How to use I-s in a sentence

i-s
  • It's a shame I don't have a little princess to lay to rest along its pristine shore.

    1
    0
  • Though I wouldn't have believed it two weeks ago, peace of sorts prevails at Econ Scrutiny and with the lives of its employees.

    1
    0
  • I know people think I'm crazy, but I'd like to keep the ranch as near its natural state as possible.

    0
    0
  • I prefer not to cross state lines with my prizes, but Delaware is such a small state I'd left its boundary before I realized.

    0
    0
  • Let's say I'm passing on information but I'm close enough to vouch for its accuracy.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • I told him we were trying to trace the electric bike by its model but asked about checking hospitals.

    0
    0
  • He and I agreed it would operate totally on its own, unaware of our operation.

    0
    0
  • Secondly, I realized when we began this venture; it would have its run and then be over.

    0
    0
  • I was growing to love this town, with its simple history, proud of its old homes and field stone fences, telling the world it was a place worth staying.

    0
    0
  • I glanced out in time to see it moving with its headlights off.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • I dropped to the ground as he yanked the phone from its base and flung it across the room.

    0
    0
  • Behind him, to the far right, I could see the front door was off its hinges, wrested to a strange angle.

    0
    0
  • I wasn't sure if the Pace Arrow motor home had vacated its site or simply was out for an afternoon jaunt.

    0
    0
  • I didn't know what to think when that police car rolled up with its lights blazing.

    0
    0
  • If I hadn't taken time to apply my sleeping solution to the rag, I'd have been in the process of taking them just as that police car with its flashing lights came rolling up!

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In desperation, I turned on the tape recorder which had run to its end.

    0
    0
  • I found pieces of DNA on its teeth.

    0
    0
  • I hereby bequeath to you my shopping cart and all its contents.

    0
    0
  • I plan on restoring its life as well.

    0
    0
  • I don't care about Qatwal or destroying its people.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • I had slept little as Jerome Jones' band played its brass near till dawn at The Gold Belt.

    0
    0
  • I saw it, with its two round sacks tied tightly and men standing nearby with their hats off.

    0
    0
  • It hangs there, waiting for me to step upon this velvet chair where I sit, tie its far descending end to my neck, and step from this world, freeing it from the guilt and troubles Annie Quincy has caused.

    0
    0
  • Dean asked Harrigan to work up his end of the report on the Byrne matter and make a few last minute return phone calls to neighbors, just to dot the I's.

    0
    0
  • I'm glad to see Parkside is looking out for its citizens, regardless of the hour and whether they deserve it or not.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • I'm hearing a lot of I's here.

    0
    0
  • I will teach my son the demon's power and warn him about its lies.

    0
    0
  • My father warned me about its lies, but I know this is not one of them.

    0
    0
  • I see its magic with my own eyes.

    0
    0
  • The difference between me and them is that I'm willing to take Tiyan without its magic.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • I love its people.

    0
    0
  • I feel my body weakening - -it refuses to heal me this time, now that it's chosen its successor, as my father said it would!

    0
    0
  • I thought Arkansas had its own wild hogs.

    0
    0
  • I know when you lie, Xander said into its mind.

    0
    0
  • Now, of these quantities, b is the only one depending on time; and therefore, as i is of no dimensions in time, b cannot occur in its expression.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • But I have just been at Leyden and Amsterdam to ask after Galileo's cosmical system as I imagined I had heard of its being printed last year in Italy.

    0
    0
  • Lingah, with its principal place Bander Lingah and i 1 villages, formerly a part of Laristan, is now included in the "Persian Gulf Ports," a separate administrative division.

    0
    0
  • Lauenburg, or Saxe-Lauenburg, as it is generally called, became a separate duchy ruled by his son John, and had its own lines of dukes for over 400 years, one of them, Magnus I.

    0
    0
  • The island was perhaps occupied by Greek settlers even before Cumae; its Eretrian and Chalcidian inhabitants abandoned it about Soo B.C. owing to an eruption, and it is said to have been deserted almost at once by the greater part of the garrison which Hiero I.

    0
    0
  • Christian Levantines were employed in its construction and it was decorated in part with Venetian mirrors, &c. In the same enclosure is a small castle attributed to Yesu I.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • San Pietro de' Cassinensi (outside the Porta Romana) is a basilica with nave and aisles, founded in the beginning of the i 1th century by San Pietro Vincioli on the site of a building of the 6th century, and remarkable for its conspicuous spire, its ancient granite and marble columns, its walnut stall-work of 1535 by Stefano de' Zambelli da Bergamo, and its numerous pictures (by Perugino, &c.).

    0
    0
  • But if the epithet is intended to designate an animal that takes an interest in its rider so far as a beast can, that in some way understands his intentions, or shares them in a subordinate fashion, that obeys from a sort of submissive or halffellow-feeling' with his master, like the horse or elephant, then I say that the camel is by no means docile - very much the contrary.

    0
    0
  • This shows a considerable improvement, largely, but not entirely, in the diminution of infant mortality; the expectation of life at birth in 1882, it is true, was only 33 years and 6 months, and at three years of age 56 years I month; but the increase, both in the expectation of life and in its average duration, goes all through the different ages.

    0
    0
  • I For example, wheat, the price of which was in 1902 26 lire pe cwt., pays a tax of 74 lire; sugar pays four times its wholesale val,ii in tax; coffee twice its wholesale value.

    0
    0
  • Your Holiness (he wrote) is sovereign of Rome, but I am its emperor; and he threatened to annul the presumed donation of Rome by Charlemagne, unless the pope yielded implicit obedience to him in all temporal affairs.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The crisis dragged for three months, and before its definitive solution by the formation of a Depretis-Crispi ministry, Robilant succeeded (I 7th March 1887) in renewing the triple alliance on terms more favorable to First re- Italy than those obtained in 1882.

