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iberian

iberian

iberian Sentence Examples

  • Elche is usually identified with the Iberian Helike, afterwards the Roman colony of Ilici or Illici.

    7
    2
  • At the same time, the general lines of Iberian controversy are clear enough.

    3
    1
  • Knowledge of ancient Iberian language and history is mainly derived from a variety of coins, found widely distributed in the peninsula,' and also in the neighbourhood of Narbonne.

    3
    1
  • Tomorrow after dinner I shall take the Iberian icon of the Mother of God to the wounded in the Catherine Hospital where we will have some water blessed.

    2
    0
  • ANTHIM THE IBERIAN, a notable figure in the ecclesiastical history of Rumania.

    2
    1
  • 2 The same Iberian alphabet is found also rarely in inscriptions.

    2
    1
  • This phase of Iberian theory opens with K.

    2
    1
  • who contended that there existed once a single great Iberian people, speaking a distinct language of their own; that an essentially " Iberian " population was to be found in Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica, in southern France, and even in the British Isles; and that the Basques of the present day were remnants of this race, which had elsewhere been expelled or absorbed.

    2
    1
  • d'Arbois de Jubainville, for example (Les Premiers habitants de l'Europe, Paris, 1877), maintained that besides possessing Spain, Gaul, Italy and the British Isles, " Iberian " peoples penetrated into the Balkan peninsula, and occupied a part of northern Africa, Corsica and Sardinia; and it is now generally accepted that a race with fairly uniform characteristics was at one time in possession of the south of France (or at least of Aquitania), the whole of Spain from the Pyrenees to the straits, the Canary Islands (the Guanches) a part of northern Africa and Corsica.

    2
    1
  • Next morning Marya Dmitrievna took the young ladies to the Iberian shrine of the Mother of God and to Madame Suppert-Roguet, who was so afraid of Marya Dmitrievna that she always let her have costumes at a loss merely to get rid of her.

    2
    1
  • Below 500 fathoms the western centres of maximum disappear, and higher temperatures occur in the eastern Atlantic off the Iberian peninsula and north-western Africa down to at least 1000 fathoms; at still greater depths temperature gradually becomes more and more uniform.

    1
    0
  • There is an interestini connection with Europe through the so-called Iberian flora.

    1
    0
  • 4 Coming to the Iberian peninsula,we must, i n default of separate works depart from our rule of not mentioning contributions to journals, for of the former there are only Colonel Irby's Ornithology of the Straits of Gibraltar (8vo, 1875) and Mr A.

    1
    0
  • Whether this type is more conveniently designated by the word Iberian, or by some other name (" Eur-african," " Mediterranean," &c.) is a matter of comparative indifference, provided that there is no misunderstanding as to the steps by which the term Iberian attained its meaning in modern anthropology.

    1
    0
  • But from the fact that the bulk of the Tunisian population belongs to the Iberian section of the Berbers, and to this being no doubt the fundamental stock of most Italian peoples, the intermixture of the Italianized Berber with his African brother has not much affected the physique of the people, though it may have slightly tinged their mental characteristics.

    1
    0
  • EBRO (anc. Iberus or Hiberus), the only one of the five great rivers of the Iberian Peninsula (Tagus, Douro, Ebro, Guadalquivir, Guadiana) which flows into the Mediterranean.

    1
    0
  • This population came from Africa, not from Sicily, and was of Iberian or Ibero-Ligurian stock.

    1
    0
  • The family to which he belonged was probably Italian and not Iberian by blood.

    1
    0
  • Tejo), the longest river of the Iberian Peninsula.

    1
    0
  • The basin is comparatively narrow, and the Tagus, like the other rivers of the Iberian tableland, generally flows in a rather confined valley, often at the bottom of a rocky gorge below the general level of the adjacent country.

    1
    0
  • The triangular territory of Catalonia forms the north-eastern corner of the Iberian Peninsula.

    1
    0
  • Before the Roman conquest, the Iberian tribe of Astures had been able to maintain itself independent of the Carthaginians, and to extend its territory as far south as the Douro.

