks the room-stopping allure of Martha LeBlanc.

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  • Yes, Ethel confesses to appointment as the tipster's public representative and seems to be accepted as sorts, in the eyes of her growing public of readers.

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  • It would be a Catholic wedding, albeit in the rectory—but still a must in the eyes of the Calvias.

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  • To Dean, his reputation mattered only in the eyes of one person, his wife.

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  • Of course, he wouldn't want to look bad in the eyes of his family by dumping her.

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  • The precepts of the law were valuable in the eyes of the Scribes because they were the seal of Jewish particularism, the barrier erected between the world at large and the exclusive community of Yahweh's grace.

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  • Two existing fishes may be mentioned as ranking in interest with the Myrmecobius (ant-eater) in the eyes of the naturalist.

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  • Guaranteed thus against Russian attack, Italy became in the eyes of the central powers a negligible quantity, and was treated accordingly.

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  • It is the Church's representative in the eyes of the law.

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  • The strange contrast between the succession of dynasties and kings cut off by assassination in the northern kingdom, ending in the tragic overthrow of 721 B.C., and the persistent succession through three centuries of the seed of David on the throne of Jerusalem, as well as the marvellous escape of Jerusalem in 701 B.C. from the fate of Samaria, must have invested the seed of David in the eyes of all thoughtful observers with a mysterious and divine significance.

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  • In response to his complaints Nicanor was appointed governor of Judaea with power to treat with Judas, It appears that the two became friends at first, but fresh orders from Antioch made Nicanor, guilty of treachery in the eyes of Judas's partisans.

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  • Such public virtues at first counterbalanced his private vices in the eyes of the people.

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  • Hence his efforts, praiseworthy as they were from several points of view, and particularly so in regard to some details, failed to satisfy the philosophic taxonomer when generalizations and deeper principles were concerned, and in his practice in respect of certain technicalities of classification he was, in the eyes of the orthodox, a transgressor.

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  • The whole of antiquity seemed precious in the eyes of its discoverers; and even a thinker so acute as Pico di Mirandola dreamed of the possibility of extracting the essence of philosophical truth by indiscriminate collation of the most divergent doctrines.

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  • Thus Africa was originally, in the eyes of the Romans and Carthaginians alike, the country inhabited by the great tribe of Berbers or Numidians called Afarik.

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  • Its purpose was to glorify the Jewish nation in the eyes of the Roman world.

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  • Negotiations could only bring the conflict a little nearer, delay it a little longer, or supply an opportunity to either side to justify its action in the eyes of the world.

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  • There he acted the accessible prince in the eyes of the people, for the last of the Plantagenets was another of the usurpers who found favour in the eyes of the men of London.

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  • Each fresh apocalypse would in the eyes of its writer be in some degree but a fresh edition of the traditions naturally attaching themselves to great names in Israel's past, and thus the books named respectively Enoch, Noah, Ezra would to some slight extent be not pseudonymous.

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  • Such violations of holy things as making mock of the Scriptures, or even reciting them as one would ordinary literature, was sacrilege in the eyes of the rabbi.

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  • It is fair to assume that Grant would have followed other unsuccessful generals into retirement, had he not shown that, whatever his mistakes or failures, and whether he was or was not sober and temperate in his habits, he possessed the iron determination and energy which in the eyes of Lincoln and Stanton,' and of the whole Northern people, was the first requisite of their generals.

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  • The first National Lithuanian Assembly, which, however, in the eyes of the Tsar's Government was merely a revolutionary body tolerated for the time being, met at Vilnius (Vilna).

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  • It was in vain to complain, saying, " Every one that doeth evil is good in the eyes of Yahweh," or " Where is the God of judgment ?

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  • What gave them a seeming importance in the eyes of posterity was the fact that the true history of the Egyptians, Mesopotamians, Arabians and Hittites had been well-nigh forgotten.

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  • Hence the conflict which made Trajan appear in the eyes of Christians like Tertullian the most infamous of monsters.

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  • He found quarters at Passy, 1 then a suburb of Paris, in a house belonging to Le Ray de Chaumont, an active friend of the American cause, who had influential relations with the court, and through whom he was enabled to be in the fullest communication with the French government without compromising it in the eyes of Great Britain.