    0
    0
  • Eritrea has now approximately the same extent as before the revolt of Bath-Agos, except in regard (I) to Kassala, which was transferred to the Anglo-Egyptian authorities on the 25th of December 1897, lfl pursuance of the above-mentioned Anglo-Italian convention; and (2) to slight rectifications of its northern and eastern boundaries by conventions concluded between the Eritrean and the Anglo-Egyptian authorities.

    0
    0
  • Polyp 7 has proof sense, 1 o c oduced as its first bud, 8; as its second bud, a7, motion and nutriwhich starts a uniserial pinnule; and as a third t i on, until its bud I', which starts a biserial branch (I I'-VI') medusoid nature that repeats the structure of the main stem and and organization gives off pinnules.

    0
    0
  • In this use the term loses, of course, its morphoI logical value, and it is better to call such a segment of a broken-up I stele a meristele, the whole solenostele with overlapping leaf-gaps being called a dictyostele.

    0
    0
  • The I heart-wood ceases to be of any use to the tree except as a support, but owing to its dryness and hardness it alone is of much use for industrial purposes.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • AdaptationThe morphological and physiological differentiation of the plant-body has, so far, been attributed to (I) the nature of the organism, that is to its inherent tendency towards higher organization, and (2) to the indefinite results of the external conditions acting as a stimulus which excites the organism to variation, but does not direct the course of variation.

    0
    0
  • This gigantic work, the line of which may still be traced throughout its course, was formerly called the Khandak Sabur or " Sapor's trench," being ascribed to the Sassanian king, Shapur I.

    0
    0
  • It possessed a good harbour; and the neighbourhood was famous for its wine, so that, having fallen into the hands of the Persians during the Ionian revolt, it was assigned by Artaxerxes I.

    0
    0
  • During the wars between Turkey and Austria, its ownership was often contested; and it fell before King Matthias I.

    0
    0
  • The Gabun was discovered by Portuguese navigators towards the close of the I 5th century, and was named from its fanciful resemblance to a gabao or cabin.

    0
    0
  • The theoretical limit is about i in 16; between I in 20 and 1 in 16 a steam locomotive depending on the adhesion between its wheels and the rails can only haul about its own weight.

    0
    0
  • Other noteworthy churches are the Jakobskirche, an i r th-century Romanesque basilica; the St Martinskirche; the Marienkirche or Obere Pfarrkirche (1320-1387), which has now been restored to its original pure Gothic style.

    0
    0
  • Inside its boundaries there is the restored Remigius Kirche, apparently dating from the time of Frederick I.

    0
    0
  • Lymington dates its importance from the grant of the town to Richard de Redvers, earl of Devon, in the reign of Henry I.

    0
    0
  • The history of his life i s i mmediately continued in I Kings i., where his old age and weakness are for the first time vividly empha sized.

    0
    0
  • This branch of the Capetians is also distinguished by its union with the Habsburgs, through the marriage of Mary, daughter of Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, with Maximilian, afterwards the emperor Maximilian I.

    0
    0
  • The former was the driving force which made the First Crusade successful, where later Crusades, without its stimulus, for the most part failed; the latter was the one staunch ally which alone enabled Baldwin I.

    0
    0
  • They gave the kingdom a connexion of its own with the Red Sea and its shipping; and they enabled the Franks to 2 Pisa naturally connected itself with Antioch, because Antioch was hostile to Constantinople, and Pisa cherished the same hostility, since Alexius I.

    0
    0
  • The day of its dedication (August i) corresponded with the birthday of Claudius, which explains the frequent occurrence of Spes on the coins of that emperor.

    0
    0
  • As a complete fusion between dramatic and musical movement, its very crudities point to its immense advance towards the solution of the problem, propounded chaotically at the beginning of the i 7th century by Monteverde, and solved in a simple form by Gluck.

    0
    0
  • Breda was in the i i th century a direct fief of the Holy Roman Empire, its earliest known lord being Henry I.

    0
    0
  • In these men the millennarianism of the ancient church came to life again; and in the revolutionary movements of the i 5th and 16th centuries - especially in the Anabaptist movements - it appears with all its old uncompromising energy.

    0
    0
  • In the papal chancery it was used at an early date, evidence of its presence there being found in the biography of Gregory I.

    0
    0
  • With the moral and ecclesiastical decay of the papacy in the 9th and 10th centuries much of its territorial authority slipped from its grasp; and by the middle of the I ith century its rule was not recognized beyond Rome and the immediate vicinity.

    0
    0
  • Special commissioners were to have concurrent jurisdiction with the U.S. circuit and district courts and the inferior courts of Territories in enforcing the law; fugitives could not testify in their own behalf; no trial by jury was provided; i The precise amount of organization in the Underground Railroad cannot be definitely ascertained because of the exaggerated use of the figure of railroading in the documents of the "presidents" of the road, Robert Purvis and Levi Coffin, and of its many "conductors," and their discussion of the "packages" and "freight" shipped by them.

    0
    0
  • The silver coinage consisted of the mejidie (weight 24.055 grammes, 0.830 fine), equivalent to 20 piastres, and its subdivisions 10, 5, 2, I, and 2 piastre pieces.

    0
    0
  • The classical period comes to an end with Nedim; its brightest time is that which falls between the rise of Nef'i and the death of Nedim, or, more roughly, that extending from the accession of Ahmed I.

    0
    0
  • The part of the Elburz immediately north of Teheran is known as the Kuh i Shimran (mountain of Shimran, from the name of the Shimran district on its southern slopes) and culminates in the Sar i Tochal (12,600 ft.).

    0
    0
  • If, as is now usual, we take the equivalent weight of oxygen as our standard and call it 16, the equivalent weight of hydrogen is I o08, and its electrochemical equivalent is I 044 X 5.

    0
    0
  • The electrochemical equivalent of any other substance, whether element or compound, may be found by multiplying its chemical equivalent by I 036X Io-5.

    0
    0
  • For certain concentrated solutions the transport number is found to be greater than unity; thus for a normal solution of cadmium iodide its value is I 12.

    0
    0
  • Occlusor muscle - its double origin (i.) is derived from the is shown.

