In-common sentence example

in-common
  • You two have a lot in common.
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  • The only thing she had in common with that girl was the fact that they were both poor.
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  • And to think she once thought she and Alex had nothing in common.
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  • Articles written in common soon led to a complete literary partnership, and 1831 there appeared in the Revue de Paris a joint novel entitled Prima Donna and signed Jules Sand.
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  • What did she and Alex have in common?
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  • Sackler and DeLeo, partners for nearly 12 years, had more in common than their constant arguing would suggest.
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  • Both recognized from the very start that aside from sex, they had absolutely nothing in common.
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  • It was times like this that she realized how much they had in common.
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  • Dad, the only thing Denton and I have in common is that we're both Homo Sapiens.
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  • We enjoy each other's company and we have a lot in common.
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  • As a painter of nature she has much in common with Wordsworth.
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  • This was the name in common use when the Jesuits entered China towards the end of the 16th century, and began to send home accurate information about China.
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  • They have so much in common that they must have drawn from the same current bodies of thought, or there must have been borrowing in one direction or the other.
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  • With respect to the calculating rods, he mentions in the dedication that they had already found so much favour as to be almost in common use, and even to have been carried to foreign countries; and that he has been advised to publish his little work relating to their mechanism and use, lest they should be put forth in some one else's name.
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  • It was a long time before decimal arithmetic came into general use, and all through the 17th century exponential marks were in common use.
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  • The Presbyterianism now visible in England is of Scottish origin and Scottish type, and beyond the fact of embracing a few congregations which date from, or before, the Act of Uniformity and the Five Mile Act, has little in common with the Presbyterianism which was for a brief period by law established.
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  • As a step towards such hypothesis it has been noted that the Antarctic, the South African, and the Australian floras have many types in common.
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  • Again, while they differ physically from neighbouring races, while there is practically nothing in common between them and the Malays, the Polynesians, or the Papuan Melanesians, they agree in type so closely among themselves that they must be regarded as forming one race.
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  • Saxon was at this period the common title of all the north German tribes; there was but little difference between Frisians and Saxons either in race or language, and they were closely united for some four centuries in common resistance to the encroachments of the Frankish power.
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  • While therefore Cromwell's administration became in practice little different from that of Strafford, the aims and ideals of the two statesmen had nothing in common.
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  • Small cuttlefish are in common use as an article of diet.
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  • It is one of the strongest instances furnished by history of the fascination exercised by an idea that the Italians themselves should have grown to glory in this dependence of their nation upon Caesars who had nothing but a name in common with the Roman Imperator of the past.
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  • As regards the Brahmanas of the Rigveda, two of such works have been handed down, the Aitareya and the Kaushitaki (or Sankhayana)-Brahmanas, which have a large amount of their material in common.
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  • A survey of the vegetable kingdom indicates that evolution has proceeded, on the whole, from the simple to the complex; at the same time, as has been already mentioned, evidence of reduction or degeneration in common.
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  • Berachiah, 2 the compiler of the "Fox Fables" (which have much in common with the "Ysopet" of Marie de France), is generally thought to have lived in Provence in the 13th century, but according to others in England in the 12th century.
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  • With that form of art the pointed style of Sicily has nothing in common.
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  • A Sicilian church has nothing in common with a French or an English church; it is sometimes purely Oriental, sometimes a basilica with pointed arches.
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  • Nor was it strictly a nobility of office, though it had more in common with that than with either of the other two.
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  • The Maoris are Polynesians, and, in common with the majority of their kinsfolk throughout the Pacific, they have traditions which point to Savaii, originally Savaiki, the largest island of the Samoan group, as their cradleland.
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  • Tribal lands were held in common and each man was entitled to a share in the products.
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  • But on the whole, the Crimean flora has little in common with that of the Caucasus.'
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  • Lastly, the rite of circumcision, which the Hebrews practised in common with their Semitic neighbours as well as the Egyptians, belonged to ages long anterior to the time of Moses.
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  • After so many years the commentators had lost the key to this unusual term, and only knew that in common Greek "myrmex" meant an ant.
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  • The two sections of the Hebrews who had had so much in common were scarcely severed by a border-line only a few miles to the north of Jerusalem.
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  • The origin of the Cretan laws was of course attributed to Minos, but they had much in common with those of the other Dorian states, as well as with those of Lycurgus at Sparta, which were, indeed, according to one tradition, copied in great measure from those already existing in Crete.'
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  • Elyrus stood at the foot of the White Mountains, just 1 Among the features common to the two were the syssitia, public tables, at which all the citizens dined in common.
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  • The south-eastern parts of the Malay Archipelago have much in common with the Australian continent, to which they adjoin, though their affinities are chiefly Indian.
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  • North China and Japan also have many forms of life in common.
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  • In the substance of their answer to Hume, the two philosophers have therefore much in common.
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  • They open in common with, or near to, or, more rarely, into, glands which are not certainly comparable to the atria of the Limicolae.
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  • Upon the disgrace of Vauban, whose Dime royale had much in common with Boisguilbert's plan, Boisguilbert violently attacked the controller in a pamphlet, Supplement au detail de la France.
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  • Their mode of hair-dressing (mop-fashion) earned them, in common with the Hadendoa, the name of "Fuzzy-wuzzies" among the British soldiers in the campaigns of 1884-98.
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  • But the two were strongly attached to one another, and practically lived in common.
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  • As the Hebrews did not mutilate any of their animals, bulls were in common use.
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  • 5 It is significant that notwithstanding this he did not figure the pterylosis of any one of them, and the thought suggests itself that, though his editor assures us he had convinced himself that the group must be here shoved in (eingeschoben is the word used), the intrusion is rather due to the necessity which Nitzsch, in common with most men of his time (the Quinarians excepted), felt for deploying the whole series of birds into line, in which case the proceeding may be defensible on the score of convenience.
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  • The two authors were in constant communication, and the classifications they adopted had much in common.
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  • The offendicula have sometimes been looked upon as an anticipation of Francis Bacon's Idola, but the two classifications have little in common.
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  • The term " Catholic " does not occur in the old Roman symbol; but Professor Loofs includes it in his reconstruction, based on typical phrases in common use at the time of the ante-Nicene creeds of the East.
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  • The bulk of the population was of Arab race, and though Aramaic was used as the written language, in common intercourse Arabic had by no means disappeared.
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  • Before this great gathering of all Christian Europe he proclaimed a Crusade for the year 1217, and in common deliberation it was resolved that a truce of God should reign for the next four years, while for the same time all trade with the Levant should cease.
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  • A fourth cause, on which many writers dwelt, particularly at the time when the suppression of the Templars was in question, was the dissensions between the two orders of Templars and Hospitallers, and the selfish policy of merely pursuing their own interest which was followed by both in common.
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  • Their language, which is neither monosyllabic nor tonic, has nothing in common with that of the MonAnnam group. It has, moreover, been pointed out that had the Malays been driven southwards by the stronger races of the mainland of Asia, it might be expected that the people inhabiting the country nearest to the border between Siam and Malaya would belong to the Malayan and not to the Mon-Annam or Mon-Khmer stock.
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  • During the struggle of Spain against Napoleon, the island, in common with the other American dominions, was represented in the Spanish Cortes and had its first legislative assembly.
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  • Marine Gasteropods are occasionally termed "sea-snails," and the compounds "pond-snails," "river-snails," "water-snails" are in common use.
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  • Glauber showed how to prepare hydrochloric acid, spiritus salis, by heating rock-salt with sulphuric acid, the method in common use to-day; and also nitric acid from saltpetre and arsenic trioxide.
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  • Restricting ourselves to compounds resulting from the fusion of benzene rings, we have first to consider naphthalene, C10H8, which consists of two benzene rings having a pair of carbon atoms in common.
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  • For substances of a difficultly combustible nature he adopted the method in common use to-day, viz.
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  • This method, as originally proposed, is not in common use, but has been superseded by Kjeldahl's method, since the nitrogen generally comes out too low.
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  • The oxidation with nitric acid in sealed tubes at a temperature of 150° to 200° for aliphatic compounds, and 250° to 260° for aromatic compounds, is in common use, for both the sulphur and phosphorus can be estimated, the former being oxidized to sulphuric acid and the latter to phosphoric acid.
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  • Debussy has this in common with Strauss, that he too regards harmonies as pure physical sensations; but he differs from Strauss firstly in systematically refusing to regard them as anything else, and secondly in his extreme sensibility to harshness.
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  • A joint conference between representatives of the two bodies, held in London in 1900, did much towards securing the uniformity of ideas which is so essential between associations having interests in common.
