In-point sentence example

in-point
  • It ranks sixth in point of size (after Sicily) among the islands of Europe, but it is much more sparsely populated.
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  • Though the third town in the state in point of population, Alleppi is the first in commercial importance.
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  • There are many stately figures in the Roman and other museums which clearly belong to the same school as the Parthenos; but they are copies of the Roman age, and not to be trusted in point of style.
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  • Cromwell had no patience with formal pedantry of this sort; and in point of strict legality "The Rump" of the Long Parliament had little better title to authority than the officers who expelled it from the House.
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  • It is the second town in point of population in the canton, coming next after I ausanne, though inferior to the "agglomeration" known as Montreux.
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  • The scab of potatoes is another case in point.
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  • Turning now to outgrowths of a woody nature, the well-known burrs or knaurs, so common on elms and other trees are cases in point.
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  • Probably in point of number of species the preponderant family is Orchideae, though, as Hemsley remarks, they do not give character to the scenery, or constitute the bulk of the vegetation.
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  • As in the IndoMalayan sub-region, epiphytic orchids are probably most numerous in point of species, but the genera and even sub-tribes are far more restricted in their range than in the Old World; 4 sub-tribes with 74 genera of Vandeae are confined to South America, though varying in range of climate and altitude.
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  • First in point of importance comes the extraordinarily beautiful family of humming-birds (Trochilidae), with nearly 150 genera (of which only three occur in the Nearctic region) and more than 400 species.
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  • It is a minority, a minority strictly marked out by birth from other members of the commonwealth, a minority which seems further, though this point is less clearly marked, to have had on the whole the advantage in point of wealth.
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  • Henry then made his claim as coming by right line of blood from King Henry III., and through his right to recover the realm which was in point to be undone for default of governance and good law.
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  • Naturally the company named does not reach all of these points, but its line across the Andes supplies the indispensable link of communication, in the absence of which the east coast towns and the west coast towns have hitherto been as widely separated as if they had been located on different continents-indeed, far more widely separated in point of time and of freight charges than Great Britain and the United States.
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  • Their names vary in origin and probably also in point of age, and where they represent fixed territorial limits, the districts so described were in some cases certainly peopled by groups of non-Israelite ancestry.
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  • Of these the people's Crusade - prior in order of time, if only secondary in point of importance - may naturally be studied first.
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  • The legend has been followed by modern historians; but in point of fact Peter is a figure of secondary importance.
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  • Generally speaking the Arabic writings are late in point of date, and cold and jejune in style; while it must also be remembered that they are set religious works written to defend Islam.
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  • Antioch, adorned with many sumptuous buildings, as the chief town of the provinces of Asia, became in point of size the third city of the empire and an eastern Rome.
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  • In actual extent of territory the empire had receded somewhat, but in point of security and organization it now stood at its height.
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  • In 1847 a recruiting law was promulgated, reducing the period of service (until then unlimited in point of time), to five years.
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  • These four groups, however, were of unequal importance, and thanks to this arrangement the English, although weakest in point of numbers, were able to exercise the same influence in the council as if they had formed a fourth of the voters.
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  • When the Israelites settled in Canaan they found there an agricultural festival connected with the beginnings of the barley harvest, which coincided in point of date with the Passover and was accordingly associated with it.
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  • Mining, the second industry in point of importance, is dealt with above.
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  • The King's Own was a vast improvement, in point of construction, upon Frank Mildmay; and he went on, through a quick succession of tales, Newton Forster (1832), Peter Simple (1834), Jacob Faithful (1834), The Pacha of Many Tales (1835), Japhet in Search of a Father (1836), Mr Midshipman Easy (1836), The Pirate and the Three Cutters (1836), till he reached his highwater mark of constructive skill in Snarley-yow, or the Dog Fiend (1837).
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  • Of foxes certainly distinct specifically from the typical representative of the group, one of the best known is the Indian Vulpes bengalensis, a species much inferior in point of size to its European relative, and lacking the strong odour of the latter, from which it is also distinguished by the black tip to the tail and the pale-coloured backs of the ears.
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  • Of the governments which were parties in these several cases Great Britain heads the list in point of numbers, the United States of America being a good second.
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  • The earliest temple in Paestum, the socalled Basilica, must in point of style be associated with the temples D and F at Selinus, and is therefore to be dated about 57 0 -554 B.C.'
