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idiom

idiom

idiom Sentence Examples

  • While his great gift to Roman literature is that he first made it artistic, that he imparted to "rude Latium" the sense of elegance, consistency and, moderation, his gift to the world is that through him it possesses a living image of the Greek society in the 3rd century B.C., presented in the purest Latin idiom.

  • Gaston Paris maintained that French versification was a natural development of popular Latin methods which depended on accent rather than quantity, and were as widely different from classical rules as the Low Latin was from the classical idiom.

  • The elaborate literary culture of the Augustan age has done something to impair the native force of the Latin idiom.

  • He breathes the old national spirit, and his mastery of classical idiom and versification is for his age extraordinary.

  • Again it is here that we can most readily trace the important changes which he wrought in melodic idiom.

  • In a great number of Babylonian inscriptions an idiom has long been recognized which is clearly not ordinary Semitic in character.

  • This idiom could, of course, be explained on the hypothesis of an Aramaic original.

  • Demosthenes united and elevated whatever had been best in earlier masters of the Greek idiom.

  • It has wit, economy and intellectual control, in a richly expressive harmonic idiom.

  • Through these two dancers, the classical idiom truly becomes a language, which they utter with utmost expressive clarity.

  • However, with few exceptions, the cottages are styled within the vernacular revival idiom.

  • It took a Japanese carmaker to make the world realize it still wanted simple two-seater sports cars in the British idiom.

  • It introduces patterns characteristic of the idiom, such as modes,, the blues scale and the minor pentatonic.

  • It was the idiom of lyric poets in every Peninsular region except Catalonia.

  • vernacular revival idiom.

  • New settings of use, idiom and construction continually surprise us, and, in spite of occasional harshness, secure for his style an unusual freshness and freedom.

  • It is essentially a literary idiom, based in the main upon the language of intercourse of the cultivated Roman society of the day (cf.

  • He advised him to addict himself to an assiduous study of the more idiomatic English writers, such as Swift and Addison - with a view to unlearn his foreign idiom and recover his halfforgotten vernacular - a task, however, which he never perfectly accomplished.

  • Irksome as were his employments, grievous as was the waste of time, uncongenial as were his companions, solid benefits were to be set off against these things; his health became robust, his knowledge of the world was enlarged, he wore off some of his foreign idiom, got rid of much of his reserve; he adds - and perhaps in his estimate it was the benefit to be most prized of all - " the discipline and evolutions of a modern battalion gave me a clearer notion of the phalanx and the legion, and the captain of the Hampshire grenadiers (the reader may smile) has not been useless to the historian of the Roman empire."

  • The prose Physiologus was done into Old High German before 1000, and afterwards into rhyme in the same idiom; since Von der Hagen (1824) its various forms have found careful editors among the leading Germanists.

  • as the designation of a high official person, as is the case in the title caliph (whence the rendering in the margin of the Revised Version, Great orator "); but the adoption of an Arabic idiom is not probable.

  • Though the vocabulary is Greek the idiom is frequently Hebraic and foreign to the genius of the Greek language.

  • Cambodian idiom bears a likeness to some of the aboriginal dialects of south Indo-China; it is agglutinate in character and rich in vowel-sounds.

  • The usual signs denoting Akkadu in the Semitic narrative inscriptions were read in the non-Semitic idiom uri-ki or ur-ki, " land of the city," which simply meant that Akkadu was the land of the city par excellence, i.e.

  • The early Syriac translations are in many cases so literal as to do violence to the idiom of their own language; but this makes them all the more valuable when we have to depend on them for reconstructing the original texts.

  • While his great gift to Roman literature is that he first made it artistic, that he imparted to "rude Latium" the sense of elegance, consistency and, moderation, his gift to the world is that through him it possesses a living image of the Greek society in the 3rd century B.C., presented in the purest Latin idiom.

  • Moreover, the idiom is particularly Semitic. Thus we have xv.

  • Gaston Paris maintained that French versification was a natural development of popular Latin methods which depended on accent rather than quantity, and were as widely different from classical rules as the Low Latin was from the classical idiom.

  • The idiom of ordinary life and social intercourse and the more fervid and elevated diction of oratorical prose had made great progress, but the language of imagination and poetical feeling was, if vivid and impressive in isolated expressions, still incapable of being wrought into consecutive passages of artistic composition.

  • The elaborate literary culture of the Augustan age has done something to impair the native force of the Latin idiom.

  • He breathes the old national spirit, and his mastery of classical idiom and versification is for his age extraordinary.

  • The translation, as a whole, is good, and adheres very closely to the Hebrew text, which has not been without its influence on the Aramaic idiom; at times, especially in the poetical passages, a freer and more paraphrastic method is employed, and the version shows evident traces of Halakhic and Haggadic expansion.

  • In all these his work belongs mainly to the style and idiom of a bygone generation: they are monuments, not landmarks, and their beauty and invention seem rather to close an epoch than to inaugurate its successor.