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  • The most striking difference between Zoroaster's doctrine of God and the old religion of India lies in this, that while in the Avesta the evil spirits are called daeva (Modern Persian div), the Aryans of India, in common with the Italians, Celts and Letts, gave the name of deva to their good spirits, the spirits of light.
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  • By the aid of these auxiliaries the fort of Ala Shehr was captured (1392), Manuel Palaeologus, son of the emperor, being allowed, in common with many other princes, the privilege of serving in the Turkish army, then the best organized and disciplined force extant.
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  • The Christian population, who in common with their Mussul- Macedo ' 'Questio man fellow subjects suffered from the defective methods of government of their rulers, had at least before them the example of their brethren - Greeks, Bulgarians or Servians - dwelling in independent kingdoms under Christian governments on the other side of the frontier.
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  • The reagents in common use are: Millon's reagent, a solution of mercuric nitrate containing nitrous acid, this gives a violet-red coloration; nitric acid, which gives a yellow colour, turning to gold when treated with ammonia (xanthoproteic reaction); fuming sulphuric acid, which gives violet solutions; and caustic potash and copper sulphate, which, on warming, gives a red to violet coloration (biuret reaction).
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  • All these Germanic tribes, which were known from the 3rd century onwards by the generic name of Franks, doubtless spoke a similar dialect and were governed by customs which must scarcely have differed from one another; but this was all they had in common.
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  • According to the language in common use, 95% of the population was German, 4.66% was Czech, and the remainder was composed of Poles, Slovaks, Ruthenians, Croatians and Italians.
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  • The second includes definitions of technical terms in common use, together with so much of the elementary theory as is necessary for understanding the experimental work described in subsequent portions of the article; a number of formulae and results are given for purposes of reference, but the mathematical reasoning by which they are obtained is not generally detailed, authorities being cited whenever the demonstrations are not likely to be found in ordinary textbooks.
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  • The Arachnida form a distinct class or line of descent in the grade Euarthropoda, diverging (perhaps in common at the start with the Crustacea) from primitive Euarthropods, which gave rise also to the separate lines of descent known as the classes Diplopoda, Crustacea, Chilopoda and Hexapoda.
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  • In the 18th century, in common with most of Anatolia, its actual lord was a Dere Bey.
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  • For some years Natal, in common with the other countries of South Africa, had suffered from the absence of anything resembling a strong government among the Boers of the Transvaal, neighbours of Natal on the north.
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  • The Hungarian parliament has power to legislate on all matters concerning Hungary, but for Croatia-Slavonia only on matters which concern these provinces in common with Hungary.
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  • Each symbol a is associated with its supplement a which satisfies the equivalences a+a = i, aa = o, the latter of which means that a and a have no region in common.
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  • (The root jabara is also met with in the word algebrista, which means a " bone-setter," and is still in common use in Spain.) The same derivation is given by Lucas Paciolus (Luca Pacioli), who reproduces the phrase in the transliterated form alghebra e almucabala, and ascribes the invention of the art to the Arabians.
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  • The name l'arte magiore, the greater art, is designed to distinguish it from l'arte minore, the lesser art, a term which he applied to the modern arithmetic. His second variant, la regula de la cosa, the rule of the thing or unknown quantity, appears to have been in common use in Italy, and the word cosa was preserved for several centuries in the forms toss or algebra, cossic or algebraic, cossist or algebraist, &c. Other Italian writers termed it the Regula rei et census, the rule of the thing and the product, or the root and the square.
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  • He then proceeds to discuss various artifices for the simplification of equations, giving methods which are still in common use.
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  • If, as in common flint-glass spectroscopes, there is only one dispersing substance, f Sy ds = Sµ.s, where s is simply the thickness traversed by the ray.
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  • We need not suppose that the Chronicler quotes from the Psalter or vice versa, the matter which they have in common being probably derived from certain traditional songs current among the Levitical singers.
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  • They, in common with the great bulk of the Uitlanders, recognized that the state had every right to have its independence respected.
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  • It is not in virtue of his great age alone that this can be said of him; he actually had much in common with the beaux esprits of the 17th century, as well as with the philosophes of the 18th.
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  • In early Egypt men of rank would be followed by a servant carrying a pair of sandals in case of need; but in the New Kingdom they were in common use, although a typical difference is observed when princes appear unshod in the presence of the Pharaoh, who wears sandals him self.
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  • In the mucinoid conditions, usually termed "mucoid " and " colloid " degenerations, we have closely allied substances which, like the normal mucins of the body, belong to the glucoproteids, and have in common similar physical characters.
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  • It is now known to have nothing in common with vegetable cellulose, but is regarded as one of the many albuminoid substances existing in the body under pathological conditions.
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  • If the particle enveloped by the protoplasm be of an organic nature, such as a bacterium, it undergoes digestion, and ultimately becomes destroyed, and accordingly the term " phagocyte " is now in common use to indicate cells having the above properties.
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  • George Ernest Stahl (1660-1734) was for more than twenty years professor of medicine at Halle, and thus a colleague of Hoffmann, whom he resembled in constructing a complete theoretical system, though their systems had little or nothing in common.
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  • These names are all in common use, though their formal application is in some cases extended over several districts of which the ancient names remain familiar.
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  • The elections in Common Hall were by the whole body of citizens until Edward I.'s reign, citizens were then specially summoned to Common Hall by the mayor.
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  • Various alterations were subsequently made and now the qualification of electors at the election of the corporate offices of lord mayor, sheriffs, chamberlain and minor offices in Common Hall is that of being a liveryman of a livery company and an enrolled freeman of London.
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  • Most varieties, however, have certain qualities in common.
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  • Long experience has fixed the mixtures, so far as ordinary furnace temperatures are concerned, which produce the varieties of glass in common use.
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  • In England directly-heated coal furnaces are still in common use, which in many cases are stoked by mechanical feeders.
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  • Since the authority of the League rested primarily on the moral support of its members, allied in common trade interests and acquiescing in the able leadership of Lubeck, its only means of compulsion was the "Verhansung," or exclusion of a recalcitrant town from the benefits of the trade privileges of the League.
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  • Padua, in common with north-eastern Italy, suffered severely from the invasion of the Huns under Attila (452).
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  • Until 1719 the Indians held the land in common.
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  • 1 does not cover a prophecy which certainly falls after Hezekiah's death, and the style has nothing in common with the earlier part of the book.
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  • Next, as all investigation proceeds from that which is known best to that which is unknown or less well known, and as, in social states, it is the collective phenomenon that is more easy of access to the observer than its parts, therefore we must consider and pursue all the elements of a given social state together and in common.
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  • His ambition had nothing in common with the vulgar eagerness for place and pay and social standing.
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  • Apart from the Churches, men like Carlyle and Matthew Arnold - with whom he had much in common - influenced him; while Herbert Spencer in England and Comte in France afforded the antithesis needful to the dialectical development of his own views.
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  • The first rhinoceros seen alive in Europe since the time when these animals, in common with nearly all the large remarkable beasts of both Africa and Asia, were exhibited in the Roman shows, was of this species.
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  • The Journal litteraire (1713-1722, 1729-1736) was founded by a society of young men, who made it a rule to discuss their contributions in common.
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  • It gives an attractive picture of Fox's good-humour, and of his enjoyment of the "species of minor comedy which is constantly exhibited in common life."
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  • The judgment purported to "synodically condemn the said volume as containing teaching contrary to the doctrine received by the United Church of England and Ireland, in common with the whole Catholic Church of Christ."
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  • An amphictyonic league, meeting in common rites at the temple of Hera on the Lacinian promontory, fostered a feeling of unity among them.
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  • Dorian states usually had in common the " Doric " dialect, a peculiar calendar and cycle of festivals of which the Hyacinthia and Carneia were the chief, and certain political and social institutions, such as the threefold " Dorian tribes."
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  • But these have also some forms in common with the " Aeolic " dialect of Boeotia and Thessaly, which in historic times was spoken also in Doris; Locris and Elis present similar northern " Achaean-Doric " dialects.
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  • By that time, as we know from many sources, Aramaic was not only the language in common use, but had also received official recognition,' despite the fact that Hebrew still remained the learned and sacred tongue.
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  • On the other hand, pseudo-Jonathan shows a tendency to condense those additions which it has in common with the Fragmentary Targum: in particular he omits all quotations from Scripture.
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  • They are nowhere covered by perpetual snow, and glaciers do not exist, so that the Carpathians, even in their highest altitude, recall the middle region of the Alps, with which, however, they have many points in common as regards appearance, structure and flora.
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  • What is known as the Society of Rosicrucians (Rosenkreuzer) was really a number of isolated individuals who early in the 17th century held certain views in common (which apparently was their only bond of union); for of a society holding meetings, and having officers, there is no trace.