    0
    0
  • When a z and the invariants B and C all vanish, either A or j must vanish; in the former case j is a perfect cube, its Hessian vanishing, and further f contains j as a factor; in the latter case, if p x, ax be the linear factors of i, f can be expressed as (pa) 5 f =cip2+c2ay; if both A and j vanish i also vanishes identically, and so also does f.

    0
    0
  • Upon one of these is based the principle of the mariner's compass, which is said to have been known to the Chinese as early as I ioo B.C., though it was not introduced into Europe until more than 2000 years later; a magnet supported so that its axis is free to turn in a horizontal plane will come to rest with its poles pointing approximately north and south.

    0
    0
  • The magnetic field due to a long straight wire in which a current of electricity is flowing is at every point at right angles to the plane passing through it and through the wire; its strength at any point distant r centimetres from the wire is H = 21/r, (2) i being the current in C.G.S.

    0
    0
  • Since 7ra'I is the moment of the sphere (=volume X magnetization), it appears from (10) that the magnetized sphere produces the same external effect as a very small magnet of equal moment placed at its centre and magnetized in the same direction; the resultant force therefore is the same as in (14).

    0
    0
  • Forces acting on a Small Body in the Magnetic Field.-If a small magnet of length ds and pole-strength m is brought into a magnetic field such that the values of the magnetic potential at the negative and positive poles respectively are V 1 and the work done upon the magnet, and therefore its potential energy, will be W =m(V2-Vi) =mdV, which may be written W =m d s- = M d v= - MHo = - vIHo, ds ds where M is the moment of the magnet, v the volume, I the magnetization, and Ho the magnetic force along ds.

    0
    0
  • If a hollow sphere 7 of which the outer radius is R and the inner radius r is placed in a uniform field Ho, the field inside will also be uniform and in the same direction as Ho, and its value will be approximately 3 i - R 3 For a cylinder placed with its axis at right angles to the lines of force, 2 = Ho (41) 2 +4(-2)(i - R2) These expressions show that the thicker the screen and the greater its permeability o, the more effectual will be the shielding action.

    0
    0
  • Therefore and m = v I - 'm of d22 (47) constant cell B21 its object is to produce inside the tube a magnetic field equal and opposite to that due to the earth's magnetism.

    0
    0
  • The weight W is moved along the scale until the yoke just tilts over upon the stop S; the distance of W from its zero position is then, as can easily be shown, proportional to F, and therefore to B 2, and approximately to I 2.

    0
    0
  • For strong magnetizing forces (which in these experiments did not exceed II= 48.9) the permeability remains almost constant at its initial value (about 400), until the temperature is within nearly i oo of the critical point; then the permeability diminishes more and more rapidly until the critical point is reached and the magnetization vanishes.

    0
    0
  • It can be shown that if a current i circulates in a small plane circuit of area S, the magnetic action of the circuit for distant points is equivalent to that of a short magnet whose axis is perpendicular to the plane of the circuit and whose moment is iS, the direction of the magnetization being related to that of the circulating current as the thrust of a right-handed screw to its rotation.

    0
    0
  • The flora consists of 129 species of angiosperms, i Cycas, 22 ferns, and a few mosses, lichens and fungi, 17 of which are endemic, while a considerable number - not specifically distinct - form local varieties nearly all presenting Indo-Malayan affinities, as do the single Cycas, the ferns and the cryptogams. As to its fauna, the island contains 319 species of animals-54 only being vertebrates-145 of which are endemic. A very remarkable distributional fact in regard to them, and one not yet fully explained, is that a large number show affinity with species in the Austro-Malayan rather than in the Indo-Malayan, their nearer, region.

    0
    0
  • A sum of Lioo,000 was bequeathed by Mr Andrew Usher (1826-1898) for a hall to be called the Usher Hall and to supplement I The original Tolbooth was completed in 1501, but a new one took its place in 1563-1564, and was subsequently altered.

    0
    0
  • The Austrian diet was transferred on the i 5th of November to Kremsier, remote from revolutionary influences; and, though the government still thought it prudent to proclaim its constitutional principles, it also proclaimed its intention to preserve the unity of the monarchy.

    0
    0
  • In (i.), for instance, we want to find the amount by which ios.

    0
    0
  • X= i s.

    0
    0
  • Each symbol a is associated with its supplement a which satisfies the equivalences a+a = i, aa = o, the latter of which means that a and a have no region in common.

    0
    0
  • In point of international law, its existence may be said to date from Dec. I 1918, when the Prince-Regent Alexander of Serbia formally complied with the invitation of the Yugoslav National Council to assume the regency over the sister provinces also.

    0
    0
  • For the later period he uses the Greek Esther, with its additions, I Maccabees, Polybius, Strabo and Nicolaus of Damascus.

    0
    0
  • A number of British subjects resident in Comman- the Transvaal, in spite of their having no political status, were commandeered to suppress a native r i s i ng.

    0
    0
  • A curious polygonal church of the i ith century at Rieux-Minervois, the abbey-church at St Papoul, with its graceful cloister of the 14th century, and the remains of the important abbey of St Hilaire, founded in the 6th century and rebuilt from the 12th to the 15th century, are also of antiquarian interest.

    0
    0
  • The country of Assyria, which in the Assyro-Babylonian literature is known as mat Assur (ki), " land of Assur," took its name from the ancient city of Assur, situated at the 1 The name Assur is not connected with the Asshur of i Chron.ii.

    0
    0
  • On its right wing the I.

    0
    0
  • Now the cellular pathology of the blood, investigated by the aid of modern staining methods, is as important as that of the solid organs; no clinical investigator - indeed, apart from research, no practitioner at this day - can dispense with examination of the blood for purposes of diagnosis; its coagulability and the kinds and the variations of the cells it contains being evidence of many def i nitely morbid states of the body.

    0
    0
  • In attempting to picture the site of London in its original condition, that is, before any building took place, it is necessary to consider (I) the condition of the Thames unconfined between made banks, (2) the slopes overlooking it, (3) the tributary streams which watered these slopes.

