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  • Carmen swirled around, enjoying the feel of the skirt as she eyed her image in the mirror.

  • They stood there for a moment, watching their image in the mirror.

  • A huge marble fireplace dominated the large family room, its image reflected on the shiny expanse of hardwood floor.

  • Combing it up into a pony tail, she bound it and eyed her image critically in the mirror.

  • Although a blurry image appeared on television of the woman captured on a video camera, she disappeared out of view once she exited.

  • I don't think an admission they were dealing with a psychic or someone with supernatural abilities would sit well with their suit and necktie image.

  • He recognized the building via a computer image Betsy provided.

  • Technically, what you saw was an image of the Bryce brothers.

  • Dusty's eyes returned to the image of the country club.

  • She couldn't dislodge the image of Jule from her mind.

  • Even now, her heart quickened and her thoughts raced to the image of him in tight black clothing.

  • Damian's attention lingered on the image on Rainy's screen.

  • She'd seen the image in his home videos.

  • The image on his bicep was the same she wore around her neck.

  • An image flashed, that of Damian chained to a wall.

  • An image of Darkyn appeared forefront before the images swirled and began to play a disjointed movie.

  • Seeing her mirror image was a reminder that Deidre was created by a goddess with the sole intention of using and discarding the human she made.

  • He tried to formulate a non-accusatory question but the image of Billy Langstrom's crushed body kept getting in the way.

  • The scribbling stopped with an image that left him irritated.

  • Unsettled by the image of a cheerful demon on a spit, she flipped to the next illustration.

  • Shoddy apartments and an image in the mirror of a dirty toddler in a diaper.

  • An image not of her own creation pushed itself into her mind.

  • Another image flashed, and Deidre gasped, covering her face with her hands in an effort to block it.

  • I made you in my image.

  • She wanted to deck her mirror image.

  • An image sprung from the paper before them.

  • There was no mistaking the image.

  • There were several portals, and she hesitated, focusing on the image of her apartment.

  • The image replayed itself in her mind, and guilt flooded her.

  • The image of baby Rhyn and Kris.s words distracted her as she hurried through the hall back to the stairs.

  • Heat flared within her body, and her imagination painted an image of the warrior before her without the clothing.

  • The tiny specs indicating crafts or personnel in the 3D image moved and changed; the image itself spun slowly, as if to present her with all sides of the battle at once.

  • Her face flamed hot as she saw the image from her vision: the two of them holding hands while gazing at each other adoringly and walking on the cracked planet.

  • The concept of something more was as foreign to him as peace, and yet he wanted the image on the leaf to be real.

  • He found himself wanting his nishani to gaze at him as she did in the image.

  • It was packed with warriors facing a screen with A'Ran's calm, hard image displayed.

  • She trailed her fingers over the first image chiseled into the stone: that of a man.

  • One bore the same image of a man, the second of the woman.

  • She stood before her favorite, an image of A'Ran the way she remembered him from the day they'd first met.

  • No image appeared on the screen, and she began to wonder if A'Ran would respond, even to her.

  • She thought of the image she'd seen so long ago when she met A'Ran, the vision of them walking together on the dead planet.

  • "Miss Worthington let me take it out of the museum so's you could see it," Fred said as he presented a curled, cardboard sepia image.

  • Fred was in his finest form, the image of polite firmness.

  • All I'm trying to do is sort out the real man from the image his wife created.

  • The security commander's image disappeared from the screen.

  • She didn't look forward to traveling alone into the valley where she'd last seen a sat image of what looked like a militia.

  • The cabin swayed, and Lana caught the image of wires and far below, water.

  • A moment later, a thin figure entered the room.  The last of the shapeshifters created, this one was a mirror image of the mad scientist, Ully.

  • Kris let out a surprised laugh at the image in his mind of Rhyn being sent packing like a misbehaving puppy.

  • The image of her smile and his memory of the way he felt when he was with her remained fixed in his mind.

  • She pulled up the bodice as she observed her image in the bathroom mirror.

  • Jenn stared, the image of her lifeless daughter falling into the chasm replaying over and over in her mind.

  • She focused hard on the image of Bianca and braced herself for Jonny's fiery touch.

  • She couldn't get the image of Darian and Claire out of her head.

  • He fought hard and fast, disturbed by an image of the woman with the piercing eyes being snapped up by a trap in the field.

  • The image accompanying him into a light doze was that of the beautiful woman sleeping in the bed nearby.

  • With the thought came an image of Jame, who told yearning tales of such a place he recalled from his youth.

