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ibis

ibis

ibis Sentence Examples

  • IBIS, one of the sacred birds of the ancient Egyptians.

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  • p. 431), and The Ibis contains several excellent papers by Lord Lilford and by H.

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  • coast of the United States, while an example is stated (Ibis, 18 75, p. 33 2) to have been received from the N.

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  • haasti, characterized in 1871 by Potts (Ibis, 1872, p. 35; Trans.

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  • p. 431), and The Ibis contains several excellent papers by Lord Lilford and by H.

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  • coast of the United States, while an example is stated (Ibis, 18 75, p. 33 2) to have been received from the N.

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  • On the lakes there is a very handsome goose, with white body and dark-green wings shading into violet, called huachua, two kinds of ibis, a large gull (Larus serranus) frequenting the alpine lakes in flocks, flamingoes called parihuana, ducks and water-hens.

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  • There are deer (at least five species), boars, bears, antelopes, beavers, otters, badgers, tiger-cats, marten, an inferior sable, striped squirrels, &c. Among birds there are black eagles, peregrines (largely used in hawking), and, specially protected by law, turkey bustards, three varieties of pheasants, swans, geese, common and spectacled teal, mallards, mandarin ducks white and pink ibis, cranes, storks, egrets, herons, curlews, pigeons, doves, nightjars, common and blue magpies, rooks, crows, orioles, halcyon and blue kingfishers, jays, nut-hatches, redstarts, snipe, grey shrikes, hawks, kites, &c. But, pending further observations, it is not possible to say which of the smaller birds actually breed in Korea and which only make it a halting-place in their annual migrations.

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  • Keeping this in mind, we may fairly conclude that the flamingo with B X Y points to an ancestral condition A B X Y, which is still represented by Platalea and Ibis, whilst the other storks proper have taken a different line, leading to A X Y.

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  • S., 1860, p. 374; Ibis, 1861, p. 66, pl.

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  • No name given, but said to include " les ibis et les spatules."

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  • Sclater published in the Ibis a classification which was mainly a revision of the system of Huxley, modified by the investigations of Garrod and Forbes and by his own large acquaintance with museum specimens.

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  • They are chiefly noted as the habitat of the gigantic land tortoise (Testudo elephantina), now carefully preserved, and of several rare and peculiar birds, including a rail (Dryolimnas aldabranus), an ibis (Ibis abbottii) and a dove (Alectroenas sganzini).

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  • Two specimens of the humerus have been found in the English fens (Ibis, 1868, p. 363; Proc. Zool.

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  • Among the larger birds are cranes, herons, the ibis, storks, eagles, vultures, falcons, hawks, kites, owls, the secretary birds, pelicans, flamingoes, wild duck and geese, gulls, and of game birds, the paauw, koraan, pheasant, partridge, guinea fowl and quail.

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  • In the garzeros of Venezuela are to be found nearly every kind of heron, crane, stork and ibis, together with an incredible number of Grallatores.

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  • Society, 1860, p. go; Ibis, 1862, p. 1752) in the case of the beautiful M.

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  • Salvin (Ibis, 1860, p. 37) in the case of one of them, M.

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  • The birds have been ably illustrated by Mr Whitaker in the Ibis magazine of the British Ornithological Union.

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  • We know only that to his persistent attempts thereafter to get his proposed verdict accepted by the people, came their fatal answer, " Thou art not Caesar's friend," and that at last he unwillingly ascended the bema (in this case a portable judgmentseat, brought for the day outside the Praetorium), and in such words as Ibis ad crucem" delivered Him to be crucified."

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  • A magnetic observatory was equipped at Bogen Atlas range the food of this bird is said to consist chiefly of the Testudo mauritanica, which "it carries to some height in the air, and lets fall on a stone to break the shell" (Ibis, 18 59, p. 1 77).

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  • They, however, removed it from the Linnaean genus Tantalus and, Lacepede having some years before founded a genus Ibis, it was transferred thither, and is now generally known as I.

