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igniting

igniting Sentence Examples

  • The more nearly the composition of guncotton approaches that represented by C6H702(N03)3, the more stable is it as regards storing at ordinary temperatures, and the higher the igniting temperature.

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  • And that that same technology would allow his questions to be spread across Europe, thereby igniting the Protestant Reformation?

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  • above a pinhole burner and igniting the gas above the gauze.

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  • By adopting modern non-sparking motors there is but little danger of igniting explosive gas.

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  • Ferric oxide or iron sesquioxide, Fe203, constitutes the valuable ores red haematite and specular iron; the minerals brown haematite or limonite, and gothite and also iron rust are hydrated forms. It is obtained as a steel-grey crystalline powder by igniting the oxide or any ferric salt containing a volatile acid.

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  • It may be obtained in the spongy form by igniting iridium ammonium chloride, and this variety of the metal readily oxidizes when heated in air.

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  • Boron trioxide B203 is the only known oxide of boron; and may be prepared by heating amorphous boron in oxygen, or better, by strongly igniting boric acid.

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  • Martin Heinrich Klaproth showed the necessity for igniting precipitates before weighing them, if they were not decomposed by this process; and he worked largely with Louis Nicolas Vauquelin in perfecting the analysis of minerals.

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  • rend., 1895, 120, p. 290) obtained a still purer metal by igniting the oxide with carbon in the electric furnace.

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  • Bismuth tetroxide, Bi 2 O 4, sometimes termed bismuth bismuthate, is obtained by melting bismuth trioxide with potash, or by igniting bismuth trioxide with potash and potassium chlorate.

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  • The return air from fiery workings is never allowed to approach the furnace, but is carried into the upcast by a special channel, called a dumb drift, some distance above the furnace drift, so as not to come in contact with the products of combustion until they have been cooled below the igniting point of fire-damp. Where the upcast pit is used for drawing coal, it is usual to discharge the smoke and gases through a short lateral drift near the surface into a tall chimney, so as to keep the pit-top as clear as possible for working.

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  • Zirconium chloride, ZrC1 4, is prepared as a white sublimate by igniting a mixture of zirconia and charcoal in a current of chlorine.

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  • This method was followed by that proposed by Gay-Lussac and Thenard, who decomposed molten caustic soda with red-hot iron; and this in turn was succeeded by Brunner's process of igniting sodium carbonate with charcoal.

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  • Brunner's process consisted in forming an intimate mixture of potassium carbonate and carbon by igniting crude tartar in covered iron crucibles, cooling the mass, and then distilling it at a white heat from iron bottles, the vaporized metal being condensed beneath the surface of paraffin or naphtha contained in a copper vessel.

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  • The sesquioxide, Cr 2 0 3, occurs native, and can be artificially obtained in several different ways, e.g., by igniting the corresponding hydroxide, or chromium trioxide, or ammonium bichromate, or by passing the vapours of chromium oxychloride through a red-hot tube, or by ignition of mercurous chromate.

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  • Chromic chloride, CrC1 31 is obtained in the anhydrous form by igniting a mixture of the sesquioxide and carbon in a current of dry chlorine; it forms violet laminae almost insoluble in water, but dissolves rapidly in presence of a trace of chromous chloride; this action has been regarded as a catalytic action, it being assumed that the insoluble chromic chloride is first reduced by the chromous chloride to the chromous condition and the original chromous chloride converted into soluble chromic chloride, the newly formed chromous chloride then reacting with the insoluble chromic chloride.

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  • But there is an interesting parallel in the legend of the kindling of the sacred fire and the igniting of the "thick water" in the time of Nehemiah (2 Macc. i.

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  • Priestley in 1774, who obtained the gas by igniting mercuric oxide, and gave it the name "dephlogistigated air."

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  • Manganese sesquioxide, Mn203, found native as the mineral braunite, may be obtained by igniting the other oxides in a mixture of nitrogen and oxygen, containing not more than .26% of the latter gas (W.

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  • A crystalline form was obtained by Debray as olive-green prisms by igniting a mixture of sodium tungstate and carbonate in a current of hydrochloric acid gas, and by Nordenskjold by heating hydrated tungstic acid with borax.