    0
    0
  • The Port of London Authority, as constituted by the act of 1908, is a body corporate consisting of a chairman, vice-chairman, 17 members elected by payers of dues, wharfingers and owners of river craft, I member elected by wharfingers exclusively, and To members appointed by the following existing bodies - Admiralty (one); Board of Trade (two); London County Council (two from among its own members and two others); City Corporation (one from among its own members and one other); Trinity House (one).

    0
    0
  • The motion was lost but the House resolved to bring in a bill for repealing the Corporation Act, and ten years later (March 5) the Grand Committee of Grievances reported to the House its opinion (I) that the rights of the City of London in the election of sheriffs in the year 1682 were invaded and that such invasion was illegal and a grievance, and (2) that the judgment given upon the Quo Warranto against the city was illegal and a grievance.

    0
    0
  • Tuam received its first charter from James I.

    0
    0
  • In the i 5th century its walls and ramparts (still extant) were renewed under the direction of Fra Giocondo, two of the gates being built by the Lombardi.

    0
    0
  • A certain critical temperature is observed in a gas, above which the liquefaction is impossible; so that the gaseous state has two subdivisions into (i.)a true gas, which cannot be liquefied, because its temperature is above the critical temperature, (ii.) a vapour, where the temperature is below the critical, and which can ultimately be liquefied by further lowering of temperature or increase of pressure.

    0
    0
  • Niebuhr's system was a modification of Hommel's second theory, for, instead of entirely ignoring Dynasty II., he reduced its independent existence to 143 years, making it overlap Dynasty I.

    0
    0
  • Babylonia on the shores of the Persian Gulf; that its kings were contemporaneous with the later kings of Dynasty I.

    0
    0
  • We shall now consider (I.) Apocalyptic, its origin and general characteristics; (II.) Old Testament Apocalyptic; (III.) New Testament Apocalyptic.

    0
    0
  • In its fullest form this apocryph consists of sixteen chapters, but i.

    0
    0
  • The series of visions has now reached its close, returning to its starting-point in i.

    0
    0
  • The aristocrats were the dominant party, and filled the highest offices of the republic, which, in the I 2th century, rose to great power, both on sea and land, by its wars with the Lucchese, Genoese and Moslems. In I I 10 Pisa made peace with Lucca after six years of continuous hostilities.

    0
    0
  • I I consists of a cylindrical vessel having in its lower half a horizontal copper coil connected to the steam supply.

    0
    0
  • Munich owes its architectural magnificence largely to Louis I.

    0
    0
  • In other Entoprocta the buds on a horseshoe retain a high degree of individuality, a shaped l o p h o - thread-like stolon giving off the cylindrical phore; stalks, each of which dilates at its end i, Ectocyst; into the body of a zooid.

    0
    0
  • In examining the conditions of a spiritual power properformodern times, he indicates in so many terms the presence in his mind of a direct analogy between his proposed spiritual power and the functions of the Catholic clergy at the time of its greatest vigour and most complete independence, - that is to say, from about the middle of the i i th century until towards the end of the 13th.

    0
    0
  • Natural arrest of haemorrhage arises from (I) the coagulation of the blood itself, (2) the diminution of the heart's action as in fainting, (3) changes taking place in the cut vessel causing its retraction and contraction.

    0
    0
  • The town hall, with its light open loggia of semicircular arches on the ground floor, was designed by Fra Giocondo towards the end of the i 5th century; its sculptured enrichments of pilasters and friezes are very graceful, though lacking the vigorous life of the earlier medieval sculptured ornamentation.

    0
    0
  • The Kaisersaal retained its antique appearance until 1843, when, as also again in 1904, it was restored and redecorated; it is now furnished with a series of modern paintings representing the German kings and Roman emperors from Charlemagne to Francis II., in all fifty-two, and a statue of the first German emperor, William I.

    0
    0
  • It was a noble art, but unfortunately the rivalry of the Buddhist and later native styles permitted it to fall into comparative neglect, and it was left for a few of the faithful, the most famous of whom was a priest of the I 4th century named Kawo, to preserve it from inanition till the great Chinese renaissance that lent its stamp to the next period.

    0
    0
  • But from the I 5th century the punching of the dots in rigidly straight lines came to be considered essential, and the difficulty involved was so great that namako-making took its place among the highest technical achievements of the sculptor.

    0
    0
  • The family of Baden-Baden was very successful in increasing the area of its possessions, which after several divisions were united by the margrave Bernard I.

    0
    0
  • In its modern form the theorem, which is true for all values of n, is written as (x +a) n -1+ I.

    0
    0
  • Hence the density v is given by 47rabc (x2/a4+y2/b4-I-z2/c4), and the potential at the centre of the ellipsoid, and therefore its potential as a whole is given by the expression, adS Q dS V f r 47rabc r' (x2/a4-I-y2/b4+z2/c4) Accordingly the capacity C of the ellipsoid is given by the equation 1 I J dS C 47rabc Y (x 2 +y 2 + z2) V (x2/a4+y2/b4+z2/c4) (5) It has been shown by Professor Chrystal that the above integral may also be presented in the form,' foo C 2 J o J { (a2 + X) (b +X) (c 2 + X) } (6).

    0
    0
  • According to Chenevix, the alloy composed of equal parts of the two metals is grey, is less ductile than its constituent metals and has the specific gravity i i.

    0
    0
  • The history of Christian preaching with which alone this article is concerned has its roots (I) in the activity of the Hebrew prophets and scribes, the former representing the broader appeal, the latter the edification of the faithful, (2) in the ministry of Jesus Christ and His apostles, where again we have both the evangelical invitation and the teaching of truth and duty.

    0
    0
  • The special characteristic of its theology is in the first part where it owes most to the teaching of Augustine, who in his striving after self-knowledge analysed the mystery of his own triune personality and illustrated it with psychological images, " I exist and I am conscious that I exist, and I love the existence and the consciousness; and all this independently of any external influence."

