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impulse

impulse

impulse Sentence Examples

  • She combed Destiny's hair into pig tails, and then on impulse, did the same with hers.

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  • She resisted the impulse to check her watch.

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  • On an impulse, she leaned down and kissed them.

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  • That impulse was reasonable.

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  • On an impulse, he turned and looked at the family seated near his table still enjoying their meal.

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  • has supplied a powerful impulse to migration.

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  • On impulse she opened the small crystal box where they'd placed the bone.

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  • On impulse, she touched his brow.

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  • The game finished but Dean ignored an impulse to introduce himself and chat with the boy.

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  • God could not have put into her heart an impulse that was against His will.

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  • In this he was true to his prophetic impulse and genius.

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  • The impulse to utter audible sounds had always been strong within me.

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  • Emerson declares that " the impulse to seek proof of immortality is itself the strongest proof of all."

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  • A wild impulse to jump seized me, but terror held me fast.

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  • But an irresistible impulse drew her forward.

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  • Plans of attack were sketched: routes were traced: distances were measured; and finally in 1163 there came the impulse from within which turned these plans into action.

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  • Avoiding an impulse to jerk the straps back up, she gazed up at him.

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  • On an impulse, Dean drove back in behind it and strolled over to meet the young man who stepped from the vehicle.

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  • Carmen's first impulse was to snatch Destiny back, but the six months waiting period had long passed.

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  • Carmen's first impulse was to snatch Destiny back, but the six months waiting period had long passed.

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  • The impulse to do as he bid was too strong.

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  • The impulse to do as he bid was too strong.

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  • carried out by the Swedish chemist, Torbern Bergman, acting under the impulse of Linnaeus, and by the German philosopher, Immanuel Kant.

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  • These facilities, coupled with the wide and fascinating field of research opened up by Sir William Herschel's discovery of the binary character of double stars, gave an impulse to micrometric research which has continued unabated to the present time.

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  • Deputy Sheriff Lydia Larkin drove by in her official white Blazer and Dean repressed the impulse to give her a one-finger salute.

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  • Dean planned to send a patrol car by later to pick up some clothes but his trip home passed within a block of Parsons Street and on an impulse, he drove by the building.

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  • Dean planned to send a patrol car by later to pick up some clothes but his trip home passed within a block of Parsons Street and on an impulse, he drove by the building.

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  • The orange and lemon groves have also suffered considerably, but new varieties of the orange tree are now being introduced, and an impulse will be given to the export trade in this fruit by the removal of the restriction on its importation into Greece.

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  • The impulse to tell is the important thing.

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  • At this epoch the study of Roman law received a new impulse, imd thu.

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  • He may, in fact, be regarded as the final exponent of that empirical school of philosophy which owed its impulse to John Locke, and is generally spoken of as being typically English.

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  • The demise of war will be hastened when every impulse to war is regarded, at least initially, with a healthy measure of distrust.

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  • On impulse, Brady tapped his implant and breathed her name as he continued to ready himself.

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  • The impulse to similar work in the West came also from Babylonia.

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  • The impulse to similar work in the West came also from Babylonia.

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  • The European country which had come the most completely under the influence of Arab culture now began to send forth explorers Spanish to distant lands, though the impulse came not from the Moors but from Italian merchant navigators in Spanish explora- service.

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  • A law passed on the 22nd of March 1900 gave a B a, special impulse to this form of enterprise by fixing the ratio r naze.

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  • To Aristotle the whole of nature is instinct with a vital impulse towards some higher manifestation.

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  • any impulse from theory, simply as a spontaneous outgrowth of popular life.

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  • With Nehemiah and Ezra we enter upon the era in which a new impulse gave to Jewish life and thought that form which became the characteristic orthodox Judaism.

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  • To Aristotle the whole of nature is instinct with a vital impulse towards some higher manifestation.

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  • The impulse gone, I fell down and cried for her to take me up in her arms.

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  • When nominalism was revived in the 14th century by the English Franciscan, William of Occam, it gave evidence of a new tendency in thought, a distrust of abstractions and an impulse towards direct observation and inductive research, a tendency which had its fulfilment in the scientific movement of the Renaissance.

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  • Wheels creak on their axles as the cogs engage one another and the revolving pulleys whirr with the rapidity of their movement, but a neighboring wheel is as quiet and motionless as though it were prepared to remain so for a hundred years; but the moment comes when the lever catches it and obeying the impulse that wheel begins to creak and joins in the common motion the result and aim of which are beyond its ken.

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  • At length when he had understood and looked in the direction the old man indicated, he recognized Natasha, and following his first impulse stepped instantly and rapidly toward the coach.

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  • The idea of these meetings was first suggested in a letter to the archbishop of Canterbury by Bishop Hopkins of Vermont in 1851, but the immediate impulse came from the colonial Church in Canada.

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  • They first brought the products and arts of the Orient into western Europe; and in the Netherlands, by the impulse that they gave to commerce, they were one of the primary causes of the rise of the chartered towns.

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  • The contest between the royal power and that of the Sicilian estates threatened to bring matters to a deadlock, until in 1812, under the impulse of Lord William Bentinck, a constitution modelled largely on that of England was passed by the estates.

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  • This was unquestionably the greatest of the voyages which followed from the impulse of Prince Henry, and it was rendered possible only by the magnificent courage of the commander in spite of rebellion, mutiny and starvation.

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  • The imitation of Greek comedy, tragedy and epic poetry, which produced great results in the hands of Naevius, Plautus, Ennius and their successors, received its first impulse from him.

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  • For in Ford's genius there was real refinement, except when the "suprasensually sensual" impulse or the humbler self-delusion referred to came into play.

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  • The interest in spiritualism, apart from scientific curiosity and mere love of the marvellous, is partly due to the belief that trustworthy information and advice about mundane matters can be obtained through mediums - to the same impulse in fact which has in all ages attracted inquirers to fortune-tellers.

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  • The impulse given by Theodoric was continued by his successors, and during the regency of Amalasuntha and the reigns of Theodatus and Vitiges (526-539), S.

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  • Greater weight must be laid upon the independent evidence of the prophetical writings, and the objection that Palestine could not have produced the religious fervency of Haggai or Zechariah without an initial impulse from Babylonia begs the question.

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  • The protective instinct was responsible for much of this interference with the natural impulse of men of various creeds towards mutual esteem and forbearance.

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  • The impulse communicated by Schleiermacher was confirmed by Planck, and he seems now to have realized that the original investigation of Christian history was to form the great work of his life.

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  • The fingers of the clock had been pushed back; once more things were as they had been at the time of the First Crusade; once more the West must arm itself for the holy war and the recovery of Jerusalem - but now it must face a united Mahommedan world, where in 1096 it had found political and religious dissension, and it must attempt its vastly heavier task without the morning freshness of a new religious impulse, and with something of the weariness of a hundred years of struggle upon its shoulders.

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  • The imitation of Greek comedy, tragedy and epic poetry, which produced great results in the hands of Naevius, Plautus, Ennius and their successors, received its first impulse from him.

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  • Greater weight must be laid upon the independent evidence of the prophetical writings, and the objection that Palestine could not have produced the religious fervency of Haggai or Zechariah without an initial impulse from Babylonia begs the question.

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  • It is the following out of an inherent tendency or impulse to a series of changes, all of which were virtually pre-existent, and this process cannot be interfered with from without.

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  • Whether it was the wine he had drunk, or an impulse of frankness, or the thought that this man did not, and never would, know any of those who played a part in his story, or whether it was all these things together, something loosened Pierre's tongue.

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  • In 1337 the industry received an impulse from the settlement of a party of Flemish clothiers, and extended so greatly that when it was found necessary in 1566 to appoint by act of parliament deputies to assist the aulnegers, Bolton is named as one of the places where these deputies were to be employed.

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  • It is perhaps as much from the impulse which Ernesti gave to sacred and profane criticism in Germany, as from the intrinsic excellence of his own works in either department, that he must derive his reputation as a philologist or theologian.

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  • Perhaps his energy would not have been sufficient to sustain him against these repeated blows of destiny if, in 1854, the accession to the viceroyalty of Egypt of his old friend, Said Pacha, had not given a new impulse to the ideas that had haunted him for the last twenty-two years concerning the Suez Canal.

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  • Alliance with Phoenicia gave the impulse to extended intercourse; trading expeditions were undertaken from the Gulf of Akaba, and Ahab built himself a palace decorated with ivory.

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  • This process received a great impulse from the erection in the 11th and 12th centuries of defined territorial jurisdictions for the archdeacons, who had hitherto been itinerant representatives of the central power of the diocese.

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  • 2 Meanwhile the study received a great impulse from the appearance, at Zurich in 1555, of the third book of Conrad Gesner's Historia Animalium " qvi est de Auium natura," and at Paris in the same year of Pierre Belon's (Bellonius) Histoire de la nature des Oyseaux.

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  • Neander found in him the very impulse which he needed, while Schleiermacher found a pupil of thoroughly congenial feeling, and one destined to carry out his views in a higher and more effective Christian form than he himself was capable of imparting to them.

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  • The Norman conquest of Sicily may with justice be called a crusade before the Crusades; and it cannot but have given some impulse to that later attempt to wrest Syria from the Mahommedans, in which the virtual leader was Bohemund, a scion of the same house which had conquered Sicily.

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  • It is perhaps as much from the impulse which Ernesti gave to sacred and profane criticism in Germany, as from the intrinsic excellence of his own works in either department, that he must derive his reputation as a philologist or theologian.

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  • Natasha checked her first impulse to run out to her, and remained in her hiding place, watching--as under an invisible cap--to see what went on in the world.

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  • One can never consent to creep when one feels an impulse to soar.

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  • For the world as a whole, however, he postulated a beginning in time (whence his use of the word creation), and further supposed that the impulse of organization which was conveyed to chaotic matter by the Creator issued from a central point in the infinite space spreading gradually outwards.

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  • He possesses the cool temperament of the man of science rather than the fervid Godward aspiration of the mystic proper; and the speculative impulse which lies at the root of this form of thought is almost entirely absent from his writings.

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  • For the world as a whole, however, he postulated a beginning in time (whence his use of the word creation), and further supposed that the impulse of organization which was conveyed to chaotic matter by the Creator issued from a central point in the infinite space spreading gradually outwards.

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  • In the various ceramic arts Italy was once unrivalled, but the ancient tradition for a long time lost its primeval impulse.