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  • The Apostles' Creed is the ancient baptismal creed, held in common both by East and West, in its final western form.
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  • In 459 the Corinthians, in common with their former rivals the Aeginetans, made war upon Athens, but lost both by sea and land.
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  • For chronological purposes, the Chinese, in common with some other nations of the east of Asia, employ cycles of sixty, by means of which they reckon their days, moons and years.
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  • 3; the succeeding stages of creep are shown at b, c, d, f, and g, in the same figure; the last being the final stage, when the coal begins to sustain the pressure from the overlying strata, in common with the disturbed pavement.
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  • In London four ale-conners, whose duty it is to examine the measures used by beer and liquor sellers to guard against fraud, are still chosen annually by the liverymen in common hall assembled on Midsummer Day.
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  • The new movement was not in the old direction - had, indeed, nothing in common with it.
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  • These consisted of a company united by holding in common certain speculative principles, by having the same theory of things.
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  • He died about 1200; and his sons, Conrad and Frederick, ruled their lands in common until 1227, when an important division took place.
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  • Dying in 1332, Frederick was succeeded by his son, John II., who, after one of his brothers had died and two others had entered the church, ruled his lands in common with his brother Albert.
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  • With this meaning the philosophical use of the term has little in common.
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  • 4 The distinction of pure and mixed articles - those of revelation and those taught in common by revelation and natural theology - reappears in modern Roman Catholic theology as a distinction between pure and mixed dogmas.
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  • Almost the only characters they possess in common are the short and spike-like horns of the bucks, which are ringed at the base, with smooth tips, and the large size of the face-gland, which opens by a circular aperture.
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  • These opinions were subversive of the system of the medieval church, and were naturally viewed with great disfavour by its officials; but it cannot fairly be said that they have much in common with the opinions of the Reformers of the 16th century.
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  • The flora is most closely associated with that of New Zealand, and the avifauna indicates the same connexion rather than one with Australia, as those birds which belong to Australian genera are apparently immigrants, while those which occur on the island in common with New Zealand would be incapable of such distant migration.
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  • Babylonian influence, as is now well known, was strongly felt for many centuries in Canaan, and even the cuneiform script was in common use among the high officials of the country.
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  • The terms "Precisian," "Puritan," "Presbyterian," were all used by Archbishop Parker in his letters about this time as nicknames for the same party, and ten years later the name was in common use.
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  • It strictly designates only that district in upper Saxony that is bounded by the Werra, the Harz Mountains, the Saale and the Thuringian Forest; in common parlance, however, it is frequently used as equivalent to the Thuringian states, i.e.
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  • It is now known, however, that" Siam "or" Sayam "is one of the most ancient names of the country, and that at least a thousand years ago it was in common use, such titles as Swankalok-Sukhotai, Shahr-i-nao, Dwarapuri, Ayuthia, the last sometimes corrupted to" Judea,"by which the kingdom has been known at various periods of its history, being no more than the names of the different capital cities whose rulers in turn brought the land under their sway.
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  • Each instalment of his History, in common with almost everything which he wrote, was widely read, and in spite of some adverse criticisms was received with eager applause.
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  • In contradistinction to all these somewhat refined meanings, the term "Protestant" is in common parlance applied to all Christians who do not belong to the Roman Catholic Church, or to one or other of the ancient Churches of the East.
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  • The Girondists were, indeed, rather a group of individuals holding certain opinions and principles in common than an organized political party, and the name was at first somewhat loosely applied to them owing to the fact that the most brilliant exponents of their point of view were deputies from the Gironde.
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  • With the ferocious fanaticism or the ruthless opportunism of the future organizers of the Terror they had nothing in common.
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  • Many of the terms in common use in them were employed in connexion with the Christian rites, and many of the conceptions, particularly that of sharing in immortality by communion with deity, became an essential part of Christian doctrine.
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  • In external form and appearance the Hydrozoa exhibit such striking differences that there would seem at first sight to be little in common between the more divergent members of the group. Nevertheless there is no other class in the animal kingdom with better marked characteristics, or with more uniform morphological peculiarities underlying the utmost diversity of superficial characters.
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  • All dependencies and colonies, including Prussia and Livonia, were to belong to Poland and Lithuania in common.
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  • Earlier names, still in common use, are plumbago and black-lead, but since the mineral contains no lead these names are singularly inappropriate.
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  • Amongst the Arabs, lands were either held in common by a whole tribe, under a tenure known as the arch or sabegha, or sometimes, especially in the towns, under a modified form of freehold (melk) by the family.
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  • In group 4 the situation is more complex; Clement used a text which has most in common with.
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  • We have no evidence earlier than Clement, and the text of the New Testament which he quotes has more in common with the Old Latin or " geographically Western " text than with the Neutral, though it definitely agrees with no known type preserved in MSS.
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  • There now remains a vast number of small islands which lie chiefly (but not entirely) within an area which may be defined as extending from the Philippines, New Guinea and Australia to 130° W., and from tropic to tropic. These islands fall principally into a number of groups clearly enough defined to be well seen on a map of small scale; they are moreover divided, as will be shown, into three main divisions; but whereas they have enough characteristics in common to render a general view of them desirable, there is no well-recognized name to cover them all.
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  • Kentucky, in common with other states in this part of the country, suffered from over-speculation in land and railways during 1830-1850.
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  • The title occurs for the first time in a letter to Epiphanius, prefixed to his Panarium (c. 375), but the Lausiac History of Palladius may be evidence that it was in common use in the 4th century as applied to Pachomius (q.v.).
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  • He was one of the original co-signatories of the Holy Alliance, though, in common with most, he signed it with reluctance; and in the counsels of the Grand Alliance he allowed himself to be practically subordinated to Alexander and later to Metternich.
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  • It is, in common with others, a hollow process into which run two pairs of broad, coarsely transversely striated muscles.
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  • They cannot be the same as the Scythians of Europe, though the name and original nomadic life are points in common.
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  • It has to be remembered (1) that the movement originated within the pale of the Church, and had a great deal in common with that which it opposed; (2) that it was ante-Catholic rather than anti-Catholic, e.g.
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  • But they all had certain features in common.
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  • The blessing of the Bread and Cup, as an incident in a feast of Christian brotherhood, is all that the Didache has in common with Paul and the Synoptists.
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  • An older prophet would have slain an animal and drunk its blood in common with his followers, or they would all alike have smeared themselves with it.
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  • Tertullian both as a man and as a writer had much in common with the apostle Paul.
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  • Again, according to both works, an individual substance is a subject, a universal its predicate; and they have in common the Aristotelian metaphysics, which differs greatly from the modern logic of subject and predicate.
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  • More recently the subdivision of the Linnean Neuroptera has been carried still further by the separation of the caddis-flies and scorpion-flies as distinct orders (Trichoptera and Mecaptera respectively), and by the withdrawal of the " Pseudo-neuroptera " from the Orthoptera - with whose typical families they have little in common - and their division into a number of small orders.
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  • He Had Ordered That The First, Third, Fifth, Seventh, Ninth And Eleventh Months, That Is January, March, May, July, September And November, Should Have Each Thirty One Days, And The Other Months Thirty, Excepting February, Which In Common Years Should Have Only Twenty Nine, But Every Fourth Year Thirty Days.
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  • The laboratory form in common use consists of a bellows worked by either hand or foot, and a special type of gas burner formed of two concentric tubes, one conveying the blast, the other the gas; the supply of air and gas being regulated by stopcocks.
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  • The contents of the visual and the tactual consciousness have no element in common.
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  • Indeed, though the Celestines are reckoned as a branch of the Benedictines, there is little in common between them.
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  • It is remarkably tough, resisting a rending strain better than any of the fir or pine woods in common use, though not as elastic as some; properly seasoned, it is as little liable to shrink as to split; the boughs being small compared to the trunk, the timber is more free from large knots, and the small knots remain firm and undecayed.
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  • The structural features which the Mollusca do possess in common with other animals belonging to other great phyla of the animal kingdom are those characteristic of the Coelomata, one of the two great grades (the other and lower being that of the Coelentera) into which the higher animals; or Metazoa as distinguished from the Protozoa, are divided.
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  • - The next Myoxoidea, or dormice, mouse group, have the three sections of the order, namely, the Dipodoidea, or jerboas, and Myoidea, or the following characteristics in common.
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  • Again, silk dissolves freely in common nitric acid, which is not the case with wool.
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  • For the investigation of the spectra of gases at reduced pressures the so-called Plucker tubes (more generally but incorrectly called Geissler tubes) are in common use.
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  • The chief features which Platyelmia possess in common are the following.
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  • His Vindiciae Pietatis (which first appeared in 1660) was refused licence by Archbishop Sheldon, and was published, in common with other nonconformist books, without it.
