This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

imperfect

imperfect

imperfect Sentence Examples

  • Communications are still very imperfect, but have been greatly improved of late years.

    270
    198
  • Even an exceptional salesperson has an imperfect memory.

    194
    163
  • The Anomomeristic Arachnida form a single sub-class, of which only imperfect fossil remains are known.

    44
    41
  • Eachard attributed the contempt into which the clergy had fallen to their imperfect education, their insufficient incomes, and the want of a true vocation.

    40
    39
  • Amongst insects with imperfect metamorphosis the nearest approximations to the true pupa of the Holometabola are to be found in the subimago a From Chittenden, Bull.

    39
    39
  • But the knowledge was very imperfect; neither was it much clarified by H.

    34
    29
  • But, when I took up Algebra, I had a harder time still--I was terribly handicapped by my imperfect knowledge of the notation.

    34
    34
  • But the knowledge was very imperfect; neither was it much clarified by H.

    33
    28
  • The defects of Descartes lie rather in his apparently imperfect apprehension of the principle of movements uniformly accelerated which his contemporary Galileo had illustrated and insisted upon, and in the indistinctness which attaches to his views of the transmission of motion in cases of impact.

    33
    57
  • There is no distinct cleavage, but imperfect parting may be obtained along octahedral planes.

    28
    30
  • Before winter I built a chimney, and shingled the sides of my house, which were already impervious to rain, with imperfect and sappy shingles made of the first slice of the log, whose edges I was obliged to straighten with a plane.

    27
    28
  • But these translations were regarded as imperfect, and it remained for Tobit ben Korra (836-901) to produce a satisfactory edition.

    26
    26
  • An innumerable number of forms of coherer or wave detector depending upon the change in resistance produced at a loose or imperfect contact have been devised.

    26
    27
  • Owen's Dasornis, of the London Clay, known from an imperfect cranium, and E.

    24
    19
  • The above summary gives, indeed, a very imperfect idea of the extent to which the remains of the great Minoan civilization are spread throughout the island.

    23
    21
  • They are infinite and perfect when the En Soph imparts his fullness to them, and finite and imperfect when that fullness is withdrawn from them.

    23
    24
  • The duty of a railway with deficient plant or facilities would seem to be to make up for their absence by moderating the speeds of its trains, but public sentiment in America appears so far to have approved, at least tacitly, the combination of imperfect railways and high speeds.

    23
    25
  • In the upper molars the two outer columns or tubercles of the primitive tubercular molar coalesce to form an outer wall, from which proceed two crescentic transverse crests, the connexion between the crests and the wall being slight or imperfect, and the crests themselves sometimes tubercular.

    20
    19
  • Moreover, in many insects with imperfect metamorphosis the change from larva or (as the later stage of the larva is called in these cases) nymph to imago is about as great as the corresponding change in the Holometabola, as the student will recognize if he recalls the histories of Ephemeridae, Odonata and male Coccidae.

    20
    20
  • The one is the Confession, which is contained in an imperfect state in the Book of Armagh (c. 807), but complete copies are found in later MSS.

    20
    20
  • Of George Sand's style a foreigner can be but an imperfect judge, but French critics, from Sainte-Beuve, Nisard and Caro down to Jules Lemaitre and Faguet, have agreed to praise her spontaneity, her correctness of diction, her easy opulence - the lactea ubertas that Quintilian attributes to Livy.

    20
    21
  • Latin letters are used throughout; the miniatures of older maps are superseded by symbols, and in the better-known countries the maps are fairly correct, but they fail lamentably when we follow their author into regions - the successful delineation of which depends upon critical combination of imperfect information.

    20
    28
  • The above statements, though correct as far as they go, are an imperfect account of the nature of the radiation from a coupled antenna, but a mathematical treatment is required for a fuller explanation.

    17
    16
  • C. Marsh, by finding the imperfect fossilized tibia of a bird in the middle cretaceous shale of Kansas, Marsh, began a series of wonderful discoveries of great im portance to ornithology.

    17
    16
  • All true wisdom is contained in the Scriptures, at least implicitly; and the true end of philosophy is to rise from the imperfect knowledge of created things to a knowledge of the Creator.

    17
    16
  • The above statements, though correct as far as they go, are an imperfect account of the nature of the radiation from a coupled antenna, but a mathematical treatment is required for a fuller explanation.

    17
    16
  • It is reasonable to hold that the supreme personality is the only fully personal being, while ours is a broken and imperfect personality, hindered by the Non-ego which in other ways helps it.

    17
    17
  • He attacks Hegelianism for its pantheism, its lowering of human personality, and imperfect recognition of the demands of the moral consciousness.

    17
    18
  • but which, in consequence of imperfect nutrition, may end in mortification.

    17
    18
  • but which, in consequence of imperfect nutrition, may end in mortification.

    17
    18
  • Many other more or less imperfect devices - such as those of Mahlon Loomis, put forward in 1872 and 1877, and Kitsee in 1895 - for wireless telegraphy were not within the region of practically realizable schemes.

    17
    21
  • If it should be objected that the wings so developed would be rudimentary, and that there would be nothing to encourage their development into perfect functional organs, we may remind the reader that we have already pointed out that imperfect wings of Exopterygota do, even at the present time under certain conditions, become perfect organs; and we may also add that there are, even among existing Endopterygota, species in which the wings are usually vestiges and yet sometimes become perfectly developed.

    16
    17
  • An imperfect solution of the equation x 3 +-- px 2 was discovered by Nicholas Tartalea (Tartaglia) in 1530, and his pride in this achievement led him into conflict with Floridas, who proclaimed his own knowledge of the form resolved by Ferro.

    16
    17
  • The difference between the highest and lowest price, we may observe, is a very imperfect indication of the range of movement (though, taken in conjunction with the standard deviation, it is the best at our disposal), because either of the extreme prices might be accidental and quite out of relation to all others.

    15
    14
  • The first would correspond to a general turning of the beam; and the second would imply imperfect focusing of the central parts.

    15
    16
  • Ann., 1885, 24, 52, and 1885, 25, 601), but so far with imperfect success.

    15
    21
  • Ann., 1885, 24, 52, and 1885, 25, 601), but so far with imperfect success.

    15
    21
  • The cleavage is imperfect, but there is a well-marked conchoidal fracture.

    15
    25
  • These materials, imperfect as they are, when combined with the notices derived from ancient writers and the evidence of archaeological excavations, may be considered as having furnished some results of reasonable certainty.

    14
    15
  • But there are gaps in Kant's system - a imperfect gap between sensation and the sense-forms of time and space; a gap between sense-forms and thought; a gap between the lower but practicable processes of the Understanding and the higher but unrealizable ideas of Reason.

    14
    15
  • Whether a pouch is present or not, the young are born in an exceedingly imperfect state of development, after a very short period of gestation, and are immediately transferred by the female parent to the teats, where they remain firmly attached for a considerable time; the milk being injected into their mouths at intervals by means of a special muscle which compresses the glands.

    13
    14
  • The historians of the day give us but imperfect records or make unsatisfactory allusions.

    13
    14
  • Even when conspicuous and well formed crystals are not visible in the rock there is nearly always an abundance of minute imperfect crystallizations (microlites, &c.).

    13
    16
  • Even when conspicuous and well formed crystals are not visible in the rock there is nearly always an abundance of minute imperfect crystallizations (microlites, &c.).

    13
    16
  • Kant takes for granted that we cannot sum up these imperfect conceptions in a wider reconciling truth.

    13
    18
  • But the knowledge is imperfect, and the Christian was to do many things in simple obedience without knowing the reason.

    12
    13
  • The Coptic version (C. Schmidt, Acta Pauli, pp. 74-82), which is here imperfect, is clearly from a Greek original, while the Latin and Armenian are from the Syriac. (c) The Acts of Paul and Thecla.

    12
    17
  • This is the moment to examine whether there is a more complete polarization in a direction somewhat oblique; and it is found that with 0 positive there is, in fact, a direction of more complete polarization, while with 0 negative the polarization is more imperfect than in the perpendicular direction itself.

    11
    12
  • This is the moment to examine whether there is a more complete polarization in a direction somewhat oblique; and it is found that with 0 positive there is, in fact, a direction of more complete polarization, while with 0 negative the polarization is more imperfect than in the perpendicular direction itself.

    11
    12
  • Supposing a number of some species of arthropod or fish to be swept into a cavern or to be carried from less to greater depths in the sea, those individuals with perfect eyes would follow the glimmer of light and eventually escape to the outer air or the shallower depths, leaving behind those with imperfect eyes to breed in the dark place.

    11
    14
  • The somewhat imperfect skull of an extinct species of musk-ox from the gravels of the Klondike has enabled Mr W.

    11
    17
  • The uncertainty with which the results are affected depends chiefly upon the imperfect contact between the bar and the yoke and also between the ends of the divided bar.

    10
    12
  • Gold, the most perfect metal, had the symbol of the Sun, 0; silver, the semiperfect metal, had the symbol of the Moon, 0j; copper, iron and antimony, the imperfect metals of the gold class, had the symbols of Venus Mars and the Earth tin and lead, the imperfect metals of the silver class, had the symbols of Jupiter 94, and Saturn h; while mercury, the imperfect metal of both the gold and silver class, had the symbol of the planet,.

    10
    13
  • It is urged that the imperfect placenta of the bandicoots instead of being vestigial, may be an instance of parallelism, and that in marsupials generally the allantois failed to form a placental connexion.

    7
    8
  • Even as a child her parts were good, if not brilliant, but unfortunately her education was both imperfect and desultory.

    7
    12
  • None of the groups of existing Endopterygota have been traced with certainty farther back than the Mesozoic epoch, and all the numerous Palaeozoic insect-fossils seem to belong to forms that possessed only imperfect metamorphosis.

    6
    8
  • There must have been many imperfect copies in circulation, from which people transcribed such sections as they found or chose, and afterwards completed their MS. as occasion served.

    5
    8
  • None of the groups of existing Endopterygota have been traced with certainty farther back than the Mesozoic epoch, and all the numerous Palaeozoic insect-fossils seem to belong to forms that possessed only imperfect metamorphosis.

    5
    8
  • There must have been many imperfect copies in circulation, from which people transcribed such sections as they found or chose, and afterwards completed their MS. as occasion served.

    5
    8
  • Marsupials may be defined as viviparous (that is non-egglaying) mammals, in which the young are born in an imperfect condition, and almost immediately attached to the teats of the mammary glands; the latter being generally enclosed in a pouch, and the front edge of the pelvis being always furnished with epipubic or "marsupial" bones.

    5
    9
  • Such excessive multiplication of the larger taxonomic divisions shows an imperfect sense of proportion, for if the term " class " be allowed its usual zoological value, no student can fail to recognize that the Hexapoda form a single welldefined class, from which few entomologists would wish to exclude even the Apterygogenea.

    5
    17
  • When your core is weak, you can suffer from lower back pain and imperfect posture.

    1
    0
  • (3) Its independence of civil control was very imperfect.

    0
    0
  • His optical investigations led him to adopt in an imperfect form the undulatory theory of light, to anticipate the doctrine of interference, and to observe, independently of though subsequently to F.