    1
    0
  • He was more or less effectively the supreme temporal chief of the kingdom of Sicily and Naples, Sardinia, the states of the Iberian peninsula (Castile, Leon, Navarre and Portugal), Aragon (which, under Peter II., was the type of vassal and tributary kingdom of the Roman power), the Scandinavian states, the kingdom of Hungary, the Slav states of Bohemia, Poland, Servia, Bosnia and Bulgaria, and the Christian states founded in Syria by the crusaders of the 12th century.

    1
    0
  • The march of Arab conquest kept the Armenians friendly to Byzantium for a few years; but in 718 the catholicus John of Odsun ascended the throne and at the council of Manazkert in 728 repeated and confirmed the anathemas against Chalcedon and the tome of Leo, that had been first pronounced by the catholicus Babken in 491 at a synod held in Valarshapat by the united Armenian, Georgian or Iberian, and Albanian churches.

    1
    0
  • CASTILE, or Castille (Castilla), an ancient kingdom of Spain, occupying the central districts of the Iberian Peninsula; and bounded on the N.

    1
    0
  • The Castilian use of the word in the sense of a right, privilege or charter is most probably to be traced to the Roman conventus juridici, otherwise known as jurisdictiones or fora, which in Pliny's time were already numerous in the Iberian peninsula.

    1
    0
  • The continent of Europe is no more than a great peninsula extending westwards from the much vaster continent of Asia, while it is itself broken up by two inland seas into several smaller peninsulas - the Mediterranean forming the Iberian, the Italian and the Greek peninsulas, while the Baltic forms that of Scandinavia and the much smaller one of Denmark.

    1
    0
  • the secret Jews of the Iberian peninsula.

    1
    0
  • He also gave help to Sparta against Thebes, sending Gaulish and Iberian mercenaries to take part in Greek warfare.

    1
    0
  • less than that of the Iberian Peninsula, but more than twice that of the Italian.

    1
    0
  • It was pointed out by Barrande that early in Palaeozoic Europe there appeared two marine provinces - a northern one extending from Russia to the British Isles through Scandinavia and northern Germany, and a southern one comprising France, Bohemia, the Iberian peninsula and Sardinia.

    1
    0
  • Amounting to a serious pest in Australasian colonies, it is also established in the Falklands and Kerguelen; its presence in much of Europe is attributed to early acclimatization, as it seems anciently to have been confined to the Iberian peninsula.

    1
    0
  • PORTUGAL, a republic of western Europe, forming part of the Iberian Peninsula, and bounded on the N.

    1
    0
  • An account of the fauna of the Iberian Peninsula as a whole is given under Spain.

    1
    0
  • The Iberian Peninsula was one: and its common history is related under Spain.

    1
    0
  • On these terms the political union of the Iberian Peninsula was accomplished.

    1
    0
  • There were also the Miguelites, active but impotent intriguers; and the advocates of Iberian union, who became prominent in 1867, 1869, 1874, and especially in July 1872, when many wellknown politicians were implicated in a fantastic conspiracy for the establishment of an Iberian republic. Portuguese nationalism was too strong for these advocates of union with Spain, whose propaganda was discredited as soon as any national interest was seriously endangered.

    1
    0
  • N.W., was the Roman Acci, and, according to tradition, the seat of the first Iberian bishopric, in the 2nd century.

    1
    0
  • Upon this version, no doubt, are based the editions of Iordache Cantacuzene(Bucharest, 1682), and that of §erban Greceanu (1693), in which for the first time the Greek text is printed side by side with the Rumanian; and the edition of Anthim the Iberian (1703).

    1
    0
  • The only collection of original sermons is the Didahii delivered by the metropolitan Anthim the Iberian (q.v.), the scholar, artist, translator, printer and great linguist, who was the first to issue books in Arabic and even in Georgian from his printing-presses in Bucharest.

    1
    0
  • march to Rome, on the banks of the Rhne, the frontier of the Iberian and Ligurian territories.

    1
    0
  • For centuries they had been silently massing themselves around ancient Europe, whether Iberian, Celtic or Roman.

    1
    0
  • Pyrenees], a range of mountains in south-west Europe, separating the Iberian Peninsula from France, and extending for about 240 m., from the Bay of Biscay to Cape Creus, or, if only the main crest of the range be considered, to Cape Cerbere, on the Mediterranean Sea.