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  • Our concern lies with the first kind of Crusade, and with the other three only so far as they bear on the first, and as they illustrate the immense widening which the term "Crusade" now underwent - a widening accompanied by its inevitable corollary of shallowness of motive and degradation of impulse.

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  • The common use of armorial bearings, and the practice of the tournament, may be Oriental in their origin; the latter has its affinities with the equestrian exercises of the Jerid, and the former, though of prehistoric antiquity, may have received a new impulse from contact with the Arabs.

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  • geography more studied; the Crusades gave a great impulse to the writing of history, and produced, besides innumerable other works, the greatest historical work of the middle ages - the Historia transmarina of William of Tyre.

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  • received an impulse, largely, it is true, from the Arabs of Spain, but also from the East; Leonardo Fibonacci, the first Christian algebraist, had travelled in Syria and Egypt.

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  • The basis of this growth is partly the story-telling instinct innate in all men, which loves to heighten an effect, sharpen a point or increase a contrast - the instinct which breathes in Icelandic sagas like that of Burnt Njal; partly the instinct of idolization, if it may be so called, which leads to the perversion into impossible greatness of an approved character, and has created, in this instance, the legendary figures of Peter the Hermit and Godfrey of Bouillon (qq.v.); partly the religious impulse, which counted nothing wonderful in a holy war, and imported miraculous elements even into the sober pages of the Gesta.

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  • The earliest certain reaction against Baalism is ascribed to the reign of Ahab, whose marriage with Jezebel gave the impulse to the introduction of a particular form of the cult.

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  • She is noteworthy as having given the chief impulse at the court of her brother Henry II.

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  • These two works interrupted the execution of the Ring and formed the stepping-stones to Parsifal, a work which may perhaps be said to mark a further advance in that subtlety of poetic conception which, as we have seen, gave the determining impulse to Wagner's true musical style.

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  • Since then the race has been drifting steadily southward and eastward, a vast, aggregate of small independent clans united by no common government, but all obeying a common impulse to move outwards from their original seats along the line of least resistance.

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  • The value of that work cannot be denied; the impulse which it gave to Platonic studies in Italy, and through them to the formation of the new philosophy in Europe, is indisputable.

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  • He experienced within himself the inward call to seek the amelioration of mankind and their deliverance from ruin, and regarded this inner impulse, intensified as it was by long, contemplative solitude and by visions, as being the call addressed to him by God Himself.

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  • At the age of fourteen he entered Yale College, where he graduated in 1810 and where under the instruction of Jeremiah Day and Benjamin Silliman he received the first impulse towards electrical studies.

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  • and C. Peckham, Instincts and Habits of Solitary Wasps (1898); see also the bibliography (section "Instinct and Impulse") in Baldwin's Dict.

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  • The government of intervention at first directed its main effort simply to holding the country together, without undertaking much that could divide public opinion or seem of unpalatably foreign impulse; and later to the establishment of a few fundamental laws which, when intervention ceased, should give greater simplicity, strength and stability to a new native government.

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  • If she maintained neutrality, it was due to no impulse of gratitude, and it was far from " benevolent."

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  • He had mastered his manner and, as one may say, learned his trade, in the exercise of criticism and the reflective parts of literature, before he surrendered himself to that powerful creative impulse which had long been tempting him, so that when, in mature life, he essayed the portraiture of invented character he came to it unhampered by any imperfection of language.

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  • - It was the accession of Hamburg to the customs union in 1888 which gave such a vigorous impulse to her more recent commercial development.

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  • The trade of Hamburg received its first great impulse in 1783, when the United States, by the treaty of Paris, became an independent power.

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  • This change synchronized with the revival of the Western Empire under Charlemagne, a revival which necessarily gave an impulse to the claims of the see of Rome.

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  • Whatever effect the reinvigoration of the papacy may have had in hastening the process, the original impulse towards the adoption of the Roman rite had proceeded, not from Rome, but from Spain and Gaul; it was the natural result of the lively intercourse between the Churches of these countries and the Holy See.

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  • In 1717 Prince Eugene of Savoy conquered it for Austria, which kept it until 1739, improving the fortifications and giving great impulse to the commercial development of the town.

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  • pure form entirely separate (Xcoptor6v) from all matter, eternal, unchangeable, operating not by its own activity but by the impulse which its own absolute existence excites in matter

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  • Eclecticism gained great popularity, and, partly owing to Cousin's position as minister of public instruction, became the authorized system in the chief seats of learning in France, where it has given a most remarkable impulse to the study of the history of philosophy.

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  • In geography he found a field hardly touched since Samuel Bochart, in whose footsteps he followed in the Spicilegium geographiae hebraeorum exterae post Bochartum (1769-1780); and to his impulse we owe the famous Eastern expedition conducted by Carsten Niebuhr.

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  • Thenceforward affairs went on prosperously; the mining districts continued to be enlarged; the trading companies of the littoral provinces were abolished, but the impulse they had given to agriculture remained.

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  • of The speculative impulse was exhausted which marks Decline .

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  • The freedom here spoken of is a freedom from the immediacy of impulse - a freedom based upon our possession of reason as a power of comparison, memory and forethought.

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  • The encouragement of polite literature was more especially the object of the Kisfaludy Society, founded in 1836.4 Polite literature had received a great impulse in the preceding period (1807-1830), but after the formation of the academy and the Kisfaludy society it advanced with accelerated speed towards the point attained by other nations.

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  • The first active impulse toward political unity was given by Napoleon, when after Wagram he erected the Slovene districts and most of Croatia and Dalmatia into a separate Illyrian State, incorporated in the French Empire, but having its administrative capital at Laibach.

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  • Aristeas says that the first impulse came from the Arimaspi, who displaced the Issedones, who in turn fell upon the Scyths.

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  • The latter is the more probable motive, and we recognize in this the first instance of that impulse to visit the scenes familiar to them through literature which afterwards acted on many of the great writers of Rome.

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  • An impulse is communicated to the blood vessels in accordance with this demand, and a greater or smaller outflow is the result.

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  • The impulse which all departments of intellectual activity received from the revival of Greek literature in Europe was felt by medicine among the rest.

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  • His only important precursors in serious poetry were Ennius and Lucilius, and, though he derived from the first of these an impulse to shape the Latin tongue into a fitting vehicle for the expression of elevated emotion and imaginative conception, he could find in neither a guide to follow in the task he set before himself.

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  • The result was a great schism among the Jews of Spain and southern France, and a new impulse was given to the study of philosophy by the unauthorized interference of the Spanish rabbis.

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  • In 1603, however, he resumed his theological reading at Jena, and in the following year received a new impulse from J.

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  • When the cylinder r =a is moved with velocity U and r =b with velocity U 1 along Ox, = U b e - a,1 r +0 cos 0 - U ib2 - 2 a, (r +Q 2 ') cos 0, = - U be a2 a2 (b 2 - r) sin 0 - Uib2 b1)a, (r - ¢2 sin 0; b and similarly, with velocity components V and V 1 along Oy a 2 b2 ?= Vb,_a,(r+r) sin g -Vi b, b2 a, (r+ 2) sin 0, (17) = V b, a2 a, (b2 r) cos 0+Vi b, b, a, (r- ¢ 2) cos h; (18) and then for the resultant motion z 2zz w= (U 2 + V2)b2a a2U+Vi +b a b a2 U z Vi -(U12+V12) b2 z a2b2 Ui +VIi b 2 - a 2 U1 +Vii b 2 - a 2 z The resultant impulse of the liquid on the cylinder is given by the component, over r=a (§ 36), X =f p4 cos 0.ad0 =7rpa 2 (U b z 2 + a 2 Uib.2bz a2); (20) and over r =b Xi= fp?

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  • (2) If the actual motion at any instant is supposed to be generated instantaneously from rest by the application of pressure impulse over the surface, or suddenly reduced to rest again, then, since no natural forces can act impulsively throughout the liquid, the pressure impulse W satisfies the equations I do = I d i dos - ax -u, - - y = -v, Pdz = -t, a =p4)-}-a constant, (4) and the constant may be ignored; and Green's transformation of the energy T amounts to the theorem that the work done by an impulse is the product of the impulse and average velocity, or half the velocity from rest.

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  • The impulse required to set up the motion in liquid of density p i the resultant of an impulsive pressure p4) over the surface S of th ellipsoid, and is therefore ffp4ldS = p4GoffxldS =p 40 (volume of the ellipsoid) =4)oW', (23) where W' denotes the weight of liquid displaced.

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  • These theorems, which hold for the motion of a single rigid body, are true generally for a flexible system, such as considered here for a liquid, with one or more rigid bodies swimming in it; and they express the statement that the work done by an impulse is the product of the impulse and the arithmetic mean of the initial and final velocity; so that the kinetic energy is the work done by the impulse in starting the motion from rest.

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  • These equations are proved by taking a line fixed in space, whose direction cosines are 1, then dt=mR-nQ,' d'-t = nP =lQ-mP. (5) If P denotes the resultant linear impulse or momentum in this direction P =lxl+mx2+nx3, ' dP dt xl+, d y t x2' x3 +1 dtl dt 2 +n dt3, =1 ('+m (dt2-x3P+x1R) ' +n ('-x1Q-{-x2P) ' '= IX +mY+nZ, / (7) for all values of 1, Next, taking a fixed origin and axes parallel to Ox, Oy, Oz through 0, and denoting by x, y, z the coordinates of 0, and by G the component angular momentum about 1"2 in the direction (1, G =1(yi-x2z+x3y) m 2-+xlz) n(y(y 3x 1 x3x y + x 2 x) (8) Differentiating with respect to t, and afterwards moving the fixed.

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  • well as of the body from the vector OF to O'F' requires an impulse couple, tending to increase the angle F00', of magnitude, in sec. foot-pounds F.00'.sin FOO'=FVt sin (0-0), (4) equivalent to an incessant couple N=FV sin (0-0) = (F sin 0 cos 0-F cos 0 sin ¢)V = (c 2 -c i) (V /g) sin 0 cos 4) =W'(13-a)uv/g (5) This N is the couple in foot-pounds changing the momentum of the medium, the momentum of the body alone remaining the same; the medium reacts on the body with the same couple N in the opposite direction, tending when c 2 -c 1 is positive to set the body broadside to the advance.

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  • The body is held fixed, and the reactio of the mechanism and the resultant of the impulsive pressure on th surface are a measure of the impulse, linear,, , and angula A, µ, v, required to start the circulation.

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  • 00 ab2dX °0 ab2dX (22) L (I JS)' (18) (t9) This impulse will remain of constant magnitude, and fixed relatively to the body, which thus experiences an additional reaction from the circulation which is the opposite of the force required to change the position in space of the circulation impulse; and these extra forces must be taken into account in the dynamical equations.