    0
    0
  • From this principle, it follows (I) that the distinction between right and wrong is part of the constitution of human nature; (2) that morality stands apart from theology, and the moral qualities of actions are determined apart from the arbitrary will of God; (3) that the ultimate test of an action is its tendency to promote the general harmony or welfare; (4) that appetite and reason concur in the determination of action; and (5) that the moralist is not concerned to solve the problem of freewill and determinism.

    0
    0
  • None of them, in point of fact, has held its ground, and even his proposal to denote unknown quantities by the vowels A, E, I, 0, u, Y - the consonants B, c, &c., being reserved for general known quantities - has not been taken up. In this denotation he followed, perhaps, some older contemporaries, as Ramus, who designated the points in geometrical figures by vowels, making use of consonants, R, S, T, &c., only when these were exhausted.

    0
    0
  • The reason for this is readily seen; if a mass M of any gas occupies a volume V at a temperature T (on the absolute scale) and a pressure P, then its absolute density under these conditions is O = M/V; if now the temperature and pressure be changed to l and P,, the volume V l under these conditions is VPT/PIT1, and the absolute density is MP,T/VPT I.

    0
    0
  • In other words, water which has a specific gravity of 1 0280 at the surface would at the same temperature have a specific gravity of 1 0450 at 2000 and I 0540 at 3000 fathoms. If the whole mass of water in the ocean were relieved from pressure its volume would expand from 319 million cub.

    0
    0
  • When acetylene was first introduced on a commercial scale grave fears were entertained as to its safety, it being represented that it had the power of combining with certain metals, more especially copper and silver, to form acetylides of a highly explosive character, and that even with coal gas, which contains less than i %, such copper compounds had been known to be formed in cases where the gas-distributing mains were composed of copper, and that accidents had happened from this cause.

    0
    0
  • In spite of the treaty of 1710 and the efforts of the Livonian nobles, it was not till 1802 that its restoration was effected under the patronage of Alexander I.

    0
    0
  • If a solid body is regarded as an aggregation of similar atoms each of mass m, its specific heat C is given, as in formula (19) by C = i (n+3) R/Jm.

    0
    0
  • In its present shape, dating substantially from the Renaissance, it is a peaked head-covering not unlike a closed mitre, round which are placed one above the other three circlets or open iCYzc=4- i FIG.

    0
    0
  • The third edition was confiscated; its writer was deprived of his post, and in 1809 was compelled to leave Paris and take up his abode in Reims. In 18 i 1 he obtained permission to return, and again received a government appointment.

    0
    0
  • I by no means say in all his gifts, but only in some single point; as, for instance, the beauty of his language, or its harmony, or the natural and peculiar grace of the Ionic dialect, or his fulness of thought, or by whatever name those thousand beauties are called which to the despair of his imitator are united in him."

    0
    0
  • Such a formula is approximative, in that it is known that the result of its application will only be approximately correct; it differs from an approximative formula of the kind mentioned in (i) (b) above, in that it is adopted of necessity, not by choice.

    0
    0
  • The formulae of § 82 can be extended to the case of a briquette whose top has close contact with the base all along its boundary; the data being the volumes of the minor briquettes formed by the planes x =x0, x = x i,

    0
    0
  • This rate of loss for each amplitude was determined (i) when the fork was vibrating alone, and (2) when a resonator was placed with its mouth under the free ends of the fork.

    0
    0
  • Its depth at the crown is 33 ft., and its centre line?4?J???/.?IyII, 1 i i I I - - - - - - - FIG.

    0
    0
  • Of its ten books, the second and third are lost; Book i.

    0
    0
  • The walls by which it is surrounded were erected in 1320 by Guido Tarlati di Pietramala, its warlike bishop, who died in 1327, and is buried in the cathedral; they were reconstructed by Cosimo I.

    0
    0
  • This diplomatic triumph in its turn led to the consolidation of Napoleon's power as First Consul for life (August I, 1802) with the chief voice in the selection of his successor.

    0
    0
  • As regards its constitution, it has been given at different times the formulae NI 3, NHI 2, NH 2 I, N 2 H 3 I 3, &c., these varying results being due to the impurities in the substance, owing to the different investigators working under unsuitable conditions, and also to the decomposing action of light.

    0
    0
  • Chattaway determined its composition as N 2 H 3 I 3, by the addition of excess of standard sodium sulphite solution, in the dark, and subsequent titration of the excess of the sulphite with standard iodine.

    0
    0
  • The Roman town lay immediately to the southeast of the modern; its north-western wall is marked by the modern Corso Umberto I.

    0
    0
  • I do not think that early priests received oracles save in dreams, &c. That magic early invaded religion is possible, but there are many traces of its being a foreign element.

    0
    0
  • The embryo passes through three stages - (I) still enclosed within the egg and living on its own yolk; (2) free, within the vitelline mass, which is directly swallowed by the mouth; (3) there is no more vitelline mass, but the embryo is possessed of long external gills, which serve for an exchange of nutritive fluid through the maternal uterus, these gills functioning in the same way as the chorionic villi of the mammalian egg.

    0
    0
  • On his death in 1580, after a brief reign of seventeen months, the male line of the royal family which traced its descent from Henry, first count of Portugal (c. i ioo), came to an end; and all attempts to fix the succession during his lifetime having ignominiously failed, Portugal became an easy prey to Philip II.

    0
    0
  • In North America the Carolina parakeet, Conurus carolinensis, at the beginning of the i 9th century used to range in summer as high as the shores of lakes Erie and Ontario - a latitude equal to the south of France; and even much later it reached, according to trustworthy information, the junction of the Ohio and the Mississippi, though now its limits have been so much curtailed that its occurrence in any but the Gulf States is doubtful.

    0
    0
  • After 1668 the growth of trade increased its prosperity, and at the beginning of the reign of George I.

    0
    0
  • The French Th i s period is marked by a many-sided erudition period.

    0
    0
  • On the eastern side of the city stand the ruins of the Masjed i Jehan Shah, commonly known as the Masjed i Kebud, or "Blue Mosque," from the blue glazed tiles which cover its walls.

    0
    0
  • One eye-space i s shown lens, and its three pigmentabove on the left.

