Impulses sentence example

impulses
  • Mechanism is that which obeys impulses from outside.
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  • There is a similar difficulty in tracing the paths by which the impulses are transmitted to the growing and curving regions.
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  • The conduction of such stimulation to parts removed some distance from the sense organ suggests paths of transmission comparable to those which transmit nervous impulses in animals.
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  • In the ripe perfection of humanity, the two impulses will be perfectly adjusted.
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  • To achieve this second stage the impulses must be trained in such a way that the fitness of things indifferent may be the guide of conduct.
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  • I regard my pupil as a free and active being, whose own spontaneous impulses must be my surest guide.
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  • It could readily ascend the sides of the room by short impulses, like a squirrel, which it resembled in its motions.
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  • And the impulses felt by a single person are always magnified in a crowd.
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  • He has to resist the temptations of the body, keeping it under strict control, and with the eye of the soul undimmed by corporeal wants and impulses, contemplate God the supreme good, and live a life according to reason.
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  • Besides this most important contribution to the general fabric of dynamical science, we owe to Lagrange several minor theorems of great elegance, - among which may be mentioned his theorem that the kinetic energy imparted by given impulses to a material system under given constraints is a maximum.
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  • The discoveries of the separate paths of sensory and motor impulses in the spinal cord, and consequently of the laws of reflex action, by Charles Bell and Marshall Hall respectively, in their illumination of the phenomena of nervous function, may be compared with the discovery in the region of the vascular system of the circulation of the blood; for therein a key to large classes of normal and aberrant functions and a fertile principle of interpretation were obtained.
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  • That is to say, in tracing back the later acquisitions of civilization to impulses which are as old as the dawn of primitive culture, he did not, as the modern evolutionist does, lay stress on the superiority of the later to the earlier stages of human development, but rather became enamoured of the simplicity and spontaneity of those early impulses which, since they are the oldest, easily come to look like the most real and precious.
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  • In opposition to the general spirit of the 18th century he saw, by means of his historic sense, the naturalness of religion, its relation to man's wants and impulses.
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  • Under the impulses which came from these various sides Martineau's mind lived and moved, and as they successively rose he promptly, by appreciation or criticism, responded to the dialectical issues which they raised.
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  • He had a sprightly wit, some delicacy of feeling, and some generous impulses which made him amiable.
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  • He seems to have held that virtue consisted in the direction of activity towards the satisfaction of the natural impulses.
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  • Until the vibrations of a source have a frequency in the neighbourhood of 30 per second the ear can hear the separate impulses, if strong enough, but does not hear a note.
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  • It is not easy to determine the exact point at which the impulses fuse into a continuous tone, for higher tones are usually present with the deepest of which the frequency is being counted, and these may be mistaken for it.
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  • His father intended him for the law, but his impulses towards an artistic career were irresistible.
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  • Shall we resign our traditional belief that the greater part of the world is mere body, but that its general adaptability to conscious organisms proves its creation and government by God, and take to the new hypothesis, which, by a transfer of design from God to Nature, supposes that everything physical is alive, and conducts its life by psychical impulses of its own?
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  • If he is to be believed, at the bottom of all organic evolution organic impulses becoming habits produce structural changes, which are transmitted by heredity; and as an impulse thus gradually becomes secondarily automatic, the will passes to higher activities, which in their turn become secondarily automatic, and so on.
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  • But even so, have plants even those lowest impulses from feelings of pain or pleasure ?
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  • A nature formed on great broad lines - a man of spontaneous impulses carrying away others as he himself was carried away, a genuine Latin in the whole of his being - he belongs to those imposing figures of the Italian Renaissance whose character is summarized in contemporary literature by the word terribile, which is best translated "extraordinary" or " magnificent."
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  • In contrast to his predecessor, he was a man of slow and calm deliberation, and it was natural to suppose that he was little, if at all, accessible to impulses of the moment or to the persuasions of his entourage.
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  • It may be held that every action is causally connected not only externally with the sum of the agent's environment, but also internally with his motives and impulses.
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  • Bodily pleasures and all sensuous impulses must be abandoned as detrimental to the spiritual purity of the soul.