  • He darted after Vara, unable to shake the image of his father falling beneath a barbarian's sword.

  • The image of Taran's face flashed before her closed eyes, and with it a sense of frustration, fear, anger, and, most damning of all, desire.

  • The image of Taran crossed her mind, and she admired him more for his ability to survive such a place.

  • Carmen glanced up at his image in the mirror.

  • Denton was fastidious about his appearance and he expected the woman at his side to mirror that image.

  • Satisfied with her image in the mirror, she stepped out of the bathroom and found a plate of scrambled eggs waiting for her in the kitchen.

  • Denton cultured his grace and worked at presenting the proper image.

  • The image of his mother lying serenely in the grave he made her was engraved in his mind.

  • The image of her world being destroyed was hazy, fading.

  • Ashley was a spitting image of her mother: brown curls, blue-gray eyes, a willowy, graceful body.

  • Cold fear filtered through her, taking her breath away at the image he painted.

  • 71, and article Image) .

  • image of a distant body; and the micrometers of Malvasia, Auzout and Picard are the natural developments of this discovery.

  • As the powers of the telescope were gradually developed, it was found that the finest hairs or filaments of silk, or the thinnest silver wires that could be drawn, were much too thick for the refined purposes of the astronomer, as p p they entirely obliterated the image of a star in the more powerful telescopes.

  • To avoid such error Dawes used double wires, not spider webs, placing the image of the star symmetrically between these wires, as in fig.

  • Thus a latent image of the " reseau-lines " will be formed on the sensitive plate, and, when the latter has been exposed to the sky in the telescope, we obtain, on development, a negative of the images both of the stars and of the reseau-lines.

  • square within which that image is included.

  • At Greenwich, Oxford and several other observatories, instead of measuring the distances of the star's image from the opposite sides of the 5 mm.

  • The image of the star is set updn the intersections of the lines of the central cross, and the positions of the reseau-lines are read off by estimation to - of a division on the glass scale.

  • In the measuring machines in general use the field of view, as in the case of the glass-scale micrometer, is sufficiently large to include the image of the 5 mm.

  • The image of a normal reseau-square, as viewed in the microscope, shall exactly coincide with the square formed by the fixed webs - that is to say, the image of the sides of a normal reseau-square shall measure exactly io screw-revolutions.

  • By means of the quick rack motions A and B move the plate so as to bring the reseau-square into the centre of the field of the micrometer; then, by means of the screw heads o, p, perfect the coincidence of the " fixed square " of webs, with the image of the reseau-square.

  • Similarly, place the star's image in the middle of the webs moved by Y.

  • Estimate the diameter of the star's image in terms of the 4" intervals of the movable webs.

  • 2940, Dr Repsold proposed a method of meridian observing which consists in causing a web to follow the image of a star in transit by motions communicated by the observer's hands alone, whilst electrical contacts on the drum of the micrometer screw register on the chronograph the instants corresponding to known intervals from the line of collimation.

  • Thus, if the star's image is kept in bisection by the wire, both star and wire will appear at rest in the field of view.

  • Hartmann overcame these and many other difficulties by directly superposing the image of the spectrogram of a star, having iron comparison lines, upon the image of a spectrogram of the sun taken also with iron comparison lines.

  • Then if the prism P4 is cemented to P3, a sharp image of such lines of the solar spectrograph as are visible in the field of view will be seen in the eyepiece.

  • then the lines of the stellar spectrogram would be seen in focus of the eyepiece and the image of the solar spectrograph would be obliterated.

  • If, for example, it is found that the image of the solar.

  • Artisans came from a great distance to view and honour the image of the popular writer whose best efforts had been dedicated to the cause and the sufferings of the workers of the world; and literary men of all opinions gathered round the grave of one of their brethren whose writings were at once the delight of every boy and the instruction of every man who read them.

  • Mithras), the person so glorified being identified with the sun and represented in the sun's image; so the aureole is the Hvareno of Mazdaism.

  • On the Acropolis of Athens he set up a colossal bronze image of Athena, which was visible far out at sea.

  • Other authorities suggest that it is going much too far to deny the existence of religion altogether, and instance as proof of the divinity of the supra-normal anthropomorphic beings of the Baiame class, the fact that the Yuin and cognate tribes dance around the image of Daramulun (their equivalent of Baiame) and the medicine men " invocate his name."

  • " The phrase was seized upon and made a party name, and it became the fashion for patriots to wear beggar's garb and a medal round the neck, bearing Philip's image on one side and a wallet on the other, with two hands crossed, and the legend Fideles au roi jusqu'd la besace.