    0
    0
  • The usual size of the cockle in its shell is from I to 2 in.

    0
    0
  • This valley i$ famed for its fertility, and is admirably irrigated by canals, part of which, however, fell into decay after 55,000 of the inhabitants migrated to Russian territory in 1881.

    0
    0
  • The Sunnites insist that the office belongs to the tribe of Koreish (Quraish) to which Mahomet himself belonged, but this condition would vitiate the claim of the Turkish sultans, who have held the office since its transference by the last caliph to Selim I.

    0
    0
  • This i f the post-prophetic problem which occupies the more profound of the later Old-Testament books, but first received its true solution in the gospel, when the last shreds of the old nationalism disappeared and the spiritual kingdom found its centre in the person of Christ.

    0
    0
  • It was a work of so much expectation, by yourself, by your friends, and by the public, that I trembled for its appearance, but am now much relieved.

    0
    0
  • Not but that the reading of it necessarily requires so much attention, and the public is disposed to give so little, that I shall still doubt for some time of its being at first very popular, but it has depth, and solidity, and acuteness, and is so much illustrated by curious facts that it must at last attract the public attention."

    0
    0
  • If 1 denotes the logarithm to base e (that is, the so-called "Napierian " or hyperbolic logarithm) and L denotes, as above, " Napier's " logarithm, the connexion between 1 and L is expressed by L = r o 7 loge 10 7 - 10 7 / or e t = I 07e-L/Ia7 Napier's work (which will henceforth in this article be referred to as the Descriptio) immediately on its appearance in 1614 attracted the attention of perhaps the two most eminent English mathematicians then living - Edward Wright and Henry Briggs.

    0
    0
  • The best general method of calculating logarithms consists, in its simplest form, in resolving the number whose logarithm is required into factors of the form I - i r n, where n is one of the nine digits, and making use of subsidiary tables of logarithms of factors of this form.

    0
    0
  • Although the method is usually known by the names of Weddle and Hearn, it is really, in its essential features, due to Briggs, who gave in the Arithmetica logarithmica of 1624 a table of the logarithms of I + i r n up to r =9 to 15 places of decimals.

    0
    0
  • It was formerly famed for the chalybeate springs to which it owes its name, and in 1621 was visited by Charles I.

    0
    0
  • It is probable that the first of these forms is the primary one and the second in most cases a development from it due to (i.) the influence of other individual cults, (ii.) anthropomorphic tendencies, (iii.) the influence of chieftainship, hereditary and otherwise, (iv.) annual sacrifice of the sacred animal and mystical ideas connected therewith, (v.) syncretism, due either to unity of function or to a philosophic unification, (vi.) the desire to do honour to the species in the person of one of its members, and possibly other less easily traceable causes.

    0
    0
  • The most i m important developments of the cult are in East Asia p p among the Siberian tribes; among the Ainu of Sakhalin a young bear is caught at the end of winter and fed for some nine months; then after receiving honours it is killed, and the people, who previously show marks of grief at its approaching fate, dance merrily and feast on its body.

    0
    0
  • The local Roman Church, true to its ancient traditions, adhered to the simpler forms. The modern Roman chasuble pictured in Plate I.

    0
    0
  • The central section of the plains thus presents a marked contrast to the northern section; for while the northern section owes its smoothness to the removal of local gravels and sands from a formerly uneven surface by the action of degrading rivers and their inflowing tributaries, the southern section owes its smoothness to the deposition of imported gravels and sands upon a previously I uneven surface by the action of aggrading rivers and their outgoing distributaries.

    0
    0
  • The buildings are completely ruined, but enough remains to enable us to identify the grand cruciform church (A), the cloister-court with the chapterhouse (B), the refectory (I), the kitchen-court with its offices (K, 0, 0) and the other principal apartments.

    0
    0
  • The co-ordinates of its centre are - g/c, f/c; and its radius is (g 2 +f 2 - c) I.

    0
    0
  • Most of the legislation during Oscar I.'s reign aimed at improving the economic position of Sweden, and the riksdag, in its address to him in 1857, rightly declared that he had promoted the material prosperity of the kingdom more than any of his predecessors.

    0
    0
  • This event is referred to by Aristophanes in the Clouds (212), where the old farmer, on being shown Euboea on the map "lying outstretched in all its length," remarks, - "I know; we laid it prostrate under Pericles."

    0
    0
  • Other kinds of repetition are Shelley's Witch of Atlas, 6 i i seq., "Like one asleep in a green hermitage, I With gentle sleep about its eyelids playing" (sleep for smiles has come from the previous line); Revolt of Islam, 4749, "Where" for "When" appears to have come from "Where" in 4750 or 4751.

    0
    0
  • Often the word thus extruded is irrecoverable; Ginevra, 125 sqq., "The matin winds from the expanded flowers I Scatter their hoarded incense and awaken I The earth, until the dewy sleep is shaken From every living heart which it possesses I Through seas and winds, cities and wildernesses"; the second "winds" is a repetition of the first, but what should stand in its place, - "lands" or "strands" or "waves" or something else - no one can say.

    0
    0
  • As for his theology, its leading factors were - (i.) the teachings of the apologists; (ii.) the philosophy of the Stoics; (iii.) the rule of faith, interpreted in an anti-Gnostic sense, as he had received it from the Church of Rome; (iv.) the Soteriological theology of Melito and Irenaeus; (v.) the substance of the utterances of the Montanist prophets (in the closing decades of his life).

    0
    0
  • No doubt, however, he went on writing and rewriting well into the last period of his life; for example, the recently discovered 'Ath i valwv 7roXtreia mentions on the one hand (c. 54) the archonship of Cephisophon (329-328), on the other hand (c. 46) triremes and quadriremes but without quinqueremes, which first appeared at Athens in 325-324; and as it mentions nothing later it probably received its final touches between 329 and 324.

    0
    0
  • I, 1 355 a 33-35); rhetoric, since its artificial evidences involve characters, passions and reasoning, is called a kind of offshoot of dialectic and morals, and a copy of dialectic, because neither is a science of anything definite, but both faculties (SvvItyas) of providing arguments (i.