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  • This duchy was soon reduced to obedience and was treated with consideration, and when the third anti-king, Egbert, margrave of Meissen, was murdered in 1090 there would have been peace if Germany had followed her own impulses.
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  • Louis could not always follow his own impulses, but whenever he could he associated himself with the latter party.
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  • By the growth of the cities in social, if not in political, importance the products of labor were more and more widely diffused; and it was easier than at any previous time for the nation to be moved by common ideas and impulses.
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  • But when neurons are linked together it is found that nerve impulses will only pass from neuron A to neuron B, and not from neuron B to neuron A; that is, the transmission of the excited state or nervous impulse, although possible in each neuron both up and down its own cell branches, is possible from one nerve cell to another in one direction only.
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  • That direction is the direction in which the nerve impulses flow under the conditions of natural life.
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  • This trophic influence which one neuron exerts upon others, or upon the cells of an extrinsic tissue, such as muscle, is exerted in that direction which is the one normally taken by the natural nerve impulses.
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  • It seems, especially in the case of the nexus between certain neurons, that the influence, loss of which endangers nutrition, is associated with the occurrence of something more than merely the nervous impulses awakened from time to time in the leading nerve cell.
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  • A continuous lesser "change" or stream of changes sets through the neuron, and is distributed by it to other neurons in the same direction and by the same synapses as are its nerve impulses.
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  • Stretching of the muscles antagonistic to the extensors - namely, of the flexor muscles - reduces the jerk by inhibiting the extensor spinal nerve cells through the nervous impulses generated by the tense flexor muscles.
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  • Frederick, however, had free and generous impulses which could not be restrained by the sternest system.
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  • The third, gathering together the more revolutionary impulses, expanded into that complex movement called Anabaptism - which spread over western Europe from England to Poland and from Scandinavia to northern Italy, and endured a long and sanguinary persecution at the hands of the civil authorities in most European countries.
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  • If two masses m1, nil moving in the same straight line impinge, with the result that the velocities are changed from u1, u2, to ui, ui, then, since the impulses on the two bodies must be equal and opposite, the total momentum is unchanged, i.e.
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  • The total impulse in any finite interval of time is the integral of the impulses corresponding to the infinitesimal elements 3t into which the interval may be subdivided; the summation of which the integral is the limit is of course to be understood in the vectorial sense.
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  • The preceding formulae are sufficient for the, treatment of instantaneous impulses.
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  • And a continuous force may be regarded as the limit of a succession of infinitesimal instantaneous impulses.
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  • It may indeed be said in general that what is true of France is likewise true of all countries which felt the artistic impulses of the Renaissance.
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  • This led Clerk Maxwell to frame his theory of electro-dynamics, in which electrical impulses were assumed to be transmitted through the ether by waves.
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  • This Simon de Vries was a youth of generous impulses and of much promise.
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  • But it was unquestionably from Marcionite impulses that the new sects of the Paulicians and Bogomils arose; and in so far as the western Cathari, and the antinomian and anticlerical sects ' Marcion was the earliest critical student of the New Testament canon and text.
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  • He was a man of varied culture, of large breadth and liberality of views, of generous impulses, of great gentleness and courtesy of manner, combined with equal firmness of purpose and energy of action.
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  • It is this latter fact which has led many students of human character to state that men do in fact aim at the gratification of their personal desires and impulses.
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  • We miss the graces and consolations of faith; we have human efforts and ambitions, but they are unimpregnated with divine impulses and heavenly aspirings.
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  • To the Indians he preached through an interpreter, and their interests he boldly and successfully defended by attacking the whites 1 Edwards recognized the abuse of impulses and impressions, opposed itinerant and lay preachers, and defended a well-ordered and well-educated clergy.
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  • Similarly, logic, so far as it is an art of thought or a doctrine of fallacies, and ethics, so far as it is occupied with a natural history of impulses and moral sentiments, do neither of them belong, except by courtesy, to the philosophic province.
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  • The change in direction of the air when striking a flat surface such as the side of a building will form a cushion to diminish the effects of impulses and shocks from local gusts.
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  • Jouffroy, however, always kept firm to the early - the French and Scottish - impulses of Cousin's teaching.