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  • But, in opposition to Wundt and in common with Schuppe, he believes that experience is (1) experience of the individual, and (2) experience of the race, which is but an extension of individual experience, and is variously called, in the course of the discussion, universal, collective, conceptual, rational experience, consciousness in general, absolute consciousness, intelligence, and even, after Caird, " a perfect intelligence."
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  • What makes his vindication of conscious personality all the more interesting is that he has so much in common with the Hegelians; agreeing as he does with Hegel that self-consciousness is the highest fact, the ultimate category of thought through which alone the universe is intelligible, and an adequate account of the great fact of existence.
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  • It is clear from literary evidence that the helmet (helm) and coat of chain mail (byrne) were also in common use.
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  • The holdings were probably not compact but consisted of scattered strips in common fields, changed perhaps from year to year, the choice being determined by lot or otherwise.
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  • The Anglo-Saxon homilist 1Elfric, in his Lives of the Saints (996 or 997), refers to it as in common use; but the earliest evidence of its authoritative prescription is a decree of the synod of Beneventum in 1091.
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  • They had in common with that sect their veneration for Moses and the Law, their Sabbatarianism, their striving after ceremonial purity, and their tendency towards fatalism.
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  • 4 shows the mounting of a Thomson card on its pivot, which in common with the pivots of most other compasses is made of brass, tipped with osmium-iridium, which although very hard can be sharply pointed and does not corrode.
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  • During the provincial period Pennsylvania, in common with the other colonies, was affected with the paper money craze.
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  • Among the customs of the Tibetans, perhaps the most peculiar is polyandry, the brothers in a family having one wife in common.
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  • The close resemblance of the Tibetan characters " with heads " to the Gupta inscriptions of Allahabad shows them to have been derived from the monumental writing of the period; and various arguments appear to show that the other Tibetan letters came from the same Indian character in the style in which it was used in common life.
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  • Glauber devised the process in common use to-day, viz.
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  • The duchies of Saxe Altenburg, Saxe Coburg Gotha and Saxe Meiningen have in common the family Order of Ernest, founded in 1833 in memory of Duke Ernest the Pious of Saxe Gotha and as a revival of the Order of German Integrity (Orden der deutschen Redlichkeit) founded in 1690.
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  • As the remarks on the nature of the spermatia show, the question of the sexuality of the lichens has been hotly disputed in common with that of the rest of the Ascomycetes.
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  • This is a shortened form of the earlier "rake-hell," apparently in common use in the 16th century.
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  • Kaolin or China clay is essentially a pure disilicate (Al 2 O 3.2SiO 2.2H 2 O), occurring in large beds almost throughout the world, and containing in its anhydrous state 2 4.4% of the metal, which, however, in common clays is more or less replaced by calcium, magnesium, and the alkalis, the proportion of silica sometimes reaching 70%.
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  • The queen's abdication was revoked, messengers were despatched to the English and French courts, and word was sent to Murray at Glasgow that he must resign the regency, and should be pardoned in common with all offenders against the queen.
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  • Eocene beds, indeed, penetrate farther within the chain, but these are limestones with nummulites or lignite-bearing shales and have nothing in common with the Flysch.
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  • "Baltic" flora on the north and the "Mediterranean" flora on the south, but chiefly to the presence on their heights of a third flora which has but little in common with either of the others.
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  • Means of affording ventilation in all plant houses should be provided in at least two places - as near the floor as practicable, and at the top. Mechanical contrivances whereby whole sets of ventilators may be operated simultaneously are now in common use, and are much more convenient and economical than the older method of working each ventilator separately.
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  • The only physiological peculiarity exhibited in common by all spores is that they germinate and initiate the production of a new fungus-plant.
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  • - In common practice the cast iron as it runs from the blast-furnace is allowed to solidify and cool completely in the form of pigs, which are then graded by their fracture, and remelted in the puddling furnace itself.
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  • The two metallic masses coalesce, and the reaction between the oxygen of one and the carbon of the other is therefore extremely rapid because it occurs throughout their depth, whereas in common procedure oxidation occurs only at the upper surface of the bath of cast iron at its contact with the overlying slag.
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  • Besides minor advantages, this plan has the merit of avoiding an ineffective period which occurs in common open-hearth procedure just after the charge of cast iron has been melted down.
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  • Yet frothing is not excessive, because the slag is not, as in common practice, locally chilled and made viscous by cold lumps of ore.
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  • Deliberate inversion certainly occurs in the Sumerian documents, and it is highly probable that this was a priestly mode of writing, but never of speaking; at any rate, not when the language was in common use.
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  • But it is in the colder northern regions that they are found in the greatest numbers and with the best fur or underwool, the top hair, which, with the exception of the scarce and very rich dark brown specimens they have in common with most aquatic animals, is pulled out before the skins are manufactured.
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  • The chiefs of the clans, with a few sub-chiefs having hereditary rights, formed the King's Council, and the king, unless of exceptionally strong character, often exercised less power than the council of chiefs, each of whom kept his little court, making a profuse display of barbaric pomp. Land is held in common by the tribes, lands unallotted being attached to the office of head chief or king and called "stool lands."
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  • The life was fully cenobitical, regulated in all details by minute rules, and with prayer and meals in common.
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  • The conquest of Campania by the last-mentioned people is an undoubted historical fact, and there can be no doubt that Pompeii shared the fate of the neighbouring cities on this occasion, and afterwards passed in common with them under the yoke of Rome.
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  • It has nothing in common with the Mediterranean climate of southern Europe, Germany being separated from that region by the lofty barrier of the Alps.
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  • This attitude had little in common with the Liberal appeal to the voice of the people.
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  • This was denounced by Bismarck in a circular note to the powers as a breach of the convention of Gastein and of the treaty of January 16, 1864, by which Austria and Prussia had agreed to govern the duchies in common.
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  • These three genera have the following characters in common.
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  • His chief work is The Life of Reason: or the Phases of Human Progress (1905-6), 5 vols., entitled respectively Reason in Common Sense; Reason in Society; Reason in Religion; Reason in Art and Reason in Science.
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  • At this time the principle of primogeniture was unknown in the house of Habsburg, and for many years the duchies were ruled in common by two, or even three, members of the family.
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  • Leopold was killed in 1386 at the battle of Sempach, and Albert became guardian for his four nephews, who subsequently ruled their lands in common.
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  • Now begin the dealings of Dionysius with Italy, where the Rhegines, kinsmen of Naxos and Catana, planned a fruitless attack on him in common with Messana.
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  • An effort was made by many to establish a more refined pronunciation for the Koran than was usual in common life or in secular literature.
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  • His granting of the Roman citizenship to all Egyptians in common with the other provincials was only to extort more taxes.
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  • Well-defined polypetalous and gamopetalous genera sometimes occur in the same order, and even Monocotyledons and Dicotyledons are classed together where they have some .striking physiological character in common.
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  • About the same time he commenced, at the desire of the ruler of the neighbouring Shirvan, his second romantic poem, the famous Bedouin love-story of Laila and Majnun, which has so many points in common with Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, and finished it in the short space of four months.
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  • The gods were worshipped as the givers of the kindly fruits of the earth, and, as all over the world " bread and salt " go together in common use and common phrase, salt was habitually associated with offerings, at least with all offerings which consisted in whole or in part of cereal elements.
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  • Of these the first three include multicellular plants, some of them of great size; the last three are unicellular organisms, with little in common with the rest excepting the possession of a brown colouring matter.
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  • On the coins struck in India, the well-known Indian alphabet (called Brahmi by the Indians, the older form of the Devanagari) is used; on the coins struck in Afghanistan and in the Punjab the Kharoshthi alphabet, which is derived directly from the Aramaic and was in common use in the western parts of India, as is shown by one of the inscriptions of Asoka and by the recent discovery of many fragments of Indian manuscripts, written in Kharoshthi, in eastern Turkestan (formerly this alphabet has been called Arianic or Bactrian Pali; the true name is derived from Indian sources).
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  • But iron was not in common use in Denmark until the end of the 1st century A.D.
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  • The pilgrims' formed themselves into unions, elected a "master" and concluded their agreements, as to the outward voyage and return, in common.
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  • Whatever be the origin of the Polynesians, they are not Malays, though, themselves of mixed blood, they have probably certain racial elements in common with the latter, who are undoubtedly hybrids.
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  • Property belonging to a clan is held in common.
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  • He says (p. 406) the terms of husband and wife are used in common by a group of sisters or brothers, but the fact is that the words used for husband and wife in Hawaii simply mean male and female.