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  • The catechumenate, an old institution, older in most regions than the mysteries themselves, suggested and rendered feasible such wholesale theft, especially in an age in which the sacerdotal class wished to be pre-eminent, and left nothing undone to enhance in the eyes of the multitude the importance and solemnity of rites which it was their prerogative to administer.

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  • It was a capital offence in the eyes of the State to disagree with the teachings of the Church, and these, it must be remembered, included a recognition of the papal supremacy.

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  • His course, bold even to the point of rashness in the eyes of the traditionalist exegetists, was at length suspended.

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  • But, over and above this, there was probably something in the circumstances in which the canonical Gospels were composed, and in their early history, which gave them a special prestige in the eyes of the faithful.

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  • In some cases the whole object is a modern reproduction in electro-plate, but more often really old articles from which the original plating has been worn off in course of time have been replated, both equally being in the eyes of the connoisseur, unworthy of serious attention and comparatively valueless.

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  • German statesmen, under the powerful stimulus of the emperor William II., have, in the eyes of some critics, carried this secondary object of conscript training to such excess as to be detrimental to military efficiency.

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  • The coronation of a woman was in the eyes of the Russian people a scandalous innovation, and the proposed coronation was doubly scandalous in view of the base and disreputable origin of Catherine herself.

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  • Nor must it be forgotten that, in the eyes of contemporaries, the scene at Venice had none of that humiliating character which later historians have attributed to it.

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  • His active prosecution of the second task made the Rovere pope, in the eyes of Italian patriots, the hero of the century.

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  • And in the eyes of all Dorians the assured dignity thus added to Olympia would be enhanced by the fact that the protectors were the Spartan Heraclidae.

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  • After Mecca and Medina Kairawan is the most sacred city in the eyes of the Mahommedans of Africa, and constant pilgrimages are made to its shrines.

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  • The sculptures and paintings of ancient Egypt bear no trace of anything approaching scientific irrigation, but they often show the peasant baling up the water at least as early as 2000 B.C. By means of this simple plan of raising water and pouring it over the fields thousands of acres are watered every year in India, and the system has many advantages in the eyes of the peasant.

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  • Even to this day Behar, where there are extensive remains of Buddhist buildings, remains a sacred spot in the eyes of the Chinese and other Buddhist nations.

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  • At the menace of her armaments, concentrated on the Rhine, Napoleon had stopped dead in the full career of victory; Austria, in the eyes of German men, had been placed under an obligation to her rival; and Italy realized the emergence of a new military power, whose interests in antagonism to Austria were identical with her own.

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  • In that case he would have been put to shame, even in the eyes of many of his own followers, by the first poem that came to hand.

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  • The rest has been accomplished by dogmatic prejudice, which is quite capable of working other miracles besides turning a defective literary production into an unrivalled masterpiece in the eyes of believers.

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  • During the years of Unionist ascendancy Mr Asquith divided his energies between his legal work and politics; but his adhesion to Lord Rosebery (q.v.) as a Liberal Imperialist at the time of the Boer War, while it strengthened his position in the eyes of the public, put him in some difficulty with his own party, led as it was by Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, who was identified with the "proBoer" policy.

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  • We can see now that the very event which seemed, in the eyes of the world, to be the most striking proof of the success of the new movement, the conversion and strenuous support, in the 3rd century B.C., of Asoka, the most powerful ruler India had had, only hastened the decline.

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  • Goethe's dramas, on the other hand, have not, in the eyes of his nation, succeeded in holding their own beside Schiller's; but the reason is rather because Goethe, from what might be called a wilful obstinacy, refused to be bound by the conventions of the theatre, than because he was deficient in the cunning of the dramatist.

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  • This indeed comes from the late Priestly Code; but we are also told in the earlier story that "Noah found favour in the eyes of the Lord," vi.

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  • At this time prisons were primarily places of detention, not of punishment, peopled by accused persons, still innocent in the eyes of the law, and debtors guilty only of breaches of the financial rules of a commercial country, framed chiefly in the interest of the creditor.