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  • Though not destitute of good impulses Lancaster was hasty, improvident and obstinate; he was unfortunate in his choice of friends, for he allied himself to all his fathers unscrupulous dependents.
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  • This yearning, he held, springs - like more sensual impulses - from a sense of want of something formerly possessed, of which there remains a latent memory in the soul, strong in proportion to its philosophic capacity; hence it is that in learning any abstract truth by scientific demonstration we merely make explicit what we already implicitly know; we bring into clear consciousness hidden memories of a state in which the soul looked upon Reality and Good face to face, before the lapse that imprisoned her in an alien body and mingled her true nature with fleshly feelings and impulses.
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  • It is only the lowest form of virtue - the " civic " virtue of Plato's Republic - that is employed in regulating those animal impulses whose presence in the soul is due to its mixture with the body; higher or philosophic wisdom, temperance, courage and justice are essentially purifications from this contagion; until finally the highest mode of goodness is reached, in which the soul has no community with the body, and is entirely turned towards reason.
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  • There is no logical connexion between this theory and the doctrine that appetite of desire has always pleasure (or the absence of pain) for its object; but a materialist, framing a system of psychology, will naturally direct his attention to the impulses arising out of bodily wants, whose obvious end is the preservation of the agent's organism; and this, together with a philosophic wish to simplify, may lead him to the conclusion that all human impulses are similarly self-regarding.
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  • But though it is an essential point in Clarke's view that what is right is to be done as such, apart from any consideration of pleasure or pain, it is to be inferred that he is not prepared to apply this doctrine in its unqualified form to such a creature as man, who is partly under the influence of irrational impulses.
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  • It remains to try another psychological basis for ethical construction; instead of presenting the principle of social duty as abstract reason, liable to conflict to any extent naturalness of man's social affections, and demonstrate a normal harmony between these and his self-regarding impulses.
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  • This theory had already been advanced by Cumberland and others, but Shaftesbury was the first to make it the cardinal point in his system; no one had yet definitely transferred the centre of ethical interest from the Reason, conceived as apprehending either abstract moral distinctions or laws of divine legislation, for the emotional impulses that prompt to social duty; no one had undertaken to distinguish clearly, by analysis of experience, the disinterested and self-regarding elements of our appetitive nature, or to prove inductively their perfect harmony.
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  • Such a being we might doubtless call " good," if his impulses were adapted to the attainment of his own felicity.
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  • But man we must and do consider in relation to a larger system of which he forms a part, and so we call him " good " only when his impulses and dispositions are so balanced as to tend towards the good of this whole.
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  • Moral goodness, then, in a " sensible creature " implies primarily disinterested affections, whose direct object is the good of others; but Shaftesbury does not mean (as he has been misunderstood to mean) that only such benevolent social impulses are good, and that these are always good.
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  • Taking the different impulses in detail, he first shows how the individual's happiness is promoted by developing 1 It should be observed that, while Clarke is sincerely anxious to prove that most principles are binding independently of Divine appointment, he is no less concerned to show that morality requires the practical support of revealed religion.
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  • He then exhibits the unhappiness that results from any excess of the self-regarding impulses, bodily appetite, desire of wealth, emulation, resentment, even love of life itself; and ends by dwelling on the intrinsic painfulness of all malevolence .2 One more special impulse remains to be noticed.
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  • With the generation of moralists that followed, the consideration of abstract rational principles falls into the background, and its place is taken by introspective study of the human mind, observation of the actual play of its various impulses and sentiments.
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  • The view of " human nature " against which Butler preached was not exactly Mandeville's, nor was it properly to be called 2 Three classes of impulses are thus distinguished by Shaftesbury: - (i) " Natural Affections," (2) " Self-affections," and (3) " Unnatural Affections."
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  • He first follows Shaftesbury in exhibiting the social affections as no less natural than the appetites and desires which tend directly to self-preservation; then reviving the Stoic view of the prima naturae, the first objects of natural appetites, he argues that pleasure is not the primary aim even of the impulses which Shaftesbury allowed to be " self-affections "; but rather a result which follows upon their attaining their natural ends.
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  • The latter are " necessarily presupposed " as distinct impulses in " the very idea of an interested pursuit "; since, if there were no such pre-existing desires, there would be no pleasure for self-love to aim at.