  • Again it is here that we can most readily trace the important changes which he wrought in melodic idiom.

  • His natural idiom in short was that of a heightened and ennobled folk-song, and one of the most remarkable evidences of his genius was the power with which he adapted all his perfection and symmetry of style to the requirements of popular speech.

  • Though many of them have adopted Arabic a Berber idiom is commonly spoken.

  • According to Semitic idiom "sons of the prophets" most naturally means "members of a prophetic corporation," 3 which may imply that under the headship of Elisha and the favour of the dynasty of Jehu, which owed much to Elisha and his party, the prophetic societies took a more regular form than before.

  • The Aztecs, who called themselves Mejica or Mexicans after they had established themselves on the high table-land of Mexico, belong to a very large family or group of tribes speaking a common idiom called Nahua or Nahoa.

  • The word Nonohualco signifies in the Mexican language a place where a language changes, where another idiom begins.

  • He maintains that " the Greek of the New Testament may never be understood as classical Greek is understood," and accuses the revisers of distorting the meaning " by translating in accordance with Attic idiom phrases that convey in later Greek a wholly different sense, the sense which the earlier translators in happy ignorance had recognized that the context demanded."

  • A reading may be impugned on a number of grounds: that it gives no sense or an inappropriate sense, that it involves a usage or an idiom not current at the assumed time of writing, or foreign to the reputed author, or to the style in which he then was writing, that it involves some metrical or rhythmical anomaly, or that the connexion of thought which it produces is incoherent or disorderly.

  • His Latin style, though wanting the inimitable ease of Erasmus and often offending against idiom, is yet in copiousness and propriety much above the ordinary Latin of the English scholars of his time.

  • The assumption that Latin was properly the language of the Latian plain and of the Plebs at Rome, which the conquering patrician nobles learnt from their subjects, and substituted for their own kindred but different Safine idiom, renders easier to understand the borrowing of a number of words into Latin from some dialect (presumably Sabine) where the velars had been labialized; for example, the very common word bos, which in pure Latin should have been *vos.

  • He translated the Odyssey, wrote a wellknown manual of idiom, A Plea for the Queen's English (1863), and was the first editor of the Contemporary Review (1866-1870).

  • In a great number of Babylonian inscriptions an idiom has long been recognized which is clearly not ordinary Semitic in character.

  • These invaders, according to this latter view, adopted the religion and culture of the conquered Sumerians; and, consequently, the Sumerian idiom at a comparatively early date began to be used exclusively in the Semitic temples as the written vehicles of religious thought in much the same way as was the medieval Latin of the Roman Church.

  • This etymological study of Sumerian is attended with incalculable difficulties, because nearly all the Sumerian texts which we possess are written in an idiom which is quite evidently under the influence of Semitic. With the exception of some very ancient texts, the Sumerian literature, consisting largely of religious material such as hymns and incantations, shows a number of Semitic loanwords and grammatical Semitisms, and in many cases, although not always, is quite patently a translation of Semitic ideas by Semitic priests into the formal religious Sumerian language.

  • In these instances, however, we can explain the difficulty away by applying that great fundamental principle followed by the Semitic priests and scribes who played with and on the Sumerian idiom, and in the course of many centuries turned what was originally an agglutinative language into what has almost justified Halevy and his followers in calling Sumerian a cryptography.

  • There can be no doubt that Eme-sal means " woman's language," and it was perhaps thus designated because it was a softer idiom phonetically than the other dialect.

  • In it were written most of the penitential hymns, which were possibly thought to require a more euphonious idiom than, for example, hymns of praise.

  • Furthermore, in a real cryptography or secret language, of which English has several, we find only phenomena based on the language from which the artificial idiom is derived.

  • Here, in his artistic use of familiar idiom, he might fairly be called the Euripides of Attic prose.

  • The gradual supersession of the old dialects by the Koine the common speech of the Greeks, a modification of the Attic idiom coloured by Ionic, was one obvious sign of the new order of things (see Greek Language).

  • The revival of the various Balkan nationalities was in every case accompanied or preceded by a literary movement; in Servian literature, under the influence of Obradovich and Vuk Karajich, the popular idiom, notwithstanding the opposition of the priesthood, superseded the ecclesiastical RussianSlavonic; in Bulgaria the eastern dialect, that of the Sredna Gora, prevailed.

  • The outward frontiers of both were the sea; no difficult physical barriers divided the two territories; the majority of Scots spoke an intelligible form of English, differing from northern English more in spelling and pronunciation than in idiom and vocabulary; and after the Reformation the State religion in both countries was Protestant.

  • He purposely put his into the ordinary conversational idiom of the day, that is to say, into Pali.

  • Much information on points of Ciceronian idiom and language will be found in J.

  • Whether the form fefaked was ever good Latin in Rome may be doubted, for the Romans, in spite of the few miles that separate Praeneste from Rome, were inclined to sneer at the pronunciation and idiom of the Praenestines (cf.