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  • In his childhood Gaston Paris learned to appreciate the Old French romances as poems and stories, and this early impulse to the study of Romance literature was placed on a solid basis by courses of study at Bonn (1856-1857) under Friedrich Diez, at Göttingen (1857-1858) and finally at the Ecole des Chartes (1858-1861).

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  • In the 6th century they received a new impulse from a monk of 'the name of Jacob, who united the various divisions into which the Eutychians, or Monophysites, had separated into one church, which exists at the present time under the name of the Jacobite Church, and has numerous adherents in Armenia, Egypt and Ethiopia.

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  • The German trading towns, at the mouths of the numerous streams which drain the North European plain, were stimulated or created by the unifying impulse of a common and long-continued advance of conquest and colonization.

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  • Comte is in no true sense a follower of Saint-Simon, but it was undoubtedly Saint-Simon who launched him, to take Comte's own word, by suggesting the two starting-points of what grew into the Comtist system - first, that political phenomena are as capable of being grouped under laws as other phenomena; and second, that the true destination of philosophy must be social, and the true object of the thinker must be the reorganization of the moral, religious and political systems. We can readily see what an impulse these far-reaching conceptions would give to Comte's meditations.

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  • Is there any one element which communicates the decisive impulse to all the rest, - any predominating agency in the course of social evolution?

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  • Through affection she purifies the activity of the test of every institution, impulse, act; his fabric and knowledge at every point, is evidently beyond the compass of such an article as this.

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  • To the older and more luxurious lyrics, as reprinted in 1842, Tennyson did not spare the curbing and pruning hand, and in some cases went too far in restraining the wanton spirit of beauty in its youthful impulse.

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  • It was not to his paintings, however, that he owed his greatest influence, but to the powerful impulse he gave to the illustration of books and broadsides by wood-engravings.

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  • It was he who gave their first really artistic impulse to the kilns of Awata, Mizoro and Iwakura, whence so many delightful specimens of faience issued almost without interruption until the middle of the 19th century and continue to issue to-day.

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  • Latest of all to acknowledge the impulse of the new departure have been the potters of Kaga.

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  • These had their origin in the same impulse which ultimately found its full gratification in Roman history, Roman epic poetry, and that form of Roman oratory known as laudationes, and in some of the Odes of Horace.

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  • First among his special services to Latin literature was the fresh impulse which he gave to tragedy.

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  • Through his industry and vigorous understanding he gave a great impulse to the creation of Roman oratory, history and systematic didactic writing.

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  • The impulse given to oratory by Cato, Ser.

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  • The poetic impulse and culture communicated to Roman literature in the last years of the republic passed on without any break of continuity into the literature of the of imperial succeeding age.

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  • The imitative impulse, which had much of the character of a creative impulse, and had resulted in the appropriation of the forms of poetry suited to the Roman and Italian character and of the metres suited to the genius of the Latin language, no longer stimulated to artistic effort.

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  • A fresh impulse was given to letters on the accession of Nero, and this was partly due to the theatrical and artistic tastes of the young emperor.

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  • The Church as a whole, however, under pressure of circumstances rather than by a spontaneous impulse, decided otherwise.

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  • The fresh impulse enabled it to break the Scottish cavalry and repulse the foot, and Leslie's line of battle was gradually rolled up from right to left.

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  • It is possible that Leo's letter to Flavian gave the impulse to put it forward because it contained a parallel to words which Leo quoted from the Old Roman Creed, " born of the Holy Ghost and the Virgin Mary," " crucified and buried," which do not occur in the first Nicene Creed.

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  • gave fresh impulse to the Liberal movement, and on the 4th of September 1847 Leopold instituted the National Guard - a first step towards the constitution; shortly after the marchese Cosimo Ridolfi was appointed prime minister.

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  • The peace of the Pyrenees was a decisive event in his personal history as well as in that of France, for one of its most important stipulations referred to his marriage, He had already been strongly attracted to one of the nieces of Mazarin, but reasons of state triumphed over personal impulse; and it was agreed that the new friendship with Spain should be cemented by the marriage of Louis to his cousin, the Infanta Maria Theresa.

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  • When the wind acts on the surface of the sea it drives before it the particles of the surface layer of water, and, as these cannot be parted from those immediately beneath, the internal friction of the fluid causes the propelling impulse to act through a considerable depth, and if the wind continued long enough it would ultimately set the whole mass of the ocean in motion 'right down to the bottom.

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  • In 1737 he had been appointed postmaster at Philadelphia, and about the same time he organized the first police force and fire company in the colonies; in 1749, after he had written Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth in Pensilvania, he and twenty-three other citizens of Philadelphia formed themselves into an association for the purpose of establishing an academy, which was opened in 1751, was chartered in 1753, and eventually became the University of Pennsylvania; in 1727 he organized a debating club, the " Junto," in Philadelphia, and later he was one of the founders of the American Philosophical Society (1743; incorporated 1780); he took the lead in the organization of a militia force, and in the paving of the city streets, improved the method of street lighting, and assisted in the founding of a city hospital (1751); in brief, he gave the impulse to nearly every measure or project for the welfare and prosperity of Philadelphia undertaken in his day.

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  • Speranski's own indiscretions gave the final impulse.

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  • The feelings which grew up, and the movements that were fostered till they rendered the Civil War inevitable, received something of the same impulse from Massachusetts which she had given a century before to the feelings and movements forerunning the War of American Independence.

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  • The religious impulse which was so strong both in the Spanish and the English colonies was prominent in the French, but in the most fatal form.

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  • Protestant creeds had clearly affirmed that nothing possessed authority which was not in Scripture: in a short time, Protestant theologians - following an impulse common to all Christian communions - define more sharply the - identity of what is authoritative with the letter of Scripture, and call these entire contents dogmas.

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  • He was not a great original thinker; he lacked the creative faculty and the creative impulse.

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  • Even before that, however, owing partly to the impulse given by the university of London after 1836, the standard of learning in some of the colleges had been rising; and the last generation has seen marked advance in this respect.

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  • Another great service to English philology was rendered by his paper, read before the Philological Society, "On some Deficiencies in our English Dictionaries" (1857), which gave the first impulse to the great Oxford New EnglishDictionary.

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  • The close of the American Civil War, the Fenian raids across the American border, and the dangers incident to the international situation, gave a decisive impulse to the movement.

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  • The historical and geographical researches of Kremer and Sprenger gave a fresh impulse to inquiry.

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  • After 1/nth of a revolution, the two sets of perforations will again coincide, the lateral impulse of the air repeated, and hence the rapidity of rotation increased.

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  • Ordinarily when a bell is struck the impulse primarily excites the radial motion, and the tangential motion follows as a matter of course.

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  • Thus if a pendulum always receives a slight impulse in the direction of motion just about the lowest point, this is equivalent to an increase of the restoring force if received before passage through the lowest point, and to a decrease if received after that passage, and in either case it tends to maintain the swing.

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  • Garrulous after a fashion as Montaigne is, he gives us no clear idea of any original or definite impulse leading him to write the famous Essays.

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  • From the Kenites, at any rate, they may have received, not only a strong religious impulse, but a store of tales of the primitive age, and these stories too may have been partly influenced by Babylonian traditions.

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  • Feudalism was abolished; the Code Napoleon was introduced; the Jews were freed from repressive laws; and education received some impulse in its higher departments.

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  • Here he came under the influence of the historian, Ludwig Timotheus Spittler, from whom, as also from Johannes von Muller and Friedrich Schlegel, his historical studies received a fresh impulse.

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  • He simply obeyed the impulse given him by the queen and Godoy.

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  • The latter followed, almost without opposition, the impulse received from Syria; from the rule of the patriarch Babaeus (Syr.

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  • The impulse came from the Hansa.

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  • (2) The same problem took a new form in the Synergist controversy, which discussed the first impulse in conversion.

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  • One party taught that while the first impulse must come from the Holy Spirit the work might be compared to reviving a man apparently dead.

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  • The scientific impulse communicated by Socrates was sufficient to drive scepticism into the background during the great age of Greek philosophy (i.e.

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  • But with these insignificant exceptions it holds true that, after the sceptical wave marked by the Sophists, scepticism does not reappear till after the exhaustion of the Socratic impulse in Aristotle.

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  • The expulsion of the Jesuits gave a new impulse to the attacks directed against all schemes of education in which Latin held a prominent position.

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  • And the impulse thus given continued.

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  • And while the movement received its impulse from Athanasius, the power by which it was carried through and established was largely that of his powerful ally, the Church of Rome.

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  • After nearly five years spent in Europe in preparation, he entered with enthusiasm on his duties, and, for five years more, gave a vigorous impulse, not only to the study of Greek, but to all the work of the college.

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  • He also introduced text-books, and came into stimulating contact with his people; perhaps no one has ever succeeded as he did by the use of these methods in communicating intellectual, moral and religious impulse to so many students.

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  • The great philosophical impulse was that given by Darwin in 1859 through his demonstration of the theory of descent, which gave tremendous zest to the search for pedigrees (phylogeny) of the existing and extinct types of animal and plant life.

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  • Thus there came into the fluctuating mass a strong movement and formative impulse, and the individual systems and sects sprang up like mushrooms from this soil.

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  • Finally, it was Gnosticism which gave the most decided impulse to the consolidation of the Christian Church as a church.

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  • A great impulse to the prosperity of the town was given by the introduction of the boot and shoe trade, especially the manufacture of uppers.

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  • There must be recognized in God as a completed actuality, a dim, obscure ground or basis, which can only be described as not yet being, but as containing in itself the impulse to externalization, to existence.

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  • The new honours received from the caliph gave fresh impulse to Mahmud's zeal on behalf of Islam, and he resolved on an annual expedition against the idolaters of India.

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  • But it still continued to exist elsewhere, both in the Byzantine Empire and in the West, and in the earlier part of the middle ages it gave an impulse to the formation of new sects, which remained related to it.'

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  • The most powerful impulse to mining operations, and the immediate cause of a somewhat lengthy period of wild excitement and speculation, was the discovery and successful opening of the Comstock lode in 1859, in the western part of what is now Nevada, but was then part of Utah.

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  • Good fortune it divides into two kinds, both irrational; one divine, according to impulse, and more continuous; the other contrary to impulse and not continuous.

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  • The opposition of divine good fortune according to impulse to that which is contrary to impulse reminds us of Plato's point in the Phaedrus that there is a divine as well as a diseased madness.