    0
    0
  • Mahommedanism undoubtedly spread to the Malays of the peninsula from Sumatra, but their conversion was slow and gradual, and may even now in some respects be regarded as imperfect.

    0
    0
  • We have already seen that the Sephiric decade or the archetypal man, like Christ, is considered to be of a double nature, both infinite and finite, perfect and imperfect.

    0
    0
  • 226) has shown that success may be attained by a variety of processes, including bichromated gelatin and the old bitumen process, and has investigated the effect of imperfect approximation during the exposure between the prepared plate and the original.

    0
    0
  • The first of these equations is the condition for the formation of dark bands, and the second marks their situation, which is the same as that determined by the imperfect theory.

    0
    0
  • It appears that Fresnel's results, although based on an imperfect theory, require only insignificant corrections.

    0
    0
  • The Memoirs of the cardinal de Retz were first published in a very imperfect condition in 1717 at Nancy.

    0
    0
  • If our results are imperfect and liable to correction, that is only to be expected in the present position of the historical study of the Bible.

    0
    0
  • Among the works which he translated into Syriac and of which his versions survive are treatises of Aristotle, Porphyry and Galen, 3 the Ars grammatica of Dionysius Thrax, the works of Dionysius the Areopagite, and possibly two or three treatises of Plutarch.4 His own original works are less important, but include a " treatise on logic, addressed to Theodore (of Merv), which is unfortunately imperfect, a tract on negation and affirmation; a treatise, likewise addressed to Theodore, On the Causes of the Universe, according to the Views of Aristotle, showing how it is a Circle; a tract On Genus, Species and Individuality; and a third tract addressed to Theodore, On the Action and Influence of the Moon, explanatory and illustrative of Galen's IIEpi rcptaiµwv r t µepwv, bk.

    0
    0
  • Of this work, which exists in only one imperfect copy, the later portion was edited by Baethgen in 2884, and the earlier by Lamy in 1888.

    0
    0
  • We find a distinct and organized profession; we find a system of treatment, especially in regard to injuries, which it must have been the work of long experience to frame; we meet with a nomenclature of parts of the body substantially the same (according to Daremberg) as that employed long afterwards in the writings of Hippocrates; in short, we find a science and an organization which, however imperfect as compared with those of later times, are yet very far from being in their beginning.

    0
    0
  • Diagnosis, or recognition of the disease, must have been necessarily imperfect, when no scientific nosology or system of disease existed, and the knowledge of anatomy was quite inadequate to allow of a precise determination of the seat of disease; but symptoms were no doubt observed and interpreted skilfully.

    0
    0
  • Various works of a more or less imperfect character were carried out, such as the bridging over in 1637 of the Drainage.

    0
    0
  • That peculiar kind of glass usually called schmelz, an imperfect imitation of calcedony, was also made at Venice in the 15th century.

    0
    0
  • These rodents are characterized by the imperfectly rooted cheek-teeth, imperfect clavicles or collar-bones, cleft upper lip, rudimentary first front-toes, smooth soles, six teats and many cranial characters.

    0
    0
  • The original material was a fine clay, sometimes with more or less of sand or ashy ingredients, occasionally with some lime; and the bedding may be indicated by alternating bands of different lithological character, crossing the cleavage faces of the slates, and often interrupting the cleavage, or rendering it imperfect.

    0
    0
  • This is due to (a) the dirty condition of the cows' udders, (b) the imperfect cleansing of the cans and of the hands of the milkers.

    0
    0
  • At Paris, in 150o, he was fully conscious that " without Greek the amplest knowledge of Latin was imperfect"; and, during his three years in Italy (1506-1509), he worked quietly at Greek in Bologna and attended the lectures of Musurus in Padua.

    0
    0
  • Further, unlike diamond, it never occurs as distinctly developed crystals, but only as imperfect six-sided plates and scales.

    0
    0
  • important, if limited and imperfect, efforts in textual criticism.

    0
    0
  • Egyptian chronology is unfortunately imperfect; but Professor Petrie, who has paid particular attention to the subject, and who assigns the reign of Amen-hotep IV.

    0
    0
  • Palatinus (e) of the 5th century at Vienna, both of which are imperfect, especially k, which, however, is far the superior in quality; in the Acts and Catholic epistles by cod.

    0
    0
  • " rule ") best known as the name of a now imperfect halakic Midrash on Exod.

    0
    0
  • parliament in 1 543; but his name does not occur in the imperfect parliamentary returns until 1547, when he was elected for the family borough of Stamford.

    0
    0
  • they were, in however imperfect a way, an organ of national religious feeling, and could move forward with the movement of national life.

    0
    0
  • The prophets of the restoration are only the last waves beating on the shore after the storm which destroyed the old nation, but created in its room a fellowship of spiritual religion, had passed over; they resemble the old prophets in the same imperfect way in which the restored community of Jerusalem resembled a real nation.

    0
    0
  • Their creative religious ideas had become the common property of religious-minded Jews, at least in the somewhat imperfect shape in which they were embodied in the law, and their work on this side was carried on by the great religious, poets.

    0
    0
  • Although our sources are unfortunately very imperfect, the theology of the church does not appear to have learned much from Neoplatonism in the 3rd century - partly because the latter had not yet reached the form in which its doctrines could be accepted by the church dogmatic, and partly because theology was otherwise occupied.

    0
    0
  • But, as a body of exposition, it has the real unity which results from a mode of thinking homogeneous throughout and the general absence of such contradictions as would arise from an imperfect digestion of the subject.

    0
    0
  • In ethics he made contributions to the science in regard to the place and functions of volition and attention, the separate and underived character of the moral sentiments, and the distinction between the virtues of perfect and imperfect obligation.

    0
    0
  • Both as regards structure and habits, the leopard may be reckoned as one of the more typical representatives of the genus Felis, belonging to that section in which the hyoid bone is loosely connected with the skull, owing to imperfect ossification of its anterior arch, and the pupil of the eye when contracted under the influence of light is circular, not linear as in the smaller cats.

    0
    0
  • The degree of accuracy in such anatomical and physiographic restorations from relatively imperfect evidence will always represent the state of the science and the degree of its approach toward being exact or complete.

    0
    0
  • a Nickel: times is very imperfect, but not altogether wanting.

    0
    0
  • Among the later viceroys the Conde de Revillagigedo (1789-1794) deserves mention as a progressive ruler who developed commerce and improved administration, and took the first, but very imperfect, census, on which Humboldt based his estimate of the population in 1803 at 5,840,000.

    0
    0
  • of the octavo only one perfect copy (the title-page missing) in the Baptist College at Bristol, 4 and one imperfect in the library of St Paul's cathedral.

    0
    0
  • Elsewhere moderate re-entrants between the ranges have a continuous beach, concave seaward; such re-entrants afford imperfect harbourage for vessels; Monterey Bay is the most pronounced example of this kind.

    0
    0
  • The Proterozoic formations have yielded a few fossils in several places, especially Montana and northern Arizona; but they are so imperfect, their numbers, whether of individuals or of species, are so small, and the localities where they occur so few, that they are of little service in correlation throughout the United States.

    0
    0
  • There is some resemblance to the Tropical life-zone at the south-eastern extremity of Texas, but this zone in the United States is properly restricted to southern Florida and the lower valley of the Colorado along the border of California and Arizona, and the knowledge of the latter is very imperfect.

    0
    0
  • In 1810 Congress provided for such a report, but the results were so imperfect that there was never published any summary for the country, nor for any state.

    0
    0
  • This waste, however, is decreasing, the coal abandoned in the mine having averaged, in the beginning of mining, two or three times the amount taken out; and the chief part of the remaining waste is in imperfect combustion in furnaces and fire-boxes.

    0
    0
  • As nearly as can be estimated from imperfect statistics, frirn the total ore production of the country rose steadily from 2,873,400 long tons in, 1860 to 51,720,619 tons in 1907.

    0
    0
  • The work consists of seventeen books, of which the seventh is imperfect.

    0
    0
  • There is an imperfect copy of the recension of alMarzugi (died 1030), with his commentary, in the Berlin collection.

    0
    0
  • Unfortunately, The Imperfect Data On Which It Is Based, And The Too Exclusively Patriotic Spirit In Which It Is Written, Prevent It From Being An Authoritative History: The Author Himself Declares " Vous Verrez Si La Defaite De Nos Ancetres Ne Vaut Pas Toutes Les Victoires."

    0
    0
  • In the latter case what we have are not "collations," for the art of collation was not understood till the 10th century, but selections or "excerpts" of readings which we have reason to fear are often imperfect and erroneous.

    0
    0
  • But this method of representation is a very imperfect one; we may easily impose on ourselves and others by strained and ambiguous renderings.

    0
    0
  • Of the imperfect arrangement of the Metaphysics we have already spoken; and we shall speak of that of his logical writings when we come to the order of his whole system.

    0
    0
  • At present the Politics will supply us with a conspicuous example of the imperfect arrangement of some, as well as of the gradual composition of all, of Aristotle's extant writings.

    0
    0
  • Such rudimentary and imperfect sketches would be quite excusable in a first draft, but inexcusable and incredible after the Nicomachean Ethics had been written.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, though each natural substance is corruptible (40apr6v), species is eternal (&t&ov), because there was always some individual of it to continue its original essence (expressed by the imperfect tense in TO TI Etvae), which is ungenerated and incorruptible; the natural world therefore is eternal; and nature is for ever aiming at an eternal propagation, by efficient acting on matter, of essence as end.

    0
    0
  • In These Cases Respectively The Year Is Said To Be Imperfect, Common Or Perfect.

    0
    0
  • xiv.) mentions cases in which this imperfect compensation led to the extra duty payable upon spirits which were more than ro% over proof being demanded on spirits which were purposely diluted to below 10% over proof in order to avoid the charge.

    0
    0
  • never realized in the imperfect kingship of the past.

    0
    0
  • His imperfect acquaintance with French feeling was strikingly proved in the despatch which he sent home on learning of Napoleon's escape from Elba.

    0
    0
  • Rodents may be characterized as terrestrial, or in some cases arboreal or aquatic, placental mammals of small or medium size, with a milk and a permanent series of teeth, plantigrade or partially plantigrade, and generally five-toed, clawed (rarely nailed or semi hoofed) feet, clavicles or collar-bones (occasionally imperfect or rudimentary), no canine teeth, and a single pair of lower incisors, opposed by only one similar and functional pair in the upper jaw.

    0
    0
  • The scapula is usually narrow, with a long acromion; the clavicles may be altogether absent or imperfect, as in porcupines, cavies and hares, but in most species are well developed.

    0
    0
  • the hollow tympanic bullae, they have the clavicles imperfect, the first front toe opposable to the rest, the temporal region of the skull roofed with bone, and the crowns of the molars with cusps arranged in rows but eventually covered by a layer of enamel.

    0
    0
  • The upper lip is cleft, the jugal lacks an inferior angle, the fore part of the skull is short and broad; the cheek-teeth are partially rooted, with external and internal enamel-folds, the soles of the feet are smooth, there are six pairs of teats, the clavicles are imperfect and the tail is not prehensile.

    0
    0
  • Fore-feet with four digits, hind-feet with three; clavicles imperfect; molars divided by enamel-folds into transverse lobes; milk-teeth shed before birth.