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  • No attempt can here be made to treat the ibis from a mythological or antiquarian point of view.

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  • The ibis is chiefly an inhabitant of the Nile basin from Dongola southward, as well as of Kordofan and Sennar; whence about midsummer it moves northwards to Egypt.

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  • C. Taylor (Ibis, 1878, p. 372) saw an adult which had been killed near Lake Menzal in 1877.

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  • The story told to Herodotus of its destroying snakes is, according to Savigny, devoid of truth, but Cuvier states that he discovered partly digested remains of a snake in the stomach of a mummied ibis.

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  • The ibis is somewhat larger than a curlew, Numenius arquata, which bird it resembles, with a much stouter bill and stouter legs.

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  • Congeneric with the typical ibis are two or three other species, the I.

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  • Among these are several beautiful species such as the Japanese Geronticus nippon, the Lophotibis cristata of Madagascar, and the scarlet ibis, 5 Eudocimus ruber, of America.

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  • This bird, believed to be the second kind of ibis spoken of by Herodotus, is rather smaller than the sacred ibis, and mostly of a dark chestnut colour with brilliant green and purple reflections on the upper parts, exhibiting, however, when young none of the rufous hue.

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  • This species lays eggs of a deep sea-green colour, having wholly the character of heron's eggs, and it often breeds in company with herons, while the eggs of all other ibises whose eggs are known resemble those of the sacred ibis.

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  • C. Taylor remarked (Ibis, 18 59, p. 51), that the buff-backed heron, Ardea bubulcus, was made by the tourists' dragomans to do duty for the "sacred ibis," and this seems to be no novel practice, since by it, or something like it, Hasselqvist was misled, and through him Linnaeus.

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  • 3 The ibis has more than once nested in the gardens of the Zoological Society in London, and even reared its young there.

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  • 5 It is a popular error - especially among painters - that this bird was the sacred ibis of the Egyptians.

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  • The sacred ibis is not found in Egypt, but the buff-backed heron, the constant companion of the buffalo, is usually called an ibis.

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  • The glossy ibis is occasionally seen.

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  • the ram Khnum in Elephautine, the jerboa or okapi (?) Seth in Ombos, the ibis Thoth in Hermopolis Magna, and of the gods named above, Horus in Hieraconpolis, Wepwawet in Assiut, Neith in Sais, and Mm in Coptos.

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  • In other cases the transitional steps are shrouded nystery; we do not know, for example, why the ibis Thoth 1equently became the patron of the fine arts, the inventor ~riting, and the scribe of the gods.

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  • The nest of one species, as observed by Robert Owen, is at the end of a hole bored in the bank of a watercourse, and the eggs are pure white and glossy (Ibis, 1861, p. 65).

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  • One species of ibis, the Theristicus caudatus, is to be found, it is said, only on the slopes of Antisana.

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  • Thoth is found on the earliest monuments symbolized by an ibis (Ibis aethio pica, still not uncommon in Nubia), which bird was sacred to him.

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  • Wolves are numerous in the mountains; the heron, ibis, wild goose and snipe in the valley of the Wei.

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  • A fuller account of his discovery, illustrated by Hewitson, is given in The Ibis (1861, pp. 92-106, pl.

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  • C. Taylor (Ibis, 1864, p. 90), have a strong crow-like odour.

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  • (1868), pp. 384-387; Goering, Vargasia (1869), pp. 124-128; l'Iurie, Ibis (1873), pp. 81-86.

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  • Wood and glossy ibises are commonly seen, and the white ibis breeds in numbers; the sand-hill crane is less common than formerly.

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  • Among the birds, of which 172 species are described by Mr Swinhoe in his paper in The Ibis (1870), there are eagles, notably a new species Spilornis Rutherfordi, buzzards, harriers, kites, owls, goatsuckers and woodpeckers.