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  • The great development of its herring fishery in the latter part of the 18th century gave a new impulse to the city's trade, which was kept up by the influence of the "Continental System," under which Gothenburg became a depot for the colonial merchandise of England.

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  • In 1808 the fugitive Portuguese court, under the regent Dom Joao VI., took refuge in Rio de Janeiro, and gave a new impulse to its growth.

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  • Into England silk manufacture was introduced during the reign of Henry VI.; but the first serious impulse to manufactures of that class was due to the immigration in 1585 of a large body of skilled Flemish weavers who fled from the Low Countries in consequence of the struggle with Spain then devastating their land.

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  • Somewhere about this period of More's life two things happened which gave in opposite directions the determining impulse to his.

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  • The veneration of relics also received a strong impulse from the fact that the Church required that a relic should be deposited in every altar.

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  • The island served as a refuge for Greek scholars, and in 1732 became the home of the first academy of modern Greece, but no serious impulse to Greek thought came from this quarter.

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  • Buchner (q.v.) himself said that he owed to Moleschott the first impulse to composing his important Buchner.

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  • Again, Schelling urged that besides the rational element there must be something else; that there is in nature, as natures naturans, a blind impulse, a will without intelligence, which belongs to the existent; and that even God Himself as the Absolute cannot be pure thought, because in order to think He must have an existence which cannot be merely His thought of it, and therefore pure being is the prior condition of thought and spirit.

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  • Like these predecessors, and like his younger contemporary Paulsen, in calling will fundamental he includes impulse (Trieb).

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  • Accordingly he divides will into two species: on the one hand, simple volition, or impulse, which in his view requires as motive a feeling directed to an end, and therefore an idea, e.g.

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  • the impulse of a beast arising from hunger and sight of prey; on the other hand, complex volition issuing in a voluntary act requiring decision (Entscheidung) or conscious adoption of a motive, with or without choice.

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  • If he is to be believed, at the bottom of all organic evolution organic impulses becoming habits produce structural changes, which are transmitted by heredity; and as an impulse thus gradually becomes secondarily automatic, the will passes to higher activities, which in their turn become secondarily automatic, and so on.

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  • He has endowed all the plants in the world with motives, feelings directed to an end, and ideas, all of which, according to him, are required for impulse !

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  • There is also an impulse to think, e.g.

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  • But it does not follow that thought is will, or even that there is no thinking without either impulse or will proper.

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  • It is a confusion of impulse with will, and activity with both.

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  • that we must die), often without even an impulse to believe, often without taking any interest, or when taking interest in something else of no importance.

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  • But it must be remembered that these conclusions are arrived at by confusing action, reaction, life, excitability, impulse, and rational desire, all under the one word " will," as well as by omitting the involuntary action of intelligence under the pressure of evidence.

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  • Its finest products were in bronze, but the artistic impulse spread to humbler work in wood and pottery.

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  • Those that finally perish in the sea, committing what appears to be a voluntary suicide, are only acting under the same blind impulse which has led them previously to cross shallower pieces of water with safety.

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  • 1106), as legate; like Urban and Gregory, he gave or confirmed monastic privileges without the protection he granted to the monks assuming a character of hostility towards the episcopate; and, finally, he gave an impulse to the reformation of the chapters, and, unlike Urban II., maintained the rights of the canons against the claims of the abbots.

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  • Among the Aramaic-speaking people the revolution which displaced the Arabian court of Damascus in favour of a cosmopolitan world centred at the Babylonian seat of the civilizations dealt with in the preceding paragraphs naturally gave an impulse to the wider scholarship. Translations were made from Greek, as, e.g.

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  • The Gupta dynasty appears to have fostered a revival of Brahmanism at the expense of Buddhism, and to have given an impulse to art and literature.

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  • This theory, however superficial from the standpoint of observation, indicates considerable knowledge of geometry and gave a great impulse to the study of the science.

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  • He did so, and then governed like an evil-disposed boy - indulging the merest animal passions, listening to a small camarilla of low-born favourites, changing his ministers every three months, and acting on the impulse of whims which were sometimes mere buffoonery, but were at times lubricous, or ferocious.

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  • its missionary impulse from the teaching of its founder.

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  • That revival had intensified the idea of the worth of the individual soul, whether Christian or heathen, and " to snatch even one brand from the burning " became a dominant impulse.

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  • The next or the twin-born impulse of her indomitable nature was, as usual in all times of danger, one of passionate and high-spirited defiance on discovering the seizure of her papers.

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  • He imparted a life and impulse to prevailing tendencies, helping on the construction of the system hereafter to be completed in Scholasticism.

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  • The mineral wealth of the country was largely developed, the iron manufactures of Liege made rapid advance, the woollen manufactures of Verviers received a similar impulse, and many large establishments were formed at Ghent and other places, where cotton goods were produced which rivalled those of England and surpassed those of France.

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  • It rose into importance in the reign of Charles X., who bestowed on it considerable privileges, and gave the first impulse to its manufacturing activity.

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  • A body thrown from the hand would, under the single impulse of projection, move for ever in a straight line; but it would not be reasonable to take special action for the prevention of this result, ignoring the fact that it will be sufficiently counteracted by the other forces which will come into play.

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  • Still more curious, and almost peculiar to Pompeii, are the numerous writings painted upon the walls, which have generally a semipublic character, such as recommendations of candidates for municipal offices, advertisements, &c., and the scratched inscriptions (graffiti), which are generally the mere expression of individual impulse and feeling, frequently amatory, and not uncommonly conveyed in rude and imperfect verses.

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  • The facts that he used to walk with Bacon at Gorhambury, and would jot down with exceptional intelligence the eager thinker's sudden " notions," and that he was employed to make the Latin version of some of the Essays, prove nothing when weighed against his own disregard of all Bacon's principles, and the other evidence that the impulse to independent thinking came to him not from Bacon, and not till some time after Bacon's death in 1626.1 So far as we have any positive evidence, it was not before the year 1629 that Hobbes entered on philosophical inquiry.

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  • 5 seq.), his wife was firmly attached to the worship of the Tyrian Baal, Melkart, and led by her he gave a great impulse to this cult by building a temple in honour of Baal in Samaria.

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  • In this last regard it may be remarked that the impulse is less from religious conviction than from a desire to associate on more equal terms with their neighbors.

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  • A political system which allowed the princes to do as they pleased was very much to their liking, and if they had followed their own impulse it is possible that they would never have placed a king over their country.

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  • Even before the Seven Years War there were signs that the German people were beginning to tire of incessant imitation of France, for in literature they welcomed the early efforts of Klopstock, Wieland and Lessing; but the movement received a powerful impulse from the great deeds of Frederick.

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  • They founded coffee and sugar plantations and gave a great impulse to trade.

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  • On either Birkeland's or Nordmann's theory, the electric impulse from the sun acts indirectly by creating secondary cathode rays in the earth's atmosphere, or ionizing it so that discharges due to natural differences of potential are immensely facilitated.

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  • Epiphanes (175-164), a fresh impulse was given to Syrian Hellenism.

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  • The impulse given by Alfred was continued under Edward, and we have what may be called an official continuation of the history of the Danish wars, which, in B, C, D extends to 915, and in A to 924.

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  • Religious building was continued under the Ptolemies and Romans; and though the royal impulse may not have been strong, yet the wealth of the land under good government supplied means for many places to rebuild their old shrines magnificently.

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  • He followed him to Rome in 44, and is said to have criticized him with the utmost candour, bidding him repeat the letters of the alphabet before acting on an angry impulse.

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  • But when neurons are linked together it is found that nerve impulses will only pass from neuron A to neuron B, and not from neuron B to neuron A; that is, the transmission of the excited state or nervous impulse, although possible in each neuron both up and down its own cell branches, is possible from one nerve cell to another in one direction only.

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  • The wave of change (nervous impulse) induced in a neuron by advent of a stimulus is after all only a sudden augmentation of an activity continuous within the neuron - a transient accentuation of one (the disintegrative) phase of the metabolism inherent in and inseparable from its life.

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  • The nervous impulse is, so to say, the sudden evanescent glow of an ember continuously black-hot.

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  • Exner first showed, many years ago, that the nerve impulse travels through the spinal ganglion at the same speed as along the other parts of the nerve trunk - that is, that it suffers no delay in transit through the perikarya of the afferent rootneurons.

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  • The coinage was gradually restored to its proper value, and trade received a favourable impulse by the foundation of the Bank of Berlin.

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  • It was indeed from Italy that the races of the north caught the impulse of intellectual freedom, the spirit of science and curiosity, the eager retrospect towards the classic past; but joined with these in Germany was a moral impulse which was her own, a craving after truth and right, a rebellion against spiritual tyranny and corruption - the Renaissance was big in the north, as it was not in the south, with a Reformation to come.

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  • Luther received a fresh impulse towards the study of Greek, and his translation of the Scriptures, begun as early as 1517, now made rapid progress, Melanchthon helping to collate the Greek versions and revising Luther's translation.

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  • He properly begged her not to yield to the impulse without due consideration.

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  • Robert Chambers, in the once famous Vestiges of Creation, interested and shocked his contemporaries by his denial of the fixity of species and his insistence on creation by progressive evolution, but had no better theory of the cause of variation than to suppose that organisms - "from the simplest and oldest to the highest and most recent" were possessed of "an inherent impulse, imparted by the Almighty both to advance them from the several grades and modify their structure as circumstances required."

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  • He was a constant preacher, and gave a great impulse to Trench's practice of inviting distinguished preachers to the abbey pulpit, especially to the evening services in the nave.

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  • Apart from the great impulse which he gave to the study alike of the Bible and Church history, his influence maybe said in a very true sense to colour the writings of many of those who most differ from him.

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  • impulse which was driving part of the Norse and Danish peoples to piracies in the west was also driving the Swedes and perhaps a portion of the Danes to eastward invasion, which resulted in the establishment of a Scandinavian kingdom (GarOariki) in what is now Russia, with its capital first at Novgorod, afterwards at Kiev.

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  • But the arrival of part of the British 4th Division under Sir George Cathcart gave the impulse for a counter-attack.

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  • 4) may have given an impulse to the prophet's imagination.

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  • But, although not a critical scholar, he was the first to attempt a scientific treatment of Greek mythology, and he gave an undoubted impulse to philological studies.

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  • Binney was the pioneer in a much-needed improvement of the forms of service in Nonconformist churches, and gave a special impulse to congregational psalmody by the publication of a book entitled The Service of Song in the House of the Lord.