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  • The most famous of the temples of Paestum, the so-called temple of Neptune, comes next in point of date (about 420 B.C.).
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  • Many forms of clothing, moreover, seem to call attention to those parts of the body of which, under the conditions of Western civilization at the present day, it aims at the concealment; certain articles of dress worn by the New Hebrideans, the Zulu-Xosa tribes, certain tribes of Brazil and others, are cases in point.
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  • The fleet of steamers and barges navigating the Elbe is in point of fact greater than on any other German river.
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  • Monro arrived and recommended evacuation of the peninsula, the Ottoman host gathered about the Dardanelles was already decidedly stronger in point of numbers than was the army which was clinging to patches of littoral without a sheltered base.
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  • The second river in the province in point of size is the Salween, a huge river, believed from the volume of its waters to rise in the Tibetan mountains to the north of Lhasa.
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  • His contemporaries, with the exception of Hume, regarded his writings as of great importance; in point of fact they are superficial.
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  • He was not only the first in point of time, and according to ancient testimony one of the first in point of merit, among the comic poets of Rome, and in spirit, though not in form, the earliest of the line of Roman satirists, but he was also the oldest of the national poets.
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  • Thus was established a political combination in which Lithuania in point of territory was three times the size of Poland.
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  • The earliest English tragedy, Gorboduc (1565), the Mirror for Magistrates (1587), and Shakespeare's Lear, are instances in point.
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  • It is especially suitable to gold containing little silver and base metals - a character of Australian gold - but it yields to the sulphuric acid and electrolytic methods in point of economy.
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  • Of the Portuguese inhabitants more than three-fourths are natives of Macao - a race very inferior in point of physique to their European ancestors.
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  • The point is of no very great significance, however, since no one has pretended that the Western civilization compared with the Eastern in point of antiquity; and in any event, no amount of negative evidence weighs a grain in the balance against the positive evidence of the Cretan inscriptions.
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  • None of them, in point of fact, has held its ground, and even his proposal to denote unknown quantities by the vowels A, E, I, 0, u, Y - the consonants B, c, &c., being reserved for general known quantities - has not been taken up. In this denotation he followed, perhaps, some older contemporaries, as Ramus, who designated the points in geometrical figures by vowels, making use of consonants, R, S, T, &c., only when these were exhausted.
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  • No chronicle, however, is known to exist which actually states that Edmund Crouchback was thus set aside; and in point of fact he had no deformity at all, while Edward was six years his senior.
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  • His biographer attributes the comparative failure of the Clavis to its inferiority in point of style, but the crudeness of his thought had quite as much to do with his failure to gain a hearing.
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  • This system presents the greatest advantages in point of economy of driving power, especially where the gradients are variable, but is expensive in first cost, and is not well suited for curves, and branch roads cannot be worked continuously, as a fresh set of pulleys worked by bevel gearing is required for each branch.
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  • It is noteworthy, however, that in some instances there appears to have been a retrograde modification from the selenodont towards the bunodont type, the hippopotamus being a case in point.
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  • In Strabo's time they appear to have been ruled by a single king, though previously there were twenty-six, each one ruling over a community distinct only in point of language.
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  • The Massachusetts railroad commission, though preceded in point of time by that of New Hampshire of 1844, was the real beginning of modern state commissions.
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  • As a wild animal, then, the aurochs appears to have ceased to exist in the early part of the 17th century; but as a species it survives, for the majority of the domesticated breeds of European cattle are its descendants, all diminished in point of size, and some departing more widely from the original type than others.
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  • This influence is almost equally remarkable in point of matter and in point of form.
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  • Now as Altyn-tagh 2 is an accepted, though in point of fact erroneous, name for Astin-tagh, it is clear that Grenard considers the main Kuen-lun ranges to be continued directly by the Astin-tagh.
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  • 3 The twin ranges of the Astin-tagh are fairly equivalent in point of magnitude and regularity; but while the Lower Range, on the north, sensibly decreases in altitude towards the east,the Upper Range, on the south, maintains its general altitude in a remarkable way, and is gapped by steep, wild, deeply incised transverse glens directed towards the north, and generally fenced in by dark precipitous walls of rock.