    0
    0
  • From the picas the hares and rabbits (Leporidae) are distinguished by the imperfect clavicles, the more or less elongated hind-limbs, short recurved tail (absent in one case) and generally long ears.

    0
    0
  • With regard to his views of art, he himself modified and revised them from time to time; and it is admitted that some of his judgments are founded on imperfect study and personal bias.

    0
    0
  • There are round towers at Killala, Turlough, Meelick and Balla, and an imperfect one at Aughagower.

    0
    0
  • Using the word religion to cover all the imperfect ways in which men have felt after God, we note that in every case men have found the need alike of a teacher and of fellowship. Thus the idea of a church as " the pillar and ground of the truth " (i Tim.

    0
    0
  • This stage is left imperfect.

    0
    0
  • The Old and the New Covenants are related to one another as imperfect (earthly) and perfect (heavenly) forms of the same method of salvation, each with its own type of sacrifice and priesthood.

    0
    0
  • From the imperfect and conflicting data which are alone available one positive result can be gathered, viz.

    0
    0
  • In this conclusion he is in close agreement with Kant; reason is the arbiter, and right is (1) not a matter of the emotions and (2) not relative to imperfect human nature.

    0
    0
  • The mariner's compass during the early part of the 19th century was still a very imperfect instrument, although numerous inventors had tried to improve it.

    0
    0
  • We have already seen that the Chinese as late as the end of the 8th century made voyages with compasses on which but little reliance could be placed; and it may perhaps be assumed that the compasses early used in the East were mostly too imperfect to be of much assistance to navigators, and were therefore often dispensed with on customary routes.

    0
    0
  • They merely show that, in the conditions of the particular experiments, the thermodynamic equilibrium value of the osmotic pressure cannot be reached - the thermodynamic or theoretical osmotic pressure (which must be independent of the nature of the membrane provided it is truly semi-permeable) is a different thing from the equilibrium pressure actually reached in a given experiment, which measures the balance of ingress and egress of solvent through an imperfect semi-permeable membrane.

    0
    0
  • Technically it was often imperfect, and its artistic treatment was never of a high order.

    0
    0
  • At the foot of the Acropolis Hill, where the ground begins to rise, the theatre lies; and though the material of which this was built is rough, and only seven imperfect rows of seats remain, a good part of the scena and of the chambers behind it is preserved, and beneath these there runs a tunnel, which, together with other peculiar features, has raised interesting questions in connexion with the arrangement of the Greek theatre, the orchestra being at present on a level about 12 ft.

    0
    0
  • Thus the metaphysic of Plato finds reality only in the "Idea," of which all phenomena are merely imperfect copies.

    0
    0
  • Chivalry was an imperfect discipline, but it was a discipline, and one fit for the times.

    0
    0
  • Imperfect though this illustration may be, it will serve to explain the modern conception of the forces concerned in the formation of the Alps.

    0
    0
  • In one of his appearances at Brussels his name is given as Isaac Laquedem, implying an imperfect knowledge of Hebrew in an attempt to represent Isaac " from of old."

    0
    0
  • Inconsistencies, no doubt, are to be detected in his system, but they arise from the limitations of the view itself, and not, as in the case of Locke and Berkeley, from imperfect grasp of the principle, and endeavour to unite with it others radically incompatible.

    0
    0
  • 20); "All things are double one against another: and he hath made nothing imperfect" (xlii.

    0
    0
  • Still more curious, and almost peculiar to Pompeii, are the numerous writings painted upon the walls, which have generally a semipublic character, such as recommendations of candidates for municipal offices, advertisements, &c., and the scratched inscriptions (graffiti), which are generally the mere expression of individual impulse and feeling, frequently amatory, and not uncommonly conveyed in rude and imperfect verses.

    0
    0
  • After all, however, even these powerful Frankish conquerors had but imperfect success in Germany.

    0
    0
  • If the cities had gained the day they might still have aimed at balancing the power of the princes, but owing partly to their imperfect union, partly to the necessity of fighting with hired troops, they did not gain any serious advantage.

    0
    0
  • There was not a state, not the smallest principality, in which some authoritative but imperfect law or code had not been published.

    0
    0
  • In addition to these earlier imperfect laws, three great codes have been published, by which a complete system was applied to a large district: the Prussian Code of 1794, the Austrian Code of 1811 and the Code Napoleon, which applied to all Germany left of the Rhine; for neither Prussia, nor Bavaria.

    0
    0
  • It is known to us only from 16th century versions of it published by Leland, Holinshed and Duchesne, all more or less imperfect and corrupt.

    0
    0
  • a Wood, with additions by the Rev. Sir Peshall (1773, 4to; the text is garbled and the editing very imperfect).

    0
    0
  • The ecclesiastical organization of Austria was imperfect, so long as there was no archbishopric within its borders, and its clergy owed allegiance to foreign prelates.

    0
    0
  • In Greece itself the overlordship to which the Macedonian king aspires is imperfect in extent and only maintained to that extent by continual wars.

    0
    0
  • an imperfect instead of a perfect.

    0
    0
  • Such is an imperfect sketch of the composition and the internal history of the Koran, but it is probably sufficient to show that the book is a very heterogeneous collection.

    0
    0
  • The ancient Arabic alphabet was very imperfect; it not only wanted marks for the short and in part even for the long vowels, but it often expressed several consonants by the same sign, e.g.

    0
    0
  • But the study of this with the other scanty monuments and imperfect copies of inscriptions that were available enabled the celebrated physicist Thomas Young (1773-1829) to make a beginning.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the very imperfect notation of sound in the writing, the highly important subject, of the verbal roots and verbal forms was perhaps the obscurest branch of Egyptian grammar when Sethe first attacked it in 1895.

    0
    0
  • There is no trace of the Semitic imperfect in Egyptian.

    0
    0
  • .fdm-f seems rather to be imperfect, tdin-n-f perfect, and generally to express the past.

    0
    0
  • In the Graeco- Roman period various imperfect attempts were made to render the vowels in foreign names and words by the semi - vowels as also by _~, the consonant y which __~ originally represented having been reduced in speech by that time to the power of s, only.

    0
    0
  • The movements obtained by point-to-point excitation of the cortex are often evidently imperfect as compared with natural movements - that is, are only portions of complete normal movements.

    0
    0
  • 7.82 seq.); but these were imperfect surrogates.

    0
    0
  • Leidy on the evidence of imperfect materials, and other remains now known to belong to the same type were subsequently described as Cosoryx, to which Blastomeryx seems to be allied..

    0
    0
  • This edition, although it was a great undertaking and a work of considerable merit, was a very imperfect representation of the original code.

    0
    0
  • The knowledge that the deepest devotion underlies misunderstandings is often a very imperfect consolation; but such devotion clearly existed all through, and proves the defect to have been relatively superficial.

    0
    0
  • Many important manuscripts in muniment rooms are still uncalendared; those of the French Foreign Office are imperfect in places, and have been little consulted; and a complete calendar of the treasures of the Advocate's Library was only recently begun.

    0
    0
  • Even the results of mutilation involve an intrinsic factor, for they range, according to the organ and organism affected, from complete regeneration to the most imperfect healing.

    0
    0
  • - Outlines of Mineralogy (2 vols., 1809); A Geologi, cal Essay on the Imperfect Evidence in Support of a Theory of the Earth (1815); On the Adaptation of External Nature to the Physical Condition of Man, 1833 (Bridgewater Treatise).

    0
    0
  • Our information concerning him is so imperfect, and the scanty notices preserved to us from his work are so meagre and discordant, that it is difficult to arrive at anything like a sound conclusion.

    0
    0
  • The document is imperfect, owing probably to the accidental loss of its last leaf.

    0
    0
  • From the moral world the next step is religion; the moral law gives place to God; but the idea of Godhead, too, as it first appears, is imperfect, and has to pass through the forms of nature-worship and of art before it reaches a full utterance in Christianity.

    0
    0
  • When the idea, itself indefinite, gets no further than a struggle and endeavour for its appropriate expression, we have the symbolic, which is the Oriental, form of art, which seeks to compensate its imperfect expression by colossal and enigmatic structures.

    0
    0
  • 12 seq.), and implies imperfect views of the Godhead at a more advanced stage of religion and morality.

    0
    0
  • Eocene beds have not yet been proved to exist; but this is probably owing to the imperfect knowledge of the country, for the formation is known in Persia, Baluchistan and the Suliman Hills.

    0
    0
  • The Defects Of The Earlier Work From An Electrical Point Of View Lay Chiefly In The Difficulty Of Measuring The Current With Sufficient Accuracy Owing To The Imperfect Development Of The Science Of Electrical Measurement.

    0
    0
  • The magnetic observations, though imperfect, led him to the conclusion that the magnetic effect at all attainable elevations above the earth's surface remains constant; and on analysing the samples of air he could find no difference of composition at different heights.

    0
    0
  • But he thought that inferences other than syllogism are imperfect; that analogical inference is rhetorical induction; and that induction, through the necessary preliminary of syllogism and the sole process of ascent from sense, memory and experience to the principles of science, is itself neither reasoning nor science.

    0
    0
  • The consequence is that the proposition, being different from a judgment arising after a judgment, and remaining an imperfect copy of judgment, is only a superficial evidence of its real nature.

    0
    0
  • But his account of the first is imperfect, because in ancient analysis the more general propositions, with which it concludes, are not mere consequences, but the real grounds of the given proposition; while his addition of the second reduces the nature of analysis to the utmost confusion, because hypothetical deduction is progressive from hypothesis to consequent facts whereas analysis is regressive from consequent facts to real ground.

    0
    0
  • the contingency of particular events future, the solution of which remains imperfect.'

    0
    0
  • the fruit of the conclusion, severing its nexus with the stock from which it springs, we have an imperfect form of definition, while, if further we abandon all idea of making it adequate by exhibition of its ground, we have, with still the same form of words, a definition merely nominal or lexicographical.

    0
    0
  • Aristotelians, the dialectical induction of the Topics, content with imperfect enumeration and with showing the burden of disproof upon the critic, is puerile, and at the mercy of a single instance to the contrary.

    0
    0
  • Grounds for a variety of developments are to be found in the imperfect harmonization of the rationalistic heritage from the Wolffian tradition which still dominates Kant's pure general logic with the manifest epistemological intention of his transcendental theory.

    0
    0
  • we ought to regard these as only imperfect forms of Quaternions,.

    0
    0
  • A similar method of calculation might be applied to deduce the thermodynamical properties of other vapours, but the required experimental data are in most cases very imperfect or even entirely wanting.

    0
    0
  • Crystals have imperfect cleavages parallel to the eight faces of the pyramid c 12011.

    0
    0
  • Their speculation as to the nature of God had led them gradually to separate him by an infinite distance from all creation, and to feel keenly the opposition of the finite and the infinite, the perfect and the imperfect, the eternal and the temporal.

    0
    0
  • Any attempt to picture the geographical conditions of the Cambrian period must of necessity be very imperfect.

    0
    0
  • near affinity; and while more nearly related to the Marsupialia (q.v.), in which an imperfect allantoic placenta is sometimes developed, it is broadly distinguished therefrom by the invariable presence of a functional placenta by the aid of which the foetus is nourished throughout the greater portion of intra-uterine life.

