Ideal-gas sentence example

ideal-gas
  • An ideal gas is a substance possessing very simple thermodynamic properties to which actual gases and vapours appear to approximate indefinitely at low pressures and high temperatures.
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  • The characteristic equation of the fluid must then be of the form v/0=f(p), where f(p) is any arbitrary function of p. If the fluid is a gas also obeying Boyle's law, pv = f (0), then it must be an ideal gas.
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  • The energy is less than that of an ideal gas by the term npc. If we imagine that the defect of volume c is due to the formation of molecular aggregates consisting of two or more single molecules, and if the kinetic energy of translation of any one of these aggregates is equal to that of one of the single molecules, it is clear that some energy must be lost in co-aggregating, but that the proportion lost will be different for different types of molecules and also for different types of co-aggregation.
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  • (16) where So is the value of S when p=o, and is assumed to be independent of 0, as in the case of an ideal gas.
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  • lo g i op =o 6640+8.585t/e-4.70(log109/Bo-Mt/6), where t=9 -273, and M =0.4343, the modulus of common logarithms. These formulae are practically accurate for a range of 20° or 30° C. on either side of the melting-point, as the pressure is so small that the vapour may be treated as an ideal gas.
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  • The close agreement found under these conditions is a very strong confirmation of the correctness of the assumption that a vapour at low pressures does really behave as an ideal gas of constant specific heat.
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  • The expression for is clearly experimentally verifiable: it is the ideal gas law.
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  • The assumption usually made is that the total kinetic energy of the molecules, including possible energy of rotation or vibration if the molecules consist of more than one atom, is proportional to the energy of translation in the case of an ideal gas.
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  • lo g i op =o 6640+8.585t/e-4.70(log109/Bo-Mt/6), where t=9 -273, and M =0.4343, the modulus of common logarithms. These formulae are practically accurate for a range of 20° or 30° C. on either side of the melting-point, as the pressure is so small that the vapour may be treated as an ideal gas.
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