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  • But between the Chimen-tagh, the Ara-tagh and the Kalta-alaghan there is comparatively little difference in point of elevation, namely, 730 ft.
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  • (In the following statistics those for the city are enclosed within brackets.) In 1900 this population was thus divided in point of religion: Romanists, 67,162 (49,9 6 5), Protestants, 62,400 (52,121), and Jews 1119 (r081).
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  • Almost every acre of densely populated Masovia was in the hands of her sturdy, ultra-conservative squires, in point of culture far below their brethren in Great and Little Poland.
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  • Both in point of view and in phraseology the compiler shows himself to be strongly influenced by Deuteronomy.
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  • - In point of age the Samaritan Pentateuch furnishes the earliest external witness to the Hebrew text.
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  • But in point of fact the function of the new prophecy was not to preserve but to destroy Israel, if Israel still meant the actual Hebrew nation, with its traditional national life.
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  • A very important evolutionary principle is that in such secondary returns to primary phases lost organs are never recovered, but new organs are acquired; hence the force of Dollo's dictum that evolution is irreversible from the point of view of structure, while frequently reversible, or recurrent, in point of view of the conditions of environment and adaptation.
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  • The inscription of Scoppito shows that at the time at which it was written the upper Aternus valley must be counted Vestine, not Sabine, in point of dialect.
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  • The aim is not self-destruction, but self-preservation; and yet the ethics of Manichaeism appears in point of fact as thoroughly ascetic. The Manichaean had, above all, to refrain from sensual enjoyment, shutting himself up against it by three seals - the signaculum oris, manus and sinus.
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  • Nevertheless, in most states the bench is respectable in point of character, while in some it is occasionally adorned by men of the highest eminence.
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  • It is, on the whole, admirably clear, definite and concise, probably superior in point of technique to all the documents since framed on its model.
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  • There has been, in point of fact, no permanent shifting of weight or strength from any one organ of government to any other.
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  • Papineau, The Most Insistent Demagogue Of 1837, Must Certainly Be Named Among The Founders, For The Sake Of Speeches Which Came Before Written Works Both In Point Of Time And Popular Esteem.
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  • (2) The Son as absolute high priest, in an order transcending the Aaronic (vii.) and relative to a Tabernacle of ministry and a Covenant higher than the Mosaic in point of reality and finality (viii., ix.).
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  • The towns next in point of size are Gorlitz, Liegnitz, K6nigshiitte, Beuthen, Schweidnitz, Neisse and Glogau.
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  • The custom from the first, he says, had been to feast on one and the same day the two births, much as they differed in sacramental import and in point of time.
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  • The scions should be taken off some weeks before they are wanted, and half-buried in the earth, since the stock at the time of grafting should in point of vegetation be somewhat in advance of the graft.
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  • Though of small size, and by no means remarkable in point of architecture, it is interesting as the only temple that has come down to us in a good state of preservation of those dedicated to the Egyptian goddess, whose worship became so popular under the Roman Empire.
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  • In respect of its area, the German empire occupied in 1909 the third place among European countries, and in point of population the second, coming in point of area immediately after Russia and Austria-Hungary, and in population next to Russia.
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  • While the conquest was going on, the towns that remained unconquered gained in point of local freedom.
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  • It was only after that date that democracy was suppressed in the Peloponnesian League, and even then Mantinea remained democratic. In point of fact, it was only when Lysander became the representative of Spartan foreign policy - i.e.
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  • For the most part the old prophets only serve to introduce a little variety in point of form, for they are almost in every case facsimiles of Mahomet himself.
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  • The chief defect of the Digest is in point of scientific arrangement, a matter about which the Roman lawyers, perhaps one may say the ancients generally, cared very little.
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  • Nothing can exceed the fulness and variety of invention, or the searching force and precision of detail in this picture; nor does it leave so much to desire as several of the master's other paintings in point of colour-harmony and pleasurable general effect.
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  • Its name must not be taken to imply that it was used by the ancients; in point of fact the manufacture of this substance dates back only to 1796.
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  • A case in point is the employment of hydraulic lime in place of Portland cement as grouting outside the cast-iron tubes used for lining tunnels made by the shield system.
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  • It should be noted that, according to Scottish usage, police " includes drainage, the suppression of nuisances, paving, lighting and cleansing, in addition to the provision of a constabulary force, and that in point of fact, paradoxical as it appears, the bulk of the police burghs do not manage their police.