  • The image of Jesus was crowned along with those of Pythagoras, Plato and Aristotle.

  • His image and name are often found on "votive hands," a kind of talisman adorned with emblems, the nature of which is obscure.

  • Before the rise of the First Dynasty of Babylon, however, Elam had recovered its independence, and in 2280 B.C. the Elamite king Kutur-Nakhkhunte made a raid in Babylonia and carried away from Erech the image of the goddess Nana.

  • A list of the Elamite deities is given by Assur-bani-pal; at the head of them was In-Susinak, "the lord of the Susians," - a title which went back to the age of Babylonian suzerainty, - whose image and oracle were hidden from the eyes of the profane.

  • And in the Great Council itself we have the lively image of the aristocratic popular assembly of Rome, the assembly of the populus, that of the curiae, where every man of patrician birth had his place.

  • In all the large temples the cella is divided into two parts, the smaller and inner of which (the adytum) was intended for the cult image.

  • The counterspell took the form of a bronze image of the serpent-demon; see Frazer, Golden Bough, ii.

  • in the days of Saul and David) it was the priest with the ephod or image of Yahweh who gave answers to those who consulted him.

  • Israel) the corn, the new wine and the oil, and have bestowed on her silver and gold in abundance which they have wrought into a Baal image " (Hos.

  • For the prophet's function became in an increasing degree a function of mind, and not merely of traditional routine or mechanical technique, like that of the diviner with his arrows or his lots which he cast in the presence of the ephod or plated Yahweh image.

  • The cave, still called Mavrospelya ("black cave"), was ever afterwards regarded as sacred to Demeter, and in'it, according to information given to Pausanias, there had been set up an image of the goddess, a female form seated on a rock, but with a horse's head and mane, to which were attached snakes and other wild animals.

  • Is there anyway to get an image of an article in order to correct the OCR scan?

  • Remaining itself in repose, it rays out, as it were, from its own fullness an image of itself, which is called vas, and which constitutes the system of ideas of the intelligible world.

  • The soul is in turn the image or product of the vas, and the soul by its motion begets corporeal matter..

  • According to Apollodorus (iii, 12, 3) it was made by order of Athena, and was intended as an image of Pallas, the daughter of Triton, whom she had accidentally slain, Pallas and Athena being thus regarded as two distinct beings.

  • The Lord accepted the offering, and after using the napkin handed it back to her with the image of His face miraculously impressed upon it.

  • The legend continued to gather accretions, and a miraculous origin came to be assigned to the image.

  • It appears that in the 12th century the image began to be identified with one preserved at Rome, and in the popular speech the image, too, was called Veronica.

  • It is interesting to note that the fanciful derivation of the same Veronica from the words Vera icon (euccav) " true image" - is not, as has been thought, of modern origin, since it occurs in the Otia Imperialia (iii.

  • Alongside of Mana rabba frequent mention is made of D'mutha, his "image," as a female power; the name "image of the father" arises out of the same conception as that which gives rise to the name of 'vvota among the Greek Gnostics.

  • Beneath him was originally nothing but a huge void with muddy black water at the bottom, in which his image was reflected, becoming ultimately solidified into P'tahil, his son, who now partakes of the nature of matter.

  • Manda d'hayye and his image Hibil Ziva with his incarnations clearly correspond to the old Babylonian Marduk, Merodach, the "first-born" son of Ea, with his incarnations, the chief divinity of the city of Babylon, the mediator and redeemer in the old religion.

  • 103, 104), Laodameia made a waxen image of her husband.

  • A slave, having detected her in the act of embracing it and supposing it to be a lover, informed her father, who ordered her to burn the image; whereupon she threw herself with it into the flames.

  • The suspected theses included such points as the following: that Christ descended ad inferos not in His real presence but quoad effectum; that no image or cross should receive latreia even in the sense allowed by Thomas; that it is more reasonable to regard Origen as saved than as damned; that it is not in a man's free will to believe or disbelieve an article of faith as he pleases.

  • In this new country it was her duty to sacrifice to the goddess all strangers; and as her brother Orestes came to search for her and to carry off to Attica the image of the goddess, she was about to sacrifice him, when a happy recognition took place.

  • Orestes and Iphigeneia fled, takini with them the image; at Delphi they met Electra, the sister of Orestes, who having heard that her brother had been sacrificed by the Tauric priestess, was about to tear out the eyes of Iphigeneia.

