Idyll sentence example

idyll
  • The bird is often spoken of in Latin poetry, and is the subject of an idyll by Claudian.
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  • The idyll of Sesenheim, as described in Dichtung and Wahrheit, is one of the most beautiful love-stories in the literature of the world.
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  • Well, that is the whole of this simple village idyll, I think.
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  • Idyll vii., the Harvest Feast (eaXUVla), is the most important of the bucolic poems. The scene is laid in the isle of Cos.
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  • With all his modest intention he is a past master of the little country idyll.
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  • There are some small hotels, trattorias and cafes but little to mar a summers day idyll.
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  • I suppose it's hard to remember a little romantic idyll when you've just come on top of a tragedy.
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  • The information concerning his parentage bears the stamp of genuineness, and disposes of a rival theory based upon a misinterpretation of Idyll vii.
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  • The Independent May 13th 2004 Is it really possible for a city dweller to create a rustic idyll in their back garden?
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  • County Homesearch, for example, reports that 60 per cent of its clients were seeking the pastoral idyll.
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  • It is principally a manual for those that enjoy this rural idyll and have the luck to live in the country.
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  • Sadly small matters such as finding the folding stuff for food, children and a mortgage soon shatter the idyll.
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  • Looking at this mid-century year, what was there then to spoil the Portuguese idyll?
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  • The area inspired the Hudson River School of painting, a sort of early American pastoral idyll.
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  • Nicolson writes about the challenge of moving from the hectic London life to the quiet rural idyll which is the title of the book.
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  • Just before you think you are about to vomit war breaks out to shatter this romantic idyll.
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  • So in early spring a dozen eager falconers set about creating the perfect sporting idyll.
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  • His last published volume contains a series of sonnets of singular beauty, addressed to the river, resembling Wordsworth's "Sonnets to the Duddon," but more perfect in form; and a blank verse idyll, "Ii Pettirosso" ("The Redbreast"), bearing an equally strong, though equally accidental, resemblance to the similar compositions of Coleridge.
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  • The warbling birds dissuade to meet The idyll of fields created by a farmer.
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  • She is constantly invoked, in the well-known idyll (ii.) of Theocritus, in the incantation to bring back a woman's faithless lover.
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  • Theocritus (Idyll 17) hails Ptolemy Philadelphus as a demigod, and speaks of his father as seated among the gods along with Alexander.
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  • Amongst the finest of his classical pictures were - "Syracusan Bride leading Wild Beasts in Procession to the Temple of Diana" (1866), "Venus disrobing for the Bath" (1867), "Electra at the Tomb of Agamemnon," and "Helios and Rhodos" (1869), "Hercules wrestling with Death for the Body of Alcestis" (1871), "Clytemnestra" (1874), "The Daphnephoria" (1876), "Nausicaa" (1878), "An Idyll" (1881), two lovers under a spreading oak listening to the piping of a shepherd and gazing on the rich plain below; "Phryne" (1882), a nude figure standing in the sun; "Cymon and Iphigenia" (1884), "Captive Andromache" (1888), now in the Manchester Art Gallery; with the "Last Watch of Hero" (1887), "The Bath of Psyche" (1890), now in the Chantrey Bequest collection; "The Garden of the Hesperides" (1892), "Perseus and Andromeda" and "The Return of Persephone," now in the Leeds Gallery (1891); and "Clytie," his last work (1896).
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  • A vivid description of the festival at Alexandria (for which Bion probably wrote his Dirge of Adonis) is given by Theocritus in his fifteenth idyll, the Adoniazusae.
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  • Other of his lyrics are: "The Monymusk Christmas Ba'ing," a football idyll; "The Ewie wi' the Crookit Horn" and "John o' Badenyon."
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  • Whatever the predominant party might think of foreign marriages, the tradition of the half-Moabite origin of David serves, in the beautiful idyll of Ruth (q.v.), to suggest the debt which Judah and Jerusalem owed to one at least of its neighbours.
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