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  • Indeed, it is common for men to sacrifice to passion what they know to be their true interests; at the same time we do not consider such conduct " natural " in man as a rational being; we rather regard it as natural for him to govern his transient impulses.
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  • Indeed, we may say that an egoist must be doubly self-regulative, since rational self-love ought to restrain not only other impulses, but itself also; for as happiness is made up of feelings that result from the satisfaction of impulses other than self-love, any over-development of the latter, enfeebling these other impulses, must proportionally diminish the happiness at which self-love aims. If, then, it be admitted that human impulses are naturally under government, the natural claim of conscience or the moral faculty to be the supreme governor will hardly be denied.
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  • We have seen that in the latter's system the " moral sense " is not absolutely required, or at least is necessary only as a substitute for enlightened self-regard; since if the harmony between prudence and virtue, self-regarding and social impulses, is complete, mere self-interest will prompt a duly enlightened mind to maintain precisely that " balance " of affections in which goodness consists.
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  • Butler's ordered polity of impulses turns out to be a polity with two independent governments.
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  • This dualism of governing principles, conscience and self-love, in Butler's system, and perhaps, too, his revival of the Platonic conception of human nature as an ordered and governed community of impulses, is perhaps most nearly antici pated in Wollaston's Religion of Nature Delineated (1722).
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  • On the one hand, he speaks of moral approbation as derived from " humanity and benevolence," while expressly recognizing, after Butler, that there is a strictly disinterested element in our benevolent impulses (as also in hunger, thirst, love of fame and other passions).
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  • Without denying the actuality or importance of that sympathetic pleasure in the perceived or inferred effects of virtues and vices he yet holds that the essential part of common moral sentiment is constituted rather by a more direct sympathy with the impulses that prompt to action or expression.
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  • Moral judgments, then, are expressions of the complex normal sympathy of an impartial spectator with the active impulses that prompt to and result from actions.
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  • Finally, Price, writing after the demonstration by Shaftesbury and Butler of the actuality of disinterested impulses in human nature, is bolder and clearer than Cudworth or Clarke in insisting that right actions are to be chosen because they are right by virtuous agents as such, even going so far as to lay down that an act loses its moral worth in proportion as it is done from natural inclination.
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  • The principle of purity, again, " that the lower parts of our nature ought to be subject to the higher," merely particularizes that supremacy of reason over non-rational impulses which is involved in the very notion of reasoned morality.
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  • The moral sentiments, on this view, are not phases of self-love as Hobbes held; nor can they be directly identified with sympathy, either in Hume's way or in Adani Smith's; in fact, though apparently simple they are really derived in a complex manner from self-love and sympathy combined with more primitive impulses.
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  • Some years earlier, Gay,' admitting Hutcheson's proof of the actual disinterestedness of moral and benevolent impulses, had maintained that these (like the desires of knowledge or fame, the delight of reading, hunting and planting, &c.) were derived from self-love by " the power of association."
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  • When it was accomplished, the little knot of able men who came to the front did much in preserving the records of the past, while Odd and Hallgrim exhibit the noblest impulses of their time.
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  • Your psychosis, depressions, murderous impulses, short sighted narrow minded and utterly primitive barbarism is tearing into me.
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  • When enough endorphins are produced, the nerves that control pain and pleasure impulses in your brain are activated.
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  • Neural impulses do not travel at the same speed, muscles are not equidistant from the brain, and much more.
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  • The leathered lips resulted in vaguely defined broad impulses being delivered to the air column in the pipe, such impulses containing fewer harmonics.
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  • Also severe suicidal ideation where you feel you may act on the thoughts or impulses you should see a doctor ASAP.
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  • Failure to transmit nerve impulses ultimately results in paralysis of the louse.
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  • Mode of Action Nitrous oxide suppresses spinal impulses and may supress supraspinal pathways.
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  • Click the image for a large version Neurons in those segments then convey the impulses outward beyond the cord.
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  • Intention is a powerful force; it begins to activate the nervous system and triggers nerve impulses into muscles.
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  • The electrical impulses form the " machine code routines " which drive his muscles.
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  • I understand you have a hearing tomorrow where you'll have to testify to these murderous impulses of yours.
