Imperturbable sentence example

imperturbable
  • With her imperturbable calm she did not begin to speak in front of the valet.
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  • It is not too much to say that his imperturbable equanimity, his serene bonhomie kept the host together.
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  • His prudent reserve and imperturbable calmness were branded as stiffness and haughtiness.
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  • The resplendent medieval colouring of the subject, the essentially heroic character of Joan of Arc, gave Schiller an admirable opportunity for the display of his rich imagination and rhetorical gifts; and by an ingenious alteration of the historical tradition, he was able to make the drama a vehicle for his own imperturbable moral optimism.
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  • Annoyed by Whitworth's imperturbable demeanour, he ended with these words: "You must respect treaties, then: woe to those who do not respect treaties.
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  • During this time he went from one city to the other, according as the danger was more pressing, and constantly displayed an admirable zeal and an imperturbable energy.
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  • After all, I'd designed it to be imperturbable.
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  • Though quite illiterate, she was an uncommonly shrewd and sensible woman, and her imperturbable good nature under exceptionally difficult circumstances, testifies equally to the soundness of her head and the goodness of her heart.
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  • Something in his imperturbable, kindly presence, his angelic look, his musical voice, his commanding style of thought and speech, announced him as the possessor of the great secret which many were seeking - the secret of a freer, deeper, more harmonious life.
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  • Anatole was not quick-witted, nor ready or eloquent in conversation, but he had the faculty, so invaluable in society, of composure and imperturbable self-possession.
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  • He has the same imperturbable and persuasive effrontery in protesting that he is doing one thing at the moment when his energies are concentrated on doing the opposite.
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  • The Directions to Servants (first published in 1745) in like manner derive their overpowering comic force from the imperturbable solemnity with which all the misdemeanours that domestics can commit are enjoined upon them as duties.
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  • The imperturbable courtesy of his style is in striking contrast to the violence of his opponents; and it must be remembered that, in spite of his unorthodoxy, he was not an atheist or even an agnostic. In his own words, "Ignorance is the foundation of atheism, and freethinking the cure of it" (Discourse of Freethinking, 105).
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