    1
    1
  • Bismuth tetroxide, Bi 2 O 4, sometimes termed bismuth bismuthate, is obtained by melting bismuth trioxide with potash, or by igniting bismuth trioxide with potash and potassium chlorate.

    1
    1
  • Priestley in 1774, who obtained the gas by igniting mercuric oxide, and gave it the name "dephlogistigated air."

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    1
  • Phosphorus combines directly with the metal to form W3P4; another phosphide, W2P, results on igniting a mixture of phosphorus pentoxide and tungsten.

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  • Ludolff (1707-1763) of Berlin in 1744 succeeded in igniting ether with the electric spark (Phil.

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  • She recalled with bitterness how he'd plied her with potion, falsely igniting her deep seeded passions until there was no turning back from his rampant lust.

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  • Oxygen, recognized by its power of igniting a glowing splinter, results from the decomposition of oxides of the noble metals, peroxides, chlorates, nitrates and other highly oxygenized salts.

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  • Pure sodium carbonate is prepared by igniting the bicarbonate, and exactly 53 grammes are dissolved in water, forming a strictly normal solution.

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  • The pure salt is dissolved in hot water and decomposed with ammonia to produce a slightly ammoniacal hydrated oxide; this, when ignited in platinum, leaves pure TiO 2 in the form of brownish lumps, the specific gravity of which varies from 3.9 to 4.25, according to the temperature at which it was kept in igniting.

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  • She recalled with bitterness how he'd plied her with potion, falsely igniting her deep seeded passions until there was no turning back from his rampant lust.

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  • Hand Grenades Grenades in 1914 were exploded wither by percussion or by igniting a fuse.

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  • ignitees seem good idea, but uneasy about potential hazard of igniting accidentally.

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  • ignitever, the impact of an accident in which escaping liquid would instantly revert to gas, possibly igniting immediately, is potentially enormous.

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  • Walking hand in hand, initiating exception, lighting the dark, igniting the spark.

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  • It may be obtained in the spongy form by igniting iridium ammonium chloride, and this variety of the metal readily oxidizes when heated in air.

    0
    0
  • Boron trioxide B203 is the only known oxide of boron; and may be prepared by heating amorphous boron in oxygen, or better, by strongly igniting boric acid.

    0
    0
  • Martin Heinrich Klaproth showed the necessity for igniting precipitates before weighing them, if they were not decomposed by this process; and he worked largely with Louis Nicolas Vauquelin in perfecting the analysis of minerals.

    0
    0
  • Oxygen, recognized by its power of igniting a glowing splinter, results from the decomposition of oxides of the noble metals, peroxides, chlorates, nitrates and other highly oxygenized salts.

    0
    0
  • Pure sodium carbonate is prepared by igniting the bicarbonate, and exactly 53 grammes are dissolved in water, forming a strictly normal solution.

    0
    0
  • The same decomposition may be effected by igniting with iron, ferric oxide and sodium carbonate (E.

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    0
  • The more nearly the composition of guncotton approaches that represented by C6H702(N03)3, the more stable is it as regards storing at ordinary temperatures, and the higher the igniting temperature.

    0
    0
  • By adopting modern non-sparking motors there is but little danger of igniting explosive gas.

    0
    0
  • rend., 1895, 120, p. 290) obtained a still purer metal by igniting the oxide with carbon in the electric furnace.

    0
    0
  • The pure salt is dissolved in hot water and decomposed with ammonia to produce a slightly ammoniacal hydrated oxide; this, when ignited in platinum, leaves pure TiO 2 in the form of brownish lumps, the specific gravity of which varies from 3.9 to 4.25, according to the temperature at which it was kept in igniting.

    0
    0
  • Strontium nitride, Sr 3 N 2, is formed when strontium amalgam is heated to redness in a stream of nitrogen or by igniting the oxide with magnesium (H.

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    0
  • The return air from fiery workings is never allowed to approach the furnace, but is carried into the upcast by a special channel, called a dumb drift, some distance above the furnace drift, so as not to come in contact with the products of combustion until they have been cooled below the igniting point of fire-damp. Where the upcast pit is used for drawing coal, it is usual to discharge the smoke and gases through a short lateral drift near the surface into a tall chimney, so as to keep the pit-top as clear as possible for working.