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  • Fortunately for him he was murdered (end of January 661), thereby posthumously attaining an importance in the eyes of a large part of the Mahommedan world (Shi`a) which he had never possessed during his life.

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  • The inherent viciousness of these expedients had, however, not as yet been revealed by their inevitable results, and Mehemet Ali in the eyes of the world was at once the most enlightened and the most powerful of the sultan's valis.

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  • The more fiercely he denounced infallibility, the confessional, the sacramental system, the larger these things bulked in the eyes of Rome.

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  • He won his cause; but in the eyes of all posterity he justified the reproaches of his contemporaries, who describe him as a cruel, venal, grasping seeker after power, eager to support a despotism for the sake of honours, offices and emoluments secured for himself by a bargain with the oppressors of his country.

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  • The object of these rites is primarily to impart mystic virtue to the novice, such virtue, in the eyes of the primitive man, being always something more than social usefulness, amounting as it does to a share in the tribal luck by means of association with all it holds sacred.

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  • It arose from an attempt to demonstrate to his class the nature of the glow of reflected light sometimes seen in the eyes of animals such as the cat.

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  • The horn is sacred in the eyes of the natives.

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  • It need scarcely be said that tiles have rather increased in value than deteriorated in the eyes of the connoisseur, that the ornamentation of metal-work, wood carving and inlaying, gem and seal engraving, are exquisite of their kind, and that the carpets manufactured by skilled workmen, when left to themselves and their native patterns, are to a great extent unrivalled.

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  • As Carlyle has told in his Life of Sterling, the poet's distinction, in the eyes of the younger churchmen with philosophic interests, lay in his having recovered and preserved his Christian faith after having passed through periods of rationalism and Unitarianism, and faced the full results of German criticism and philosophy.

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  • This crime of Stilicho alone is sufficient in the eyes of Rutilius to account for the disasters that afterwards befell the city, just as Merobaudes, a generation or two later, traced the miseries of his own day to the overthrow of the ancient rites of Vesta.

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  • The ancient books, preserved in the Pali Pitakas, being mainly occupied with the details of Arahatship, lost their exclusive value in the eyes of those whose attention was being directed to the details of Bodhisatship. And the opinion that every leader in their religious circles, every teacher distinguished among them for his sanctity of life, or for his extensive learning, was a Bodhisat, who might have and who probably had inherited the karma of some great teacher of old, opened the door to a flood of superstitious fancies.

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  • These were immediately hailed as martyrs, and in the eyes of the exalted Franciscans at Naples and in Sicily and the south of France the pope was regarded as antichrist.

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  • If he were serious, it can only be said that the desperation of his circumstances had momentarily troubled the lucidity of his understanding; if the pamphlet were merely intended as a feeler after public opinion, it is surprising that he did not perceive how irretrievably he was ruining his friends in the eyes of all moderate men.

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  • Voluntary facts alone are marked in the eyes of consciousness with the characters of imputability and personality.

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  • His greatest fault in the eyes of his subjects was his love of foreigners; since John had lost Normandy the English baronage had become as national in spirit as the commons.

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  • As soon as the demand for a vigorous prosecution of the war relaxed, the Whigs could but rely on their domestic policy, in which they were strongest in the eyes of posterity but weakest in the eyes of contemporaries.

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  • Secure of the support of Rome he was concerned also to legitimize his position in the eyes of the Jews by taking, for love as well as policy, the Hasmonaean princess Mariamne to be his second wife.

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  • This was the decree of the state, and it had the effect of making him a martyr in the eyes of the populace and of bringing about the downfall of the ministry.

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  • From this time forward a great historic transformation was effected in the eyes of the bishops and of the Gallo-Romans; the Frankish chief took the Clovisar place of the ancient emperors.

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  • To make their authority felt in the provinces they had an army of officials at their disposala legacy, this, from imperial Rome who represented them in the eyes of their various peoples.

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  • To pay court to himself was the first and only duty in the eyes of a proud and haughty prince who saw and noted everything, especially any ones absence.

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  • Her refusal of the sacraments to those who would not accept the bull Unigenitus (1746) was exploited in the eyes of the masses, as in those of more enlightened people was her selfish and short-sighted resistance to the financial plans of Machault.