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  • The licentiateship has been preserved in the faculties of arts, science and laws, and is in point of difficulty about equal to the pass degree examinations of the university of London, though differing in the nature of the tests.
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  • It is to be observed, however, that the meaning of geographical and ethnical terms for culture in general must be properly tested - the term " Phoenician " is a conspicuous case in point.
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  • Its vegetation is in point of fact of a composite character, and is constituted by the meeting and more or less blending of adjoining floras, - those of Persia and the south-eastern Mediterranean area to the north-west, of Siberia to the north, of China to the east, and of Malaya to the south-east.
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  • Formerly Norfolk trotters held the first place in point of number, but their place has been taken in recent years by English thoroughbreds, Arabs, and especially Australians.
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  • Ali in point of fact had no real right to the succession, and moreover was apparently actuated not by piety but by ambition and the desire of power, so that men of penetration, even although they condemned Othman's method of government, yet refused to recognize his successor.
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  • Eisenach, the second district in size, and the first in point of natural beauty, stretches in a narrow strip from north to south on the extreme western boundary of Thuringia, and includes parts of the church lands of Fulda, of Hesse and of the former countship of Henneberg.
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  • On the ist of August Palmerston wrote to Ponsonby impressing upon him that the representatives of the powers, in their communications with the Porte, "should act not only simultaneously in point of time, but identically in point of manner" - a principle important in view of later developments.
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  • There is always danger of failure when an attempt is thus made 1 It is understood that, in point of fact, the Princess Wittgenstein was determined to marry Liszt; and as neither he nor her family wished their connexion to take this form, Cardinal Hohenlohe quietly had him ordained.
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  • The modification of motion and the modification of force take place together, and are connected by certain laws; but in the study of the theory of machines, as well as in that of pure mechanics, much advantage has been gained in point of clearness and simplicity by first considering alone the principles of the modification of motion, which are founded upon what is now known as Kinematics, and afterwards considering the principles of the combined modification 01 motion and force, which are founded both on geometry and on the laws of dynamics.
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  • Murray,' Homeric art does not rise above the stage of decoration, applied to objects in common use; while in point of style it is characterized by a richness and variety of ornament which is in the strongest contrast to the simplicity of the best periods.
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  • Wines Of Austria-Hungary In point of quantity Austria-Hungary takes the fourth place among the wine-producing nations.
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  • The wine industry in Greece, which in ancient times and during the middle ages was of great importance, has now become, at any rate in point of quality, quite insignificant.
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  • The session, however, was not far advanced when the question of patents was brought up; a determined attack was made upon the very ones of which Bacon had been in dread, and it was even proposed to proceed against the referees (Bacon and Montagu) who had certified that there was no objection to them in point of law.
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  • The principal of these, in point of numbers, are the Nagas, who inhabit the hills and forests along the eastern and south-eastern frontier of Assam.
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  • Gregory says he had the legend from the interpretation of "a certain Syrian"; in point of fact the story is common in Syriac sources.
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  • (590628) is distinguished by the surname of Parvez (the conqueror), though, in point of fact, he was immeasurably inferior to a powerful sovereign like his grandfather, or even to a competent general.
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  • The delegation of the franchise to the liverymen was thus, in point of fact, the selection of a superior class of householders to represent the rest.
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  • From 1891 to 1900 San Francisco dropped from the fifth to the eighth rank among the customs districts of the United States in point of aggregate commerce (the ports of Puget Sound rising in the same period from the twentieth to the tenth place).
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  • In particular he maintained that the constant pressure K, which occurs in Laplace's theory, and which on that theory is very large, must be in point of fact very small, but the equation of equilibrium from which he concluded this is itself defective.
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  • It is the best-built port of the sultanate and is generally second in point of trade, which is carried on mainly with Marseilles, London, Gibraltar and the Canaries, the principal exports being almonds, goat-skins, gums and olive-oil, and the principal imports cotton goods, sugar and tea.
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  • In the alternative, they would be available, with some delay in point of time, to reinforce the army in Thrace.
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  • The Friedrich Wilhelm University, although young in point of foundation, has long outstripped its great rival Leipzig in numbers, and can point with pride to the fact that its teaching staff has yielded to none in the number of illustrious names.