    1
    0
  • SPAIN (Espana), a kingdom in the extreme south-west of Europe, comprising about eleven-thirteenths of the Iberian Peninsula, in addition to the Balearic Islands, the Canary Islands, and the fortified station of Ceuta, on the Moroccan coast opposite to Gibraltar.

    1
    0
  • The bleak districts of Siguenza and Soria, round the headwaters of the Douro, separate the mountains of the so-called Iberian system on the north-east of the table-land from the eastern portion of the central mountain chains of the peninsula.

    1
    0
  • It is the Montes Carpetani of the ancients, and a portion of it (due north of Madrid) still bears the name of Carpetanos Composed almost entirely of granite, it has an aspect when seen from a distance highly characteristic of the mountains of the Iberian Peninsula in general, presenting the appearance of a saw-like ridge (sierra) broken up into numerous sections.

    1
    0
  • The southern system of mountains bounding the Iberian table-landthe Sierra Morena (q.v.)is even less of a continuous chain than the two systems last described.

    1
    0
  • Fauna.The Iberian Peninsula belongs to the Mediterranean sub-region of the Palaearctic region of the animal kingdom.

    1
    0
  • On the west of the Iberian range and the Recon- south of the Guadarrama was the kingdom called, quest.

    1
    0
  • The word commonwealth had no meaning either east or west of the Iberian range.

    1
    0
  • The Iberian Peninsula is not a linguistic unit.

    1
    0
  • Douro, anc. Durius), a river of the Iberian Peninsula.

    1
    0
  • The length of the Douro, which is greater than that of any other Iberian river except the Tagus and Guadiana, is probably about 485 m.; but competent authorities differ widely in their estimates, the extremes given being 420 and 507 m.

    1
    0
  • EBRO (anc. Iberus or Hiberus), the only one of the five great rivers of the Iberian Peninsula (Tagus, Douro, Ebro, Guadalquivir, Guadiana) which flows into the Mediterranean.

    1
    0
  • the secret Jews of the Iberian peninsula.

    1
    0
  • Douro, anc. Durius), a river of the Iberian Peninsula.

    1
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  • As for them"--and she pointed to the girls--"tomorrow I'll take them first to the Iberian shrine of the Mother of God, and then we'll drive to the Super-Rogue's.

    1
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  • The Iberian Mother of God! someone cried.

    1
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  • Sir John Moore and the statesmen of Austria - the heroic Stadion at their head - failed in their enterprise; but at least they frustrated the determined effort of Napoleon to stamp out the national movement in the Iberian Peninsula.

    1
    1
  • The principal evidence which Humboldt adduced in its support was the possibility of explaining a vast number of the ancient topographical names of Spain, and of other asserted Iberian districts, by the forms and significations of Basque.

    1
    1
  • proper Iberian race, that the Basques were always shut in by alien races, that their affinity is still to seek, and that the whole Basque-Iberian theory is a figment.

    1
    1
  • - Humboldt's " Iberian theory " depended partly on linguistic comparisons, but partly on his observation of widespread similarity of physical type among the population of south-western Europe.

    1
    1
  • Their remains have been found in Belgium and France, in Britain, Germany and Denmark, as well as in Spain; and they bear a close resemblance to a type which is common among the Basques as well as all over the Iberian peninsula.

    1
    1
  • This Neolithic race has consequently been nicknamed " Iberians," and it is now common to speak of the " Iberian " ancestry of the people of Britain, recognizing the racial characteristics of " Iberians " in the" small swarthy Welshman," the " small dark Highlander," and the " Black Celts to the west of the Shannon," as well as in the typical inhabitants of Aquitania and Brittany.

    1
    1
  • Anthim The Iberian >>

    0
    0
  • The Servians and Russians apparently always used the Cyrillic, and its advantages gradually ousted the Glagolitic elsewhere, though the service book in the old ecclesiastical language which is used by the Roman Catholic Croats is in Glagolitic.4 While the Carian and Lycian were probably independent of the Greek in origin, so, too, at the opposite end of the Mediterranean was the Iberian.

    0
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  • On the eastern slope of the Iberian.

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  • We also failed to bump into Iberian Green Woodpecker anywhere, but I had no specific gen.

    0
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  • Pottery specialist Duncan Smith from Southampton recognized pieces of Iberian courseware and high grade Italian majolica.

    0
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  • But I shall be playing in Sweden in the future, and all up and down the European seaboard to the Iberian Peninsula.