    0
    0
  • This appears to be the case very approximately with steel or glass balls; generally, however, there is some appreciable loss of apparent energy; this is accounted for by vibrations produced in the balls and imperfect elasticity of the materials.

    0
    0
  • This conclusion he then supports by the character attributed to the " Cyclic " poems (whose want of unity showed that the structure of the Iliad and Odyssey must be the work of a later time), by one or two indications of imperfect connexion, and by the doubts of ancient critics as to the genuineness of certain parts.

    0
    0
  • Imperfect acquaintance with authors whom they studied in Latin translations made by Jews from Arabic commentaries on Greek texts, together with almost total ignorance of natural laws, condemned them to sterility.

    0
    0
  • It absorbed the relics of antiquity with omnivorous appetite, and with very imperfect sense of the distinction between worse and better Criticism.

    0
    0
  • But the invaders appear to have acquired only an imperfect possession of the country, as it was again wrested from the Hindu princes of Orissa about the year 1571, during the reign of Ibrahim, of the Kutb Shahi dynasty of Hyderabad or Golconda.

    0
    0
  • The adjective masculus points to the power of bringing forth fruit possessed by the new philosophy, and perhaps indicates that all previous births of time were to be looked upon as feminine or imperfect; it is used in a somewhat similar sense in Letters and Life, vi.

    0
    0
  • Imperfect sing.

    0
    0
  • Of Ephraim as a commentator on Scripture we have only imperfect means of judging.

    0
    0
  • In a state of nature, every recurring severe winter or otherwise unfavourable season weeds out those individuals of tender constitution or imperfect structure which may have got on very well during favourable years, and it is thus that the adaptation of the species to the climate in which it has to exist is kept up. Under domestication the same thing occurs by what C. Darwin has termed "unconscious selection."

    0
    0
  • Still more instructive for Schopenhauer was the imperfect and obscure Latin translation of the Upanishads which in 1801-1802 Anquetil Duperron had published from a Persian version of the Sanskrit original.

    0
    0
  • This feeble echo of the full response to stimulus is an idea, which is thus only another word for imperfect organization or adjustment.

    0
    0
  • But gradually this imperfect correspondence is improved, and the idea passes over again into the state of unconscious or organic memory.

    0
    0
  • Obligations may be either perfect or imperfect.

    0
    0
  • A perfect obligation is one which is directly enforceable by legal proceedings; an imperfect or moral obligation (the naturalis obligatio of Roman law) is one in which the vinculum juris is in some respects incomplete, so that it cannot be directly enforced, though it is not entirely destitute of legal effect.

    0
    0
  • A perfect obligation may become imperfect by lapse of time or other means, and, conversely, an imperfect obligation may under certain circumstances become perfect.

    0
    0
  • The obligation, however, remains, though imperfect, for if there be a subsequent acknowledgment by the debtor, the debt revives, and the imperfect obligation becomes again perfect.

    0
    0
  • Samuel von Triewald (1688-1743) played a very imperfect Dryden to Dalin's Pope.

    0
    0
  • Arguing from the Old Testament, they represented Paul's gospel as an imperfect creed which required to be supplemented by legal exactitude, 2 including ritual observance (iv.

    0
    0
  • This inslation, though still regarded as canonical by the Parsees, shows, very imperfect knowledge of the original language.

    0
    0
  • From considering the nature of diabetes, he had come to the conclusion that many cases were due to imperfect oxidation of sugar in the body; that this oxidation was normally carried out by a ferment in the muscles, and that probably the disease was in some cases dependent upon absence of the ferment.

    0
    0
  • It is probable that the kidneys also have an internal secretion, and that the great oedema sometimes found in kidney disease is rather due to the action of some proteid body resembling in its effects the streptococcus anti-toxin, than to accumulation of water due to imperfect action of the kidney.

    0
    0
  • Imperfect digestion is very often caused by defective teeth or by undue haste in eating, so that the food is bolted instead of being sufficiently masticated and insalivated.

    0
    0
  • Complete knowledge is impossible; nay, what we call knowledge of any part of the system is inherently imperfect.

    0
    0
  • It is this strong grasp of the imperfect character of our knowledge of nature and of the grounds for its limitation that makes Butler so formidable an opponent to his deistical contemporaries.

    0
    0
  • Of imperfect things, the highest are angels and human beings, who by virtue of the possession of reason are akin to the Divine and superior to the lower creation.

    0
    0
  • Some of the flowers are often imperfect, the stamens or pistil being more or less aborted.

    0
    0
  • In laying the foundations of a science of ancient chronology he relied sometimes upon groundless, sometimes even upon absurd hypotheses, frequently upon an imperfect induction of facts.

    0
    0
  • The young (which, as in other marsupials, leave the uterus in an extremely small and imperfect condition) are placed in the pouch as soon as they are born; and to this they resort temporarily for shelter for some time after they are able to run, jump and feed upon the herbage which forms the nourishment of the parent.

    0
    0
  • The last satire is now imperfect, and the authenticity both of this and of the fifteenth has been questioned, though on insufficient grounds.

    0
    0
  • The mere performance of relative or imperfect duties, they would have said, is something neither good nor evil; the essential constituents of human good is ignored.

    0
    0
  • That bacteria have existed from very early periods is clear from their presence in fossils; and although we cannot accept all the conclusions drawn from the imperfect records of the rocks, and may dismiss as absurd the statements that geologically immured forms have been found still living, the researches of Renault and van Tieghem have shown pretty clearly that large numbers of bacteria existed in Carboniferous and Devonian times, and probably earlier.

    0
    0
  • It must be borne in mind that the reports of these speeches which have come down to us were made from hearsay, or at best from recollection, and are necessarily therefore most imperfect.

    0
    0
  • So difficult was the country and so imperfect the liaisons that it was not till the 2gth that the deployment of the I., II.

    0
    0
  • But his documents also gave only very imperfect indications of the occasions of many of the utterances; and the result of his method of procedure has been to give us an exceedingly effective representation of the teaching of Jesus.

    0
    0
  • The large amount of soluble sulphates of iron and copper formed in the roast is made to act upon salt charged in a copper-bottomed amalgamating pan; the chlorides formed finish in the wet way the imperfect chloridation obtained in the furnace.

    0
    0
  • The same turn for detail is observable in his ethics, where, to judge from the imperfect evidence of the Characters, he elaborated still farther Aristotle's portraiture of the virtues See Gellius, Noct.

    0
    0
  • Upon the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861, Lord Palmerston acknowledged that it was the duty of the British government to stand aloof from the fray; but his own opinion led him rather to desire than to avert the rupture of the Union, which might have been the result of a refusal on the part of England and France to recognize a blockade of the Southern ports, which was notoriously imperfect, and extremely prejudicial to the interests of Europe.

    0
    0
  • Poetry, as Thucydides complained, is a most imperfect medium for fact.

    0
    0
  • But such enlargement of the field of history is a modern scientific product, and is to be distinguished from the imperfect beginnings of history-writing which the archaeologist is able to decipher.

    0
    0
  • But given the imperfect medium for investigation and the absence of an archaeological basis for criticism, the work of Herodotus remains a scientific achievement, as remarkable for its approximation to truth as for the vastness of its scope.

    0
    0
  • Some canals and river navigations have consequently become derelict, or are only maintained with difficulty and in imperfect condition.

    0
    0
  • The results thus derived are, however, based on imperfect formulae.

    0
    0
  • A series of the apes, arranged from lower to higher orders, shows gradations from a brain little higher that that of a rat, to a brain like a small and imperfect imitation of a man's; and the greatest structural break in the series lies not between man and the manlike apes, but between the apes and monkeys on one side, and the lemurs on the other.

    0
    0
  • and imitative sounds to represent the cat's mew, the click of a trigger, the clap or thud of a blow, &c. The total result of this combination of gesture and significant sound will be a general system of expression, imperfect but serviceable, and naturally intelligible to all mankind without distinction of race.

    0
    0
  • The accounts, imperfect as they are, which have been preserved of their arts, beliefs and habits, thus present a picture of the arts, beliefs and habits of tribes.

    0
    0
  • The blade is frequently wanting or small and imperfect in the basal leaves, but in the rest is long and set on to the sheath at an angle.

    0
    0
  • They are commonly firm and strong, often enclose the spikelet, and are rarely provided with long points or imperfect awns.

    0
    0
  • Robert Brown suggested two primary divisions - Paniceae and Poaceae, according to the position of the most perfect flower in the spikelet; this is the upper (apparently) terminal one in the first, whilst in the second it occupies the lower position, the more imperfect ones (if any) being above it.

    0
    0
  • a, Imperfect Archegonia.

    0
    0
  • The payers of income tax, unfortunately, are not one class but many, and although the rate of duty is the same, the definition of income seems imperfect, so that many pay on a much larger assessment of income than seems fair in comparison with other incomes of nominally the same amount, but really of much greater value when all deductions from the gross sum are fairly reckoned.

    0
    0
  • From this point (considered as a building merely) it appears only as a secondary unit in a magnificent group. Seen from the west, however, it is the dominant unit, but here it is impossible to overlook the imperfect conception of the "Gothic humour" (as he himself termed it) manifested by Wren, from whose designs the western towers were completed in 1740.

    0
    0
  • There is no distinct cleavage; though an imperfect cleavage may sometimes be developed parallel to the faces of the rhombohedron r by plunging a heated crystal into cold water.

    0
    0
  • The monastic remains in Bedfordshire include the fine fragment of the church of the Augustinian priory at Dunstable, serving as the parish church; the church (also imperfect) of Elstow near Bedford, which belonged to a Benedictine nunnery founded by Judith, niece of William the Conqueror; and portions of the Gilbertine Chicksands Priory and of a Cistercian foundation at Old Warden.

    0
    0
  • imperfect in his rhyme and rhythm, his poetry is of a didactical nature, and his best - poems are rhymed fables, many of which are thinly disguised political satires.

    0
    0
  • An ideal bill was impracticable; it is to Forster's enduring credit that the bill of 1870, imperfect as it was, established at last some approach to a system of national education in England without running absolutely counter to the most cherished English ideas and without ignoring the principal agencies already in existence.

    0
    0
  • It must be remembered, however, that his treatises on scientific subjects are lost, and only known from imperfect abstracts.

    0
    0
  • Pondoland Cretaceous Series Uitenhage Series Stormberg Series Beaufort Series Ecca Series Dwyka Series Witteberg Series Bokkeveld Series Table Mountain Sandstone Series Includes several independent unfossiliferous formations of pre-Devonian age Cretaceous Carboniferous to Jurassic Devonian Archaean to Silurian(?) { Karroo System Cape System Pre-Cape Rocks Cretaceous System imperfect remains of plants (Spirophyton) are the only fossils, and these are not sufficient to determine if the beds belong to the Devonian or Carboniferous System.

    0
    0
  • This was accordingly done; but Le Clerc sent the manuscript to the library of the Remonstrants, and it was afterwards published at London in 1754, under the title of Two Letters from Sir Isaac Newton to M le Clerc. This edition is imperfect, and in many places erroneous.

    0
    0
  • This was followed in 1779 by Woldemar, a philosophic novel, of very imperfect structure, but full of genial ideas, and giving the most complete picture of Jacobi's method of philosophizing.