    0
    0
  • It is probable also that the " extraneous discourses " (Oi i wTEpLKoi Aoyoc) sometimes mentioned in them here mean dialectical discussions of a subject from opinions extraneous to its nature, as opposed to scientific deduction from its appropriate principles.

    0
    0
  • It is well known in England for its graceful habit, the slender, grey - or white - barked stem, the delicate, drooping branches and the quivering leaves, a bright, clear green in s p r i n g, becoming duller in the summer, but often keeping their greenness rather late into the 5 autumn.

    0
    0
  • Its more pointed lower end iš attached to the uterus by the ligament of the ovary, while its anterior border has a short reflection of peritoneum, known as the mesovarium, running forward to the broad ligament of the uterus.

    0
    0
  • The public parks and gardens are numerous and include the Botanical Garden with its famous avenue of royal palms (Oreodoxa regia); the Passeio Publico (dating from 1783), a small garden on the water-front facing the harbour entrance; the Jardim d'Acclamacao, forming part of the Praca da Republica (once known as the Campo de Sant' Anna) with its artistic walks and masses of shrubbery; the Praca Tiradentes (the old Largo do Rocio, afterwards rechristened Praca da Constituicao) with its magnificent equestrian statue of Dom Pedro I.

    0
    0
  • On this adulterant Sir Thomas Wardle remarks " With a solution of sugar, silk can have its weight augmented from I oz.

    0
    0
  • Of these the most valuable is its splendid picture gallery, founded by Augustus I.

    0
    0
  • These causes, scientific, industrial and philosophical, led to the domination of materialism in the middle of the 19th century in Germany, or rather to its revival; for in its main position, that matter and motion are everything and eternal, it was a repetition of the materialism of the i 8th century in France.

    0
    0
  • In order to prove this novel conclusion he started afresh from the Cartesian " I think " in the Kantian form of the synthetic unity of apperception acting by a priori categories; but instead of allowing, with all previous metaphysicians, that the Ego passively receives sensations from something different, and not contenting himself with Kant's view that the Ego, by synthetically combining the matter of sensations with a priori forms, partially constructs objects, and therefore Nature as we know it, he boldly asserted that the Ego, in its synthetic unity, entirely constructs things; that its act of spontaneity is not mere synthesis of passive sensations, but construction of sensations into an object within itself; and that therefore understanding makes as well as shapes Nature.

    0
    0
  • It was still being held in strict subjection by the latter when, towards the end of the i ith century, Hildebrand (Gregory VII.) undertook its enfranchisement and began the war of the investitures (q.v.), from which the papacy was to issue with such an extraordinary renewal of its vitality.

    0
    0
  • The story has been attacked more vigorously than any other portion of the Fourth Gospel, mainly on two grounds, (i.) the fact that, in spite of its striking character, it is omitted by the Synoptists, and (ii.) its unique significance.

    0
    0
  • On his return to Paris, during its occupation by the allied sovereigns, he was well received by the emperor Alexander I.

    0
    0
  • Availing himself of a testamentary union made in 1 537 between the duke of Liegnitz and the elector of Brandenburg, and of an attempt by the elector Frederick William to call it into force in spite of its annulment by Ferdinand I.

    0
    0
  • For this purpose I diminished a similar mixture of dephlogisticated [oxygen] and common air, in the same manner as before [by sparks over ], till it was reduced to a small part of its original bulk.

    0
    0
  • Under Ethbaal further expansion is recorded; Botrys north of Byblus and Aoza in North Africa are said to have been founded by him; the more famous Carthage owed its origin to the civil discords which followed the death of Metten I.

    0
    0
  • During the Scottish wars of the Independence its fortifications were strengthened by Edward I.

    0
    0
  • He was one of the most heroic figures of the American Civil War, and Grant is reported to have said when he heard of McPherson's death, " The country has lost one of its best soldiers, and I have lost my best friend."

    0
    0
  • Through its connexion with Morecambe Bay by a ship canal of I m.

    0
    0
  • Pruning is a very important operation in the fruit garden, its object being twofold - (i) to give form to the tree, and (2) to induce the free production of flower buds as the precursors of a plentiful crop of fruit.

    0
    0
  • Ruyschianum, I z ft., with its var.

    0
    0
  • Besides this, P. Sieboldii (cortusoides amoena), I ft., originally deep rose with white eye, but now including many varieties of colour, such as white, pink, lilac and purple; P. japonica, to 2 ft., crimson-rose; P. denticulate, ft., bright bluish-lilac, with its allies P. erosa and P. purpurea, all best grown in a cold frame; P. viscosa, 6 in., purple, and its white variety nivalis, with P. pedemontana and P. spectabilis, 6 in., both purple; and the charming little Indian P. rosea, 3 to 6 in., bright cherry-rose colour, are but a few of the many beautiful kinds in cultivation.

    0
    0
  • The struggle for its possession continued until 1156, when King Frederick I.

    0
    0
  • At first the bishops were too strong for the townsmen; the defences built in i i 10 were pulled down by the bishop's order two years later; and during the 12th and 13th centuries the see of Utrecht, in spite of frequent revolts, succeeded in maintaining its authority.

    0
    0
  • The I, Oogonium (og) with the an5, Fertilized oogonium sur theridial branch (az) applied rounded by two layers of to its surface.

    0
    0
  • The lining of the converter is made of 90% of the mixture of lime and magnesia which results from calcining dolomite, (Ca,Mg)CO i, at a very high temperature, and 10% of coal tar freed from its water by heating.

    0
    0
  • Fortunately the phosphorus, turned from a curse into a blessing, develops by its oxidation the needed temperature, though the fact that this requires at least i.

    0
    0
  • The conditions under which it is impracticable are (I) when the piece has either an extremely large or an extremely small cross section, and (2) when its cross section varies materially in different parts of its length.

    0
    0
  • This privilege, by which the archbishop was lord of the city and his Vogt its judge, was frequently confirmed by subsequent emperors, ending under Frederick I.