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  • He was also an unfailing supporter of contemporary painting, in so far as it responded to his romantic tendencies, and he gave a fresh impulse to the arts of working in metal and glass.

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  • Under the impulse given by Lessing and Kant he turned to the original records of Christianity, and attempted to construe for himself the real significance of Christ.

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  • The charges of superficial analogies, so freely urged against the " Natur-philosophie " by critics who forget the impulse it gave to physical research by the identification of forces then believed to be radically distinct, do not particularly affect,Hegel.

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  • The first impulse came from J.

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  • Only a small fraction of Goethe's work was written in an impersonal and objective spirit, and sprang from what might be called a conscious artistic impulse; by far the larger - and the better - part is the immediate reflex of his feelings and experiences.

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  • It is believed that from the nature of the cell in which she is ovipositing, the queen derives a reflex impulse to lay the appropriate egg - fertilized in the queen or worker cell, unfertilized in the drone cell, as previously mentioned.

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  • During the next two hundred years Buddhism spread over northern India, perhaps receiving a new impulse from the Greek kingdoms in the Punjab.

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  • This law applies to every body that is set in motion upon the surface of the rotating earth, but usually the duration of the motion of any body due to a single impulse is so brief, and there are so many frictional disturbances, that it is not easy to observe the results of this deflecting force.

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  • 1 The impulse of thought to reduce coincidence to coherence reaches immediately only to objectivity or validity.

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  • The impulse of W.

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  • The initial impulse to this increase was the beginning of the " fruit epoch " in these counties, combined with a railway " rate-war " following the completion to the coast in 1885 of the Santa Fe, and an extraordinary land boom prevailing from 1886 to 1888.

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  • had sunk for the most part into scepticism and impotence; its original impulse had been lost, and no new intellectual power took its place; only in Alexandria was there a genuine effort make to solve the fundamental problems of God and the world.

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  • In fact, virtue (which he defined as "every performance by which man, contrary to the impulse of nature, should endeavour the benefit of others, or the conquest of his own passions, out of a rational ambition of being good") is actually detrimental to the state in its commercial and intellectual progress, for it is the vices (i.e.

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  • Two changes, the inception of which is early, but the completion of which belongs to the Persian period, gave the impulse which Aramaic obeyed in all its later developments.

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  • After Paganini he received a fresh impulse from the playing and the compositions of Chopin, who arrived in 1831, and yet another impulse of equal force from a performance of Berlioz's " Symphonie Fantastique, episode de la vie d'un artiste," in 1832.

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  • The time-integral on the right hand is called the impulse of the force on the interval I I.

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  • The statement that the increase of momentum is equal to the impulse is (it may be remarked) equivalent to Newtons own formulation of his Second Law.

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  • In problems of impact we have to deal with cases of practically instantaneous impulse, where a very great and rapidly varying force produces an appreciable change of momentum in an exceedingly minute interval of time.

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  • The whole effect is summed up in the value of the instantaneous impulse, which is the timeintegral of the force.

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  • Thus if an instantaneous impulse ~ changes the velocity of a mass m from u to u we havtt mumu=f.

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  • The effect of ordinary finite forces during the infinitely short duraticm of this impulse is of course ignored.

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  • The total impulse in any finite interval of time is the integral of the impulses corresponding to the infinitesimal elements 3t into which the interval may be subdivided; the summation of which the integral is the limit is of course to be understood in the vectorial sense.

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  • Newtons Second Law asserts that change of momentum is equal to the impulse; this is a statement as to equality of vectors and so implies identity of direction as well as of magnitude.

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  • Since the impulse of the force in any element of time & has zero moment about 0, the same will be true of the additional momentum generated.

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  • In the time ~5t a certain impulse is given to the first particle in the direction (say) from P to Q, whilst an equal and opposite impulse is given to the second in the, direction from Q to P. Since these impulses produce equal and opposite momenta in the two particles, the resultant lineal momentumof the system is unaltered.

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  • If extraneous forces act, it is seen in like manner that the resultant linear momentum of the system is in any given time modified by the geometric additiofi of the total impulse of the extraneous forces.

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  • If extraneous forces act, the total angular momentum about any fixed axis is in time t increased by the total extraneous impulse about that axis.

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  • Thus if an impulse (~, 1~, ~, X, u, 1) change the motion from (u, v, w, p, q, r) to (u, 1, w, p, q, r) we have Mo(u u) =~, Mo(v v) =,1~ Mo(w w) = i, ~

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  • (i6) The factors of ~, i~, ~, X, if, v on the right-hand side are proportional to the constituents of a possible infinitesimal displacement of the solid, and the whole expression is proportional (on, the same scale) to the work done by the given system of impulsive forces in such a displacement, As in 9 this must be equal to the total work done in such a displacement by the several forces, whatever they are, which make up the impulse.

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  • For we have seen that r is constant when there are no extraneous forces; and r is evidently not affected by an instantaneous impulse which leaves the angular momentum Cr, about the axis of symmetry, unaltered.

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  • q,,) tobe generated instantaneously from rest by the action of suitable impulsive forces, we find on integrating (II) with respect tot over the infinitely short duration of the impulse ~-=Q.

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  • is the time integral of Q~ and so represents a generalized component of impulse.

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  • The physical characteristics of a normal mode are that an impulse of a particular normal type generates an initial velocity of that type only, and that a constant extraneous force of a particular normal type maintains a displacement of that type only.

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  • Thus in 1846, after the resignation of his seat for Dorset, he explored the slums of the metropolis, and not only gave a new impulse to the movement for the establishment of ragged schools, but was able to make it more widely beneficial.

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  • Apparently there is an influence on the afferent nerves of the part which causes a reflex contraction - some authors say dilatation - of the vessels in the internal organs that are under the control of the same segment of the nervous system as that supplying the area of skin from which the exciting impulse comes.

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  • What was wanting was not vitality and licence, not audacity of speculation, not lawless instinct or rebellious impulse.

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  • In doing so, we must be careful to remember that the study of the classics did but give a special impulse to pent-up energies which were bound in one way or another to assert their independence.

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  • They seem to have been conscious that they could not give the desired impulse to modern literature and art without contact with the classics; and, in spite of the splendour of their achievements in Italian, they found no immediate followers upon that path.

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  • But they forget that France was bound by inexorable laws of human evolution to obey the impulse which communicated itself to every form of art in Europe.

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  • The vernacular in the Netherlands profited at first but little by the impulse which raised Italian, Spanish, French and English to the rank of classic languages.

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  • He never equalled Clay in the latter's magnetism of impulse and inspiration of affection, but he far surpassed him in clearness and directness and in tenacity of will.

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  • The name of Remscheid occurs in a document of 1132, and the town received the first impulse to its industrial importance through the immigration of Protestant refugees from France and Holland.

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  • Nevertheless these non-moral taboos or restraints may have played a part in building up in us that faculty of preferring the larger good to the impulse of the moment which is the note of real civilization.

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  • They did not form a sect, but represented an impulse felt everywhere.

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  • in 1843, Sir Charles Wheatstone gave a great impulse to this study.

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  • Maxwell showed in this paper that the velocity of propagation of an electromagnetic impulse through space could also be determined by certain experimental methods which consisted in measuring the same electric quantity, capacity, resistance or potential in two ways.

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  • Maxwell suggested new methods for the determination of this ratio of the electrostatic to the electromagnetic units, and by experiments of great ingenuity was able to show that this ratio, which is also that of the velocity of the propagation of an electromagnetic impulse through space, is identical with that of light.

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  • He has mana, power, and by means of this mana, felt inwardly by himself, acknowledged by his fellows, he stems the social impulse to run away from a mystery.

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  • Here is a monotheism of a definite and clearcut type, arising apparently by spontaneous development apart from any external impulse.

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  • That fortunate circumstance gave an impulse to the spinning of the fibre which it never lost, and since that period its progress has been truly astonishing."

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  • He studied the nature of muscular contraction, causing a muscle to record its movements on a smoked glass plate, and he worked out the problem of the velocity of the nervous impulse both in the motor nerves of the frog and in the sensory nerves of man.

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  • The impulse towards natural science which he had received from Van den Ende would be strengthened by the reading of Descartes; he gave over divinity, we are told, to devote himself entirely to these new studies.

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  • The serenity of Swedish literature was rudely shaken about 1884 by an incursion of realism and by a stream of novel and violent imaginative impulse.

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  • Drama has rarely flourished in Sweden, but several of the poets mentioned above have written important plays, and, somewhat earlier, the socialistic problempieces of Anne Charlotte Edgren-Leffler, duchess of Cajanello (1849-1893), possessed considerable dramatic talent, working under a direct impulse from Ibsen; but her greatest gift was as a novelist.

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  • A still greater impulse was given, both to thepatriotic feelings and the national poetry of the Persians, by Man~rs son arid suecessor.

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  • This rich genius gave also the first impulse to romantic, didactic and mystic poetry; and even his own age produced powerful co-operators in these three most conspicuous departments of Persian literature.

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  • Of late years enormous impulse has been given to our knowledge of the causation of disease by microbes, through the works of Gaspard, who injected putrid matter into the veins of a living animal; by Villemin, who discovered that tuberculosis is infective; by Davaine; and especially by Pasteur, Koch and others too numerous to mention, who have worked, and are still working, at the microbic causation of disease with marvellous success.

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  • Certain drugs have the power of relieving inflammation by slowing the heart and rendering its impulse more feeble.

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  • The impulse of self preservation in nature is the lowest form of religion; above this comes animal religion; and finally rational religion, the perfection of which consists in perfect knowledge, pure volition and love, and is union with God.

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  • From the unity of soul it follows that all psychical processes - sensation, assent, impulse - proceed from reason, the ruling part; that is to say, there is no strife or division: the one rational soul alone has sensations, assents to judgments, is impelled towards objects of desire just as much as it thinks or reasons.

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  • Panaetius had referred two faculties (those of speech and of reproduction) to animal impulse and to the vegetative " nature " (01,o-cs) respectively.

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  • Following Epictetus, he speaks of man as a corpse bearing about a soul; at another time he has a threefold division - (z) body, (2) soul, the seat of impulse (7rveu,uariov),.

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  • The first impulse to them was given in 1873 by the reception in Berlin of certain reliefs, extracted by Humann from the walls of Bergama.

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  • A great impulse to its trade was given in 18 9 8 by the opening of a free harbour adjoining the suburb of Lastadie on the east bank of the Oder; this embraces a total area of i 50 acres and quays with a length of 14,270 ft.