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  • The basis remains that no cell or organ can function correctly without its full supply of nervous impulses.
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  • The nerve impulses cause the muscles to contract, thus narrowing the airway.
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  • These chlorinated hydrocarbons work mainly by blocking nerve impulses necessary for normal bodily functions.
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  • Calcium also helps conduct nerve impulses, regulate your heartbeat, and maintain cell membranes.
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  • Nerve impulses from the hypothalamus stimulate the posterior pituitary to produce ADH when the osmotic pressure of the blood rises.
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  • Despite their sometimes self-destructive impulses in 2004 The Vines are back, stronger and more focussed than ever.
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  • Through this electromagnet pass impulses of current regulated in frequency by a tuningfork contact breaker; these impulses, acting on the teeth of the iron wheel, by a series of pulls keep it in uniform rotation.
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  • He also devised a " call " or arrangement for actuating an ordinary electric bell by the accumulated effect of the properly tuned inductive impulses falling on the secondary circuit.
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  • The problem of syntonic electric wave telegraphy is then to construct a transmitter and a receiver of such kind that the receiver will be affected by the waves emitted by the corresponding or syntonic transmitter, but not by waves of any other wavelength or by irregular electric impulses due to atmospheric electricity.
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  • The success so far achieved in isolating electric wave telegraphic stations has been based upon the principles of electric resonance and the fact that electric oscillations can be set up in a circuit having capacity and considerable inductance by feeble electromotive impulses, provided they are of exactly the natural frequency of the said circuit.
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  • But it was an easier thing to consecrate the fighting instinct than to curb it; and the institution of chivalry represents such a clerical consecration, for ideal ends and noble purposes, of the martial impulses which the Church had hitherto endeavoured to check.
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  • Lewes and others the doctrine of "cerebral reflex" was suggested, whereby actions, at first achieved only by incessant attention, became organized as conscious or subconscious habits; as for instance in the playing on musical or other instruments, when acts even of a very elaborate kind may directly follow the impulses of sensations, conscious adaptation and the deliberate choice of means being thus economized.
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  • Eytelwein (1764-1848) of Berlin, who published in 1801 a valuable compendium of hydraulics entitled Handbuch der Mechanik and der Hydraulik, investigated the subject of the discharge of water by compound pipes, the motions of jets and their impulses against plane and oblique surfaces; and he showed theoretically that a waterwheel will have its maximum effect when its circumference moves with half the velocity of the stream.
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  • Now, the revelation of this divine character of morality is possible only to a being in whom the lower impulses have been, or are, successful in overcoming reverence for the law.
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  • Hence arises the same number of successive impulses of the external air immediately in contact with the movable plate, which is thus thrown into a state of vibration at the rate of n for every revolution of the plate.
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  • But very often refreshment is undoubtedly obtained from such narcotic sleep. It may be supposed that in the latter case the effect of the drug has been to ensure occurrence of that second predisposing factor mentioned above, of that withdrawal of sense impulses from the nerve centres that serves to usher in the state of sleep. In certain conditions it may be well worth while by means of narcotic drugs to close the portals of the senses for the sake of thus obtaining stillness in the chambers of the mind; their enforced quietude may induce a period in which natural rest and repair continue long after the initial unnatural arrest of vitality due to the drug itself has passed away.
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  • Here also psychology, by its elucidation of the important part which instinctive appetites and animal impulses play in the development of intelligence, still more perhaps by arguments (based largely upon the examination of hypnotic subjects or the phenomena of fixed ideas) which show the permanent influence of irrational or semi-rational suggestions or habits upon human conduct, has done much to aid and abet idealists in their contentions.
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  • And the history of the Godfreys and the Minnesingers has remained the history of Godfreys and Minnesingers, but the history of the life of the peoples and their impulses has remained unknown.
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  • He could not live, because all man's efforts, all his impulses to life, are only efforts to increase freedom.
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  • On the contrary, the democratic impulses of the anti-capitalist and anti-war movement have been contradicted by the role of often self-appointed elites.
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  • Sensory neurones: Nerve cells within the nervous system responsible for converting external stimuli from the organism 's environment into internal electrical impulses.