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  • The statement that he proceeded along the coasts of Europe "from Gades to the Tanais" is evidently based upon the supposition that this would be a simple and direct course along the northern shores of Germany and Scythia - Polybius himself, in common with the other Greek geographers till a much later period, being ignorant of the projection of the Danish or Cimbric peninsula, and the circumnavigation that it involved - of all which no trace is found in the extant notices of Pytheas.
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  • Finally, a late date for Proverbs is indicated by what may be called its philosophical element - a feature that it has in common with the other Wisdom books (see Wisdom Literature).
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  • - The Missa pro defunctis or Requiem Mass has a far less definite musical history than the ordinary Mass; and such special musical forms as it has produced have little in common with each other.
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  • He ruled for a time in common with his elder brother George; and after George's death in 1531 he shared the duchy with his nephew Philip I., retaining for himself the duchy of Pomerania-Stettin.
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  • O'Connell, having long before attained an undisputed and easy ascendancy, stood at the head of this great national movement; but it will be observed that, having been controlled from first to last by himself and the priesthood, it had little in common with the mob rule and violence which he had never ceased to regard with aversion.
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  • It should be observed, however, that in his judgment the repeal of the union would not weaken the real bond between Great Britain and Ireland; and he had nothing in common with the revolutionists who, at a later period, openly declared for the separation of the two countries by physical force.
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  • The pure Arab origin of the Bedouins is recognized in common conversation in the country, the word " Arab " being almost restricted to denote these wanderers, and seldom applied to the dwellers in towns and villages.
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  • Tools, appliances and methods have little in common.
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  • Yet they also claim to be Pukhtun (or Pathan) in common with all other Pushtu-speaking tribes, whom they do not admit to be Afghan.
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  • From January to the middle of April, Mauritius, in common with the neighbouring islands and the surrounding ocean from 8° to 30° of southern latitude is subject to severe cyclones, accompanied by torrents of rain, which often cause great destruction to houses and plantations.
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  • The impetus to the purification of the old Semite religion to which the Hebrews for a long time clung in common with their fellows - the various branches of nomadic Arabs - was largely furnished by the remarkable civilization unfolded in the Euphrates valley and in many of the traditions, myths and legends embodied in the Old Testament; traces of direct borrowing from Babylonia may be discerned, while the indirect influences in the domain of the prophetical books, as also in the Psalms and in the so-called "Wisdom Literature," are even more noteworthy.
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  • The mark system, as recommended by the committee of 1863 and as subsequently introduced, had however little in common with either Maconochie's or the Irish plan.
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  • The bulk of the prisoners live and labour in common.
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  • - His son Wathiq, who succeeded, though not in the least to be compared with Mamun, had yet in common with him a thirst for knowledge - perhaps curiosity would be a more appropriate term - which prompted him, as soon as he became caliph, to send the famous astronomer Mahommed b.
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  • It is rather in virtue of his general faith in the possibility of construction, which he still does not undertake, and because of his consequent insistence on the elucidation of general concepts, which in common with some of his contemporaries, he may have thought of as endued with a certain objectivity, that he induces the controversies of what are called the Socratic schools as to the nature of predication.
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  • Again the formula of the Joint-Method, which contemplates the enumeration of cases " which have nothing in common but the absence of one circumstance," is ridiculously unsound as it stands.
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  • Swedenborg is usually reckoned among the theosophists, and some parts of his theory justify this inclusion; but his system as a whole has little in common with those speculative constructions of the Divine nature which form the essence of theosophy, as strictly understood.
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  • In another research dealing with the nature of alum he showed that one of the constituents of that substance, alumina, is contained in common clay, and further that the salt cannot be prepared by the action of sulphuric acid on alumina alone, the addition of an alkali being necessary.
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  • In some other respects the constitution of the cities in the south of France, as will be seen, has more in common with that of the Italian communes, and that of the northern French towns with those of Germany, than the constitutions of the various groups of French towns have among each other.
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  • Another feature which these southern towns had in common with their Italian neighbours was the prominent part played by the native nobility.
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  • This we should expect indeed from its insistence upon individual freedom; yet, notwithstanding certain notable exceptions, amid the diversity there is a substantial unity, a unity which in our day finds expression in common organizations for great practical ends, for example in the " Bible Societies," " Tract Societies," the " Young Men's Christian Associations," " Societies of Christian Endeavour," &c., which disregard denominational lines.
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  • The occupation of the fairest provinces of the Roman empire by the northern barbarians had little in common with colonization.
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  • The same author postulates an Arctic continent, bordering upon northern Europe, Greenland and North America; an African-Brazilian continent across the present south Atlantic, and a marine communication between Australia and India, where the faunas have much in common.
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  • Buhler, on the other hand, shows from literary evidence that writing was in common use in India in the 5th, possibly in the 6th, century B.C. The oldest alphabet must have been the Brahmi lipi, which is found all over India.
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  • The results of these investigations show that they have little in common with the Swiss lake-dwellings, except that they are placed in lakes.
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  • At the beginning Virginia colonists had held their land and improvements in common.
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  • Laws of Motion.-The action of a machine in transmitting force and motion simultaneously, or performing work, is governed, in common with the phenomena of moving bodies in general, by two laws of motion.
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  • The plants are rapidly-growing, hardy, ornamental climbers, which flourish in common garden soil, and are readily propagated by cuttings.
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  • Murray,' Homeric art does not rise above the stage of decoration, applied to objects in common use; while in point of style it is characterized by a richness and variety of ornament which is in the strongest contrast to the simplicity of the best periods.
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  • Into 1 Devised originally for the clergy of Chrodegang's cathedral, it was largely an adaptation of St Benedict's rule to secular clergy living in common.
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  • Alimentary, Respiratory and Excretory Systems. - Although the function of the two latter systems of organs is the purification of the blood, they are not usually considered together, and it is therefore the more remarkable that their close association in Amphioxus renders it necessary to treat them in common.
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  • His Commentary on the Epistle to the Philippians (1618, reprinted 1864) is a specimen of his preaching before his college, and of his fiery denunciation of popery and his fearless enunciation of that Calvinism which Oxford in common with all England then prized.
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  • Pachuca was sacked in 1812, and so keen was the desire to possess its sources of wealth, in common with other mining towns, that mining operations were partially suspended for a time and the mines were greatly damaged.
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  • Many of these physical and moral characteristics they have in common with the so-called " Mongolian " race, to which they are no doubt ethnically, if not also linguistically, related.
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  • Cardigan, in Welsh Aberteifi, from its situation near the mouth of the Teifi, and Brecon, in Welsh Aberhonddu, from its site near the confluence of the Usk and Honddu, are examples of corrupted Welsh names in common use - Ceredigion, Brychan - which possess in addition pure Celtic forms. In the third division, English place-names are tolerably frequent everywhere and predominate in the Marches and on the South Wales coast.
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  • Tien Ti, Fu Mu, " Heaven and Earth, Father and Mother," are conjoined in common speech, and are the supreme objects of imperial worship. The great altar to Heaven, round in shape like the circuit of the sky, and white as the symbol of the light principle (Yang), stands in the southern suburb of Peking in the direction of light and heat.
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  • Its alloy with tin (bronze) was the first metallic compound in common use by mankind, and so extensive and characteristic was its employment in prehistoric times that the epoch is known as the Bronze Age.
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  • These names, as appears elsewhere in this article, remain in common use.
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  • Primary education is carried on in common schools of different grades, under both local and state inspection, the parish being the school district.
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  • The volcanic origin of the Andes and their comparatively recent elevation still subject Chile, in common with other parts of the western coast region, to frequent volcanic and seismic disturbances.
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  • In the latest inscriptions the iguage is already much degraded; but on the whole it is almost antique as Zend, with which it has many points in common.
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  • Kurdish, a language nearly, akin to New Persian, with which it has important characteristics in common.
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  • Each island retains its own institutions, and they have neither legislature, laws, revenue nor tariff in common.
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  • With regard to the literary relation of this chapter with Ezekiel, it must be admitted that Ezekiel presents many striking parallels, and in particular makes use, in common with chap. xxvi., of several expressions which do not occur elsewhere in the Old Testament.
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  • Israel received circumcision as a sign that they were the Lord's, and this privilege of circumcision they enjoyed in common with the two highest orders of angels.
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  • It was evidently in common use in the latter half of the 16th century as it is used by De Mornay in De la verite de la religion chretienne (1581) and by Montaigne.
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  • The alpine meadows, which have many species in common with the European Alps, have also a number of their own peculiar Altaian species.
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  • From the point of view of Orthodoxy the English Church is schismatical, since it has seceded from the Roman patriarchate of the West, and doubly heretical, since it retains the obnoxious Filioque clause in the creed while rejecting many of the doctrines and practices held in common by Rome and the East; moreover, the Orthodox Church had never admitted the validity of Anglican orders, while not denying it.