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  • Its internal weakness, between the danger of anarchy and the opposition of the monar chists, was extreme; and it soon became discredited by its own coups detat and by financial impotence in the eyes of a nation sick of revolution, aspiring towards peace and the resumption of economic undertakings.

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  • It was a system of Greek thought, expressed in a Semitic tongue, and modified by Oriental influences, called into existence amongst the Moslem people by the patronage of their more liberal princes, and kept alive by the intrepidity and zeal of a small band of thinkers, who stood suspected and disliked in the eyes of their nation.

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  • These allies were said to be the dynastic and monarchical ballast, and in some sort the dynastic guarantees of liberalism in the eyes of the court.

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  • It would be a Catholic wedding, albeit in the rectory—but still a must in the eyes of the Calvias.

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  • But fear of seeing disappointment in the eyes of her mentor kept her silent.

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  • No, if anything, there's more reproach in the eyes of the world.

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  • He might be a genius; but he counted for less in the eyes of authority than the worst blockhead with a title.

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  • In an age of political cronyism and corporate bullies scientists, in the eyes of the public are vulnerable to temptation.

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  • But in the eyes of Swansea City fans, Lee Trundle is God in a pair of magic daps.

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  • It was, in the eyes of the nation, primarily radio, and radio was then far too dignified to have such things.

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  • Wisdom allows me to find favor in the eyes of God.

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  • Did Hevel violate any known principle by being successful and gaining favor in the eyes of his Maker?

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  • An instant afterward he had closed the door behind us, and we had become felons in the eyes of the law.

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  • Or, in the eyes of some, a band of social misfits running their own private mafia.

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  • Others report that, feeling himself powerless to scatter the gathered clouds, and aware of his physical feebleness, he had had the moral courage to pass in the eyes of his family, which he did not wish to afflict, as the dupe of the efforts they employed to conceal the truth from him.

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  • To France and to the world Gramont was responsible for the policy which put his country definitely into the wrong in the eyes of Europe, and enabled Bismarck to administer to her the "slap in the face" (sou let) - as Gramont called it in the Chamber - by means of the mutilated "Ems telegram," which was the immediate cause of the French declaration of war on the 15th.

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  • The story of Cain and Abel, which appears to represent the nomad life as a curse, may be an attempt to explain the origin of an existence which in the eyes of the settled agriculturist was one of continual restlessness, whilst at the same time it endeavours to find a reason for the institution of blood-revenge on the theory that at some remote age a man (or tribe) had killed his brother (or brother tribe).

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  • Kruger now endeavoured to control the railway policy of the Free State, and induced that republic to agree to a treaty whereby each state bound itself to help the other whenever the independence of either should be threatened or assailed, unless the cause of quarrel was, in the eyes of the state called in to assist, an unjust one (see Orange Free State).

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  • It is impossible to offer any exhaustive classification of those who, while they rejected the teachings of the old Church, refused at the same time to conform to the particular types of Protestantism which had found favour in the eyes of the princes and been imposed by them on their subjects.

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  • The unity of opposites translated into its most abstract terms PP ing as the " identity of being and not-being," the principle in that the " real is the rational," the apparent substitution of " bloodless " categories for the substance of concrete reality gave it an air of paradox in the eyes of metaphysicians while physicists were scandalized by the premature attempts at a complete philosophy of nature and history.

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  • The coronation of a woman was in the eyes of the Russian people a scandalous innovation in any case, and the proposed coronation was doubly scandalous in view of the base and disreputable origin of Catherine herself (see Catherine I.).

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  • But he was not without care for the honor of his empire in the eyes of Europe and the outer world, and his early career in Mazandaran gave him a deeply-rooted mistrust of Russia, with the officers of which power he was in constant contact.

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  • In all these transactions, whilst full justice must be done to the force and patriotic vigour which Lord Palmerston brought to bear on the questions he took in hand, it was but too apparent that he imported into them an amount of passion, of personal animosity, and imperious language which rendered him in the eyes of the queen and of his colleagues a dangerous minister.