    0
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  • visiting the shrine of the " Iberian Mother of God " .

    0
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  • During the confusion that followed that event Alexius Comnenus escaped into Asia, and, having collected an army of Iberian mercenaries, entered Trebizond, where he was acknowledged as the legitimate sovereign, and assumed the title of Grand Comnenus.

    0
    0
  • Below 500 fathoms the western centres of maximum disappear, and higher temperatures occur in the eastern Atlantic off the Iberian peninsula and north-western Africa down to at least 1000 fathoms; at still greater depths temperature gradually becomes more and more uniform.

    0
    0
  • There is an interestini connection with Europe through the so-called Iberian flora.

    0
    0
  • Elche is usually identified with the Iberian Helike, afterwards the Roman colony of Ilici or Illici.

    0
    0
  • Britain, it was true, acting on the initiative of George Canning, had seized the Danish fleet, thus forestalling an action which Napoleon certainly contemplated; but on the other hand Denmark now allied herself with him; and while in Lombardy he heard of the triumphant entry of his troops into Lisbon - an event which seemed to prelude his domination in the Iberian Peninsula and thereafter in the Mediterranean.

    0
    0
  • Sir John Moore and the statesmen of Austria - the heroic Stadion at their head - failed in their enterprise; but at least they frustrated the determined effort of Napoleon to stamp out the national movement in the Iberian Peninsula.

    0
    0
  • 4 Coming to the Iberian peninsula,we must, i n default of separate works depart from our rule of not mentioning contributions to journals, for of the former there are only Colonel Irby's Ornithology of the Straits of Gibraltar (8vo, 1875) and Mr A.

    0
    0
  • ANTHIM THE IBERIAN, a notable figure in the ecclesiastical history of Rumania.

    0
    0
  • Anthim The Iberian >>

    0
    0
  • At the same time, the general lines of Iberian controversy are clear enough.

    0
    0
  • Knowledge of ancient Iberian language and history is mainly derived from a variety of coins, found widely distributed in the peninsula,' and also in the neighbourhood of Narbonne.

    0
    0
  • 2 The same Iberian alphabet is found also rarely in inscriptions.

    0
    0
  • This phase of Iberian theory opens with K.

    0
    0
  • who contended that there existed once a single great Iberian people, speaking a distinct language of their own; that an essentially " Iberian " population was to be found in Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica, in southern France, and even in the British Isles; and that the Basques of the present day were remnants of this race, which had elsewhere been expelled or absorbed.

    0
    0
  • The principal evidence which Humboldt adduced in its support was the possibility of explaining a vast number of the ancient topographical names of Spain, and of other asserted Iberian districts, by the forms and significations of Basque.

    0
    0
  • proper Iberian race, that the Basques were always shut in by alien races, that their affinity is still to seek, and that the whole Basque-Iberian theory is a figment.

    0
    0
  • - Humboldt's " Iberian theory " depended partly on linguistic comparisons, but partly on his observation of widespread similarity of physical type among the population of south-western Europe.

    0
    0
  • Their remains have been found in Belgium and France, in Britain, Germany and Denmark, as well as in Spain; and they bear a close resemblance to a type which is common among the Basques as well as all over the Iberian peninsula.

    0
    0
  • This Neolithic race has consequently been nicknamed " Iberians," and it is now common to speak of the " Iberian " ancestry of the people of Britain, recognizing the racial characteristics of " Iberians " in the" small swarthy Welshman," the " small dark Highlander," and the " Black Celts to the west of the Shannon," as well as in the typical inhabitants of Aquitania and Brittany.

    0
    0
  • d'Arbois de Jubainville, for example (Les Premiers habitants de l'Europe, Paris, 1877), maintained that besides possessing Spain, Gaul, Italy and the British Isles, " Iberian " peoples penetrated into the Balkan peninsula, and occupied a part of northern Africa, Corsica and Sardinia; and it is now generally accepted that a race with fairly uniform characteristics was at one time in possession of the south of France (or at least of Aquitania), the whole of Spain from the Pyrenees to the straits, the Canary Islands (the Guanches) a part of northern Africa and Corsica.