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  • Of C. coscoroba Mr Gibson remarks (Ibis, 1880, pp. 36, 37) that its "note is a loud trumpet-call," and that it swims with "the neck curved and the wings raised after the true swan model."

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  • The Cape-Pigeon or Pintado Petrel, Daption capensis, is one that has long been well known to mariners and other wayfarers on the great waters, while those who voyage to or from Australia, whatever be the route they take, are 1 Thus Oestrelata haesitata, the Capped Petrel, a species whose proper home seems to be Guadeloupe and some of the neighbouring West-Indian Islands, has occurred in the State of New York, near Boulogne, in Norfolk, and in Hungary (Ibis, 1884, p. 202).

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  • Forbes (Ibis, 1881, pp. 360, 361) to inhabit the dry and open "sertoes" of north-eastern Brazil, a discovery the more interesting since it was in that part of the country that Marcgrav and Piso became acquainted with a bird of this kind, though the existence of any species of rhea in the district had been long overlooked by or unknown to succeeding travellers.

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  • Ibis >>

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  • Wilma who was sitting in the other boat also saw green ibis, anhinga and black curassow.

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  • glossy ibis - 7 birds recorded, along the way to K 20 and at Northern Sewage Ponds 2 and 3 birds 13.

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  • ibis Almost daily seen, common to very common in the dry zone.

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  • On board diving which i was the entrance of scarlet ibis in.

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  • A wonderful variety of birds, ranging from sunbirds and weaver birds to fish eagles and sacred ibis are numerous.

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  • In a similar myth, the Egyptians credited Thoth, whose symbol was the white ibis, with the invention of writing.

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  • The population of bald ibis has been in decline and the species is in danger of extinction.

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  • ibis hotel heathrow ' links above.

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  • ibis input models - this includes all the input data to carryout simulations, including the die input capacitance.

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  • ibis widespread and common noted on nearly all dates.

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  • ibis site early on Sunday morning.

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  • ibis coromandus A group of 13 was seen in fields between Hanoi and XT, 5/1.

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  • Cattle Egret [Bubulcus ibis ]: 1 at Miranda on 11th and 29th and 3 in fields inland of Kaikoura on 26th.

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  • roseate spoonbills, White Ibis, Great, Little Blue and Snowy Egrets, also.

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  • scarlet ibis in.

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  • Small flocks of herons started to fly into roost soon to be followed by flock after flock of brilliantly colored scarlet Ibis.

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  • Out on the muddy banks were African Sacred Ibis, 3 Glossy Ibis, and 8 African spoonbills.

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  • There were several stunning Roseate spoonbills, White Ibis, Great, Little Blue and Snowy Egrets, also.

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  • Ken disappears into his chalet, and I sit and watch the seabirds - two huge black storks, and an ibis chasing crabs.

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  • This bird arrived during a period of southerly winds, when Glossy Ibis and large tortoiseshell appeared in our area.

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  • The young are hatched ' Yet Forbes states (Ibis, 1881, p. 358) that Seriema comes from Siri, " a diminutive of Indian extraction," and Ema, the Portuguese name for the Rhea (see Emeu), the whole thus meaning "Little Rhea."

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  • Sclater (Ibis, 18 74, pp. 189-206) in 8 genera, are believed to belong to this group.

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  • Keeping this in mind, we may fairly conclude that the flamingo with B X Y points to an ancestral condition A B X Y, which is still represented by Platalea and Ibis, whilst the other storks proper have taken a different line, leading to A X Y.

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  • 13); (34) the tree called peridexion (protects pigeons from the serpent by its shadow); (35) the pigeons (of several colours;: led by one of them, which is of a purple or golden colour); (36) the antelope (or hydrippus; caught by its horns in the thicket); (37) the fireflints (of two sexes; combine to produce fire); (38) the magnet (adheres to iron); (39) the saw-fish (sails in company with ships); (40) the ibis (fishes only along the shore); (41) the ibex (descries a hunter from afar); (42) the diamond again (read "carbuncle"; found only by night); (43) the elephant.(conceives after partaking of mandrake; brings forth in the water; the young protected from the serpent by the father; when fallen is lifted up only by a certain small individual of its own kind); (44) the agate (employed in pearl-fishing); (45) the wild ass and ape (mark the equinox); (46) the Indian stone (relieves patients of the dropsy); (47) the heron (touches no dead body, and keeps to one dwellingplace); (48) the sycamore (or wild fig; grubs living inside the fruit and coming out); (49) the ostrich (devours all sorts of things; forgetful of its own eggs).