    0
    0
  • First, in the spontaneous stage, where reflection is not yet developed, and art is imperfect, humanity has thought only of the immensity around it.

    0
    0
  • Pending the work of a second Brehon Law Commission, the Laws are best studied in the six imperfect volumes (Ancient Laws of Ireland, 1865-1901) produced by the first Commission (ignoring their long and worthless introductions), together with Dr. Whitley Stokes's Criticism (London, Nutt, 1903) of Atkinson's Glossary (Dublin, 1901).

    0
    0
  • The entire system has been - as in other states where it prevails - extremely irregular and arbitrary as regards local assessments, and very imperfect; and the figures of total valuation (in 1880 $160,570,761, in 1890 $347,717,218, in 1906 $408,329,749, and in 1908, when it was supposed to be the actual valuation of all taxable property, $2,453,691,859), though significant of taxation methods, are not significant of the general condition or progress of the state.

    0
    0
  • His hereditary title indeed was imperfect; though he was the eldest descendant of Edward III.

    0
    0
  • It conceived itself as the trustee of a system of government which, however theoretically imperfect, alone of the governments of Europe had survived the storms of the Revolution intact.

    0
    0
  • The political records of this energy are the State Papers, a class of document which soon dwarfs all others, and renders chroniclers, historians and the like almost negligible quantities as sources of history; but in another way their value is enhanced, for these hundreds of thousands of documents provide a test of the accuracy of modern historians which is imperfect in the case of medieval chroniclers and almost non-existent in that of ancient writers.

    0
    0
  • uncalendared in the British Museum there is no guide exceptthe imperfect indexes to the Cotton, Harleian, Lansdowne, Additional and other collections.

    0
    0
  • She appeared in San Francisco in 1877, in an English version of Adrienne Lecouvreur, and, in spite of her imperfect command of the language, achieved a remarkable success.

    0
    0
  • Although the present article does not discuss mammalian osteology in general (for which see Vertebrata), it is interesting to notice in this connexion that the primitive condition of the mammalian tympanum apparently consisted merely of a small and incomplete bony ring, with, at most, an imperfect ventral wall to the tympanic cavity, and that a close approximation to this original condition still persists in the monotremes, especially Ornithorhynchus.

    0
    0
  • Of the European Jurassic (or Oolitic) mammals our knowledge is unfortunately very imperfect; and from the scarcity of their remains it is quite probable that they are merely stragglers from the region (possibly Africa) where the class was first differentiated.

    0
    0
  • In private houses it found its way more slowly, partly from an apprehension of danger attending its use, and partly from the discomfort which was experienced in many cases through the gas being distributed without purification, and to the careless and imperfect manner in which the service pipes were first fitted.

    0
    0
  • In his second address (1853) he criticized Elie de Beaumont's theory of the elevation of mountain-chains and showed the imperfect evidence on which it rested.

    0
    0
  • Is it enough to extricate the spirit of Protestantism from the imperfect letter of its early creeds?

    0
    0
  • From the imperfect statistics available, the following tables of the class of goods imported and exported, and their respective values, were drawn up in 1901 by the late Mr Whittaker, The Times correspondent.

    0
    0
  • The spikelets contain two or three flowers, of which the uppermost is usually imperfect.

    0
    0
  • The imperfect fragment was edited by his brother and Dr Buschmann in 1836, and contains the remarkable introduction on "The Heterogeneity of Language and its Influence on the Intellectual Development of Mankind" (Ober die Verschiedenheit des menschlichen Sprachbaues and ihren Einfluss auf die geistige Entwickelung des Menschengeschlechts), which was afterwards edited and defended against Steinthal's criticisms by Pott (2 vols., 1876).

    0
    0
  • The spores of the homosporous Vascular Cryptogams are usually of small size; the prothalli produced from them usually bear both antheridia and archegonia, though under special conditions an imperfect sexual differentiation may result.

    0
    0
  • These differences and our comparatively imperfect knowledge of the Sphenophyllaceous plants which most closely resemble the Psilotaceae appear to justify the provisional isolation of the latter as a distinct group, showing affinities with both the Sphenophyllales and Lycopodiales.

    0
    0
  • While Danton kept power Terrorism remained imperfect, for Danton, although unscrupulous, did not love cruelty and kept in view a return to normal government.

    0
    0
  • The printed materials are so abundant and varied that any brief notice of them must be imperfect.

    0
    0
  • Only he who apprehends good in the abstract can imitate it in such transient and imperfect good as may be realized in human life, and it is impossible that, having this knowledge, he should not act on it, whether in private or public affairs.

    0
    0
  • Human law is required, not merely to determine the details for which natural law gives no intuitive guidance, but also to supply the force necessary for practically securing, among imperfect men, the observance of the most necessary rules of mutual behaviour.

    0
    0
  • which is at present imperfect.

    0
    0
  • Of the north there are the sagas of Kormak (930-960), most primitive of all, a tale of a wild poet's love and feuds, containing many notices of the heathen times; of Vatzdeelasaga (890-980), relating to the settlement and the chief family in Waterdale; of Hallfred the poet (996-1014), narrating his fortune at King Olaf's court, his love affairs in Iceland, and finally his death and burial at Iona; of Reyk -deela (990), which preserves the lives of Askell and his son Viga-Skuti; of Svarf-deela (980-990), a cruel, coarse story of the old days, with some good scenes in it, unfortunately imperfect, chapters I-10 being forged; of VigaGlum (970-990), a fine story of a heathen hero, brave, crafty and cruel.

    0
    0
  • The end is imperfect, there being a blank of some years before the fragmentary ending to which an editor has affixed a notice of the author's death.

    0
    0
  • The former work, Arna Saga Biskups, is imperfect; it is the record of the struggles of church and state over patronage rights and glebes, written c. 1315; it now covers only the years 1269-1291; a great many documents are given in it, after the modern fashion.

    0
    0
  • Convalescence is generally slow, and recovery may be imperfect.

    0
    0
  • But his efforts to supply such an explanation were rendered futile by his imperfect apprehension of what motion is in itself.

    0
    0
  • In the course of the memorable voyage of the "Beagle," C. Darwin came to hear of another kind of rhea, called by his informants Avestruz petise, and at Port Desire on the east coast of Patagonia he obtained an example of it, the imperfect skin of which enabled J.

    0
    0
  • In the Monologen he threw out his ethical manifesto, in which he proclaimed his ideas as to the freedom and independence of the spirit, and as to the relation of the mind to the world of sense and imperfect social organizations, and sketched his ideal of the future of the individual and society.

    0
    0
  • But owing to the imperfect state of existing information, it is impossible to say with any certainty what is the real state of the balance of visible trade between Ireland and other countries.

    0
    0
  • Owing to imperfect and contradictory authorities, the chronology and details of this reign are very uncertain.

    0
    0
  • A special application of this relation between the prior perfect, and the imperfect, which it influences, is found in the doctrine of the connexion of the abstract (transcendent) intellect with man.

    0
    0
  • Thus the mistakes inevitable in the isolated study of an imperfect Organon could not henceforth be made.

    0
    0
  • When three or more reals are together, each disturbance and self-preservation will (in general) be imperfect, i.e.

    0
    0
  • Religious thinkers are faced by the problem of the Creator and the created, and the necessity for formulating a close relationship between God and man, the Infinite and Perfect with the finite and imperfect.

    0
    0
  • attained its height during the early Roman Soria Empire, when it has been estimated, though Palencia of course on imperfect data, to have numbered Valladolid forty or fifty millions.

    0
    0
  • of the imperfect (canidbamos, canidbais), of the pluperfect indicative (cantdramos, cantdrais), and of the imperfect subjunctive (cantdsemos, cantdseis); possibly the impulse to this was given by the forms of future perfect canidremos, cantdreis (cantarlrnus, caniarilis).

    0
    0
  • of the present of ser is eres, which is best explained as borrowed from the imperfect (eras), this tense being often used in Old Spanish with the meaning of the present; alongside of eres one finds (but only in old documents or in dialects) sos, formed like sois (2nd pen.

    0
    0
  • Certain forms of the conjugation of the verb differ from the Castilian: dar, esiar, haver, saber, poner readily form their imperfects and imperfect subjunctives like the regular verbs in ar and erhavieron (Cast.

    0
    0
  • If a contemporary grammarian, Saco Area, is to be trusted, Gallego would form an absolute exception to the law of Spanish accentuation in the imperfect and pluperfect indicative: falabdmos, falabddes; batidmos, batiddes; pididmos, p-ididdes; and falardrnos, falarddes; baterdmos, baterddes; pidirdmos, pidirddes.

    0
    0
  • The future perfect indicative and the imperfect subjunctive, on the other hand, would seem to be accented regularly: faldremos, faldsernos.

    0
    0
  • The work, which is imperfect at the beginning and end (breaking off in the year 627), is preceded by an introduction on the Christian methods of reckoning time and the Easter cycle.

    0
    0
  • 678, who explains how transpositions actually arise by transcribers trying to make up a complete set of the tales from several imperfect copies.

    0
    0
  • Axis prolonged, bearing an imperfect flower at its apex.

    0
    0
  • Alteration in the symmetrical arrangement as well as in the completeness and regularity of flowers has been traced to suppression or the non-development of parts, degeneration or imperfect formation, cohesion or union of parts of the same whorl, adhesion or union of the parts of different whorls, multiplication of parts, and deduplication (sometimes called chorisis) or splitting of parts.

    0
    0
  • He was in sympathy with the dominant forces of public life only while they took, during the war, the predominant impress of an imperfect nationalism.

    0
    0
  • to furnish material for repairing the city walls; an imperfect inscription from it is preserved in the British Museum.

    0
    0
  • Here it need only be said that the masses of vegetable substance, more or less carbonized and chemically altered, of which coal is composed, frequently contain cells and fragments of tissue in a condition recognizable under the microscope, as for example spores (sometimes present in great quantities), elements of the wood, fibres of the bark, &c. These remnants, however, though interesting as revealing something of the sources of coal, are too fragmentary and imperfect to be of any botanical importance.

    0
    0
  • The close resemblance between specimens from Jurassic rocks placed in one or other of the genera Thinnfeldia, Dichopteris, Cycadopteris, &c., illustrates the unsatisfactory custom of founding new names on imperfect fronds.

    0
    0
  • It takes up into itself what had characterized the previous efforts of modern thought, shows the imperfect nature of the fundamental notions therein employed, and offers a new solution of the problems to which these notions had been applied.

    0
    0
  • The successive essays which have already been enumerated as composing Kant's precritical work are not to be regarded as so many imperfect sketches of the doctrines of the Kritik, nor are we to look in them for anticipations of the critical view.

    0
    0
  • The particular problem which gave the occasion to the first of the precritical writings is, in an imperfect or particular fashion, the fundamental question to which the Kritik is an answer.

    0
    0
  • Immortals are about as imperfect as humans.

    0
    0
  • abstruse calculations from what may well be imperfect data.

    0
    0
  • The first line is technically imperfect, as the last stressed syllable should not alliterate.

    0
    0
  • In the Biblical perspective, man's love is an imperfect analogy, marred by sin, of God's perfect and self-giving love.

    0
    0
  • A symbol is an inevitably imperfect attempt to represent an archetype.

    0
    0
  • begets an imperfect love in us.