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  • The result is that the transmission of nerve impulses through neural networks becomes modified.
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  • Acetyl choline One of the naturally occurring chemicals that transmits impulses from one nerve to another.
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  • But it would be unrealistic to suppose that all social behavior is the spontaneous outflow of social impulses.
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  • The action of the muscles is directed by nerve impulses.
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  • When the nerve impulses send the signals to your brain, it is unable to tell the difference of an imagined or real situation or occurrence.
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  • While there is no definite cure for sexual addiction, impulses and compulsive behavior can be controlled.
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  • A person who has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder may begin lying because he/she has trouble with controlling impulses.
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  • The impulses travel to the body systems through electrical impulses transferred through nerve fibers.
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  • This part of the nervous system carries the initial impulses from the brain to other parts of the nervous system.
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  • The brain gradually ceases to send out hunger impulses, and this eventually causes a dog to completely lose his appetite.
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  • Goth can have a bad reputation because some of its adherents have used it as an excuse for violence, but true Goths know the difference between embracing the dark for its glamour and sensuality versus acting on violent impulses.
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  • He believed that nothing was done by chance and that everything was motivated by the unconscious - what a dreamer does in their dreams was the way to act on those impulses and urges.
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  • The Snore Stopper uses electronic impulses to stop a person from snoring.
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  • They send impulses of the heart's activity through a monitor (oscilloscope) to a recorder that traces them on a moving strip of paper.
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  • Another group of poisons interferes with the electrochemical impulses that travel between neurons in the nervous system.
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  • A nerve conduction velocity test should be performed to measure how fast impulses travel through the nerves.
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  • Myelin-A fatty sheath surrounding nerves throughout the body that helps them conduct impulses more quickly.
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  • When it does reach the CNS, inflammation and destruction of the spinal cord motor cells (anterior horn cells) occurs, which prevents them from sending out impulses to muscles.
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  • By the end of a month, the nerve impulses start to return to the apparently paralyzed muscle and by the end of six months, recovery is almost complete.
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  • It results in a slowing or stopping of the impulses that travel along that nerve.
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  • The security of family often makes children feel free to express feelings and impulses they are unable to express in other settings.
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  • Much attention has focused on the connection between schizophrenia and neurotransmitters, the chemicals that transmit nerve impulses within the brain.
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  • Heartbeat abnormalities such as tachycardia (rapid heart rate) and heart block (impaired conduction of the heart's cardiac impulses) are common occurrences.
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  • Laboratory tests include electromyography (a measurement of the electrical activity of muscle cells) and nerve conduction velocity tests, which measure the speed that nerves transmit impulses.
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  • The electrodes are connected to a computer that measures the heart's electrical impulses and records them in a zigzag patter on a moving strip of paper.
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  • Nervous system-The system that transmits information, in the form of electrochemical impulses, throughout the body for the purpose of activation, coordination, and control of bodily functions.
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  • The body uses electrolytes to carry electrical impulses from cell to cell.
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  • During an EKG, small electrode patches are attached to the skin on the chest and connected to a computer that measures the heart's electrical impulses and records them in a zigzag patter on a moving strip of paper.
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  • A pacemaker is a device that sends small electrical impulses to the heart muscle to maintain a suitable heart rate.
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  • It is when these acts increase, impulses cannot be controlled, or authority defiance becomes troublesome, that parents may need to seek professional help.
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  • Impulse control disorders are a relatively new class of personality disorders characterized by an ongoing inability to resist impulses to perform actions that are harmful to oneself or others.
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  • Some research suggests that impulse control disorders are linked to certain hormones, abnormal nerve impulses, and variations in brain chemistry and function.
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  • Kleptomania is an inability to resist impulses to repetitively steal objects that are not necessary for personal use or monetary value.
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  • Electroencephalogram (EEG)-A record of the tiny electrical impulses produced by the brain's activity picked up by electrodes placed on the scalp.
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  • Motor nerve-Motor or efferent nerve cells carry impulses from the brain to muscle or organ tissue.
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  • Sensory nerves-Sensory or afferent nerves carry impulses of sensation from the periphery or outward parts of the body to the brain and spinal cord.