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  • S., 1860, p. 374; Ibis, 1861, p. 66, pl.

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  • Salvin (Ibis, 1861, pp. 138-149), from his own observation of this very local and remarkable species.

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  • Captain Taylor, however, found their nests as well on low bushes of the same tree in the Bay of Fonseca (Ibis, 1859, pp. 150-152).

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  • The first Lang portion of this was published at Paris in 1820, and of its one hundred and two livraisons, which appeared with great irregularity (Ibis, 1868, p. 500), the last was issued in 1839, containing the titles of the five volumes that the whole forms, together with a " Tableau methodique " which but indifferently serves the purpose of an index.

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  • No name given, but said to include " les ibis et les spatules."

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  • It is perfectly true that in several or even in many instances he acknowledges and deplores the poverty of his information, but this does not excuse him for making assertions (and such assertions are not unfrequent) based on evidence that is either wholly untrustworthy or needs further inquiry before it can be accepted (Ibis, 1860, pp. 331-335).

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  • Wallace (Ibis, 1864, pp. 36-41), who successfully showed that they are not altogether to be despised.

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  • That this was the case is undeniably shown by some remarks of Canon Tristram, who, in treating of the Alaudidae and Saxicolinae of Algeria (whence he had recently brought a large collection of specimens of his own making), stated (Ibis, 18 59, pp. 4 2 9-433) that he could " not help feeling convinced of the truth of the views set forth by Messrs Darwin and Wallace," adding that it was " hardly possible, I 'should think, to illustrate this theory better than by the larks and chats of North Africa."

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  • Forhandlinger, 1861, pp. 1 35154; Ibis, 1862, pp. 158-175), and as it seems to the present writer not ineffectually.

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  • Professor Parker replied to his critic (Ibis, 1862, PP. 297-299).

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  • 3 In reply to some critical remarks (Ibis, 1868, pp. 8 5-9 6), chiefly aimed at showing the inexpediency of relying solely on one set of characters, especially when those afforded by the palatal bones were not, even within the limits of families, wholly diagnostic, the author (Ibis, 1868, pp. 357-362) announced a slight modification of his original scheme, by introducing three more groups into it, and concluded by indicating how its bearings upon the great question of " genetic classification" might be represented so far as the different groups of Carinatae are concerned: - 1 These names are compounded respectively of Dromaeus, the generic name applied to the emeu, 7xQ-a, a split or cleft, SEVµa, a bond or tying, a finch, and, in each case, yvaBos, a jaw.

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  • Sclater published in the Ibis a classification which was mainly a revision of the system of Huxley, modified by the investigations of Garrod and Forbes and by his own large acquaintance with museum specimens.

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  • They are chiefly noted as the habitat of the gigantic land tortoise (Testudo elephantina), now carefully preserved, and of several rare and peculiar birds, including a rail (Dryolimnas aldabranus), an ibis (Ibis abbottii) and a dove (Alectroenas sganzini).

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  • herodias), scarlet ibises (Ibis rubra), roseate spoonbills (Platalea ajaja); on higher ground the beautiful peacock heron (A.

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  • Two specimens of the humerus have been found in the English fens (Ibis, 1868, p. 363; Proc. Zool.

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  • Among the larger birds are cranes, herons, the ibis, storks, eagles, vultures, falcons, hawks, kites, owls, the secretary birds, pelicans, flamingoes, wild duck and geese, gulls, and of game birds, the paauw, koraan, pheasant, partridge, guinea fowl and quail.