    0
    0
  • The PSA test, although imperfect, remains our best means of detecting prostate cancer at a stage when it can still be cured.

    0
    0
  • Tho imperfect, The Perfect Fool would be a promising debut from any nascent novelist.

    0
    0
  • All others are merely earthly replicas, imperfect because they are bound up in our finiteness, yet illustrating a vital eternal reality.

    0
    0
  • The conclusion drawn is that the newsgroup is an effective aid to learning and a useful but imperfect tool for accelerating evolution.

    0
    0
  • Agent use simple decision heuristics, based on imperfect, local information.

    0
    0
  • imperfect at the end.

    0
    0
  • past imperfect is the first anthology using graphics and other forms of media to reflect the moving personal and spiritual journey of its author.

    0
    0
  • imperfect subjunctive in day-to-day conversation.

    0
    0
  • imperfect recollection of the events of the 1980s.

    0
    0
  • imperfect analogy, it may help us imagine a system of nodes in space-time, and their interaction.

    0
    0
  • imperfect tenses.

    0
    0
  • imperfect sketch of the eloquent words that fall from the lips of this gifted woman.

    0
    0
  • imperfect competition has brought about.

    0
    0
  • Without knowledge - however imperfect - we have little or no chance of designing new ways forward.

    0
    0
  • I hope that my manner, tho imperfect, may have been of some little service along the way.

    0
    0
  • You saw the same thing with Owen too: not even bothering to chase slightly imperfect balls.

    0
    0
  • For many years the work was carried on in a very imperfect manner.

    0
    0
  • The tools used for screening for this disease, however, are highly imperfect.

    0
    0
  • So it has taken months to set up a - still imperfect - structure to get the ball rolling.

    0
    0
  • However, it might be argued that markets may tend toward equilibrium, but remain imperfect at any given point time.

    0
    0
  • It is the " hwyl, " without which Welsh oratory is considered imperfect.

    0
    0
  • His visit afforded her but a very partial satisfaction, while his own enjoyment in it appeared so imperfect.

    0
    0
  • The chorus / climax is irresistible anyway - Verlaine crooning - " I understand destructive urges / They seem so imperfect.

    0
    0
  • However, it seems that what we have today is an imperfect peace which is getting worse; it is becoming more imperfect.

    0
    0
  • imperfect in the same way.

    0
    0
  • inhomogeneous structures with imperfect interfaces.

    0
    0
  • Frictional unemployment is the result of inevitable time lags resulting from imperfect mobility between jobs.

    0
    0
  • It was an imperfect word, but the word of God's own magisterium, a word of ' the Church ' .

    0
    0
  • Full text available as: PDF Abstract Ideas about the evolution of imperfect mimicry are reviewed.

    0
    0
  • It is the " hwyl, " without which welsh oratory is considered imperfect.

    0
    0
  • In the past and present " tenses " the perfect and imperfect participles are used.

    0
    0
  • When I arrived in the country I had an imperfect recollection of the events of the 1980s.

    0
    0
  • Those with phi substantially less likely imperfect safety nets.

    0
    0
  • Apparently, you don't use the imperfect subjunctive in day-to-day conversation.

    0
    0
  • That doesn't stop imperfect machine translators being useful.

    0
    0
  • About the Artist I use watercolors to create imperfect portraits, in which the mutilation is a metaphor for genuine experience.

    0
    0
  • Of George Sand's style a foreigner can be but an imperfect judge, but French critics, from Sainte-Beuve, Nisard and Caro down to Jules Lemaitre and Faguet, have agreed to praise her spontaneity, her correctness of diction, her easy opulence - the lactea ubertas that Quintilian attributes to Livy.

    0
    0
  • opposed by the leakage through imperfect insulation, or natural dissipation, and this may introduce a fictitious element into the apparent annual or diurnal variation.

    0
    0
  • The defects of Descartes lie rather in his apparently imperfect apprehension of the principle of movements uniformly accelerated which his contemporary Galileo had illustrated and insisted upon, and in the indistinctness which attaches to his views of the transmission of motion in cases of impact.

    0
    0
  • The very name (Aesthetics), which Baumgarten was the first to use, indicates the imperfect and partial nature of his analysis, pointing as it does to an element so variable as feeling or sensation as the ultimate ground of judgment in questions pertaining to beauty.

    0
    0
  • (3) Its independence of civil control was very imperfect.

    0
    0
  • Marsupials may be defined as viviparous (that is non-egglaying) mammals, in which the young are born in an imperfect condition, and almost immediately attached to the teats of the mammary glands; the latter being generally enclosed in a pouch, and the front edge of the pelvis being always furnished with epipubic or "marsupial" bones.

    0
    0
  • Whether a pouch is present or not, the young are born in an exceedingly imperfect state of development, after a very short period of gestation, and are immediately transferred by the female parent to the teats, where they remain firmly attached for a considerable time; the milk being injected into their mouths at intervals by means of a special muscle which compresses the glands.

    0
    0
  • It is urged that the imperfect placenta of the bandicoots instead of being vestigial, may be an instance of parallelism, and that in marsupials generally the allantois failed to form a placental connexion.

    0
    0
  • Speculations concerning a calculus of reasoning had at different times occupied Boole's thoughts, but it was not till the spring of 1847 that he put his ideas into the pamphlet called Mathematical Analysis of Logic. Boole afterwards regarded this as a hasty and imperfect exposition of his logical system, and he desired that his much larger work, An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, on which are founded the Mathematical Theories of Logic and Probabilities (1854), should alone be considered as containing a mature statement of his views.

    0
    0
  • He attacks Hegelianism for its pantheism, its lowering of human personality, and imperfect recognition of the demands of the moral consciousness.

    0
    0
  • Many other more or less imperfect devices - such as those of Mahlon Loomis, put forward in 1872 and 1877, and Kitsee in 1895 - for wireless telegraphy were not within the region of practically realizable schemes.

    0
    0
  • An innumerable number of forms of coherer or wave detector depending upon the change in resistance produced at a loose or imperfect contact have been devised.

    0
    0
  • These materials, imperfect as they are, when combined with the notices derived from ancient writers and the evidence of archaeological excavations, may be considered as having furnished some results of reasonable certainty.

    0
    0
  • But there are gaps in Kant's system - a imperfect gap between sensation and the sense-forms of time and space; a gap between sense-forms and thought; a gap between the lower but practicable processes of the Understanding and the higher but unrealizable ideas of Reason.

    0
    0
  • Kant takes for granted that we cannot sum up these imperfect conceptions in a wider reconciling truth.

    0
    0
  • It is reasonable to hold that the supreme personality is the only fully personal being, while ours is a broken and imperfect personality, hindered by the Non-ego which in other ways helps it.

    0
    0
  • Owen's Dasornis, of the London Clay, known from an imperfect cranium, and E.

    0
    0
  • The cleavage is imperfect, but there is a well-marked conchoidal fracture.

    0
    0
  • The historians of the day give us but imperfect records or make unsatisfactory allusions.

    0
    0
  • canon being as yet but half formed - the Old Testament was pushed into notice by dwelling on this imperfect " argument," which grew more extravagant as the partial control exercised by Jewish learning disappeared.

    0
    0
  • A layman's work may have the advantage of originality or the drawback of imperfect knowledge.

    0
    0
  • The duty of a railway with deficient plant or facilities would seem to be to make up for their absence by moderating the speeds of its trains, but public sentiment in America appears so far to have approved, at least tacitly, the combination of imperfect railways and high speeds.

    0
    0
  • Even if the analysis of the literature into component documents were complete, we should still possess a most imperfect record, since the documents themselves have passed through many redactions, and these redactions have proceeded from varying standpoints of religious tradition, successively eliminating or modifying certain elements deemed inconsistent with the canons of religious usage or propriety which prevailed in the age when the redaction took place.

    0
    0
  • But the curtain is raised for too brief an interval to allow of more than a passing glimpse at the restoration of Judaean fortunes; not until the time of Nehemiah, about 140 years after the fall of Jerusalem, does the historical material become less imperfect.

    0
    0
  • Elsewhere at Cnossus, in the smaller palace to the west, the royal villa and the town houses, we find the evidence of a similar catastrophe followed by an imperfect recovery, and the phenomenon meets us again at Palaikastro and other early settlements in the east of Crete.

    0
    0
  • The above summary gives, indeed, a very imperfect idea of the extent to which the remains of the great Minoan civilization are spread throughout the island.

    0
    0
  • The main grammatical distinction between Syriac and all the west Aramaic dialects is that in Syriac the 3rd person of the imperfect (singular and plural) of the verb begins with n, but in west Aramaic, as in the other Semitic languages, it begins with y.

    0
    0
  • There is no distinct cleavage, but imperfect parting may be obtained along octahedral planes.

    0
    0
  • He aimed in fact at producing a work which might replace in ordinary use the Wealth of Nations, which in his opinion was "in many parts obsolete and in all imperfect."

    0
    0
  • The inappropriate designation of St John's Christians arises from the early and imperfect acquaintance of Christian missionaries, who had regard merely to the reverence in which the name of the Baptist is held among them, and their frequent baptisms. In their dealings with members of other communions the designation they take is Sabians, in Arabic Sabi'una, from qs= y 25, to baptize, thus claiming the toleration extended by the Koran (Sur.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, in many insects with imperfect metamorphosis the change from larva or (as the later stage of the larva is called in these cases) nymph to imago is about as great as the corresponding change in the Holometabola, as the student will recognize if he recalls the histories of Ephemeridae, Odonata and male Coccidae.

    0
    0
  • Amongst insects with imperfect metamorphosis the nearest approximations to the true pupa of the Holometabola are to be found in the subimago a From Chittenden, Bull.

    0
    0
  • Such excessive multiplication of the larger taxonomic divisions shows an imperfect sense of proportion, for if the term " class " be allowed its usual zoological value, no student can fail to recognize that the Hexapoda form a single welldefined class, from which few entomologists would wish to exclude even the Apterygogenea.

    0
    0
  • With regard to its occurrence in primitive insects, our knowledge of the geological record is most imperfect, but so far as it goes it supports the conclusion that holometabolism (i.e.

    0
    0
  • If it should be objected that the wings so developed would be rudimentary, and that there would be nothing to encourage their development into perfect functional organs, we may remind the reader that we have already pointed out that imperfect wings of Exopterygota do, even at the present time under certain conditions, become perfect organs; and we may also add that there are, even among existing Endopterygota, species in which the wings are usually vestiges and yet sometimes become perfectly developed.

    0
    0
  • C. Marsh, by finding the imperfect fossilized tibia of a bird in the middle cretaceous shale of Kansas, Marsh, began a series of wonderful discoveries of great im portance to ornithology.

    0
    0
  • His optical investigations led him to adopt in an imperfect form the undulatory theory of light, to anticipate the doctrine of interference, and to observe, independently of though subsequently to F.

    0
    0
  • All true wisdom is contained in the Scriptures, at least implicitly; and the true end of philosophy is to rise from the imperfect knowledge of created things to a knowledge of the Creator.

    0
    0
  • The difference between the highest and lowest price, we may observe, is a very imperfect indication of the range of movement (though, taken in conjunction with the standard deviation, it is the best at our disposal), because either of the extreme prices might be accidental and quite out of relation to all others.