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  • Two salts are in common use for this purpose, potassium permanganate and potassium bichromate.
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  • Still less has Livy anything in common with the naïve anxiety of Dionysius of Halicarnassus to make it clear to his fellow Greeks that the irresistible people who had mastered them was in origin, in race and in language Hellenic like themselves.
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  • The vats in common use are circular wooden tanks, 16-20 ft.
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  • Melicertes being Phoenician, Palaemon also has been explained as the "burning lord" (Baal-haman), but there seems little in common between a god of the sea and a god of fire.
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  • (11) The Altai Tatars, or "Altaians," comprise - (a) the Mountain Kalmucks (12,000), to whom this name has been given by mistake, and who have nothing in common with the Kalmucks except their dress and mode of life, while they speak a Turkish dialect, and (b) the Teleutes, or Telenghites (5800), a remainder of a formerly numerous and warlike nation who have migrated from the mountains to the lowlands, where they now lave along with Russian peasants.
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  • Signet-rings also with fixed metal bezels were in common use among the Greeks from about 600 B.C.
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  • Rejected by the Yahweh who became the Christian God, they have remained to the present day, in Sunday schools and in common opinion, not nations of living men, with the culture of arts and sciences, but outcasts who do not enter into the divine scheme of the world's history.
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  • Flying animals differ entirely from sailing ships and from balloons, with which they are not unfrequently though erroneously compared; and a flying machine constructed upon proper principles can have nothing in common with either of those creations.
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  • According to the generally accepted view, she is of Hellenic origin, but Farnell regards her as a foreign importation from Thrace, the home of Bendis, with whom Hecate has many points in common.
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  • Its general uniformity of direction, its comparatively narrow width, and its well-defined limits towards both south and north are all features which it has in common with the former.
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  • But this Pamir is situated nowhere near the sources of the Zarafshan or Raskam river, which it borders, and possesses little in common with the Pamirs of the west.
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  • The many characters which they possess in common can hardly have been independently acquired by so many distinct species; so that these characters must have been inherited.
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  • All these differ from the members of the genus Cervus in having no brow-tine to the antlers, which, in common with those of the roe-deer, belong to what is called the forked type.
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  • No plant is correctly termed a grass which is not a member of this family, but the word is in common language also used, generally in combination, for many plants of widely different affinities which possess some resemblance (often slight) in foliage to true grasses; e.g.
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  • Both names are still in common use.
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  • They agree in the extraordinary habit of adding to the supplies of nitrogenous material afforded them in common with other plants by the soil and atmosphere, by the capture and consumption of insects and other small animals.
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  • Of the three bromides in common use the potassium salt is the most rapid and certain in its action, but may depress the heart in morbid states of that organ; in such cases the sodium salt - of which the base is inert - may be employed.
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  • The main entrance in common use is that in the north transept.
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  • This may be inferred (I) from the variety of speculations which it holds in common with Philo and writings of a Hellenistic character that circulated mainly in Egypt.
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  • By the Court of Probate Act 1857 the college was empowered to sell its real and personal estate and to surrender its charter, and it was enacted that on such surrender the college should be dissolved and the property thereof belong to the then existing members as tenants in common for their own use and benefit.
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  • There was this in common among the Cathari, Waldenses, Albigenses and other heretical bodies that overran so many parts of Western Europe in the second half of the 12th century and the beginning of the 13th, that they all inveighed against the wealth of the clergy, and preached the practice of austere poverty and a return to the simple life of Christ and the Apostles.
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  • It possesses two regular substantive declensions and six cases, the vocative being in common use.
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  • Yams, sweet potatoes, cassava and arracacha are chiefly cultivated for domestic needs, but in common with other fruits and vegetables they give occupation to the small agriculturalists near the larger towns.
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  • Unfortunately, she, in common with the rest of South Africa, was subsequently swept into the seething vortex of contemporary politics and controversy.
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  • John of Damascus and the schoolmen, including Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas, held Nemesius in high esteem, believing his book to be the work of Gregory of Nyssa, with whom he has much in common.
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  • Any secular shrinking of the lake in common with the lakes of Central Africa generally must be so gradual as to have no practical importance.
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  • If two numbers have no factor in common (except 1) each is said to be prime to the other.
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  • When the conspiring forces of clerical venality and political prostitution had placed a putative Bonaparte in power attained by perjury after perjury, and supported by massacre after massacre, Victor Hugo, in common with all honourable men who had ever taken part in political or public life under the government superseded by force of treason and murder, was driven from his country into an exile of well-nigh twenty years.
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  • On the other hand, in common with the rest of the Perissodactyla, they never reached Madagascar.
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  • Until the end of the 18th century the word "air," qualified by certain adjectives, was in common use for most of the gases known - a custom due in considerable measure to the important part which common air played in chemical and physical investigations.
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  • His practical inventions are briefly noticed below: Gunter's Chain, the chain in common use for surveying, is 22 yds.
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  • Few will deny that Athanasius stood for the Christian view of the questions at issue, upon the prin ciples held in common by all disputants.
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  • It has its own habitus, notwithstanding the number of species it has in common with Siberia and south-east Russia on the one hand and with the Himalayas on the other, and this habitus is due to the dryness of the climate and the consequent changes undergone by the soil.
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  • She has much in common with the oriental prototype of Aphrodite, and the Cappadocian goddess Ma, another form of Cybele.
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  • The Tiers Etat insisted that the deputies of all three estates should have their powers verified in common as the first step towards making them all members of one House.
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  • The usage of the term "Lake District," however, tends to limit the name of Furness in common thought to the district south of the Lakes, where several of the place-names are suffixed with that of the district, as Barrow-inFurness, Dalton-in-Furness, Broughton-in-Furness.
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  • Green and idealist writers of his school, has little or nothing in common with the doctrine that the self manifests its freedom in unmotived acts of will.
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  • The contrast of the characters, the rich style and fine dialogue which are so remarkable in this saga, have much in common with the best works of the Sturlung school.
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  • While it is true that the instruments and methods of research in these two branches are quite different in their details, there is so much in common in the fundamental principles which underlie their application, that it is unprofitable to consider them as completely distinct sciences.
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  • The town of Banias, with its castle, formed also a strong outpost against Damascus, and was the scene, in common with the other strongholds, of many desperate encounters between Moslems and Christians.
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  • In the meantime the provinces of the Netherlands had revolted against the arbitrary and oppressive Spanish rule, and Don John of Austria, who had been sent as governorgeneral to restore order, had found himself helpless in face of the superior talent and personal influence of the prince of Orange, who had succeeded in uniting all the provinces in common resistance to the civil and religious tyranny of Philip. In the autumn of 1577 Farnese was sent to join Don John at the head of reinforcements, and it was mainly his prompt decision at a critical moment that won the battle of Gemblours (1578).
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  • Much land as late as 1900 was held in common by Indian tribes, but has since been allotted to the members of those tribes and most of it is leased to whites.
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  • Barnes had a horror of Latin forms in English, and would have substituted English compounds for many Latin forms in common use.
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  • A new series of Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect appeared in 1862, and he was persuaded in 1868 to publish a series of Poems of Rural Life in Common English, which was less successful than his dialect poems. These latter were collected into a single volume in 1879, and on the 7th of October 1886 Barnes died at Winterborne Came.
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  • The former religion of the Fijians was a sort of ancestorworship, had much in common with the creeds of Polynesia, and included a belief in a future existence.
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  • Concrete terms are further subdivided as Singular, the names of things regarded as individuals, and General or Common, the names which a number of things bear in common in virtue of their possession of common characteristics.
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  • The system of Herbert Spencer, as explained in Principles of Sociology, has many points in common with that of Max Muller.
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  • Each country began to.lead its own separate existence, stammering its own tongue; the different nations no longer understood one another, and no longer had any general ideas in common.
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  • Colbert, in common with all his century, believed that the true secret of commerce and the indisputable proof of a countrys prosperity was to sell as many of the products of national industry to the foreigner as possible, while Colbert purchasing as little as possible.
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  • The conflict between him and the Assembly immediately broke out, and became acute over the verification of the mandates; the third estate desiring this to be made in common by the deputies of the three orders, which would involve voting by head, the suppression of classes and the preponderance of the third estate.
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  • Through his philosophical writings he became acquainted with many distinguished persons - Goethe, Herder, Princess Amalia of Gallitzin, and especially Jacobi, with whom he had much in common.
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  • He left his dominion to be held in common by his two sons.
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  • The immersion liquids in common use are water, glycerine, cedar-wood oil, monobromnaphthalene, &c. Immersion systems in which the embedding liquid, coverslip, immersion-liquid and front lens have equal refractive indices are called " homogeneous immersion systems."