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  • In the garzeros of Venezuela are to be found nearly every kind of heron, crane, stork and ibis, together with an incredible number of Grallatores.

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  • Society, 1860, p. go; Ibis, 1862, p. 1752) in the case of the beautiful M.

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  • Salvin (Ibis, 1860, p. 37) in the case of one of them, M.

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  • The birds have been ably illustrated by Mr Whitaker in the Ibis magazine of the British Ornithological Union.

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  • On the lakes there is a very handsome goose, with white body and dark-green wings shading into violet, called huachua, two kinds of ibis, a large gull (Larus serranus) frequenting the alpine lakes in flocks, flamingoes called parihuana, ducks and water-hens.

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  • We know only that to his persistent attempts thereafter to get his proposed verdict accepted by the people, came their fatal answer, " Thou art not Caesar's friend," and that at last he unwillingly ascended the bema (in this case a portable judgmentseat, brought for the day outside the Praetorium), and in such words as Ibis ad crucem" delivered Him to be crucified."

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  • militaris), toucans, trogons, herons, egrets, ibis, spoonbills, boat-bills (Cancroma), ducks, pelicans, cormorants, bitterns, stilts, sandpipers, curlews, grackles, kingfishers, motmots, " Chachalacas " (Ortalida poliocephala), woodpeckers, jays, cuckoos, " garrapateros " (Crotophaga sulcirostris), the ingenious weaver-bird (Icterus), and another species (Cassicus), whose curiously woven, sack-like nests are suspended from the slender limbs of trees, and sometimes even from telegraph-wires, scarlet-crested fly-catchers (Muscivora mexicana), tanagers, mocking-birds (called " zenzontl "), turkeys, partridge, quail (Colinus, Lophortyx, Callipepla and Cyrtonyx), doves, pigeons, eagles, caracara hawks (Polyborus), fishhawks, falcons, crows, and turkey-buzzards (both the red-faced " aura " of North America and the black-faced " zopilote " of the tropics), which are the scavengers of the country.

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  • haasti, characterized in 1871 by Potts (Ibis, 1872, p. 35; Trans.

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  • A magnetic observatory was equipped at Bogen Atlas range the food of this bird is said to consist chiefly of the Testudo mauritanica, which "it carries to some height in the air, and lets fall on a stone to break the shell" (Ibis, 18 59, p. 1 77).

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  • IBIS, one of the sacred birds of the ancient Egyptians.

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  • They, however, removed it from the Linnaean genus Tantalus and, Lacepede having some years before founded a genus Ibis, it was transferred thither, and is now generally known as I.

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  • No attempt can here be made to treat the ibis from a mythological or antiquarian point of view.

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  • The ibis is chiefly an inhabitant of the Nile basin from Dongola southward, as well as of Kordofan and Sennar; whence about midsummer it moves northwards to Egypt.

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  • C. Taylor (Ibis, 1878, p. 372) saw an adult which had been killed near Lake Menzal in 1877.

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  • The story told to Herodotus of its destroying snakes is, according to Savigny, devoid of truth, but Cuvier states that he discovered partly digested remains of a snake in the stomach of a mummied ibis.

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  • The ibis is somewhat larger than a curlew, Numenius arquata, which bird it resembles, with a much stouter bill and stouter legs.

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  • Congeneric with the typical ibis are two or three other species, the I.

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  • Among these are several beautiful species such as the Japanese Geronticus nippon, the Lophotibis cristata of Madagascar, and the scarlet ibis, 5 Eudocimus ruber, of America.

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  • The glossy ibis, Plegadis falcinellus, found throughout the West Indies, Central and the south-eastern part of North America, as well as in many parts of Europe (whence it not unfrequently strays to the British Islands), Africa, Asia and Australia.

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  • This bird, believed to be the second kind of ibis spoken of by Herodotus, is rather smaller than the sacred ibis, and mostly of a dark chestnut colour with brilliant green and purple reflections on the upper parts, exhibiting, however, when young none of the rufous hue.