    0
    0
  • Ottoman control is imperfect in Lebanon, the Houran, and over the Armenian mountain region of Zeitun and over the eastern steppe-lands, whose nomadic populations can withdraw themselves out of reach.

    0
    0
  • Communications are still very imperfect, but have been greatly improved of late years.

    0
    0
  • Mahommedanism undoubtedly spread to the Malays of the peninsula from Sumatra, but their conversion was slow and gradual, and may even now in some respects be regarded as imperfect.

    0
    0
  • Gold, the most perfect metal, had the symbol of the Sun, 0; silver, the semiperfect metal, had the symbol of the Moon, 0j; copper, iron and antimony, the imperfect metals of the gold class, had the symbols of Venus Mars and the Earth tin and lead, the imperfect metals of the silver class, had the symbols of Jupiter 94, and Saturn h; while mercury, the imperfect metal of both the gold and silver class, had the symbol of the planet,.

    0
    0
  • Latin letters are used throughout; the miniatures of older maps are superseded by symbols, and in the better-known countries the maps are fairly correct, but they fail lamentably when we follow their author into regions - the successful delineation of which depends upon critical combination of imperfect information.

    0
    0
  • The somewhat imperfect skull of an extinct species of musk-ox from the gravels of the Klondike has enabled Mr W.

    0
    0
  • In the upper molars the two outer columns or tubercles of the primitive tubercular molar coalesce to form an outer wall, from which proceed two crescentic transverse crests, the connexion between the crests and the wall being slight or imperfect, and the crests themselves sometimes tubercular.

    0
    0
  • As creation involves intention, desire, thought and work, and as these are properties which imply limit and belong to a finite being, and moreover as the imperfect and circumscribed nature of this creation precludes the idea of its being the direct work of the infinite and perfect, the En Soph had to become creative, through the medium of ten Sephiroth or intelligences, which emanated from him like rays proceeding from a luminary.

    0
    0
  • They are infinite and perfect when the En Soph imparts his fullness to them, and finite and imperfect when that fullness is withdrawn from them.

    0
    0
  • We have already seen that the Sephiric decade or the archetypal man, like Christ, is considered to be of a double nature, both infinite and finite, perfect and imperfect.

    0
    0
  • But the knowledge is imperfect, and the Christian was to do many things in simple obedience without knowing the reason.

    0
    0
  • The one is the Confession, which is contained in an imperfect state in the Book of Armagh (c. 807), but complete copies are found in later MSS.

    0
    0
  • Eachard attributed the contempt into which the clergy had fallen to their imperfect education, their insufficient incomes, and the want of a true vocation.

    0
    0
  • Even as a child her parts were good, if not brilliant, but unfortunately her education was both imperfect and desultory.

    0
    0
  • On the 12th of January 1904 Loisy wrote to Cardinal Merry del Val that he received the condemnation with respect, and condemned whatever might be reprehensible in his books, whilst reserving the rights of his conscience and his opinions as an historian, opinions doubtless imperfect, as no one was more ready to admit than himself, but which were the only form under which he was able to represent to himself the history of the Bible and of religion.

    0
    0
  • The uncertainty with which the results are affected depends chiefly upon the imperfect contact between the bar and the yoke and also between the ends of the divided bar.

    0
    0
  • The Anomomeristic Arachnida form a single sub-class, of which only imperfect fossil remains are known.

    0
    0
  • The Coptic version (C. Schmidt, Acta Pauli, pp. 74-82), which is here imperfect, is clearly from a Greek original, while the Latin and Armenian are from the Syriac. (c) The Acts of Paul and Thecla.

    0
    0
  • But these translations were regarded as imperfect, and it remained for Tobit ben Korra (836-901) to produce a satisfactory edition.

    0
    0
  • An imperfect solution of the equation x 3 +-- px 2 was discovered by Nicholas Tartalea (Tartaglia) in 1530, and his pride in this achievement led him into conflict with Floridas, who proclaimed his own knowledge of the form resolved by Ferro.

    0
    0
  • Supposing a number of some species of arthropod or fish to be swept into a cavern or to be carried from less to greater depths in the sea, those individuals with perfect eyes would follow the glimmer of light and eventually escape to the outer air or the shallower depths, leaving behind those with imperfect eyes to breed in the dark place.

    0
    0
  • If, however, as in practice, the light be heterogeneous, the source of finite area, the obstacles in motion, and the discrimination of different directions imperfect, we are concerned merely with the mean brightness found by varying the arbitrary phase-relations, and this is obtained by simply multiplying the brightness due to a single aperture by the number of apertures (n) (see Interference Of Light, § 4).

    0
    0
  • The first would correspond to a general turning of the beam; and the second would imply imperfect focusing of the central parts.

    0
    0
  • 226) has shown that success may be attained by a variety of processes, including bichromated gelatin and the old bitumen process, and has investigated the effect of imperfect approximation during the exposure between the prepared plate and the original.

    0
    0
  • The first of these equations is the condition for the formation of dark bands, and the second marks their situation, which is the same as that determined by the imperfect theory.

    0
    0
  • It appears that Fresnel's results, although based on an imperfect theory, require only insignificant corrections.

    0
    0
  • The Memoirs of the cardinal de Retz were first published in a very imperfect condition in 1717 at Nancy.

    0
    0
  • If our results are imperfect and liable to correction, that is only to be expected in the present position of the historical study of the Bible.

    0
    0
  • Among the works which he translated into Syriac and of which his versions survive are treatises of Aristotle, Porphyry and Galen, 3 the Ars grammatica of Dionysius Thrax, the works of Dionysius the Areopagite, and possibly two or three treatises of Plutarch.4 His own original works are less important, but include a " treatise on logic, addressed to Theodore (of Merv), which is unfortunately imperfect, a tract on negation and affirmation; a treatise, likewise addressed to Theodore, On the Causes of the Universe, according to the Views of Aristotle, showing how it is a Circle; a tract On Genus, Species and Individuality; and a third tract addressed to Theodore, On the Action and Influence of the Moon, explanatory and illustrative of Galen's IIEpi rcptaiµwv r t µepwv, bk.

    0
    0
  • Of this work, which exists in only one imperfect copy, the later portion was edited by Baethgen in 2884, and the earlier by Lamy in 1888.

    0
    0
  • We find a distinct and organized profession; we find a system of treatment, especially in regard to injuries, which it must have been the work of long experience to frame; we meet with a nomenclature of parts of the body substantially the same (according to Daremberg) as that employed long afterwards in the writings of Hippocrates; in short, we find a science and an organization which, however imperfect as compared with those of later times, are yet very far from being in their beginning.

    0
    0
  • Diagnosis, or recognition of the disease, must have been necessarily imperfect, when no scientific nosology or system of disease existed, and the knowledge of anatomy was quite inadequate to allow of a precise determination of the seat of disease; but symptoms were no doubt observed and interpreted skilfully.

    0
    0
  • Various works of a more or less imperfect character were carried out, such as the bridging over in 1637 of the Drainage.

    0
    0
  • That peculiar kind of glass usually called schmelz, an imperfect imitation of calcedony, was also made at Venice in the 15th century.

    0
    0
  • But, imperfect as such statistics may be, they give us at any rate some insight into the direction of governmental legislation.

    0
    0
  • Two of these dynastic compilations have been discovered, unfortunately in an imperfect state.

    0
    0
  • Our knowledge of the ancient Sumerian language is still quite imperfect, despite the considerable progress made, more particularly during recent years.

    0
    0
  • 34-869), consists of fifty-one chapters, but is imperfect.

    0
    0
  • The drainage system is still somewhat imperfect, but the water brought from the hills or from the Arno in pipes is fairly good, and the general sanitary conditions are satisfactory.

    0
    0
  • do not ripen their fruit owing to imperfect fertilization, - is to be sought in this natural tendency to dioecism.

    0
    0
  • (3) Ethiopic inscription probably of the same king, imperfect (Littmann).

    0
    0
  • in a water or steam bath, and then added more sugar or a thinner magma, and the whole being then in a state of imperfect fluidity, but so as to close readily behind the stirrer, was filled into moulds and purged " (drained).

    0
    0
  • The processes used were at first very imperfect, but the extraordinary increase in the price of sugar on the Continent caused by the Napoleonic policy gave an impetus to the industry, 1 Lucan iii.

    0
    0
  • This apparatus the natives called "tabaco "; but it must be said that the smoking pipe of the continental tribes was entirely different from the imperfect tabaco of the Caribees.

    0
    0
  • Chemical control of the metal purchased is not nearly as common as it should be, and the refining of zinc is at best an imperfect operation.

    0
    0
  • Cavies in general, the more typical representatives of the Caviidae, are rodents with hooflike nails, four front and three hind toes, imperfect collar-bones, and the cheek-teeth divided by folds of enamel into transverse plates.

    0
    0
  • Thus for instance when any feudal institution (be it Gothic, Norman, or Anglo-Saxon) eludes our deciphering faculty from the imperfect records of its use and operation, then we endeavour conjecturally to amend our knowledge by watching the circumstances in which that institution arose."

    0
    0
  • But these correlations rest upon imperfect evidence.

    0
    0
  • The transmission of early Arabic poetry has been very imperfect.

    0
    0
  • Among the factors, economic, geographic, political and social, which combined to bring about the decline of the Hanseatic League, none was probably more influential than the absence of a German political power comparable in unity and energy with those of France and England, which could quell particularism at home, and abroad maintain in its vigour the trade which these towns had developed and defended with their imperfect union.

    0
    0
  • 47; books 36 and 5560 are imperfect.

    0
    0
  • His observations led him to the view that a glacier is an imperfect fluid or a viscous body which is urged down slopes of a certain inclination by the mutual pressure of its parts, and involved him in some controversy with Tyndall and others both as to priority and to scientific principle.

    0
    0
  • Several diverse totals have been published as the result of the census taken in 1876, which is considered imperfect.

    0
    0
  • There were conceptions of less importance than these, in which it is impossible not to feel that it was Saint-Simon's wrong or imperfect idea that put his young admirer on the track to a right and perfected idea.

    0
    0
  • The art was one of imperfect evolution, but for thirteen centuries it was the only living pictorial art in the world, and the Chinese deserve the honor of having created landscape painting.

    0
    0
  • Imperfect as this system was, it represented a great advance from the conditions in medieval times.

    0
    0
  • 490) drew up an imperfect list of the essayists, and reckoned that from the Taller to Johnson's Rambler, during a period of forty-one years, 106 papers of this description were published.

    0
    0
  • Fayette and Lefeuvre-Deumier also gave a few fragments; but it was not until 1819 that a first imperfect attempt was made by H.

    0
    0
  • Carnot verified this by calculating the values of F'(t) at various temperatures from the known properties of vapours and gases, and showed that the efficiency function diminished with rise of temperature, as measured on the scale of the mercury or gas thermometer, from about 1.40 kilogrammetres per kilo-calorie per degree C. at o° C. to about I 11 at Ioo° C., according to the imperfect data available in his time.

    0
    0
  • In the case of imperfect gases, all the available experimental evidence shows that the specific volume tends towards its ideal value, V =Re/p, in the limit, when the pressure is indefinitely reduced and the molecules are widely separated so as to eliminate the effects of their mutual actions.