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  • The story of Esther and that of the original Nights have in fact one main feature in common.
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  • These companies succeed or fail for reasons different from those which affected the chartered companies of former days, though there are points in common.
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  • Formerly, when substances were principally classified by obvious characteristics, the word included such a body as "oil of vitriol" (sulphuric acid), which has of course nothing in common with what is now understood under the term oils.
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  • It must be pointed out that in common parlance this distinction does not find its ready expression.
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  • The genus Diplolabis of Renault, shows much in common with Zygopteris as regards anatomical structure, but resembles Corynepteris in possessing a synangic fructification.
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  • The very remarkable plumose seeds described by Renault under the name Gnetopsis are of uncertain affinity, but have much in common with Lagenostoma, the seed of Lyginodendron.
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  • From the close of the Permian period, which marks the limit of the Upper Palaeozoic floras, to the .period immediately preceding the apparently sudden appearance of Angiosperms, we have a succession of floras differing from one another in certain minor details, but linked together by the possession of many characters in common.
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  • Although some of these differ very greatly in their actions after absorption, still locally they have certain effects in common due chiefly to their chemical action on albumen.
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  • Data of sense as purely particular could have nothing in common with the categories as purely universal.
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  • Joachim Ernest died in 1586 and his five sons ruled the land in common until 1603, when Anhalt was again divided, and the lines of Dessau, Bernburg, Plotzkau, Zerbst and Cothen were refounded.
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  • At a later date, when the custom in collegiate churches of living in common had become less general, a certain amount of the church revenue was divided among the clergy serving such a church, and each portion (no longer of meat or drink only) was called a prebend.
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  • Our bakers' ovens, hot-air ovens or stoves, annealing ovens for glass or metal, &c., would all be called fours in, French and Olen in German, in common with furnaces of all kinds.
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  • What they have in common is an instinctive sympathy for the characters.
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  • One such drug is called tissue plasminogen activator (alteplase) which is a clot-dissolving drug not yet in common use in the UK.
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  • During the intervening thirty year period, the church had undergone radical alterations, in common with all in this land.
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  • Today as sisters with an active apostolate, we perpetuate this tradition by maintaining a fervent life in common.
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  • The collective term biotope is now in common usage to encompass both of these biotic and abiotic elements.
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  • What all of these dogs seem to have in common is that they burn so bright before they suddenely become sick.
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  • Less dramatically, perhaps, has been the decline in common civility, and neighborliness.
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  • Children have to see what they have in common with children with disabilities, not the differences " .
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  • One nation conservatism has nothing in common with the socialism of the Labor Party, Old or New.
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  • These measures have one thing in common they all aim to empower consumers to make informed decisions.
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  • However, in common with many formulae there is an important corollary.
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  • Mea culpa, mea maxima culpa ost religions have in common that they concern people's relations with god or with gods or spirits.
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  • Many of the words that were once in common use are now deemed derogatory by the people they are used to describe.
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  • Anyhow these animals keep distinct in the countries which they inhabit in common.
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  • The test of remoteness was one well entrenched in common law.
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  • But the spirit driving those choices has nothing in common with that which drove the old eugenics.
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  • The facing foes usually had more in common than they cared to admit.
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  • Mini roundabouts, in common with some other traffic calming features such as contraflow gateways may help reduce vehicle speeds.
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  • Jigsaw Co-operative limited is a company limited by guarantee with all assets held in common.
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  • Theophrastus (300 B.C.) stated that " The white and black hellebore appear to have nothing in common except the name.
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  • The boundaries of B - independent predicates not only intersect; they intersect wherever they have a point in common.
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  • The flowerheads of greater knapweed have long rays which are lacking in common knapweed.
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  • Neither of these has much in common with the atheism characteristic of western modernity, which draws much of its energy from moral protest.
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  • Teak, in common with several exotic hardwoods, is a naturally oily timber.
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  • This is to emphasize their status as the allies and patrons of local cadres of godly Protestant fundamentalists; in common parlance radical Puritans.
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  • Many drugs in common use can cause the red cells to break down in this condition.
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  • The saboteur Issue In common with other hunts in the South of England the Ashford Valley Hunt is targeted by hunt saboteurs.
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  • Racists do not believe in common humanity, neither do cultural or religious separatists.
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  • Do not smother these account pages in common details, or details of other accounts.
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  • Present techniques share more in common with astronomers randomly trailing the sky for new supernovae.
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  • Of the hygroscopic substances in common use, phosphoric anhydride, concentrated sulphuric acid, and dry potassium hydrate are almost equal in power; sodium hydrate and calcium chloride are not much behind.
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  • The logarithms introduced by Napier in the Descriptio are not the same as those now in common use, nor even the same as those now called Napierian or hyperbolic logarithms. The change from the original logarithms to common or decimal logarithms was made by both Napier and Briggs, and the first tables of decimal logarithms were calculated by Briggs, who published a small table, extending to 1000, in 1617, and a large work, Arithmetica Logarithmica, 1 containing logarithms of numbers to 30,000 and from 90,000 to Ioo,000, in 1624.
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  • & Xj jsa, a double proposition, from 81- and Xaµ(3avav), a term used technically in logic, and popularly in common parlance and rhetoric. (I) The latter use has no exact definition, but in general it describes a situation wherein from either of two (or more) possible alternatives an unsatisfactory conclusion results.
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  • But they are separated by so many generations from the earliest historic times that sure conclusions regarding them are impossible; at all events, as yet Russian archaeologists are not agreed as to whether the ancestors of the Sla y s were Sarmatians only or Scythians also, whose skulls have nothing in common with those of the Mongol race.
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  • These structures appear to be absolutely distinctive of the Oligochaeta, unless the sacs which contain sperm and open in common with the nephridia of Saccocirrus (see Haplodrili) are similar.
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  • The derivation of its ancient name Varanasi is not known, nor is that of its alternative name Kasi, which is still in common use among Hindus, and is popularly explained to mean "bright."
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  • In this respect his hypothesis has much in common with the " law of mass-action " developed at a much later date b y the Swedish chemists Guldberg and Waage, and the American, Willard Gibbs (see Chemical Action).
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  • The oxidation with nitric acid in sealed tubes at a temperature of 150° to 200° for aliphatic compounds, and 250° to 260° for aromatic compounds, is in common use, for both the sulphur and phosphorus can be estimated, the former being oxidized to sulphuric acid and the latter to phosphoric acid.
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  • For the Asiatic provinces and Egypt, the old Persian name of satrapy (see Satrap) was still retained, but the governor seems to have been styled of Govern- officially in Greek strategos, although the term satrap certainly continued current in common parlance.
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  • The southern part of the government is flat and has much in common with the Polyesie of the government of Minsk; it is, however, more habitable, the marshes being less extensive.
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  • One preparation of this drug is in common use, the Pulvis Jalapae Compositus, which consists of 5 parts of jalap, 9 of cream of tartar, and i of ginger.
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  • There is less in common than is often supposed between the buoyant energy that led Grant to Shiloh and the grim plodding determination that led him to Vicksburg and to Appomattox.
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  • Whether or no Gawain was a sunhero, and he certainly possessed some of the features - we are constantly told how his strength waxed with the waxing of the sun till noontide, and then gradually decreased; he owned a steed known by a definite name le Gringalet; and a light-giving sword, Escalibur (which, as a rule, is represented as belonging to Gawain, not to Arthur) - all traits of a sun-hero - he certainly has much in common with the primitive Irish hero Cuchullin.
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  • It was a legacy of immense responsibilities and perils, for France was bound in common prudence to endeavour to ruin a power which encircled her on every side save the sea and threatened her independence.
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  • His views are grounded on two presuppositions: - first, the utter aversion of common sense to any theory of representative perception; second, the opinion which Collier held in common with Berkeley, and Hume afterwards, that the difference between imagination and sense perception is only one of degree.
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  • All property which either husband or wife acquires during the marriage, other than by gift, devise or descent, is their common property, and during coverture may be disposed of by the husband only; on the death of the husband the widow has one-half of the property, which they held in common.
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  • In literature their activities were directed to the most diverse objects; they have only in common a certain spirit or form.
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  • While the " rational " Presbyterians were repelled by it as " enthusiasm," the Independents had sufficient in common with its spirit to assimilate - after some distrust of its special ways and doctrines - its passion of Christlike pity for " those out of the way," and so to take their share in the wider evangelization of the people and the Christian philanthropy which flowed from the new inspiration.
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  • Either husband or wife may hold, manage and dispose of his or her separate property independent of the other, but property which they hold in common is under the management and control of the husband except that he cannot devise by will more than one-half of the community real or personal property, or convey, mortgage or encumber any of the community real estate unless his wife joins him.
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  • There now remains a vast number of small islands which lie chiefly (but not entirely) within an area which may be defined as extending from the Philippines, New Guinea and Australia to 130° W., and from tropic to tropic. These islands fall principally into a number of groups clearly enough defined to be well seen on a map of small scale; they are moreover divided, as will be shown, into three main divisions; but whereas they have enough characteristics in common to render a general view of them desirable, there is no well-recognized name to cover them all.
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  • The sublime and solitary figure of Elijah, whom we are apt to take as the typical figure of a prophet in the old kingdom, has little in common with the picture even of the true prophet which we derive from I Kings xxii.; and when his history is carefully and critically read it is found to give no reason to think that he stood in any close relation to the prophetic societies of his time.
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  • It was, in common with all such offices in ancient monasteries, constructed with the most careful regard to cleanliness and health, a stream of water running through it from end to end.
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  • Morgain herself has many traits in common with the Valkyrie; she is one of nine sisters, she can fly through the air as a bird (Swan maiden); she possesses a marvellous ointment (as does Hilde, the typical Valkyr).
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  • The forms comprised in the various groups, whilst exhibiting an extreme range of variety in shape, as may be seen on comparing an oyster, a cuttle-fish, and a sea-slug such as Doris; whilst adapted, some to life on dry land, others to the depths of the sea, others to rushing streams; whilst capable, some of swimming, others of burrowing, crawling or jumping, some, on the other hand, fixed and immobile; some amongst the most formidable of carnivores, others feeding on vegetable mud, or on the minutest of microscopic organisms - yet all agree in possessing in common a very considerable number of structural details which are not possessed in common by any other animals.
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  • The remarkable case of life in common first observed in lichens, where a fungus and an alga unite to form a compound organism - the lichen - totally different from either, has now been proved to be universal in these plants, and lichens are in all cases merely algae enmeshed in the interwoven hyphae of fungi (see Lichens).
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  • (See JEws; Nabataeans.) A populous land commanding the trade routes from Arabia to Damascus, rich in agricultural and pastoral wealth, Moab, as Mesha's inscription proves, had already reached a high state of civilization by the 9th century B.C. Its language differed only dialectically from Hebrew; its ideas and religion were very closely akin to the Israelite, and it may be assumed that they shared in common many features of culture.
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  • Its foundation was ascribed by Greek tradition to Heracles, in common with the neighbouring city of Herculaneum, but it is certain that it was not a Greek colony, in the proper sense of the term, as we know to have been the case with the more important cities of Cumae and Neapolis.
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  • The western part of the country was pervaded by Graeco-Roman civilization very much sooner than the central, and in the country districts the Phrygian language 3 continued in common use at least as late as the third century after Christ.
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  • From January to the middle of April, Mauritius, in common with the neighbouring islands and the surrounding ocean from 8° to 30° of southern latitude is subject to severe cyclones, accompanied by torrents of rain, which often cause great destruction to houses and plantations.
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  • Not one circumstance only in common but " apparently one relevant circumstance only in common " is what we are able to assert.
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  • The animal vigour and carnal enjoyment of Rubens, the refined Italianizing beauty of Vandyck, the mystery of light and gloom on Rembrandt's panels, the love of nature in Ruysdael, Cuyp and Van Hooghe, with their luminously misty skies, silvery daylight and broad expanse of landscape, the interest in common life displayed by Ter Borch, Van Steen, Douw, Ostade and Teniers, the instinct for the beauty of animals in Potter, the vast sea spaces of Vanderveldt, the grasp on reality, the acute intuition into character in portraits, the scientific study of the world and man, the robust sympathy with natural appetites, which distinguish the whole art of the Low Countries, are a direct emanation from the Renaissance.
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  • Arabic language and literature had gained too firm a footing to be supplanted at once by a new literary idiom still in its infancy; nevertheless the few poets who arose under the Tahirids and Saffgrids show already the germs of the characteristic tendency of all later Persian literature, which aims at amalgamating the enforced spirit of Islamism with their own Aryan feelings, and reconciling the strict deism of the Mahommedan religion with their inborn loftier and more or less pantheistic ideas; and we can easily trace in the few fragmentary verses of men like Iianzala, I~akim FirUz and Abu Salik those principal forms of poetry now used in common by Forms of all Mahommedan nationsthe forms of the qa~ida Eastern (the encomiastic, elegiac or satirical poem), the Poeti~.
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  • In the protest against the scheme of "judging truth by counting noses," Shaftesbury recognized the danger of the standard which seemed to satisfy many deists; and in almost every respect he has more in common with those who afterwards, in Germany, annihilated the pretensions of complacent rationalism than with the rationalists themselves.
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  • Still less has Livy anything in common with the naïve anxiety of Dionysius of Halicarnassus to make it clear to his fellow Greeks that the irresistible people who had mastered them was in origin, in race and in language Hellenic like themselves.
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  • The Cordaitales (see Palaeobotany: Palaeozoic) are represented by extinct forms only, which occupied a prominent position in the Palaeozoic period; these plants exhibit certain features in common with the living Araucarias, and others which invite a comparison with the maidenhair tree (Ginkgo biloba), the solitary survivor of another class of Gymnosperms, the Ginkgoales (see Palaeobotany: Mesozoic).
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  • After three or four years he was called (by an angel, says the legend) to establish a monastery of cenobites, or monks living in common (see Monasticism, § 4).
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  • Certain older standards remain in common use, notably the quintal (of 101.4 lb avoirdupois), the libra (1.014 lb as-oirclupois), the arroba (31/2 imperial galluns for wine, 23/4 imperial gallons for oil), the fanega (11/2 imperial bushels).
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  • You will then look to see what other factors they all have in common.
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  • I offer them because they have something interesting in common.
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  • It is true that I was familiar with all literary braille in common use in this country--English, American, and New York Point; but the various signs and symbols in geometry and algebra in the three systems are very different, and I had used only the English braille in my algebra.
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  • It is darker in the woods, even in common nights, than most suppose.
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  • I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
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  • But of course you know her already, he said, evidently trying to entertain a visitor with whom he now found nothing in common.
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  • Rostov, in common with the whole army from which he came, was far from having experienced the change of feeling toward Napoleon and the French- -who from being foes had suddenly become friends--that had taken place at headquarters and in Boris.
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  • This is to emphasize their status as the allies and patrons of local cadres of godly Protestant fundamentalists; in common parlance radical puritans.
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  • For flats, there is now a requirement to control reverberation in common parts.
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  • We can now see what the two greatest rock-and-roll bands of all time had in common !
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  • The Saboteur Issue In common with other hunts in the South of England the Ashford Valley Hunt is targeted by hunt saboteurs.
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  • The later section on Problems suggests which methods may be most appropriate in common situations.
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  • In this respect, the Doctor has a great deal in common with that other archetypal British swashbuckling hero, Mr Ben.
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  • Even wooden plates and drinking vessels (now almost entirely disappeared) were still in common use.
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  • Although aimed at slightly different audiences (the iPod at an older, more image-conscious crowd, the U2 at budget shoppers), these two flash music players have a lot in common.
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  • Two types of FeLV blood tests are in common use.
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  • You may have noticed the one thing all of these interior design firms have in common.
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  • However, most Asian decors have these things in common.
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  • The interiors featured in Elle Décor run the gamut from traditional and classic to modern and contemporary, but the one thing they always have in common is a French aesthetic.
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  • Decor in the 1970s shares a lot in common with the 60s, but the colors got brighter, the shag got longer and the patterns were even bolder.
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  • Each one is different, however, they all have one thing in common.
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  • Along with the name "True Colors" these various lines of cosmetics have one other factor in common.
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  • More members mean a greater likelihood of finding people you have something in common with.
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  • Despite the different pets you can take care of in these free online games, there is one thing in common that you must do that is universal to all the free online virtual pets.
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  • With both people being Jewish, it's a great way to celebrate something that you have in common.
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  • It sounds like you and this girl have a lot in common!
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  • Also, you sound like you have a lot in common (also, nice).
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  • He goes to a different school and we don't really have any friends in common.
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  • Another move toward progress is to gauge the atmosphere in common rooms such as school computer labs.
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  • I found out we had a lot in common and I don't mean just the normal stuff, he sees life the way I do but embraces it in a different way and that makes me look up to him.
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  • Or find out if you have any friends in common and get them to hook you guys up.
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  • By helping him realize that having things in common are important in a relationship, you are equipping him to get some practice in when it comes to later dating and relationships.
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  • Simply put, peers are the people around you with whom you share things in common.
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  • The period of puberty is unique for everyone, yet as you can see by the stages listed above, there are basic changes that all girls have in common.
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  • Do you have favorite hobbies and pasttimes in common?
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