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  • A neurotransmitter is a chemical produced by the body that conveys nerve impulses across the gaps (synapses) between nerve cells.
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  • Acting out is defined as the release of out-of-control aggressive or sexual impulses in order to gain relief from tension or anxiety.
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  • Such impulses often result in antisocial or delinquent behaviors.
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  • Electroencephalography-The recording of electrical impulses produced by the brain's activity via electrodes attached to a patient's scalp.
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  • The disease somehow blocks the flow of electrical impulses across the muscle cell membrane.
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  • Although epilepsy is a collective term for a variety of different types of seizures, all forms of epilepsy start with a random discharge of nerve impulses into the brain.
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  • Antiepileptic drugs act by either raising the seizure threshold or by limiting the spread of impulses from one nerve to another inside the brain.
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  • This makes the cells less likely to send out spontaneous impulses, which are the beginning of an epileptic seizure.
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  • Glaucoma-A common eye disease characterized by increased fluid pressure in the eye that damages the optic nerve, which carries visual impulses to the brain.
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  • The electrodes in the cochlea collect the impulses from the stimulator and send them to the brain.
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  • Stimulating a nerve cell triggers nerve impulses (signals) that speed down the axon.
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  • These nerve impulses then stimulate the end of an axon to release chemicals called neurotransmitters that spread out and communicate with the dendrites of neighboring nerve cells.
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  • This covering helps speed nerve impulses along the axon.
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  • This loss of myelin can short circuit nerve impulses (messages) and interrupt cell communication.
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  • The receiver picks up digital information forwarded by the transmitter and converts it into electrical impulses.
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  • These electrical impulses flow through electrodes contained in a narrow, flexible tube that has been threaded into the cochlea during surgery and stimulate the auditory nerve.
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  • The auditory nerve carries the electrical impulses to the brain, which interprets them as sound.
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  • Inner ear-The interior section of the ear, where sound vibrations and information about balance are translated into nerve impulses.
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  • There must be several separate episodes of failure to restrain aggressive impulses that result in serious assaults against others or property destruction.
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  • People diagnosed with IED sometimes describe strong impulses to act aggressively prior to the specific incidents reported to the doctor and/or the police.
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  • Some are able to control aggressive impulses without acting on them while others act out in less destructive ways, such as screaming at someone rather than attacking them physically.
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  • Unless stopped, these chaotic impulses are fatal.
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  • Calcium helps regulate the heart rate and nerve impulses, lower cholesterol, prevent atherosclerosis, develop muscles, and prevent muscle cramping.
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  • Symptoms of magnesium deficiency include faulty transmission of nerve and muscle impulses, irritability, nervousness, and tantrums.
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  • Brain cells communicate by producing tiny electrical impulses, also called brain waves.
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  • This effect allows the flow of nerve impulses to return to normal.
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  • Typical obsessions include fears of dirt, germs, contamination, and violent or aggressive impulses.
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  • Dendrite-A threadlike extension of the cytoplasm of a neuron that conducts electrical impulses toward the cell body of the neuron.
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  • When children control their violent impulses, they should be praised.
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  • Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)-A psychological treatment in which a series of controlled electrical impulses are delivered to the brain in order to induce a seizure within the brain.
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  • Certain neurological conditions that are present at birth or develop later in life may interrupt the nerve impulses to the brain that in turn send messages to the penis to become erect.
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  • It is not only needed to help regulate our mood and sleep, but it also transmits nerve impulses from the brain and as a neurotransmitter controls feelings like thirst and hunger.
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  • Serotonin is necessary for regulation of both sleep and mood and is essential for transmitting nerve impulses from the brain.
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  • Potassium is an electrolyte that is crucial in cell function and electrical impulses.
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  • Often they are on drugs or acting on bizarre impulses.
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  • Their inability to think about the consequences of their actions in addition to their inability to control their impulses makes them a dangerous combination of adult looking and child acting.
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  • Aquarius, like Scorpio, lives in the realm of things unseen but, unlike Scorpio, is mainly concerned with motivations, Aquarius is fascinated by the electrical impulses of thoughts and how those thoughts are then made manifest.
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  • Are they experiences that are induced by electrical impulses in the brain during the last moments before death?