  • Pahiavi books, however, fall outside of the present subject, which is the literature of the idiom which shaped itself out of the older Persian speech by slight modifications and a steadily increasing mixture of Arabic words and phrases in the 9th and 10th centuries of our era, and which in all essential respects has remained the same for the last thousand years.

  • Arabic language and literature had gained too firm a footing to be supplanted at once by a new literary idiom still in its infancy; nevertheless the few poets who arose under the Tahirids and Saffgrids show already the germs of the characteristic tendency of all later Persian literature, which aims at amalgamating the enforced spirit of Islamism with their own Aryan feelings, and reconciling the strict deism of the Mahommedan religion with their inborn loftier and more or less pantheistic ideas; and we can easily trace in the few fragmentary verses of men like Iianzala, I~akim FirUz and Abu Salik those principal forms of poetry now used in common by Forms of all Mahommedan nationsthe forms of the qa~ida Eastern (the encomiastic, elegiac or satirical poem), the Poeti~.

  • This idiom could, of course, be explained on the hypothesis of an Aramaic original.

  • It is quite evident, for example, from the Semitic character of the Chaldaean king-names, that the language of these Chaldaeans differed in no way from the ordinary Semitic Babylonian idiom which was practically identical with that of Assyria.

  • It is now known that the literary idiom of the Babylonian wise men was the non-Semitic Sumerian; but it is not probable that the late author of Daniel (c. 168 B.C.) was aware of this fact.

  • Here Petrarch spent seven years of boyhood, acquiring that pure Tuscan idiom which afterwards he used with such consummate mastery in ode and sonnet.

  • Nor is it possible to follow the theory of Merx, that Aramaic, which was the popular tongue of the day when the Book of Daniel was written, was therefore used for the simpler narrative style, while the more learned Hebrew was made the idiom of the philosophical portions.

  • In five generations the viking settlers of Normandy had not only completely forgotten their old Scandinavian tongue, but had come to look upon those who spoke the kindred English idiom not only as aliens but as inferiors.

  • Demosthenes united and elevated whatever had been best in earlier masters of the Greek idiom.

  • The language of Tuscany is remarkable for its purity of idiom, and its adoption by Dante and Petrarch probably led to its becoming the literary language of Italy.

  • In the I3th century the name given to the vulgar tongue of eastern Spain was Calaknesch (Caalizni,scr~s) or Catald (Cata lanus)the idiom of the Catalans.1 By Catalanesch or Catal was understood, essentially, the spoken language and the language of prose, while that of poetry, with a large admixture of Provenal forms, was early called Lemosi, Limosi or language of LimousinCatalan grammarians, and particularly the most celebrated of them, Ramon Vidal de Besalfl, having adopted Lemosi as the generic name of the language of the troubadours.

  • These grammarians carefully distinguish the vulgar speech, or pla Catald, from the refined Irobar idiom, which originally is a modified form of Provenal.

  • To this hour, particularly in Valencia and the Balearics, Lemosi is employed to designate on the one hand the old Catalan and on the other the very artificial and somewhat archaizing idiom which is current in the jochs fiorals; while the spoken dialect is called, according to the localities, Valencid (in Valencia), Major qul and Menorqui (in Majorca and Minorca), or Catald (in Catalonia); the form Catalanesch is obsolete.

  • long in use, and even the inhabitants of the domain outside the two Castiles fully accept it and are indeed the first to call their idiom Castellano.

  • Generally speaking, from various circumstances, and especially that of the reconquest, by which the already-formed idiom of the Christian conquerors and colonists was gradually conveyed from north to south, Castilian has maintained a uniformity of which the Romance languages afford no other example.

  • Asturian.The Asturian idiom, called by the natives bable, is differentiated from the Castilian by the following characters.

  • "Can anyone find an example of an idiom, or fun expression, to share with the class?" asked the teacher.

  • Since the woman used a strange idiom, the young kids did not understand her.

  • An idiom to describe heavy rain is, "it's raining cats and dogs!"

  • If you use an idiom, make sure that nobody takes it literally.

  • Could you explain what the idiom "a dime a dozen" means?

  • If you travel to a different region, you may find an idiom that you don't understand.

  • An idiom is not a wise choice of words for a formal speech.

  • When someone says "beat around the bush" to describe not addressing an issue, they are using an idiom.

  • "Can anyone find an example of an idiom, or fun expression, to share with the class?" asked the teacher.

  • Since the woman used a strange idiom, the young kids did not understand her.

  • If you use an idiom, make sure that nobody takes it literally.

  • If you travel to a different region, you may find an idiom that you don't understand.

  • When someone says "beat around the bush" to describe not addressing an issue, they are using an idiom.

  • Americana wall hanging is an expansive idiom that refers to decorative artifacts encompassing the culture of the United States of America.

  • However, keep in mind that accent and idiom within France also varies by region.

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