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  • It was aimed at the repeal of the whole Elizabethan legislation against the Roman Catholics and perhaps derived some impulse at first from the leniency lately shown by the administration, afterwards gaining support from the opposite cause, the return of the government to the policy of repression.

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  • In 1809 he published at Hamburg his Theoria motus corporum coelestium, a work which gave a powerful impulse to the true methods of astronomical observation; and his astronomical workings, observations, calculations of orbits of planets and comets, &c., are very numerous and valuable.

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  • The new impulse given to biological research by the publication of the Origin of Species bore fruit in Fritz Muller's Filr Darwin, in which an attempt was made to reconstruct the phylogenetic history of the class.

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  • By bringing the men of his own generation into sympathetic contact with antiquity, he gave a decisive impulse to that European movement which restored freedom, self-consciousness, and the faculty of progress to the human intellect.

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  • The impulse towards natural science and the systematizing of empirical details which distinguished Aristotle from Plato was shared by Theophrastus (q.v.).

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  • The impulse was due to Andronicus of Rhodes.

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  • The wing continues its movements of depression inclined to the horizon; but the impulse of the air, FIG.

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  • The invention of the steam engine, following quickly upon that of the carding machine, the spinning jenny, and other ingenious machinery employed in textile manufactures, gave an extraordinary impulse to their development, and, with them, that of kindred branches of industry.

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  • By his editio princeps of the Samaritan Pentateuch and Targum, in the Paris Polyglott, he gave the first impulse in Europe to the study of this dialect, which he acquired without a teacher (framing a grammar for himself) by the study of MSS.

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  • He had a vast influence upon theology in America, an influence:not so much, possibly, in the direction of the modification of specific doctrines as in "the impulse and tendency and general spirit which he imparted to theological thought."

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  • The needs of this summer population gave a new impulse and a new turn to agriculture; and the demand for souvenirs revived among the Indians basketweaving, moccasin-making, and such crafts.

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  • A new impulse was given to trade by the extension (1899) of the Transcaspian railway into Ferghana and by the opening of the Orenburg-Tashkent railway (1906).

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  • In the animal world she is the goddess of sexual impulse; amongst men, of birth, marriage, and family life.

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  • From the same example Fra Bartolommeo and a crowd of other Florentine painters of the rising or risen generation took in like manner a new impulse.

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  • some portion of his labours in those sciences and give them to the world, an incalculable impulse would have been given to all those enquiries by which mankind has since been striving to understand the laws of its being and control the conditions of its environment, - to mathematics and astronomy, to mechanics, hydraulics, and physics generally, to geology, geography, and cosmology, to anatomy and the sciences of life.

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  • He died of dropsy on the 28th of May 1793, having by writing and example given a new impulse to education throughout Prussia.

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  • This work appeared in 1867, and gave a great impulse to the study of Dante in America.

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  • As his biographer says, thousands found in his sermons "a living source of impulse, a practical direction of thought, a key to many of the problems of theology, and above all a path to spiritual freedom."

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  • Then he was troubled by a maniacal impulse which prompted him to pray to the trees, to a broomstick, to the parish bull.

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  • Yet it was long before he ceased to be tormented by an impulse which urged him to utter words of horrible impiety in the pulpit.'

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  • Livingstone had "the impression that he was in hell," but was helpless, though his "first impulse was to pistol the murderers."

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  • Evidently the impulse towards unity had to come from without; it began with the alliance between the Carolingians and the Papacy, and was accentuated by the recognition of the liber canonum.

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  • 456; but the exorbitant claims and exactions of bishops, to which this repugnance to episcopal control is to be traced, far more than to the arrogance of abbots, rendered it increasingly frequent, and, in the 6th century, the practice of exempting religious houses partly or altogether from episcopal control, and making them responsible to the pope alone, received an impulse from Gregory the Great.

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  • He went, however, to the university of Bologna, where his famous kinswoman, Laura Bassi, was professor of physics, and it is to her influence that his scientific impulse has been usually attributed.

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  • The second great philosophical impulse of his life was the teaching of Royer-Collard.

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  • In this we can deliberately resolve upon what is in our power; in that we are subject to the vain impulse of wishing the impossible.

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  • At a comparatively early age he entered the church, and held for some time the office of anagnost or reader; subsequently he manifested a desire to devote himself to the secular life as a rhetorician, an impulse which was checked by the earnest remonstrances of Gregory of Nazianzus.

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  • impulse came from Rome, and Augustine is rightly regarded as the evangelist of the English; yet only a comparatively small part of the nation owed its Christianity directly to the mission sent out by Pope Gregory.

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  • It is clear that they could not have been held together after his death, for none but a king of exceptional powers could have resisted their natural impulse to break apart.

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  • That there would in any case have been a new outbreak of anti-clerical and anti-papal agitation in England, under the influence of the Protestant impulse started by Luther in Germany, is certain.

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  • In the middle ages the stimulus to write was mainly of a moral or ecclesiastical nature, though the patriotic impulse which had suggested the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle was perhaps never entirely absent, and the ecclesiastical motive often degenerated into a desire to glorify, sometimes even by forgery, not merely the church as a whole, but the particular monastery to which the writer belonged.

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  • The Amazon is not a continuous incline, but probably consists of long, level stretches connected by short inclined planes of extremely little fall, sufficient, however, owing to its great depth, to give the gigantic volume of water a continuous impulse towards the ocean.

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  • Thus the first impulse of modern progress was given to the dormant valley.

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  • (See Arabian Philosophy, Scholasticism.) With the new knowledge and impulse, there came a new method.

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  • Southey's appeal had weight, and before the thirty years had passed, compassion for the needs of the destitute in great cities, and the impulse of a strong Church revival, aroused a body of laymen, among whom were included Mr Gladstone, Sir T.

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  • They show, for example, that his extraordinary exuberances were unforced, leaping by natural impulse from an overcharged source.

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  • As if upon the impulse of this transaction, Disraeli opened the next session of parliament with a bill to confer upon the queen the title of empress of India - a measure which offended 2 For a detailed, if somewhat controversial, account of this affair, see Lucien Wolf's article in The Times of December 26, 1905, and Mr Greenwood's letters on the subject.

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  • His natural impulse was for reconciliation with the Nationalists, and he sought reconciliation with them, but on one clear condition.

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  • The Assembly itself was subject to constant the oo electors as a temporary municipal overnment 3 P Y P g cipality of the Assembly sent a deputation to confer with them at the Hotel de Ville, and on a sudden impulse one of these deputies, Bailly, lately president of the Assembly, was P power.

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  • At the end of the 16th century its prosperity received considerable impulse from the accession of the Walloons and Netherlanders.

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  • It is by their recognition of the duty of living consistently by theory instead of mere impulse or custom, their sense of the new value given to life through this rationalization, and their effort to maintain the easy, calm, unwavering firmness of the Socratic temper, that we recognize both Antisthenes and Aristippus as " Socratic men," in spite of the completeness with which they divided their master's positive doctrine into systems diametrically opposed.

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  • For even in the physical or non-rational man, as originally constituted, we may see clear indications of the divine design, which it belongs to his rational will to carry into conscious execution; indeed, in the first stage of human life, before reason is fully developed, uncorrupted natural impulse effects what is afterwards the work of reason.

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  • In man, as in every other animal, from the moment of birth natural impulse prompts to the maintenance of his physical frame; then, when reason has been developed and has recognized itself as its own sole good, these " primary ends of nature " and whatever promotes these still constitute the outward objects at which reason is to aim; there is a certain value (a La) in them, in proportion to which they are " preferred " (7rponyµtva) and their opposites " rejected " (ci roirpony,ubm); indeed it is only in the due and consistent exercise of such choice that wisdom can find its practical manifestation.

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  • It is, however, in the impulse given to practical beneficence in all its forms, by the exaltation of love as the root of all virtues, that the most important influence of Christianity on the particulars of civilized morality is to be found; p y although the exact amount of this influence is here somewhat difficult to ascertain, since it merely carries further a development traceable in the history of pagan morality.

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  • He then exhibits the unhappiness that results from any excess of the self-regarding impulses, bodily appetite, desire of wealth, emulation, resentment, even love of life itself; and ends by dwelling on the intrinsic painfulness of all malevolence .2 One more special impulse remains to be noticed.

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  • This immediate pleasure that we take in goodness (and displeasure in its opposite) is due to a susceptibility which he calls the " reflex " or " moral " sense, and compares with our susceptibility to beauty and deformity in external things; it furnishes both an additional direct impulse to good conduct, and an additional gratification to be taken into account in the reckoning which proves the coincidence of virtue and happiness.

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  • More, among others, had imitated Descartes in a discussion of the passions, and Locke's essay had given a still stronger impulse in the same direction; still, Shaftesbury is the first moralist who distinctly takes psychological experience as the basis of ethics.

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  • Wollaston's theory of moral evil as consisting in the practical contradiction of a true proposition, closely resembles the most paradoxical part of Clarke's doctrine, and was not likely to approve itself to the strong common sense of Butler; but his statement of happiness or pleasure as a " justly desirable " end at which every rational being " ought " to aim corresponds exactly to Butler's conception of self-love as a naturally governing impulse; while' the " moral arithmetic " with which he compares pleasures and pains, and endeavours to make the notion of happiness quantitatively precise, is an anticipation of Benthamism.

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  • It is difficult to make these views quite consistent; but at any rate Hume emphatically maintains that " reason is no motive to action," except so far as it " directs the impulse received from appetite or inclination "; 2 Hume's ethical view was finally stated in his Inquiry into the Principles of Morals (1751), which is at once more popular and more purely utilitarian than his earlier work.

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  • Thus, both reason and sense of instinct co-operate in the impulse to virtuous conduct, though the rational element is primary and paramount.

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  • Thus, in his view, not merely natural inclinations towards pleasures, or the desires for selfish happiness, require to be morally resisted; but even the prompting of the individual's conscience, the impulse to do what seems to him right, if it comes into conflict with the common sense of his community.

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  • And more particularly the existence of the moral consciousness implies " the transition from mere want to consciousness of wanted object, from impulse to satisfy the want to effort for the realization of the wanted objects, implies the presence of the want to a subject which distinguishes itself from it."

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  • Taking first the sagas relating to Icelanders, of which some thirty-five or forty remain out of thrice that number, they were first written down between 1140 and 1220, in the generation which succeeded Ari and felt the g impulse his books had given to writing, on separate scrolls, no doubt mainly for the reciter's convenience; they then went through the different phases which such popular compositions have to pass in all lands - editing and compounding (1220-1260), padding and amplifying (1260-1300), and finally collection in large MSS.