  • The brother and sister returned to Mycenae; Iphigeneia deposited the image in the deme of Brauron in Attica, where she remained as priestess of Artemis Brauronia.

  • According to the Spartans, the image of Artemis was transported by Orestes and Iphigeneia to Laconia, where the goddess was worshipped as Artemis Orthia, the human sacrifices originally offered to her being abolished by Lycurgus and replaced by the flogging of youths (diamastigosis, Pausan.

  • According to DBrpfeld, this was the " old temple " of Athena Polias, frequently mentioned in literature and inscriptions, in which was housed the most holy image (oavov) of the goddess which fell from heaven; it was burnt, but not completely destroyed, during the Persian War, and some of its external decorations were afterwards built into the north wall of the Acropolis; it was subsequently restored, he thinks, with or without its colonnade - in the former case a portion of the peristyle must have been removed when the Erechtheum was built so as to make room for the porch of the maidens; the building was set on fire in 406 B.C. (Xen.

  • Admitting the identification, we may perhaps conclude that the temple was repaired in order to provide a temporary home for the venerated image and other sacred objects; no traces of a restoration exist, but the walls probably remained standing after the Persian conflagration.

  • On both sides of the passage were numerous statues, among them that of Athena Hygeia, set up by Pericles to commemorate the recovery of a favourite slave who was injured during the building of the Parthenon, a colossal bronze image of the wooden horse of Troy, and Myron's group of Marsyas with Athena throwing away her flute.

  • The 15th-century font, the pulpit (1570), the organ (1617), and the early Gothic Lady chapel containing a much venerated 13th-century image of the Virgin, which was annually carried in procession through the town, are all noticeable.

  • Lucian and Apuleius give descriptions of the beggar-priests who went round the great cities with an image of the goddess on an ass and collected money.

  • The Sumerians cast the heads of their lions in copper, not always with successful results, and filled them with bitumen and clay (like the image in " Bel and the Dragon," which was " clay within and brass without ") to give them solidity.

  • None of the coins with Alexander's own image can be shown to have been issued during his reign; the traditional gods of the Greeks still admitted no living man to share their prerogative in this sphere.

  • was for a long while largely struck with Alexander's 3 own image and superscription; the gold and silver coined in the names of Antigonid and Seleucid kings and by the minor principalities of Asia, kept to the Attic standard which Alexander had established.

  • AvT17rarpos), and coins began to be issued with his image.

  • Another process, photoor heliogravure, for obtaining an engraved image on a copper plate, was for the first time employed on a large scale for producing a new topographical map of the Austrian Empire in 718 sheets, on a scale of I: 75,000, which was completed in seventeen years (1873-1890).

  • The authors of rectangular maps look upon the Tabernacle as an image of the world at large, and believe that such expressions as the " four corners of the earth " (Isa.

  • His original home was supposed to have been Arcadia, where he married Chryse, who brought him as dowry the Palladium or image of Pallas, presented to her by the goddess herself.

  • Antoninus directed that slaves treated with excessive cruelty, who had taken refuge at an altar or imperial image, should be sold; and this provision was extended to cases in which the master had employed a slave in a way degrading to him or beneath his character.

  • The conjunction of the Sephiroth, or, according to the language of the Kabbalah, the union of the crowned King and Queen, produced the universe in their own image.

  • (1) The World of Emanations, also called the Image and the Heavenly or Archetypal Man, is, as we have seen, a direct emanation from the En Soph.

  • 23 f.) that God created man for immortality (that is, apparently, on earth) and made him an image of his own being, but through the envy of the devil death came into the world, yet (iii.

  • The school did not produce an extensive literature, but it played an important part in resisting an exaggerated Augustinianism by reasserting the freedom of the will and the continued existence of the divine image in human nature after the fall.

  • " This treatise," he says, speaking of the Stromateis, " has not been contrived for mere display, but memoranda are treasured up in it for my old age to be a remedy for forgetfulness, - an image, truly, and an outline of those clear and living discourses, and those men truly blessed and noteworthy I was privileged to hear.

  • Among the objects of interest described by Pausanias as extant in Epidaurus are the image of Athena Cissaea in the Acropolis, the temple of Dionysus and Artemis, a shrine of Aphrodite, statues of Asclepius and his wife Epione, and a temple of Hera.

  • He was always assiduously graceful, always desiring to present his idea, his image, his rhapsody, in as persuasive a light as possible, and, particularly, with as much harmony as possible.

  • a v, portrait, image), generally any image or portrait-figure, but specially the term applied to the representations in the Eastern Church of sacred personages, whether in painting or sculpture, and particularly to the small metal plaques in archaic Byzantine style, venerated by the adherents of the Greek Church.

  • When a people migrate they may take with them their god, and if they conceive him to be a spiritual being who cannot be represented by an image, they may desire a symbolical expression of or, rather, a substitute for his presence.

  • In 1896 the central conference of American Rabbis formulated as a proselyte Confession of faith these five principles: (1) God the Only One; (2) Man His Image; (3) Immortality of the Soul; (4) Retribution; and (5) Israel's Mission.

  • Her temple, which was pillaged by Sulla, contained an ivory image, which was said to have fallen from heaven.

  • On numerous monuments she is represented as apeia, "the warlike," vuoicb6pos, " bringer of victory," holding an image of Nike (q.v.) in her outstretched hand (for other similar epithets see Roscher's Lexikon).

  • (3) The Scirophoria, with a procession from the Acropolis to the village of Skiron, in the height of summer, the priests who were to entreat her to keep off the summer heat walking under the shade of parasols (aKipov) held over them; others, however, connect the name with crKipos (" gypsum"), perhaps used for smearing the image of the goddess.

  • (6) The Plynteria and Callynteria, at which her ancient image and peplus in the Erechtheum and the temple itself were cleaned, with a procession in which bunches of figs (frequently used in lustrations) were carried.

  • (8) The Panathenaea, at which the new robes for the image of the goddess were carried through the city, spread like a sail on a mast.

  • The chapel of Notre-Dame des Dunes possesses a small image, which is the object of a well-known pilgrimage.

  • When the waves are convergent and the recipient screen is placed so as to contain the centre of convergency - the image of the original radiant point, the calculation assumes a less complicated form.

  • We readily find (with substitution for k of 27r/X) a2b S n J s in fl „2a2E2 „2b2n2 f2X2 f2X2 as representing the distribution of light in the image of a mathematical point when the aperture is rectangular, as is often the case in spectroscopes.

  • From the general formula (2), if A be the area of aperture, 102 = A2 / x2 f (7) The formation of a sharp image of the radiant point requires that the illumination become insignificant when, n attain small values, and this insignificance can only arise as a consequence of discrepancies of phase among the secondary waves from various parts of the aperture.

  • The larger the aperture the smaller are the angles through which it is necessary to deviate from the principal direction in order to bring in specified discrepancies of phase - the more concentrated is the image.

  • If the image of the line be =o, the intensity at any point E, n of the diffraction pattern may be represented by ?2a2t2 S A2f2 the same law as obtains for a luminous point when horizontal directions are alone considered.

  • Let us now consider the distribution of brightness in the image of a double line whose components are of equal strength, and at such an angular interval that the central line in the image of one coincides with the first zero of brightness in the image of the other.

  • If the angular interval between the components of a double line be half as great again as that supposed in the figure, the brightness midway between is 1802 as against 1.0450 at the central lines of each image.

  • Since the limitation of the width of the central band in the image of a luminous line depends upon discrepancies of phase among the secondary waves, and since the discrepancy is greatest for the waves which come from the edges of the aperture, the question arises how far the operation of the central parts of the aperture is advantageous.

  • The following table gives the actual values: - In both cases the image of a mathematical point is thus a symmetrical ring system.

  • Verdet has compared Foucault's results with theory, and has drawn the conclusion that the radius of the visible part of the image of a luminous point was equal to half the radius of the first dark ring.

  • 4, AB represents the axis of an optical instrument (telescope or microscope), A being a point of the object and B a point of the image.

  • Under these conditions it is clear that A and P are not separated in the image.

  • The question is to what amount must the distance AP be increased in order that the difference of situation may make itself felt in the image.

  • If the change of temperature progressed uniformly from one side to the other, the result would be a lateral displacement of the image without loss of definition; but in general both effects would be observable.

  • The function of a lens in forming an image is to compensate by its variable thickness the differences of phase which would otherwise exist between secondary waves arriving at the focal point from various parts of the aperture.

  • If we suppose the diameter of the lens to be given (2R), and its focal length f gradually to increase, the original differences of phase at the image of an infinitely distant luminous point diminish without limit.

  • But, as we have seen, such an error of phase causes no sensible deterioration in the definition; so that from this point onwards the lens is useless, as only improving an image already sensibly as perfect as the aperture admits of.

  • The image of the sun thrown upon a screen at a distance exceeding 66 ft., through a hole in.

  • focus might have an aperture of 22 in., and the image would not suffer materially from aberration.

  • A rotation of this amount should therefore be easily visible, but the limits of resolving power are being approached; and the conclusion is independent of the focal length of the mirror, and of the employment of a telescope, provided of course that the reflected image is seen in focus, and that the full width of the mirror is utilized.

  • The limiting efficiency of the microscope is attained when the angular aperture amounts to 180°; and it is evident that a lateral displacement of the point under observation through -IX entails (at the old image) a phase-discrepancy B Q' of a whole period, one extreme ray FIG.

  • Apart from the ruling, we know that the image of a mathematical line will be a series of narrow bands, of which the central one is by far the brightest.

  • On either side of any one of them the illumination is distributed according to the same law as for the central image (m = o), vanishing, for example, when the retardation amounts to (mn t 1)X.

  • (7) If B m denote the brightness of the mth lateral image, and Bo that the central image, we have amp 'cosx' dx= a d (1) (-) m7r B.: Bo= a+d am?r sin' a4 d (1).

  • a+d If B denotes the brightness of the central image when the whole of the space occupied by the grating is transparent, we have Bo:B =a2:(a+d)2, and thus (2).

  • The light stopped by the opaque parts of the grating, together with that distributed in the central image and lateral spectra, ought to make up the brightness that would be found in the central image, were all the apertures transparent.

  • It is possible to prepare gratings which give a lateral spectrum brighter than the central image, and the explanation is easy.

  • For if the alternate parts were equal and alike transparent, but so constituted as to give a relative retardation of :IX, it is evident that the central image would be entirely extinguished, while the first spectrum would be four times as bright as if the alternate parts were opaque.

  • of light of assigned wave-length in one spectrum, and as illustrating the frequently observed unsymmetrical character of the spectra on the two sides of the central image.'

  • From (5) we see that, when the light falls perpendicularly upon a grating (0=o), there is no spectrum formed (the image corresponding to m=o not being counted as a spectrum), if the grating interval a or (a+d) is less than X.

  • Under these circumstances, if the material of the grating be completely transparent, the whole of the light must appear in the direct image, and the ruling is not perceptible.

  • Then, if Q be any radiant point and Q' its image (primary focus) in the spherical mirror AP, we have 1 1 2cos4) v l + u 'a ' ' where v 1 = AQ', u =AQ, a =OA, =angle of incidence QAO, equal to the angle of reflection Q'AO.

  • This disposition is adopted in Rowland's instrument; only, in addition to the central image formed at the angle 4' =4), there are a series of spectra with various values of 4', but all disposed upon the same circle.

  • The constant multiplier is of no especial interest so that we may take as applicable to the image of a line 0 I = z 2 sin e A f 1+cos ` - 271 - Eh).

  • The expression (5) gives the illumination at due to that part of the complete image whose geometrical focus is at =o, the retardation for this component being R.

  • In observing the bands he received them at first upon a screen of finely ground glass, upon which a magnifying lens was focused; but it soon appeared that the ground glass could be dispensed with, the diffraction pattern being viewed in the same way as the image formed by the object-glass of a telescope is viewed through the eye-piece.

  • It contained the ancient image of Athena Polias, and three altars, one to Poseidon and Erechtheus, one to Butes and one to Hephaestus; there were portraits of the family of the Butadae on the walls.

  • Upon the top is set up a sword which is the image of Ares; to this they sacrifice captives, pouring their blood over it.

  • Notre Image, in which Rejane made one of her last appearances, Les Sc urs d'Amour (1919), L'Homme a la Rose (1920) and La Tendresse (1921), are among his recent successful plays.

  • They are formed by parallel rays of light emanating from two sources, as, for example, the sun and its image in a sheet of water, which is situated between the observer and the sun.

  • While his great gift to Roman literature is that he first made it artistic, that he imparted to "rude Latium" the sense of elegance, consistency and, moderation, his gift to the world is that through him it possesses a living image of the Greek society in the 3rd century B.C., presented in the purest Latin idiom.

  • deus, applied to all those superhuman beings of the heathen mythologies who exercise power over nature and man and are often identified with some particular sphere of activity; and also to the visible material objects, whether an image of the supernatural being or a tree, pillar, &c. used as a symbol, an idol.

  • It has been also suggested that the word might mean a "molten image" from the sense of "pour."

  • He conceives of them as living a life of eternal peace and exemption from passion, in a world of their own; and the highest ideal of man is, through the exercise of his reason, to realize an image of this life.