    0
    0
  • Whether this type is more conveniently designated by the word Iberian, or by some other name (" Eur-african," " Mediterranean," &c.) is a matter of comparative indifference, provided that there is no misunderstanding as to the steps by which the term Iberian attained its meaning in modern anthropology.

    0
    0
  • But from the fact that the bulk of the Tunisian population belongs to the Iberian section of the Berbers, and to this being no doubt the fundamental stock of most Italian peoples, the intermixture of the Italianized Berber with his African brother has not much affected the physique of the people, though it may have slightly tinged their mental characteristics.

    0
    0
  • This population came from Africa, not from Sicily, and was of Iberian or Ibero-Ligurian stock.

    0
    0
  • The family to which he belonged was probably Italian and not Iberian by blood.

    0
    0
  • Tejo), the longest river of the Iberian Peninsula.

    0
    0
  • The basin is comparatively narrow, and the Tagus, like the other rivers of the Iberian tableland, generally flows in a rather confined valley, often at the bottom of a rocky gorge below the general level of the adjacent country.

    0
    0
  • The triangular territory of Catalonia forms the north-eastern corner of the Iberian Peninsula.

    0
    0
  • Before the Roman conquest, the Iberian tribe of Astures had been able to maintain itself independent of the Carthaginians, and to extend its territory as far south as the Douro.

    0
    0
  • Owing to their almost entire immunity from any alien domination except that of the Romans and Goths, the Asturians may perhaps be regarded as the purest representatives of the Iberian race; while their dialect (linguaje bable) is sometimes held to be closely akin to the parent speech from which modern Castilian is derived.

    0
    0
  • He was more or less effectively the supreme temporal chief of the kingdom of Sicily and Naples, Sardinia, the states of the Iberian peninsula (Castile, Leon, Navarre and Portugal), Aragon (which, under Peter II., was the type of vassal and tributary kingdom of the Roman power), the Scandinavian states, the kingdom of Hungary, the Slav states of Bohemia, Poland, Servia, Bosnia and Bulgaria, and the Christian states founded in Syria by the crusaders of the 12th century.

    0
    0
  • The march of Arab conquest kept the Armenians friendly to Byzantium for a few years; but in 718 the catholicus John of Odsun ascended the throne and at the council of Manazkert in 728 repeated and confirmed the anathemas against Chalcedon and the tome of Leo, that had been first pronounced by the catholicus Babken in 491 at a synod held in Valarshapat by the united Armenian, Georgian or Iberian, and Albanian churches.

    0
    0
  • CASTILE, or Castille (Castilla), an ancient kingdom of Spain, occupying the central districts of the Iberian Peninsula; and bounded on the N.

    0
    0
  • The Castilian use of the word in the sense of a right, privilege or charter is most probably to be traced to the Roman conventus juridici, otherwise known as jurisdictiones or fora, which in Pliny's time were already numerous in the Iberian peninsula.

    0
    0
  • The continent of Europe is no more than a great peninsula extending westwards from the much vaster continent of Asia, while it is itself broken up by two inland seas into several smaller peninsulas - the Mediterranean forming the Iberian, the Italian and the Greek peninsulas, while the Baltic forms that of Scandinavia and the much smaller one of Denmark.

    0
    0
  • He also gave help to Sparta against Thebes, sending Gaulish and Iberian mercenaries to take part in Greek warfare.

    0
    0
  • less than that of the Iberian Peninsula, but more than twice that of the Italian.

    0
    0
  • 138 (14th August 755) Abdarrahman landed in the Iberian peninsula, where he was universally welcomed, and 1 The rule of the caliphs in Morocco, which had never been firmly established, had already, in 740, given place to that of independent princes (see Morocco, History).

    0
    0
  • It was pointed out by Barrande that early in Palaeozoic Europe there appeared two marine provinces - a northern one extending from Russia to the British Isles through Scandinavia and northern Germany, and a southern one comprising France, Bohemia, the Iberian peninsula and Sardinia.

    0
    0
  • The Servians and Russians apparently always used the Cyrillic, and its advantages gradually ousted the Glagolitic elsewhere, though the service book in the old ecclesiastical language which is used by the Roman Catholic Croats is in Glagolitic.4 While the Carian and Lycian were probably independent of the Greek in origin, so, too, at the opposite end of the Mediterranean was the Iberian.