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  • To fix the ideas let us suppose that the additional attraction is only an impulse received at the moment of passing the point P. The first effect will evidently be to change either the velocity or the direction in which the planet is moving at the moment, or both.

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  • But, if the impulse is not repeated, these new elements will again remain invariable.

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  • If repeated, the second impulse will again change the elements, and so on indefinitely.

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  • As theologian he gave a fresh impulse to Protestant theology, especially in French-speaking lands, but also in England and elsewhere.

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  • Nature is preordained or constituted to become the symbol and organ of mind, just as mind is endowed with the impulse to realize this end.

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  • This movement of population took its first great impulse from the famine of 1846 and has continued ever since.

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  • He did not succeed either in stemming the tide of expense, nor in his administration, being in no way in advance of his age, and not perceiving that decisive reform could not be achieved by a government dealing with the nation as though it were inert and passive material, made to obey and to payS Like a good Cartesian he conceived of the state as an immense machine, every portion of which should receive its impulse from outsidethat is from him, Colbert.

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  • MIlft~- an impulse had been given tothespiritof conquest which achieve- had gradually succeeded to the disinterested fever of ments,of propaganda and overheated patriotism.

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  • Up to his time it was universally held in the schools that the motion of a body should cease with the impulse communicated to it, but for the "reaction of the medium" helping it forward.

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  • Another commonly received axiom was that no body could be affected by more than one movement at one time, and it was thus supposed that a cannon ball, or other projectile, moves forward in a right line until its first impulse is exhausted, when it falls vertically to the ground.

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  • It was urged by anti-Copernicans that a body flung upward or cast downward would, if the earth were in motion, be left behind by the rapid translation of the point from which it started; Galileo proved on the contrary that the reception of a fresh impulse in no way interfered with the movement already impressed, and that the rotation of the earth was insensible, because shared equally by all bodies at its surface.

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  • Catching the impulse from Hilary and confirmed in it by the success of Arian psalmody, Ambrose composed several hymns, marked by dignified simplicity, which were not only effective in themselves but served as a fruitful model for later times.

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  • One thing only is established, and this may be said to have been the real effect of the False Decretals, namely, the powerful impulse which they gave in the Frankish territories to the movement towards centralization round the see of Rome, and the legal obstacles which they opposed to unjust proceedings against the bishops.

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  • But the impulse of the opening empire,, died away and successful commerce drove out literary interests.

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  • To them was due the impulse given to the reform of the church, and to education.

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  • however, had succeeded in less than eighteen months in giving a decisive and vigorous impulse to the reorganization of the budget, of taxation and of the home and colonial debts.

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  • of the imperfect (canidbamos, canidbais), of the pluperfect indicative (cantdramos, cantdrais), and of the imperfect subjunctive (cantdsemos, cantdseis); possibly the impulse to this was given by the forms of future perfect canidremos, cantdreis (cantarlrnus, caniarilis).

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  • As the drones increase in number queen-cells are formed, unless steps be taken to turn aside the swarming impulse by affording additional room beforehand in the hive.

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  • It is rather significant that this spread of astrology should have been concomitant with the intellectual impulse that led to the rise of a genuine scientific phase of astronomy in Babylonia itself, which must have weakened to some extent the hold that astrology had on the priests and the people.

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  • The spread of astrology beyond Babylonia is thus concomitant with the rise of a truly scientific astronomy in Babylonia itself, which in turn is due to the intellectual impulse afforded by the contact with new forms of culture from both the East and the West.

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  • He asserted that the suppression of the sexual impulse was emphatically the new revelation brought by the Logos, and appealed to 1 Cor.

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  • p. 93) sums up Protestant doctrine as follows: - "He is brought into relation with natural sinfulness, and the impulse to evil thoughts and deeds is ascribed to him.

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  • While still duke of Brabant he had been the first to call the attention of the Belgians to the need of enlarging their horizon beyond sea, and after his accession to the throne he gave the first impulse towards the development of this idea by founding in 1876 the Association Internationale Africaine.

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  • The discovery of the New World, and the opening out of fresh trading routes to the Indies, gave an extraordinary impulse to shipping, commerce and industrial enterprise throughout western Europe.

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  • They gave colonies to the mother country, and an impulse to the development of its fleet.

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  • But as all who knew him admit, and as his own records testify, notwithstanding an undercurrent of shrewd common sense, he was the creature, almost the sport, of impulse; his impressions and purposes changed with the speed of lightning; anger often mastered him; he went very often by intuitions and inspirations rather than by cool Authorities.- The Journals of Major-General Gordon at Khartoum (1885); Lord Cromer, Modern Egypt (2 vols., 1908); F.

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  • It may have been the impulse given by the final supremacy of the caliphate to the long process which eventually substituted a new branch of Semitic speech for the Aramaic (which had now prevailed for a millennium and a half), that led Jacob to adopt the Greek vowel signs for use in Syriac. A century later Theophilus of Edessa (d.

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  • This supposed discovery gave a new impulse to Menasseh's Messianic hopes.

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  • She combed Destiny's hair into pig tails, and then on impulse, did the same with hers.

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  • On impulse, she stuck the pillow under her blouse and rested her arms across it, smiling.

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  • On impulse, she touched his brow.

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  • Deputy Sheriff Lydia Larkin drove by in her official white Blazer and Dean repressed the impulse to give her a one-finger salute.

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  • On impulse she opened the small crystal box where they'd placed the bone.

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  • On an impulse, she leaned down and kissed them.

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  • If both boys were struggling in the water, I suppose her natural impulse would be to first save her own child.

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  • On impulse, Brady tapped his implant and breathed her name as he continued to ready himself.

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  • The game finished but Dean ignored an impulse to introduce himself and chat with the boy.

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  • On an impulse, Dean drove back in behind it and strolled over to meet the young man who stepped from the vehicle.

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  • On an impulse, he turned and looked at the family seated near his table still enjoying their meal.

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  • Avoiding an impulse to jerk the straps back up, she gazed up at him.

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  • She resisted the impulse to check her watch.

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  • Each warring nation solemnly assured you it is fighting under the impulse of self-defense.

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  • A single long axon carries the nerve impulse away from the cell body.

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  • For first time buyers, the UK price of around £ 50-55 depending on the exchange rates puts it above the impulse buy category.

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  • centripetal force, then apply the impulse once the new radius is reached.

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  • Apart from being inspired by his great heart and immense compassion for these unhappy people, Dr. Rodocanachi was also acting from another impulse.

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  • Local anesthetic agents may be administered intradermally or subcutaneously to block impulse conduction in local nerve fibers.

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  • Got a wild impulse to get away for the big end of year countdown?

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  • counterreformation impulse.

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  • dialoguem of this conference is to foster dialog about the nature and scope of the Scriblerian impulse.

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  • Another problem I found is the decision to include the occasional expletive (on the track ' Impulse ' ).

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  • Two monopoly references were made during 1998 on the supply of raw cows ' milk and the supply of impulse ice cream.

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  • Some interpreters may have to resist the impulse to reassure, or tell the client to be strong.

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  • And suddenly his littleness was intolerable, his aspiration was intolerable, and there came to him an irresistible impulse to pray.

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  • sudden impulse which comes " out of the blue " .

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  • How are they to be saved from this suicidal impulse?

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  • impulse buying is a frequent occurrence.

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  • impulse conduction along nerve tracts.

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  • impulse response will consist of a series of pulses of finite width.

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  • impulse purchase who doesnât have many requirements already in mind.

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  • impulse ventilation systems for car parks are here to stay.

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  • impulse turbine in which pairs of cup-shaped buckets are mounted around a wheel.

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  • reverb - SIR reverb usually with a plate or hall reverb impulse.

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  • Hence, the input impulse response will consist of a series of pulses of finite width.

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  • irresistible impulse to pray.

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  • We used a heavy paving mallet to put a vibration impulse into the floor with simultaneous measurements being made in both buildings.

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  • MULDER: No. Maurice: Are you overcome by the impulse to make everyone believe you?

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  • merchandising unit for ease of display, they help you maximize your impulse sales.

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  • This is done by zeroing the first millisecond of the input impulse response (after the DC offset has been removed ).

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  • I had done that by the impulse of dire necessity, which I ought to have done at first of my own free will.

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  • A single long axon carries the nerve impulse away from the cell body.

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  • The pagan impulse is deeply embedded in the human psyche.

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  • Reverb - SIR reverb - SIR reverb usually with a plate or hall reverb impulse.

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  • rewrite, the rewriting of history is driven by a very different impulse.

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  • Bundle Branch Block If the electrical impulse from the SA and AV nodes reaches the interventricular septum normally the PR interval will be normal.

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  • The tricks of the trade used by garden centers to tempt even the most hardy shopper to impulse buy.

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  • Often bought on impulse ' for the children ' from pet superstores by people who had no idea what keeping a rabbit entailed.

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  • Inevitably, with all the significant benefits, impulse ventilation systems for car parks are here to stay.

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  • There is some evidence that intense impulse noise may cause vertigo i.

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  • The continuous wavelet transform is used to decompose the impulse response into the time-scale domain.

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  • Don't bother trying to think through what the best response would be just follow a whim, an impulse.

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  • My first impulse was to give up the Hymn entirely, after reading yours today.

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  • Ever since those early days I had felt the impulse to describe them, but as is the case with all profound emotions, whether intellectual or moral, what we most desire to realize to ourselves we are the least inclined to reveal to the world at large.

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  • In 1337 the industry received an impulse from the settlement of a party of Flemish clothiers, and extended so greatly that when it was found necessary in 1566 to appoint by act of parliament deputies to assist the aulnegers, Bolton is named as one of the places where these deputies were to be employed.

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  • These facilities, coupled with the wide and fascinating field of research opened up by Sir William Herschel's discovery of the binary character of double stars, gave an impulse to micrometric research which has continued unabated to the present time.

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  • In New Testament criticism Pfleiderer belonged to the critical school which grew out of the impulse given by F.

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  • The idea of these meetings was first suggested in a letter to the archbishop of Canterbury by Bishop Hopkins of Vermont in 1851, but the immediate impulse came from the colonial Church in Canada.

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  • Emerson declares that " the impulse to seek proof of immortality is itself the strongest proof of all."

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  • Perhaps his energy would not have been sufficient to sustain him against these repeated blows of destiny if, in 1854, the accession to the viceroyalty of Egypt of his old friend, Said Pacha, had not given a new impulse to the ideas that had haunted him for the last twenty-two years concerning the Suez Canal.