    0
    0
  • In the case of an ideal gas, dp/d9 at constant volume =R/v, and dvld6 at constant pressure =R/p; thus we obtain the expressions for the change of entropy 0-4)0 from the state poeovo to the state pev, log e e/eo+R logev/vo =S log e 9/00-R (32) In the case of an imperfect gas or vapour, the above expressions are frequently employed, but a more accurate result may be obtained by employing equation (17) with the value of the specific heat, S, from (29), which gives the expression 4-¢o = Sologe0/00 - R logep/po-n(cp/B-copo/Bo)

    0
    0
  • (See Vaporization, § 16.) The expression for R logp for an imperfect gas of this type differs from that for a perfect gas only by the addition of the term (c - b) p/D.

    0
    0
  • Israel's response should be a proper regard for the ritual of His worship; yet any offering, however imperfect, is thought good enough for Yahweh's altar (i.

    0
    0
  • The statistics are very imperfect.

    0
    0
  • To the period of this sojourn in Holland must probably be referred the surreptitious impression or publication of an imperfect edition of the Inquiry concerning Virtue, from a rough draught, sketched when he was only twenty years of age.

    0
    0
  • These volumes contain in addition to the four treatises already mentioned, Miscellaneous Reflections, now first printed, and the Inquiry concerning Virtue or Merit, described, as "formerly printed from an imperfect copy, now corrected and published intire," and as "printed first in the year 1699."

    0
    0
  • The egoist and the altruist are both imperfect.

    0
    0
  • This brief notice of Shaftesbury's scheme of natural religion would be conspicuously imperfect unless it were added that it is popularized in Pope's Essay on Man, several lines of which, especially of the first epistle, are simply statements from the Moralists done into verse.

    0
    0
  • But the most natural division is obtained by the separation of the saw-flies as a primitive sub-order, characterized by the imperfect union of the first abdominal segment with the thorax, and by the broad base of the abdomen, so that there is no median constriction or " waist," and by the presence of thoracic legs - usually also of abdominal pro-legs - in the larva.

    0
    0
  • Of the rest, P and Q are imperfect.

    0
    0
  • Our knowledge of the Pacific in this respect is still very imperfect, but it appears to be less salt than the other oceans at depths below 800 fathoms, as on the surface, the salinity at considerable depths being 34.6 to 34.7 in the Western part of the ocean, and about 34.4 to 34.5 in the eastern, so that, although the data are by no means satisfactory, it is impossible to assign a mass-salinity of more than 34.7 per mille for the whole body of Pacific water.

    0
    0
  • The most interesting genera are, however, the Upper Oligocene and Lower Miocene Gelocus and Prodremotherium, which have perfectly selenodont teeth, and the third and fourth metacarpal and metatarsal bones respectively fused into an imperfect cannon-bone, with the reduction of the lateral metacarpals and metatarsals to mere remnants of their upper and lower extremities.

    0
    0
  • In proportion as such conversion was facile and rapid, it was probably imperfect.

    0
    0
  • From the standpoint of the history of enlightenment, as Harnack has observed, " Socinianism with its systematic criticism (tentative and imperfect as it may now seem) and its rejection of all the assumptions based upon mere ecclesiastical tradition, can scarcely be rated too highly.

    0
    0
  • on account of the slow rate of fire imposed by black powder, the rapidity of laying conferred by its use was of no great advantage, and it was unsuited to the imperfect mechanical arrangements of the gun mountings of the time.

    0
    0
  • 3-6 1 summarizes E's account of this incident, adding, however, the feature that the Ammonites were associated with the Moabites, possibly an imperfect reminiscence of the reference to Ammon in J.

    0
    0
  • Grundsdtzen, 1863-1872) that Protestantism ought not to speak of dogmas at all, except as things of its imperfect past.

    0
    0
  • Such Homiliaria as were in use in England down to the end of the i 5th century were at the time of the Reformation eagerly sought for and destroyed, so that they are now extremely rare, and the few copies which have been preserved are generally in a mutilated or imperfect form.'

    0
    0
  • The results of these peace efforts were perhaps surprisingly mediocre, but it must be borne in mind that not only was the military organization of the dioceses always very imperfect, but feudal society, so long as it retained political power, was inherently hostile to the principle and practice of private peace.

    0
    0
  • Curiously enough, the allies do not appear to have decided upon the course to be taken in case they were surprised, as they virtually were, and their system of intercommunication - if system it can be called - was most imperfect.

    0
    0
  • The necessity for so many mints lay in the imperfect means of communication.

    0
    0
  • As to the internal evidence, if the Gospel typifies various imperfect or sinful attitudes in Nicodemus, the Samaritan woman and Thomas; if even the mother appears to symbolize faithful Israel: then, profoundly spiritual and forward-looking as it is, a type of the perfect disciple, not all unlike Clement's perfect " Gnostic," could hardly be omitted by it; and the precise details of this figure may well be only ideally, mystically true.

    0
    0
  • But obviously in either the octave or the fifth, if the tuning is imperfect, beats occur all along the line wherever the tones should coincide with perfect tuning.

    0
    0
  • In such circumstances the conception of sovereignty was imperfect.

    0
    0
  • Any division or classification of states must be imperfect.

    0
    0
  • The total Eaton Hodgkinson, who assisted in the experimental tests and in formulating the imperfect theory then available.

    0
    0
  • Donaldson, The Apostolical Fathers (1874), which, however, suffers from the imperfect state of the texts when he wrote.

    0
    0
  • C11.) Rousseau's influence on French music was greater than might have been expected from his very imperfect education; in truth, he was a musician by natural instinct only, but his feeling for art was very strong, and, though capricious, based upon true perceptions of the good and beautiful.

    0
    0
  • Many candidates qualifica- approach the calling with a very imperfect a reciaPP g Y P PP tion of its exacting character.

    0
    0
  • His Life of Caesar (1879), a glorification of imperialism, betrays an imperfect acquaintance with Roman politics and the life of Cicero; and of his two pleasant books of travel, The English in the West Indies (1888) shows that he made little effort to master his subject, and Oceana (1886), the record of a tour in Australia and New Zealand, among a multitude of other blunders, notes the prosperity of the working-classes in Adelaide at the date of his visit, when, in fact, owing to a failure in the wheatcrop, hundreds were then living on charity.

    0
    0
  • Ammonia can be synthesized by submitting a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen to the action of the silent electric discharge, the combination, however, being very imperfect.

    0
    0
  • But some, especially those on Celestial Dynamics and Organic Motion, are admirable examples of what really valuable work may be effected by a man of high intellectual powers, in spite of imperfect information and defective logic.

    0
    0
  • The general opinion is, that the sal ammoniac of the ancients was the same as that of the moderns; but the imperfect description of Pliny is far from being conclusive.

    0
    0
  • This is but an imperfect survival of the original work.

    0
    0
  • Richter, in his Evangelische Kirchenordnungen des 'Olen Jahrhunderts (2 vols., 1846), has collected more than one hundred and eight separate ecclesiastical constitutions, and his collection is confessedly imperfect.

    0
    0
  • The school has been considered with some truth to form a connecting link with the later scepticism, just as the contemporary Cynicism and Cyrenaicism may be held to be imperfect preludes to Stoicism and Epicureanism.

    0
    0
  • It is imperfect, and only contains the early books, viz.

    0
    0
  • These rodents are characterized by the imperfectly rooted cheek-teeth, imperfect clavicles or collar-bones, cleft upper lip, rudimentary first front-toes, smooth soles, six teats and many cranial characters.

    0
    0
  • The original material was a fine clay, sometimes with more or less of sand or ashy ingredients, occasionally with some lime; and the bedding may be indicated by alternating bands of different lithological character, crossing the cleavage faces of the slates, and often interrupting the cleavage, or rendering it imperfect.

    0
    0
  • This is due to (a) the dirty condition of the cows' udders, (b) the imperfect cleansing of the cans and of the hands of the milkers.

    0
    0
  • At Paris, in 150o, he was fully conscious that " without Greek the amplest knowledge of Latin was imperfect"; and, during his three years in Italy (1506-1509), he worked quietly at Greek in Bologna and attended the lectures of Musurus in Padua.

    0
    0
  • Further, unlike diamond, it never occurs as distinctly developed crystals, but only as imperfect six-sided plates and scales.

    0
    0
  • important, if limited and imperfect, efforts in textual criticism.

    0
    0
  • Egyptian chronology is unfortunately imperfect; but Professor Petrie, who has paid particular attention to the subject, and who assigns the reign of Amen-hotep IV.

    0
    0
  • Palatinus (e) of the 5th century at Vienna, both of which are imperfect, especially k, which, however, is far the superior in quality; in the Acts and Catholic epistles by cod.

    0
    0
  • " rule ") best known as the name of a now imperfect halakic Midrash on Exod.

    0
    0
  • parliament in 1 543; but his name does not occur in the imperfect parliamentary returns until 1547, when he was elected for the family borough of Stamford.

    0
    0
  • they were, in however imperfect a way, an organ of national religious feeling, and could move forward with the movement of national life.

    0
    0
  • The prophets of the restoration are only the last waves beating on the shore after the storm which destroyed the old nation, but created in its room a fellowship of spiritual religion, had passed over; they resemble the old prophets in the same imperfect way in which the restored community of Jerusalem resembled a real nation.

    0
    0
  • Their creative religious ideas had become the common property of religious-minded Jews, at least in the somewhat imperfect shape in which they were embodied in the law, and their work on this side was carried on by the great religious, poets.

    0
    0
  • Although our sources are unfortunately very imperfect, the theology of the church does not appear to have learned much from Neoplatonism in the 3rd century - partly because the latter had not yet reached the form in which its doctrines could be accepted by the church dogmatic, and partly because theology was otherwise occupied.

    0
    0
  • But, as a body of exposition, it has the real unity which results from a mode of thinking homogeneous throughout and the general absence of such contradictions as would arise from an imperfect digestion of the subject.

    0
    0
  • In ethics he made contributions to the science in regard to the place and functions of volition and attention, the separate and underived character of the moral sentiments, and the distinction between the virtues of perfect and imperfect obligation.

    0
    0
  • Both as regards structure and habits, the leopard may be reckoned as one of the more typical representatives of the genus Felis, belonging to that section in which the hyoid bone is loosely connected with the skull, owing to imperfect ossification of its anterior arch, and the pupil of the eye when contracted under the influence of light is circular, not linear as in the smaller cats.

    0
    0
  • The degree of accuracy in such anatomical and physiographic restorations from relatively imperfect evidence will always represent the state of the science and the degree of its approach toward being exact or complete.

    0
    0
  • For the lower and imperfect world, which in that system too is conceived and assumed, is the nebulous world of the non-existent and the formless, which is the 1 Cf.

    0
    0
  • a Nickel: times is very imperfect, but not altogether wanting.

    0
    0
  • Among the later viceroys the Conde de Revillagigedo (1789-1794) deserves mention as a progressive ruler who developed commerce and improved administration, and took the first, but very imperfect, census, on which Humboldt based his estimate of the population in 1803 at 5,840,000.

    0
    0
  • of the octavo only one perfect copy (the title-page missing) in the Baptist College at Bristol, 4 and one imperfect in the library of St Paul's cathedral.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →