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iliad

iliad

iliad Sentence Examples

  • Why all the cities of Greece dispute the honour of being his birthplace is because the Iliad and the Odyssey are not the work of one, but of many popular poets, and a true creation of the Greek people which is in every city of Greece.

  • As the rainbow unites earth and heaven, Iris is the messenger of the gods to men; in this capacity she is mentioned frequently in the Iliad, but never in the Odyssey, where Hermes takes her place.

  • In other accounts, he is confined in the land of the Arimi in Cilicia (Iliad, ii.

  • Apellicon's library contained a remarkable old copy of the Iliad.

  • See Homer, Iliad, V.

  • His leave-taking of Andromache in the sixth book of the Iliad, and his departure to meet Achilles for the last time, are most touchingly described.

  • Homer, Iliad, ii.

  • - Last year and this I read St John's Gospel, with part of Xenophon's Cyropaedia, the Iliad, and Herodotus; but, upon the whole, I rather neglected my Greek."

  • The epic of Gudrun is not unworthy to stand beside the greater Nibelungenlied, and it has been aptly compared with it as the Odyssey to the Iliad.

  • EUPHORBUS, son of Panthoiis, one of the bravest of the Trojan heroes, slain by Menelaus (Iliad, xvii.

  • A relation between objects of art described by Homer and the Mycenaean treasure was generally allowed, and a correct opinion prevailed that, while certainly posterior, the civilization of the Iliad was reminiscent of the Mycenaean.

  • Iliad, ii.

  • Only one of them is there mentioned (Iliad, xvi.

  • The earlier part of it treated of the mythical adventures of Aeneas in Sicily, Carthage and Italy, and borrowed from the interview of Zeus and Thetis in the first book of the Iliad the idea of the interview of Jupiter and Venus; which Virgil has made one of the cardinal passages in the Aeneid.

  • The special objects of his attack were the leaders of the army, and Homer (Iliad, ii.

  • Homer, Iliad, iii.

  • She already appears as the goddess of counsel (iroXv)30vXos) in the Iliad and in Hesiod.

  • Out of pity for her grief, the gods changed Niobe herself into a rock on Mount Sipylus in Phrygia, in which form she continued to weep (Homer, Iliad, xxiv.

  • His translation of the Iliad appeared at Sarospatak in 1821.

  • 18 ff.; Homer, Iliad i.

  • 3; Homer, Iliad, vi.

  • In a later verse in the Iliad (date, 7th or 6th century),.

  • A further appendix consisted of Anecdotes, Letters and Rescripts of the emperor Hadrian; fables of Aesop; extracts from Hyginus; a history of the Trojan War, abridged from the Iliad; and a legal fragment, Hepi iXethEpci €wv (De manumissionibus).

  • This name is also given them in an interpolated passage in the Iliad (xii.

  • As Amphiaraus had foretold, they all lost their lives in this war except Adrastus, who was saved by the speed of his horse Arion (Iliad, xxiii.

  • All those parts of Peloponnese and the islands which in historic times were " Dorian " are ruled by recently established dynasties of " Achaean " chiefs; the home of the Asiatic Dorians is simply " Caria "; and the geographical " catalogue " in Iliad ii.

  • See Homer, Iliad, ii.

  • In the Iliad (v.

  • The philological analysis of Wolf and his successors had raised doubts as to the very existence of Homer, and at one time the main current of scholarly opinion had set strongly in the direction of the belief that the Iliad and the Odyssey were in reality but latter-day collections of divers recitals that had been handed down by word of mouth from one generation to another of bards through ages of illiteracy.

  • It had come to be a current belief that the Iliad was first committed to writing in the age of Peisistratus.

  • Paley, even went so far as to doubt whether a single written copy of the Iliad existed in Greece at the time of the Peloponnesian War.

  • With the lessons of recent Oriental archaeology in mind, few will be sceptical enough to doubt that some such contest as that described in the Iliad actually occurred.

  • Here, then, is direct evidence that the Aegean peoples of the Mycenaean Age knew how to write, and it is no longer necessary to assume that the verses of the Iliad were dependent on mere verbal transmission for any such period 'as has been supposed.

  • Each is used in Homer as an unguent (Iliad, xiv.

  • 8; Homer, Iliad, ix.