  • 3, 4, the image of the offering of incense with the prayers of the saints, before the throne of God, is not without its significance.

  • For a plane boundary the image is the optical reflection of the vortex.

  • Projected perpendicularly against a plane boundary, the motion is determined by an equal opposite vortex ring, the optical image; the vortex ring spreads out and moves more slowly as it approaches the wall; at the same time the molecular rotation, inversely as the cross-section of the vortex, is seen to increase.

  • The image of a source of strength p at S outside a sphere of radius a is a source of strength pa/f at H, where 'OS' =f, OH =a2/f, and a line sink reaching from the image H to the centre 0 of line strength - A la; this combination will be found to produce no flow across the surface of the sphere.

  • When the source S is inside the sphere and H outside, the line sink must extend from H to infinity in the image system; to realize physically the condition of zero flow across the sphere, an equal sink must be introduced at some other internal point S'.

  • When S and S' lie on the same radius, taken along Ox, the Stokes' function can; be written down; and when S and S' coalesce a doublet is produced, with a doublet image at H.

  • For a doublet at S, of moment m, the Stokes' function is M f cos PSx = - m p s3; and for its image at H the Stokes' function is m f cos PHx =m f 3 PH" (6) so that for the comnation _ a3 I I 2 4)-myb12 (f 3 PH PS 3) =m f 3 (pa ll 3 P53)' 3 and this vanishes over the surface of the sphere.

  • There is no Stokes' function when the axis of the doublet at S does not pass through 0; the image system will consist of an inclined doublet at H, making an equal angle with OS as the doublet S, and of a parallel negative line doublet, extending from H to 0, of moment varying as the distance from O.

  • One of his first acts was to restore Babylon, to send back the image of Bel-Merodach (Bel-Marduk) to its old home, and to re-people the city with such of the priests and the former population as had survived massacre.

  • At the top of the Heiliger Berg (1889 ft.) is a church with a wonder-working image of the Virgin, which is the chief place of pilgrimage in Bohemia.

  • If we hold a common reading lens (a magnifying lens) in front of a lamp or some other bright object and at some distance from it, and if we hold a sheet of paper vertically at a suitable distance behind the lens, we see depicted on the paper an image of the lamp. This image is inverted and perverted.

  • a lady's hand glass) behind the lens and inclined at an angle of 45° to the horizon so as to reflect Mirror the rays of light vertically downwards, we can produce >» on a horizontal sheet of Image with Mirror paper an unperverted image FIG.

  • the image has the same appearance as the object and is not perverted as when the reflection of a printed page is viewed in a mirror.

  • 2nd Image Object Mirror Image without Lens camera obscura, which was extensively used in sketching from nature before the introduction of photography, although it is now scarcely to be seen except as an interesting side-show at places of popular resort.

  • The image formed on the paper may be traced out by a pencil, and it will be noticed that in this case the image is real - not virtual as in the case of the camera lucida.

  • 2) so as to form an image on the sheet of paper d e.

  • a b c is fixed at the top of a small tent furnished with opaque curtains so as to prevent the diffused daylight from overpowering the image on the paper, and in the darkened tent the images of external objects are seen very distinctly.

  • cap. 5) we find the correlated problem of the image of the sun passing through a quadrilateral aperture always appearing round, and he further notes the lunated image of the eclipsed sun projected in the same way through the interstices of foliage or lattice-work.

  • He seems to have been well acquainted with the projection of images of objects through small apertures, and to have been the first to show that the arrival of the image of an object at the concave surface of the common nerve - or the retina - corresponds with the passage of light from an object through an aperture in a darkened place, from which it falls upon a surface facing the aperture.

  • This description seems to refer to an arrangement of a transparent painting illuminated either from the back or the front and the image projected through a hole on to a white screen in a darkened room, as described by Porta (Mag.

  • Leonardo also discussed the old Aristotelian problem of the rotundity of the sun's image after passing through an angular aperture, but not so successfully as Maurolycus.

  • He shows how the paper must be moved till it is brought into the focus of the lens, the use of a diaphragm to make the image clearer, and also the application of the method for drawing in true perspective.

  • In his later book, Dioptrice (1611), he fully discusses refraction and the use of lenses, showing the action of the double convex lens in the camera obscura, with the principles which regulate its use and the reason of the reversal of the image.

  • Further, he extended the work of Maurolycus, and demonstrated the exact analogy between the eye and the camera and the arrangement by which an inverted image is produced on the retina.