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  • This species lays eggs of a deep sea-green colour, having wholly the character of heron's eggs, and it often breeds in company with herons, while the eggs of all other ibises whose eggs are known resemble those of the sacred ibis.

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  • C. Taylor remarked (Ibis, 18 59, p. 51), that the buff-backed heron, Ardea bubulcus, was made by the tourists' dragomans to do duty for the "sacred ibis," and this seems to be no novel practice, since by it, or something like it, Hasselqvist was misled, and through him Linnaeus.

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  • 3 The ibis has more than once nested in the gardens of the Zoological Society in London, and even reared its young there.

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  • 5 It is a popular error - especially among painters - that this bird was the sacred ibis of the Egyptians.

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  • ibis, I.

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  • Caymans, water-hogs (capinchos), several kinds of deer (Cervus paludosus the largest), ounces, opossums, armadillos, vampires, the American ostrich, the ibis, the jabiru, various species popularly called partridges, the pato real or royal duck, the Palamedea cornuta, parrots and parakeets, are among the more notable forms. Insect life is peculiarly abundant; the red stump-like ant-hills are a feature in every landscape, and bees used to be kept in all the mission villages.

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  • The sacred ibis is not found in Egypt, but the buff-backed heron, the constant companion of the buffalo, is usually called an ibis.

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  • The glossy ibis is occasionally seen.

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  • The names are written by special emblems placed on standards, such as an ibis ~ a jackal ~ a hare ~, a feathered crown ~ a sistrum a blade ~, &c., suggesting tribal badges.

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  • the ram Khnum in Elephautine, the jerboa or okapi (?) Seth in Ombos, the ibis Thoth in Hermopolis Magna, and of the gods named above, Horus in Hieraconpolis, Wepwawet in Assiut, Neith in Sais, and Mm in Coptos.

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  • In other cases the transitional steps are shrouded nystery; we do not know, for example, why the ibis Thoth 1equently became the patron of the fine arts, the inventor ~riting, and the scribe of the gods.

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  • The nest of one species, as observed by Robert Owen, is at the end of a hole bored in the bank of a watercourse, and the eggs are pure white and glossy (Ibis, 1861, p. 65).

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  • One species of ibis, the Theristicus caudatus, is to be found, it is said, only on the slopes of Antisana.

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  • However, if we carefully sift their characters, the flamingos obviously reveal themselves as much nearer related to the Ciconiae, especially to Platalea and Ibis, than to the Anseres.

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  • Thoth is found on the earliest monuments symbolized by an ibis (Ibis aethio pica, still not uncommon in Nubia), which bird was sacred to him.

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  • There are deer (at least five species), boars, bears, antelopes, beavers, otters, badgers, tiger-cats, marten, an inferior sable, striped squirrels, &c. Among birds there are black eagles, peregrines (largely used in hawking), and, specially protected by law, turkey bustards, three varieties of pheasants, swans, geese, common and spectacled teal, mallards, mandarin ducks white and pink ibis, cranes, storks, egrets, herons, curlews, pigeons, doves, nightjars, common and blue magpies, rooks, crows, orioles, halcyon and blue kingfishers, jays, nut-hatches, redstarts, snipe, grey shrikes, hawks, kites, &c. But, pending further observations, it is not possible to say which of the smaller birds actually breed in Korea and which only make it a halting-place in their annual migrations.

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  • Wolves are numerous in the mountains; the heron, ibis, wild goose and snipe in the valley of the Wei.

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  • A fuller account of his discovery, illustrated by Hewitson, is given in The Ibis (1861, pp. 92-106, pl.

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  • C. Taylor (Ibis, 1864, p. 90), have a strong crow-like odour.

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  • (1868), pp. 384-387; Goering, Vargasia (1869), pp. 124-128; l'Iurie, Ibis (1873), pp. 81-86.