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  • They first brought the products and arts of the Orient into western Europe; and in the Netherlands, by the impulse that they gave to commerce, they were one of the primary causes of the rise of the chartered towns.

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  • Meanwhile, like Bunyan and many other puritans, Cromwell had been passing through a trying period of mental and religious change and struggle, beginning with deep melancholy and religious doubt and depression, and ending with "seeing light" and with enthusiastic and convinced faith, which remained henceforth the chief characteristic and impulse in his career.

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  • It is true that Puritan austerity and the lack of any strong central authority after Oliver's death produced a reaction which temporarily restored Charles's dynasty to the throne; but it is not less true that the execution of the king, at a later time when all over Europe absolute monarchies "by divine right" were being established on the ruins of the ancient popular constitutions, was an object lesson to all the world; and it produced a profound effect, not only in establishing constitutional monarchy in Great Britain after James II., with the dread of his father's fate before him, had abdicated by flight, but in giving the impulse to that revolt against the idea of "the divinity that doth hedge a king" which culminated in the Revolution of 1789, and of which the mighty effects are still evident in Europe and beyond.

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  • Of Marston Moor he writes, "we never charged but we routed them"; and thereafter his battles were decided by the shock of closed squadrons, the fresh impulse of a second and even a third line, and above all by the unquestioning discipline and complete control over their horses to which he trained his men.

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  • A law passed on the 22nd of March 1900 gave a B a, special impulse to this form of enterprise by fixing the ratio r naze.

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  • In the various ceramic arts Italy was once unrivalled, but the ancient tradition for a long time lost its primeval impulse.

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  • At this epoch the study of Roman law received a new impulse, imd thu.

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  • The contest between the royal power and that of the Sicilian estates threatened to bring matters to a deadlock, until in 1812, under the impulse of Lord William Bentinck, a constitution modelled largely on that of England was passed by the estates.

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  • Sanitation and public hygiene received a potent impulse from the cholera epidemic of 1884, many of the unhealthiest quarters in Naples and other cities being demolished and rebuilt, with funds chiefly furnished by the state.

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  • When, in course of time, the extended suffrage increased the Republican and Extreme Radical elements in the Chamber, and the Liberal Pentarchy (composed of Crispi, Cairoli, Nicotera, Zanardelli and Baccarini) assumed an attitude of bitter hostility to Depretis, the Right, obeying the impulse of Minghetti, rallied openly to Depretis, lending him aid without which his prolonged term of office would have been impossible.

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  • It is the following out of an inherent tendency or impulse to a series of changes, all of which were virtually pre-existent, and this process cannot be interfered with from without.

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  • has supplied a powerful impulse to migration.

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  • carried out by the Swedish chemist, Torbern Bergman, acting under the impulse of Linnaeus, and by the German philosopher, Immanuel Kant.

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  • The impulse given to the study of natural history by the example of Linnaeus; the results brought back by Sir Joseph Banks, Dr Solander and the two Forsters, who accompanied Cook in his voyages of discovery; the studies of De Saussure in the Alps, and the lists of desiderata in physical geography drawn up by that investigator, combined to ' Printed in Schriften zur physischen Geographie, vol.

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  • The European country which had come the most completely under the influence of Arab culture now began to send forth explorers Spanish to distant lands, though the impulse came not from the Moors but from Italian merchant navigators in Spanish explora- service.

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  • This was unquestionably the greatest of the voyages which followed from the impulse of Prince Henry, and it was rendered possible only by the magnificent courage of the commander in spite of rebellion, mutiny and starvation.

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  • For in Ford's genius there was real refinement, except when the "suprasensually sensual" impulse or the humbler self-delusion referred to came into play.

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  • any impulse from theory, simply as a spontaneous outgrowth of popular life.

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  • The interest in spiritualism, apart from scientific curiosity and mere love of the marvellous, is partly due to the belief that trustworthy information and advice about mundane matters can be obtained through mediums - to the same impulse in fact which has in all ages attracted inquirers to fortune-tellers.

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  • In this he was true to his prophetic impulse and genius.

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  • By their number they show how strong was the impulse to literature, and by their character, how determined the bent of his mind in the direction of history; while their variety makes it manifest also that he had then at least no special purpose to serve, no preconceived theory to support, no particular prejudice or belief to overthrow.

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  • The impulse given by Theodoric was continued by his successors, and during the regency of Amalasuntha and the reigns of Theodatus and Vitiges (526-539), S.

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  • Such groups (each with its local deity) would combine for definite purposes under the impulse of external needs, but owing to inevitable internal jealousies and the incessant feuds among a people averse from discipline and authority, the unions were not necessarily lasting.

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  • Alliance with Phoenicia gave the impulse to extended intercourse; trading expeditions were undertaken from the Gulf of Akaba, and Ahab built himself a palace decorated with ivory.

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  • With Nehemiah and Ezra we enter upon the era in which a new impulse gave to Jewish life and thought that form which became the characteristic orthodox Judaism.

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  • The protective instinct was responsible for much of this interference with the natural impulse of men of various creeds towards mutual esteem and forbearance.

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  • The orange and lemon groves have also suffered considerably, but new varieties of the orange tree are now being introduced, and an impulse will be given to the export trade in this fruit by the removal of the restriction on its importation into Greece.

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  • He possesses the cool temperament of the man of science rather than the fervid Godward aspiration of the mystic proper; and the speculative impulse which lies at the root of this form of thought is almost entirely absent from his writings.

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  • This process received a great impulse from the erection in the 11th and 12th centuries of defined territorial jurisdictions for the archdeacons, who had hitherto been itinerant representatives of the central power of the diocese.

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  • He may, in fact, be regarded as the final exponent of that empirical school of philosophy which owed its impulse to John Locke, and is generally spoken of as being typically English.

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  • 2 Meanwhile the study received a great impulse from the appearance, at Zurich in 1555, of the third book of Conrad Gesner's Historia Animalium " qvi est de Auium natura," and at Paris in the same year of Pierre Belon's (Bellonius) Histoire de la nature des Oyseaux.

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  • His descendants and successors, all renowned for the high impulse they gave both to the patriotic feelings and the national poetry of modern Persia (see Persia: Literature), were Abmad b.

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  • When nominalism was revived in the 14th century by the English Franciscan, William of Occam, it gave evidence of a new tendency in thought, a distrust of abstractions and an impulse towards direct observation and inductive research, a tendency which had its fulfilment in the scientific movement of the Renaissance.

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  • Neander found in him the very impulse which he needed, while Schleiermacher found a pupil of thoroughly congenial feeling, and one destined to carry out his views in a higher and more effective Christian form than he himself was capable of imparting to them.

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  • The impulse communicated by Schleiermacher was confirmed by Planck, and he seems now to have realized that the original investigation of Christian history was to form the great work of his life.

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  • The Norman conquest of Sicily may with justice be called a crusade before the Crusades; and it cannot but have given some impulse to that later attempt to wrest Syria from the Mahommedans, in which the virtual leader was Bohemund, a scion of the same house which had conquered Sicily.

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  • Plans of attack were sketched: routes were traced: distances were measured; and finally in 1163 there came the impulse from within which turned these plans into action.

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  • The fingers of the clock had been pushed back; once more things were as they had been at the time of the First Crusade; once more the West must arm itself for the holy war and the recovery of Jerusalem - but now it must face a united Mahommedan world, where in 1096 it had found political and religious dissension, and it must attempt its vastly heavier task without the morning freshness of a new religious impulse, and with something of the weariness of a hundred years of struggle upon its shoulders.

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  • Our concern lies with the first kind of Crusade, and with the other three only so far as they bear on the first, and as they illustrate the immense widening which the term "Crusade" now underwent - a widening accompanied by its inevitable corollary of shallowness of motive and degradation of impulse.

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  • The common use of armorial bearings, and the practice of the tournament, may be Oriental in their origin; the latter has its affinities with the equestrian exercises of the Jerid, and the former, though of prehistoric antiquity, may have received a new impulse from contact with the Arabs.

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  • geography more studied; the Crusades gave a great impulse to the writing of history, and produced, besides innumerable other works, the greatest historical work of the middle ages - the Historia transmarina of William of Tyre.

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  • received an impulse, largely, it is true, from the Arabs of Spain, but also from the East; Leonardo Fibonacci, the first Christian algebraist, had travelled in Syria and Egypt.

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  • The basis of this growth is partly the story-telling instinct innate in all men, which loves to heighten an effect, sharpen a point or increase a contrast - the instinct which breathes in Icelandic sagas like that of Burnt Njal; partly the instinct of idolization, if it may be so called, which leads to the perversion into impossible greatness of an approved character, and has created, in this instance, the legendary figures of Peter the Hermit and Godfrey of Bouillon (qq.v.); partly the religious impulse, which counted nothing wonderful in a holy war, and imported miraculous elements even into the sober pages of the Gesta.

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  • The earliest certain reaction against Baalism is ascribed to the reign of Ahab, whose marriage with Jezebel gave the impulse to the introduction of a particular form of the cult.

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  • She is noteworthy as having given the chief impulse at the court of her brother Henry II.

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  • These two works interrupted the execution of the Ring and formed the stepping-stones to Parsifal, a work which may perhaps be said to mark a further advance in that subtlety of poetic conception which, as we have seen, gave the determining impulse to Wagner's true musical style.

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  • Since then the race has been drifting steadily southward and eastward, a vast, aggregate of small independent clans united by no common government, but all obeying a common impulse to move outwards from their original seats along the line of least resistance.

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  • The value of that work cannot be denied; the impulse which it gave to Platonic studies in Italy, and through them to the formation of the new philosophy in Europe, is indisputable.

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  • He experienced within himself the inward call to seek the amelioration of mankind and their deliverance from ruin, and regarded this inner impulse, intensified as it was by long, contemplative solitude and by visions, as being the call addressed to him by God Himself.

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  • At the age of fourteen he entered Yale College, where he graduated in 1810 and where under the instruction of Jeremiah Day and Benjamin Silliman he received the first impulse towards electrical studies.

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  • The impulse to migrate, that is to say, the calling forth of specific activities by climatal or other presentations, appears to be instin tive; whether the direction of migration is in like manner instinctive is a matter of uncertainty; and, if it be instinctive, the nature of the stimuli and the manner in which they are hereditarily linked with responsive acts is unexplained.

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  • and C. Peckham, Instincts and Habits of Solitary Wasps (1898); see also the bibliography (section "Instinct and Impulse") in Baldwin's Dict.

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