    0
    0
  • Zirconium chloride, ZrC1 4, is prepared as a white sublimate by igniting a mixture of zirconia and charcoal in a current of chlorine.

    0
    0
  • above a pinhole burner and igniting the gas above the gauze.

    0
    0
  • This method was followed by that proposed by Gay-Lussac and Thenard, who decomposed molten caustic soda with red-hot iron; and this in turn was succeeded by Brunner's process of igniting sodium carbonate with charcoal.

    0
    0
  • Brunner's process consisted in forming an intimate mixture of potassium carbonate and carbon by igniting crude tartar in covered iron crucibles, cooling the mass, and then distilling it at a white heat from iron bottles, the vaporized metal being condensed beneath the surface of paraffin or naphtha contained in a copper vessel.

    0
    0
  • Potassium bromide, KBr, may be obtained by dissolving bromine in potash, whereupon bromide and bromate are first formed, evaporating and igniting the product in order to decompose the bromate: 6KHO 3Br 2 =5KBr -}- KBrO 3 -}- 3H 2 0; 2KBrO 3 = 2KBr + 302 (cf.

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  • Chemically pure carbonate of potash is best prepared by igniting pure bicarbonate (see below) in iron or (better) in silver or platinum vessels, or else by calcining pure cream of tartar.

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  • The sesquioxide, Cr 2 0 3, occurs native, and can be artificially obtained in several different ways, e.g., by igniting the corresponding hydroxide, or chromium trioxide, or ammonium bichromate, or by passing the vapours of chromium oxychloride through a red-hot tube, or by ignition of mercurous chromate.

    0
    0
  • Chromic chloride, CrC1 31 is obtained in the anhydrous form by igniting a mixture of the sesquioxide and carbon in a current of dry chlorine; it forms violet laminae almost insoluble in water, but dissolves rapidly in presence of a trace of chromous chloride; this action has been regarded as a catalytic action, it being assumed that the insoluble chromic chloride is first reduced by the chromous chloride to the chromous condition and the original chromous chloride converted into soluble chromic chloride, the newly formed chromous chloride then reacting with the insoluble chromic chloride.

    0
    0
  • But there is an interesting parallel in the legend of the kindling of the sacred fire and the igniting of the "thick water" in the time of Nehemiah (2 Macc. i.

    0
    0
  • Manganese sesquioxide, Mn203, found native as the mineral braunite, may be obtained by igniting the other oxides in a mixture of nitrogen and oxygen, containing not more than .26% of the latter gas (W.

    0
    0
  • A crystalline form was obtained by Debray as olive-green prisms by igniting a mixture of sodium tungstate and carbonate in a current of hydrochloric acid gas, and by Nordenskjold by heating hydrated tungstic acid with borax.

    0
    0
  • Phosphorus combines directly with the metal to form W3P4; another phosphide, W2P, results on igniting a mixture of phosphorus pentoxide and tungsten.

    0
    0
  • Ludolff (1707-1763) of Berlin in 1744 succeeded in igniting ether with the electric spark (Phil.

    0
    0
  • Ferric oxide or iron sesquioxide, Fe203, constitutes the valuable ores red haematite and specular iron; the minerals brown haematite or limonite, and gothite and also iron rust are hydrated forms. It is obtained as a steel-grey crystalline powder by igniting the oxide or any ferric salt containing a volatile acid.

    0
    0
  • Walking hand in hand, initiating exception, lighting the dark, igniting the spark.

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  • For those who can't get enough of the dancing reality series, expect that Dancing with the Stars will return for a seventh season, igniting the dance floor with more raw talent and a season full of suspense.

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  • The release of games such as Street Fighter and Mortal Kombat sparked both controversy and sales, igniting the public's attention on this genre of games.

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  • But it seems Rinoa has a connection with the evil sorceresses that are controlling Galbadia and igniting wars.

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  • Vadim Gerasimov ported it to the PC shortly thereafter, igniting the Tetris boom.

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  • Igniting a stove, paper or kindling is easy with these new gadgets.

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  • Igniting Student Involvement, Peer Interaction, and Teamwork.

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  • Their confidence shines through in every part of their lives, attracting many people into their circle and igniting admiration and sometimes envy.

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  • The gossip spreads like fire igniting a confrontation between former best friends Serena and Blair.

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