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  • Wood and glossy ibises are commonly seen, and the white ibis breeds in numbers; the sand-hill crane is less common than formerly.

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  • Among the birds, of which 172 species are described by Mr Swinhoe in his paper in The Ibis (1870), there are eagles, notably a new species Spilornis Rutherfordi, buzzards, harriers, kites, owls, goatsuckers and woodpeckers.

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  • Of C. coscoroba Mr Gibson remarks (Ibis, 1880, pp. 36, 37) that its "note is a loud trumpet-call," and that it swims with "the neck curved and the wings raised after the true swan model."

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  • The Cape-Pigeon or Pintado Petrel, Daption capensis, is one that has long been well known to mariners and other wayfarers on the great waters, while those who voyage to or from Australia, whatever be the route they take, are 1 Thus Oestrelata haesitata, the Capped Petrel, a species whose proper home seems to be Guadeloupe and some of the neighbouring West-Indian Islands, has occurred in the State of New York, near Boulogne, in Norfolk, and in Hungary (Ibis, 1884, p. 202).

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  • Forbes (Ibis, 1881, pp. 360, 361) to inhabit the dry and open "sertoes" of north-eastern Brazil, a discovery the more interesting since it was in that part of the country that Marcgrav and Piso became acquainted with a bird of this kind, though the existence of any species of rhea in the district had been long overlooked by or unknown to succeeding travellers.

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  • There were several stunning Roseate Spoonbills, White Ibis, Great, Little Blue and Snowy Egrets, also.

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  • Small flocks of herons started to fly into roost soon to be followed by flock after flock of brilliantly colored scarlet Ibis.

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  • Out on the muddy banks were African Sacred Ibis, 3 Glossy Ibis, and 8 African Spoonbills.

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  • Ken disappears into his chalet, and I sit and watch the seabirds - two huge black storks, and an ibis chasing crabs.

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  • This bird arrived during a period of southerly winds, when Glossy Ibis and Large Tortoiseshell appeared in our area.

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  • Captain Taylor, however, found their nests as well on low bushes of the same tree in the Bay of Fonseca (Ibis, 1859, pp. 150-152).

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  • 3 In reply to some critical remarks (Ibis, 1868, pp. 8 5-9 6), chiefly aimed at showing the inexpediency of relying solely on one set of characters, especially when those afforded by the palatal bones were not, even within the limits of families, wholly diagnostic, the author (Ibis, 1868, pp. 357-362) announced a slight modification of his original scheme, by introducing three more groups into it, and concluded by indicating how its bearings upon the great question of " genetic classification" might be represented so far as the different groups of Carinatae are concerned: - 1 These names are compounded respectively of Dromaeus, the generic name applied to the emeu, 7xQ-a, a split or cleft, SEVµa, a bond or tying, a finch, and, in each case, yvaBos, a jaw.

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  • The glossy ibis, Plegadis falcinellus, found throughout the West Indies, Central and the south-eastern part of North America, as well as in many parts of Europe (whence it not unfrequently strays to the British Islands), Africa, Asia and Australia.

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  • Caymans, water-hogs (capinchos), several kinds of deer (Cervus paludosus the largest), ounces, opossums, armadillos, vampires, the American ostrich, the ibis, the jabiru, various species popularly called partridges, the pato real or royal duck, the Palamedea cornuta, parrots and parakeets, are among the more notable forms. Insect life is peculiarly abundant; the red stump-like ant-hills are a feature in every landscape, and bees used to be kept in all the mission villages.

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  • However, if we carefully sift their characters, the flamingos obviously reveal themselves as much nearer related to the Ciconiae, especially to Platalea and Ibis, than to the Anseres.

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  • 'Notwithstanding the evidence, which presented some incongruities, offered by Mr Mackay (Ibis, 1867, p. 244).

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  • 'Notwithstanding the evidence, which presented some incongruities, offered by Mr Mackay (Ibis, 1867, p. 244).

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  • ibis, I.

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