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  • It was never complete in point of territory: there were always two, and almost to the last three, capitals - the Lombard one, Pavia; the Latin one, Rome; the Greek one, Ravenna; and the Lombards never could get access to the sea.
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  • He was right both in point of humanity and of policy.
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  • Even in feudal times suzerainty might be merely nominal, an instance in point being the suzerainty or over-lordship of the papacy over Naples.
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  • In favour of the middle date, which has, as far as recent authorities are concerned, the weight of consent in its favour, the testimony of Guy Patin (1601-1672), a witness of some merit and not too far removed in point of time, is invoked.
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  • The form of his book was above all things popular, and the popular French literature of the middle ages as distinguished from the courtly and literary literature, which was singularly pure, can hardly be exceeded in point of coarseness.
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  • Moreover, in point of fact, all natural wings, and all artificial wings constructed on the natural type, invariably strike downwards and forwards.
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  • Such confirmation, however, though necessary to enable the council to enforce them, does not itself confer upon them any validity in point of law.
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  • There not only the littoral from (say) Sukhum-Kaleh to Batum but the inland parts of the basin of the Rion will bear comparison with any of the provinces of Italy in point of fertility, and in richness and variety of products.
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  • An example in point is that of pyramid-building.
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  • In 1749 he published a memoir of David Brainerd; the latter had lived in his family for several months, had been constantly attended by Edwards's daughter Jerusha, to whom he had been engaged to be married, and had died at Northampton on the 7th of October 1747; and he had been a case in point for the theories of conversion held by Edwards, who had made elaborate notes of Brainerd's conversations and confessions.
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  • Its position on the side of India nearest to Europe, its advantages as a port and a railway centre, and its monopoly of the cotton industry, are counteracted by the fact that the region which it serves cannot vie with the valley of the Ganges in point of fertility and has no great waterway like the Ganges or Brahmaputra.
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  • This is remarkable only in point of velocity.
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  • Parswa is said, in the Jain chronology, to have been born two hundred years before Maha-vira (that is, about 760 B.C.); but the only conclusion that it is safe to draw from this statement is that Parswa was considerably earlier in point of time than Mahavira.
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  • It is the chief manufacturing town in the kingdom, ranks next to Dresden and Leipzig in point of population, and is one of the principal commercial and industrial centres of Germany.
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  • In like manner changes in the ecclesiastical law are made directly by parliament in the ordinary course of legislation, and in point of fact a very large portion of the existing ecclesiastical law consists of acts of parliament.
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  • In course of time this policy had the desired effect, though the expression "Borders" proved too convenient geographically to be dropped, the king's proposed amendment being in point of fact merely sentimental and, in the relative positions then and now of England and Scotland, meaningless.
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  • Duluth, on Lake Superior, is, surprising to say, the second port in the United States in point of tonnage.
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  • Hanau is the principal commercial and manufacturing town in the province, and stands next to Cassel in point of population.
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  • Fourthly, if we examine things fairly, we see that in point of fact all knowledge depends on certain hypotheses, or facts taken for granted.
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  • The largest single item in point of value was the product ($3,053,008) of the slaughtering and meat-packing establishments.
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  • (2) In point of fact, all logicians further confine the syllogism to arguments in which the terms are related as subject and predicate (or attribute in the widest sense).
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  • Leipzig is one of the most enterprising and prosperous of German towns, and in point of trade and industries ranks among German cities immediately after Berlin and Hamburg.
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  • His writings are: - The Privileges of the University of Oxford in point of Visitation (1647) - a tract answered by Prynne in the University of Oxford's Plea Rejected; 18 sermons whereof 15 preached before the king ...
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  • And the whole local colour of the work, in point of dialect and also as regards the manners and customs described, clearly belongs to Egypt as it was from the 14th to the 16th century.
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  • This translation, however, left much to be desired in point of accuracy, and especially failed to reproduce the colour of the original with the exactness which those who do not read merely for amusement must desire.
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  • The cairngorm funicular case referred to under above Question 1b is a case in point.
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  • The hard disk personal video recorder is a case in point.
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  • A case in point is the feature lighting of the entrance stairwell at Lloyds Court in Newcastle.
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  • Nor does it mean that democracy can't deliver economic takeoff: India is a case in point.