  • In 1611 Johann Fabricius published his observations of sun-spots and describes how he and his father fell back upon the old method of projecting the sun's image in a darkened room, finding that they could observe the spots just as well as with the telescope.

  • They do not seem to have used a lens, or thought of using the telescope for projecting an enlarged image on Kepler's principle.

  • At one end of it paper was stretched, and at the other a convex lens was fitted in a hole, the image being viewed through an aperture at the top of the box.

  • The image was viewed through a large hole in the side.

  • One was a wooden box with a projecting tube in which a combination of a concave with a convex lens was fitted, for throwing an enlarged image upon the focusing screen, which in its proportions and application is very similar to our modern telephotographic objectives.

  • The image was first thrown upon an inclined mirror and then reflected upwards to a paper screen on the top of the box.

  • In an earlier form the image is thrown upon a vertical thin paper screen and viewed through a hole in the back of the camera.

  • THE GOLDEN CALF, a molten image made by the Israelites when Moses had ascended the Mount of Yahweh to receive the Law (Ex.

  • A carved image was made and set up in his private temple together with an ephod-idol and teraphim (objects used in divination, cf.

  • The most perfect of the ancient bronzes is the great image of Bhaicha-djyaguru in the temple of Yakushi-ji, Nara, attributed to a Korean monk of the 7th century, named Giflgi.

  • The bronze image of the same divinity at Horyu-ji, said to have been cast at the beginning of the 7th century by Tori Busshi, the grandson of a Chinese immigrant, is of good technical quality, but much inferior in design to the former.

  • The colossal Nara Daibutsu (Vairocana) at Tdai-ji, cast in 749 by a workman of Korean descent, is the largest of the great bronzes in Japan, but ranks far below the Yakushi-ji image in artistic qualities.

  • The most noteworthy effort was the casting by Ono Goroymon in 1252 of the well-known bronze image, the Kamakura Daibutsu.

  • The great image of Lochana Buddha at Nara, for example, would measure 138 ft.

  • The end of creation is that man may have this conjunction and become the image of his Creator and creation.

  • Greenough, employs two systems for setting up the image, in order to avoid the pseudoscopic effect.

  • There is a painted image from Alaska, now in the museum of the university of Pennsylvania, which represents such an one.

  • The village of Philippsdorf, now incorporated with Georgswalde, has become since 1866 a famous place of pilgrimage, owing to the miracles attributed to an image of the Virgin, placed now in a magnificent new church (1885).

  • This can be done by placing at B an equal negative point-charge -q in the place which would be occupied by the optical image of A if PO were a mirror, that is, let -q be placed at B, so that the distance BO is equal to the distance AO, whilst AOB is at right angles to PO.

  • The point-charge -q at B is called the " electrical image " of the point-charge +q at A.

  • We find a precisely analogous effect in optics which justifies the term " electrical image."

  • Whatever this increased illumination may be, it can be precisely imitated by removing the mirror and placing a second lighted candle at the place occupied by the optical image of the first candle in the mirror, that is, as far behind the plane as the first candle was in front.

  • The same reasoning can be applied to determine the electrical image of a point-charge of positive electricity in a spherical surface, and therefore the distribution of induced electricity over a metal sphere connected to earth produced by a point-charge near it.

  • Hence this charge is the electrical image of the charge +q at A in the spherical surface.

  • The most interesting of them are the Assa range, with its sandal trees and Buddhist remains; Udayagiri (Sunrise-hill), with its colossal image of Buddha, sacred reservoir, and ruins; and Assagiri, with its mosque of 1719.

  • Some of them, who denied that they had ever been Christians, had consented to pray to the gods, to adore the image of the emperor, and to blaspheme Christ; these he had dismissed.

  • IMAGE WORSHIP. It is obvious that two religious votaries kneeling together before a statue may entertain widely different conceptions of what the image is and signifies, although their outward attitude is the same.

  • The one may regard it as a mere image, picture or representation of the higher being, void in itself of value or power.

  • With the latter attitude alone does the present article deal, and it may conveniently be called idolatry or image worship. For the history of the use of images in Christian worship see Iconoclasts.

  • The image or idol differs from the fetish, charm, talisman, phylactery or miraculous relic, only in this, that either in the flat or the round it resembles the power adored; it has a prototype capable of being brought before the eye and visualized.

  • But he is not an idolater, for he has not "made unto himself any graven image, nor the likeness of anything that is in heaven above or in the water beneath or in the water under the earth."

  • In the history of human religions can we trace, as it were, a law of transition from sacred stock and stone up to picture and image?

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