  • Examples have been found at Tiryns and Mycenae, and references are made to it in the Iliad and the Odyssey.

  • the Iliad and other works on the Homeric poems are still extant in MS. He died in the year 1061.

  • The Iliad and the Odyssey are as familiar to him as Shakespeare to the educated Englishman.

  • 'AXtXX6s), one of the most famous of the legendary heroes of ancient Greece and the central figure of Homer's Iliad.

  • During the first nine years of the war as described in the Iliad, Achilles ravaged the country round Troy, and took twelve cities.

  • The Iliad concludes with the funeral rites of Hector.

  • The Aethiopis of Arctinus of Miletus took up the story of the Iliad.

  • He breaks the truce between the Trojans and the Greeks by treacherously wounding Menelaus with an arrow, and finally he is slain by Diomedes (Homer, Iliad, ii.

  • Homer, Iliad, i.

  • Iliad (xiv.

  • Zeus thereupon cast her by the hair out of Olympus, whither she did not return, but remained on earth, working evil and mischief (Iliad, xix.

  • She is followed by the Litae (Prayers), the old and crippled daughters of Zeus, who are able to repair the evil done by her (Iliad, ix.

  • His epic in fourteen books, known as Ta µe6' "Oµrjpov or Posthomerica, takes up the tale of Troy at the point where Homer's Iliad breaks off (the death of Hector), and carries it down to the capture of the city by the Greeks.

  • His materials are borrowed from the cyclic poems from which Virgil (with whose works he was probably acquainted) also drew, in particular the Aethiopis of Arctinus and the Little Iliad of Lesches.

  • Iliad, x.

  • The story of his imprisonment for thirteen months by the Aloidae (Iliad, v.

  • Originally, Helen was perhaps a goddess of light, a moon-goddess, who was gradually transformed into the beautiful heroine round whom the action of the Iliad revolves.

  • Zenodotus produced before 274 the first scientific edition of the Iliad and Odyssey, an edition in which spurious lines were marked, at the beginning, with a short horizontal dash called an obelus (-).

  • The greatest philologist of antiquity was, however, his successor, Aristophanes of Byzantium (195), who reduced accentuation and punctuation to a definite system, and used a variety of critical symbols in his recension of the Iliad and Odyssey.

  • Two critical editions of the Iliad and Odyssey were produced by his successor, Aristarchus, who was librarian until 1 4 6 B.C. and was the founder of scientific scholarship. His distinguished pupil, Dionysius Thrax (born c. 166 B.C.), drew up a Greek grammar which continued in use for more than thirteen centuries.

  • The opening pages of his commentaries on the Iliad and the Odyssey dwell with enthusiasm on the abiding influence of Homer on the literature of Greece.

  • Leaf, Iliad (2nd ed.), on the phrase 410p6010s ibrvos (ii.

  • See Homer, Iliad, v.

  • 433; Homer, Iliad, ii.

  • In Homer, Iliad, i.

  • There is an old and seemingly trustworthy tradition that some lines in Homer's "Catalogue of the Ships," Iliad, ii.

  • The Iliad contains two versions of his fall from heaven.

  • His wife was Charis, one of the Graces (in the Iliad) or Aphrodite (in the Odyssey).

  • According to Homer (Iliad, iii.

  • According to Homer (Iliad i.

  • Homer mentions him as assisting Zeus when the other Olympian deities were plotting against the king of gods and men (Iliad i.

  • He then devoted himself to literature, translating Tasso's Gerusalemme liberata (1774), and the Iliad (1776).

  • His published works include (besides several volumes of verse) Homer and the Iliad (1866), maintaining the unity of the poems; Four Phases of Morals: Socrates, Aristotle, Christianity, Utilitarianism (1871); Essay on Self-Culture (1874); Horae Hellenicae (1874); The Language and Literature of the Scottish Highlands (1876); The Natural History of Atheism (1877); The Wise Men of Greece (1877); Lay Sermons (1881); Altavona (1882); The Wisdom of Goethe (1883); The Scottish Highlanders and the Land Laws (1885); Life of Burns (1888); Scottish Song (1889); Essays on Subjects of Moral and Social Interest (1890); Christianity and the Ideal of Humanity (1893).

  • Aemilius Macer must be distinguished from the Macer called Iliacus in the Ovidian catalogue of poets, the author of an epic poem on the events preceding the opening of the Iliad.

  • Homer does not speak of the horrors of the story, which are first found in the tragedians; he merely states (Iliad, ii.

  • The chief references in ancient writers are Iliad i.

  • Their name does not occur in the Iliad or the Odyssey, but Herodotus (iv.

  • Its conspicuous character is attested by a well-known passage in the Iliad (xiii.

  • Meyer is of opinion that the writer of the Iliad was probably acquainted with the lion, but this does not prove its former existence in Greece.

  • In the Iliad he is the favourite of Athena, by whose aid he not only overcomes all mortals who venture to oppose him, but is even enabled to attack the gods.

  • He is mentioned as a special favourite of Agamemnon (Iliad, iv.

  • He divided the Homeric poems into books (with capitals for the Iliad, and small letters for the Odyssey), and possibly was the author of the calculation of the days of the Iliad in the Tabula Iliaca.

  • of the Iliad (1901), pp. 484-488.

  • It was especially important in the ancient Achaean centres, Argos, Mycenae and Sparta, which she claims in the Iliad (iv.

  • Beowulf's own burial is minutely described in terms which have a strong resemblance to the parallel passages in the Iliad and Odyssey.

  • Myers and Walter Leaf in a prose version (1883) of the Iliad, both of them remarkable for accurate scholarship and excellence of style.

  • All the passages in the Iliad and Odyssey in which his name or allusions to his legend occur are regarded with more or less probability as spurious (but see O.

  • Her father and seven brothers fell by the hands of Achilles when their town was taken by him; her mother, ransomed at a high price, was slain by Artemis (Iliad, vi.

  • The death of Astyanax, and the farewell scene between Andromache and Hector (Iliad, vi.

  • Schafer, 1817), Apollodorus, Bibliotheca Graeca (1803), Homer, Iliad (1802); Opuscula academica (1785-1812), containing more than a hundred academical dissertations, of which the most valuable are those relating to the colonies of Greece and the antiquities of Etruscan art and history.

  • Besides pamphlets on the Catholic and slavery questions, as well as several fugitive jeux d'esprit, and a number of unsigned articles in the Analytical Review, Geddes also published a free metrical version of Select Satires of Horace (1779), and a verbal rendering of the First Book of the Iliad of Homer (1792).

  • In 1729 he published the first twelve books of Homer's Iliad.

  • Three years after his death appeared also the last twelve books of the Iliad, published by his son Samuel Clarke, the first three of these books and part of the fourth having, as he states, been revised and annotated by his father.

  • On its linguistic side, as discourse it was used for any combination of names to form a phrase, such as the definition " rational animal," or a book, such as the Iliad.

  • Although the Paphlagonians play scarcely any part in history, they were one of the most ancient nations of Asia Minor (Iliad, ii.

  • All these rulers appear to have borne the name of Pylaemenes, as a token that they claimed descent from the chieftain of that name who figures in the Iliad as leader of the Paphlagonians.

  • It is spoken of in the Iliad as the stormy abode of Selli who sleep on the ground and wash not their feet, and in the Odyssey an imaginary visit of Odysseus to the oracle is referred to.

  • Homer, Iliad, xiv.

  • Many of the works once attributed to him are lost; those which remain are the two great epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey, thirty-three Hymns, a mock epic (the Battle of the Frogs and Mice), and some pieces of a few lines each (the so-called Epigrams).

  • The Little Iliad and the Phocais, according to the Herodotean life, were composed by Homer when he lived at Phocaea with a certain Thestorides, who carried them off to Chios and there gained fame by reciting them as his own.

  • His Aethiopis was composed as a sequel to the Iliad; and the structure and general character of his poems show that he took the Iliad as his model.

  • Why have the works of Arctinus escaped the attraction which drew to the name of Homer such epics as the Cypria, the Little Iliad, the Thebaid, the Epigoni, the Taking of Oechalia and the Phocais.

  • This description applies very well to the Iliad, in which Argos and Argives occur on almost every page.

  • 4 The Iliad was also recited at the festival of the Brauronia, at Brauron in Attica (Hesych.

  • In the Iliad even the epic " singer " is not met with.

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