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  • The recent vogue for product centered cause related marketing initiatives is such a case in point.
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  • As a bit of a trade wonk, I'm particularly interested in point three on the ' development box ' .
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  • The Fitzroy river is the second in point of size; it drains an area of 55,600 sq.
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  • As Theodoret had previously been a constant defender of Nestorius it was impossible for him to concur in this sentence upon his unfortunate friend with a clear conscience, and in point of fact he did not change his own dogmatic position.
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  • The views which excited this denunciation were mainly these: (I) Jovinian held that in point of merit, so far as their domestic state was concerned, virgins, widows and married persons who had been baptized into Christ were on a precisely equal footing; (2) those who with full faith have been regenerated in baptism cannot be overthrown (or, according to another reading, tempted) of the devil; (3) to abstain from meats is not more praiseworthy than thankfully to enjoy them; (4) all who have preserved their baptismal grace shall receive the same reward in the kingdom of heaven.'
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  • In connexion with this point it should be noticed that, unlike what occurs in the yak, the wild animal is not larger than the tame one, although it is incorrect to say that the former is decidedly the inferior of the latter in point of stature.
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  • First of these in point of time as well as in importance is the Nouveau recueil des planches coloriees d'oiseaux of Temminck Temminck and Langier, intended as a sequel to the Planches en- luminees of D'Aubenton before noticed, and like that and Langier.
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  • The account in the Book of Kings is so phrased that one might naturally infer from it that Sennacherib was assassinated by his sons immediately after his return from the disastrous campaign in Palestine; but in point of fact, as it now appears, the Assyrian king survived that campaign by twenty years.
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  • It follows in the main the line of Hooker and Calvin, but adds (§ 6) an important definition: "Excommunication being a spirituall punishment it doth not prejudice the excommunicate in, nor deprive him of his civil rights, therfore touched' not princes, or other magistrates, in point of their civil dignity or authority.
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  • When these proposals were passed (apparently in a packed assembly outside the walls), a Constituent Assembly of loo was elected, nominally by the 5000, who as yet were a mere phantom body, in point of fact by the leading conspirators.
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  • His favourite author was beyond all doubt Plutarch, and his own explicit confession makes it undeniable that Plutarch's translator, Jacques Amyot, was his master in point of vocabulary and (so far as he took any lessons in it) of style.
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  • (See post, 33.) Candidates for the office of elector are also nominated by party conventions, and the persons who are in each state chosen to be electorsthey are chosen by a strict party voteare expected to vote, and do in point of fact vote, for the presidential candidates named by their respective parties at the national conventions.
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  • As the Federal Constitution, which emanates directly from the people, is the supreme law of the land everywhere, any statute passed by any lower authority (whether the Federal Congress or a state legislature) which contravenes the Constitution must necessarily be invalid in point of law, just as in.
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  • It is due to the magnificent services of the municipal council that the city was enabled to assimilate the hosts of newcomers, and it is to its indefatigable exertions that Berlin has in point of organization become the model city of Europe.
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  • The most important mine in point of area, accessibility and output is Raniganj, with an area of 500 sq.
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  • The incident of Jesus rebuking the man who called him good is a case in point.
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  • A case in point is the rigorous testing that goes on with pharmacological products.
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  • Case in point is Evolution; there 's an awful lot of sparkle in the eyes going on during that.
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  • Nor does it mean that democracy ca n't deliver economic takeoff: India is a case in point.
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  • As a bit of a trade wonk, I 'm particularly interested in point three on the ' development box '.
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  • With the vast array of features available in point and shoots, it is possible to find a camera to suit almost any need.
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  • Kirsten Dunst was born on April 30, 1982 in Point Pleasant, New Jersey to Inez and Klaus Dunst.
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  • The current collection is a case in point.
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  • The black and white striped suit, which is the first item you'll see in the one piece section of the Salinas Swimwear website, is a case in point.
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  • Case in point is the Nautica Rugby Stripe Tankini set.
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  • Case in point is the Lingerie Fringe Cupless Bra and G-Sting Set.
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  • Love 'em, hate 'em -whatever, but their story is a case in point of the changes afoot in the music industry, and how the internet has leveled the playing field.
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  • Two cases in point - the movies The Rose and Beaches, which are both among Midler's most well known acting roles and the sources of some of her best known music.
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