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  • Slavonic had been the language of the Church from the early middle ages, and was therefore hallowed in the eyes of the people and the clergy; through the political connexion with the Slavonic kingdoms of the south, Bulgaria and Servia, it had also been the language of the chancellories and of the court.

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  • But consider the position in which you are placing her and me in the eyes of society, and even of the court, he added, lowering his voice.

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  • She felt that the allurements instinct had formerly taught her to use would now be merely ridiculous in the eyes of her husband, to whom she had from the first moment given herself up entirely--that is, with her whole soul, leaving no corner of it hidden from him.

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  • Man's free will differs from every other force in that man is directly conscious of it, but in the eyes of reason it in no way differs from any other force.

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  • No, if anything there 's more reproach in the eyes of the world - and I believe the devil 's laughing at us !

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  • Other families were battling with real hardship, yet maintaining an image of respectability in the eyes of their parish.

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  • Time spent traveling, usually in bad conditions, is excessive in the eyes of many of us.

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  • He tarnished the image of Britain in the eyes of many Arabs.

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  • In the meanwhile, however, the firm 's reputation could be wrongly tarnished in the eyes of the regulator and resources expended unnecessarily.

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  • I feel empathy when I see anguish in the eyes of loved ones.

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  • While of course there isn't any substitution for you in the eyes of your baby, plenty of people can adequately care for your baby if you offer them the chance.

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  • When it comes to canary diamond rings, beauty is definitely in the eyes of the beholder.

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  • The rhythm game genre as a whole quickly began to get saturated and, in the eyes of some industry analysts, it has become somewhat stagnant as well.

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  • Unfortunately, this did nothing to mar Thompson's reputation in the eyes of his supporters.

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  • Casual gamers of today are the precursors to this, and they will become far more powerful in the eyes of the industry.

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  • This created a great deal of competition and in the eyes of many industry pundits, Microsoft started to fall behind.

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  • Airborne particles can lodge in the eyes of people at any age.

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  • The amount of pressure required to get that kind of performance from children was tantamount to abuse in the eyes of many dance teachers and parents.

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  • This will give you an idea of where you stand in the eyes of potential lenders.

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  • Equity building home improvement remodeling projects should focus on increasing a home's value in the eyes of appraisers, since they are responsible for adjusting a home's potential market value.

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  • At the same time, the true beauty of a diamond engagement ring is in the eyes of its bearer.

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  • There is no one definition of what constitutes the "best" diamond ring, but the perfect ring will be the one that is favored in the eyes of the recipient.

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  • Having your name attached to an article gives you more credibility in the eyes of prospective clients.

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  • Fendi handbags were not even a twinkle in the eyes of Adele Casagande when she opened a leather and fur shop in Italy almost 100 years ago.

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  • And it's not a particularly bad one in the eyes of many people.

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  • This lends the group more credibility in the eyes of skeptics than other groups.

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  • Hummel, best known in its native Denmark but increasing in the eyes of international audiences, has recently released a new smart-foam technology for a "customized" fit.

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  • Bree Williamson's performance as Jessica and Tess were a page right out of Slezak's book and long-time viewers felt Viki's pain as she recognized her own illness in the eyes of her daughter.

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  • Adding madame or monsieur to the end of your greeting makes it an adequate greeting in the eyes of the French.

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  • The education qualified me in the eyes of the customer.

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  • The letter should build credibility for the applicant in the eyes of the reader.

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  • Keep in mind a specific resume objective can make or break your ranking in the eyes of the employer for the position you are applying for.

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  • Not all drivers are created equal in the eyes of a car insurance company.

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  • The truth is that ultimately, when it comes to music, "best" is usually in the eyes of the beholder.

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  • The term literally translates into "daughter of the commandment" and it is during this ceremony, which is usually held at age 12, that a girl formally accepts the Jewish faith as her own as an adult in the eyes of the religion.

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  • A bat mitzvah is the first party your daughter will have when she comes of age in the eyes of her religion, so an elegant invitation can make a statement about her new found maturity.

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  • Because the event means that the children are now adults in the eyes of their religion, these ages were chosen to mirror the onset of puberty.

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