    0
    0
  • Amounting to a serious pest in Australasian colonies, it is also established in the Falklands and Kerguelen; its presence in much of Europe is attributed to early acclimatization, as it seems anciently to have been confined to the Iberian peninsula.

    0
    0
  • PORTUGAL, a republic of western Europe, forming part of the Iberian Peninsula, and bounded on the N.

    0
    0
  • An account of the fauna of the Iberian Peninsula as a whole is given under Spain.

    0
    0
  • The Iberian Peninsula was one: and its common history is related under Spain.

    0
    0
  • On these terms the political union of the Iberian Peninsula was accomplished.

    0
    0
  • There were also the Miguelites, active but impotent intriguers; and the advocates of Iberian union, who became prominent in 1867, 1869, 1874, and especially in July 1872, when many wellknown politicians were implicated in a fantastic conspiracy for the establishment of an Iberian republic. Portuguese nationalism was too strong for these advocates of union with Spain, whose propaganda was discredited as soon as any national interest was seriously endangered.

    0
    0
  • N.W., was the Roman Acci, and, according to tradition, the seat of the first Iberian bishopric, in the 2nd century.

    0
    0
  • Upon this version, no doubt, are based the editions of Iordache Cantacuzene(Bucharest, 1682), and that of §erban Greceanu (1693), in which for the first time the Greek text is printed side by side with the Rumanian; and the edition of Anthim the Iberian (1703).

    0
    0
  • The only collection of original sermons is the Didahii delivered by the metropolitan Anthim the Iberian (q.v.), the scholar, artist, translator, printer and great linguist, who was the first to issue books in Arabic and even in Georgian from his printing-presses in Bucharest.

    0
    0
  • march to Rome, on the banks of the Rhne, the frontier of the Iberian and Ligurian territories.

    0
    0
  • For centuries they had been silently massing themselves around ancient Europe, whether Iberian, Celtic or Roman.

    0
    0
  • Pyrenees], a range of mountains in south-west Europe, separating the Iberian Peninsula from France, and extending for about 240 m., from the Bay of Biscay to Cape Creus, or, if only the main crest of the range be considered, to Cape Cerbere, on the Mediterranean Sea.

    0
    0
  • SPAIN (Espana), a kingdom in the extreme south-west of Europe, comprising about eleven-thirteenths of the Iberian Peninsula, in addition to the Balearic Islands, the Canary Islands, and the fortified station of Ceuta, on the Moroccan coast opposite to Gibraltar.

    0
    0
  • The bleak districts of Siguenza and Soria, round the headwaters of the Douro, separate the mountains of the so-called Iberian system on the north-east of the table-land from the eastern portion of the central mountain chains of the peninsula.

    0
    0
  • It is the Montes Carpetani of the ancients, and a portion of it (due north of Madrid) still bears the name of Carpetanos Composed almost entirely of granite, it has an aspect when seen from a distance highly characteristic of the mountains of the Iberian Peninsula in general, presenting the appearance of a saw-like ridge (sierra) broken up into numerous sections.

    0
    0
  • The southern system of mountains bounding the Iberian table-landthe Sierra Morena (q.v.)is even less of a continuous chain than the two systems last described.

    0
    0
  • Fauna.The Iberian Peninsula belongs to the Mediterranean sub-region of the Palaearctic region of the animal kingdom.

    0
    0
  • On the west of the Iberian range and the Recon- south of the Guadarrama was the kingdom called, quest.

    0
    0
  • On the eastern slope of the Iberian.

    0
    0
  • The word commonwealth had no meaning either east or west of the Iberian range.

    0
    0
  • The Iberian Peninsula is not a linguistic unit.

    0
    0
  • The length of the Douro, which is greater than that of any other Iberian river except the Tagus and Guadiana, is probably about 485 m.; but competent authorities differ widely in their estimates, the extremes given being 420 and 507 m.

    0
    0
  • But I shall be playing in Sweden in the future, and all up and down the European seaboard to the Iberian Peninsula.

    0
    0
  • Visiting the Shrine of the " Iberian Mother of God ".

    0
    0
  • It also retains a significant Jewish quarter, complete with one of the oldest surviving synagogues in the Iberian peninsula.

    0
    0
  • Iberian Flag (Iris Iberica) - One of the most singular of Iris.

    0
    0
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