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  • Although this sounds like a fairly simple plan, it will require you to control your impulses, save religiously, and live moderately.
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  • Sometimes these impulses are so severe that they interfere drastically with a person's ability to function in all life areas due to the amount of time behaviors consume or the fear and anxiety they cause.
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  • Instead of being a time of unusual behavior, Christmas is perhaps the only time in the year when people can obey their natural impulses and express their true sentiments without feeling self-conscious and, perhaps, foolish.
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  • It uses your body's natural impulses instead of working against them.
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  • Sodium also regulates blood volume and blood pressure, transmits impulses for muscle contraction and nerve function, and regulates the acid balance in the blood and body fluids.
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  • People who suffer from impulse eating and cravings often report that all impulses and cravings that relate to food go away with the Topamax.
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  • The brain controls muscles by sending tiny electrical impulses through your nervous system.
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  • This happens because nerve impulses speed up at higher temperatures.
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  • Whether the MySpace page the user wants is a personal page for friends and family, a music page for a band, or something more serious and business-like, the Thomas editor will suit any needs and satisfy any creative impulses.
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  • Rhyn does understand, but he can't control what he is.  Even if he wanted to do good, he'd fail.  He's too weak to control his impulses, Kris.
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  • Whatever his cares, his work or his troubles, I have never noticed in him aught but generous impulses and a love of humanity carried even to those heroic imprudences of which they alone are capable who devote themselves to the amelioration of humanity."
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  • The transmitted signals or electric impulses, which on a land line are sharply defined when received, become attenuated and prolonged in the case of a long cable, and are unable to actuate the.
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  • The general principle on which the instruments for working long submarine cables are based is that of making the moving parts very light and perfectly free to follow the comparatively slow rise and fall of the electric impulses or waves.
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  • These may well serve as conductors of nervous impulses.
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  • The presence of these threads between all the cells of tfie plant shows that the plant body must be regarded as a connected whole; the threads themselves probably play an important part in the growth of the cell-wall, the conduction of food and water, the process of secretion and the transmission of impulses.
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  • The opportunity thus given for debate naturally stimulated the movement in favour of constitutional government, which received new impulses from the sympathetic attitude of the emperor Alexander II., his grant in 1879 of a constitution to the liberated principality of Bulgaria, and the multiplication of Nihilist outrages which pointed to the necessity of conciliating Liberal opinion in order to present a united front against revolutionary agitation.
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  • With this opposition to the Church they combine a complete antinomianism, through the identification of all their desires with the impulses of the divine Spirit.
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  • With the principles of private morals he really deals only so far as is necessary to enable the reader to appreciate the impulses which have to be controlled by law.
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  • These instincts and impulses would be at work already among the soldiers during the Crusade, producing a saga all the more readily, as there were poets in the camp; for we know that a certain Richard, who joined the First Crusade, sang its exploits in verse, while still more famous is the princely troubadour, William of Aquitaine, who joined the Crusade of Iloo.
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  • This style originated, indeed, in a long experience of the profoundest dramatic impulses; but as a habit it does not seem, like the greatest things in art, the one inevitable treatment of the matter in hand.
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  • Friends have always held that war is contrary to the precepts and spirit of the Gospel, believing that it springs from the lower impulses of human nature, and not from the seed of divine life with its infinite capacity of response to the Spirit of God.
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  • Even in his motives and his impulses, in his mental attitude towards outward surroundings, in his appetites and aversions, inherited tendency and environment have been found to play a very large part; indeed many thinkers hold that the whole of a man's development, mental as well.
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  • In philosophy, the term (with its antithesis "heteronomy") was applied by Kant to that aspect of the rational will in which, qua rational, it is a law to itself, independently alike of any external authority, of the results of experience and of the impulses of pleasure and pain.
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  • This woman had philanthropic impulses and some real interest in art and.
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  • He was not incapable of affection nor without generous impulses, but he was flighty, passionate in a childish way, and when angry capable of cruelty.
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  • The impulses that promoted a vein of thought cognate to deism were active both before and after the time of its greatest notoriety.
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  • Through Cooke's activities the sales became enormous; the notes, issued in denominations as low as $50, appealed to the patriotic impulses of the people who could not subscribe for bonds of a higher denomination.
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