    0
    0
  • But its velocity relative to the cup, as it passes backwards, is - (V 2 - V 1), and since the forward velocity of the cup is Vi, the absolute velocity of the water is - (V2 - Vi) +VI or2V i - V2.

    0
    0
  • The town was formerly called Barnover and, still earlier, Rhosfair, and bears its present name of French origin since Edward I.

    0
    0
  • Harnack's second argument depends for its validity upon certain conclusions with regard to the date of James and I Peter, which are not universally accepted.

    0
    0
  • It received its charter from David I.

    0
    0
  • Livingstone goes so far as to say, "nothing that I ever learned of the lion could lead me to attribute to it either the ferocious or noble character ascribed to it elsewhere," and he adds that its roar is not distinguishable from that of the ostrich.

    0
    0
  • On the east bank at Karnak stand the great state temple of Amen-Re with its obelisks of Hatshepsut and Tethmosis I.

    0
    0
  • It probably received its charter from Alexander III., was created a royal burgh in 1367 and was the scene of the poem of Peblis to the Play, ascribed to James I.

    0
    0
  • After being rolled, the leaves are spread out in layers of I to 2 ins.

    0
    0
  • The successor of Louis, Charles VIII., restored the city to its former name and position, and as part of the inheritance of Mary, daughter and heiress of Charles the Bold, it was contended for by the French king, and his rival, the German king, Maximilian I.

    0
    0
  • The National Convention of the Republican Party in 1856 cast i ra votes for Lincoln as its vice-presidential candidate on the ticket with Fremont, and he was on the Republican electoral ticket of this year, and made effective campaign speeches in the interest of the new party.

    0
    0
  • The close connection with the Poles, the principle of federalism which they maintained,the support given to them by the Bavarian patriots, their protest against the revolution from above as represented equally by the annexation of Hanover and the abolition of the papal temporal power, threw them into strong opposition to the prevailing opinion, an opposition which received its expression When Hermann von Mallincrodt (182 I 1874), the most respected of their parliamentary leaders, declared that justice was not present at the birth of the empire.

    0
    0
  • Here we observe that (I) the extract agrees this time with Recognitions, not with Homilies; (2) its framework is that of the Clementine romance found in both; (3) the tenth and last book of Recognitions is here parallel to book xiv.

    0
    0
  • It received its actual name by the diploma of the emperor Francis Joseph I.

    0
    0
  • Obstruction was continued by a section of the independence party; and Kossuth, seeing his authority ignored, resigned the leadership. The obstructionists now raised the cry that the German words of command i n the joint army must be replaced by Magyar words in the regiments recruited from Hungary - a demand which, apart from its disintegrating influence on the army, the crown considered to be an encroachment upon the royal military prerogatives as defined by the Hungarian Fundamental Law XII.

    0
    0
  • The subjects of its nine chapters are - (I) the Corinthian, Ionic and Doric orders; (2) the ornaments of capitals, ac.; (3) the Doric order; (4) proportions of the cella and pronaos; (5) sites of temples; (6) doorways of temples and their architraves; (7) the Etruscan or Tuscan order of temples; (8) circular temples; (9) altars.

    0
    0
  • Similarly it is by reason of its contents that sura i.

    0
    0
  • Its first task was to crush the Hyksos power in the north-east of the Delta; this was fully accomplished by its founder Ahmosi (dialectically Ahmasi, AmOsis or Amasis I.) capturing their great stronghold of Avgris.

    0
    0
  • The society of sciences, that of northern antiquaries, the natural history and the botanical societies, &c., publish their transactions and proceedings, but the Naturhistorisk Tidsskrift, of which 14 volumes with 259 plates were published (1861-1884), and which was in the foremost rank in its department, ceased with the death in 1884 of the editor, the distinguished zoologist, I.

    0
    0
  • Except !in India, where it is controlled by the government, In 1878 seventeen lecture-rooms of the Azhar had 3707 students, of whom only 64 came from Constantinople and the northern parts of the Ottoman Empire, 8 from North Arabia, I from the government of Bagdad, 12 from Kurdistan, and 7 from India with its thirty million Sunnites.

    0
    0
  • A similar cement is a mixture of dried fresh curd with i nth of its weight of quicklime and a little camphor; it is made into a paste with water when employed.

    0
    0
  • A cement for Derbyshire spar and china, &c., is composed of 7 parts of rosin and i of wax, with a little plaster of Paris; a small quantity only should be applied to the surfaces to be united, for, as a general rule, the thinner the stratum of a cement, the more powerful its action.

    0
    0
  • Denbigh Castle, surrounding the hill with a double wall, was built, in Edward I.'s reign, by Henry de Lacy, earl of Lincoln, from whom the town received its first charter.

    0
    0
  • The lakes and water-basins may be classified in four groups, each with its own peculiar scenery and distinct mode of origin - (I) glen lakes, (2) rock-tarns, (3) moraine-tarns, (4) lakes of the plains.

    0
    0
  • Among its ancient buildings must be mentioned the Reinoldikirche, with fine stained-glass windows, the Marienkirche, the nave of which dates from the I Ith century, the Petrikirche, with a curious altar, and the Dominican church, with beautiful cloisters.

    0
    0
  • It is the prose epic of feudalism, and its romantic spirit, its high ideals, its fantastic gallantry, its ingenious adventures, its mechanism of symbolic wonders, and its flowing style have entranced readers of such various types as Francis I.

    0
    0
  • To the 4th century belongs, according to Kamper (Die deutsche Kaiseridee, 1896, p. 18) and Sackur (Texte and Forschungen, 1898, p. 114 &c.), the first nucleus of the "Tiburtine" Sibyl, very celebrated in the middle ages, with its prophecy of the return of 3 Harnack, Chronologie der altchristlichen Literatur, i.

    0
    0
  • The town owes its existence as a manufacturing centre to the tsar Alexander I.

    0
    0
  • It is chiefly remarkable for its finely preserved fortifications constructed of tetrahedral and polygonal blocks of local limestone well jointed, with maximum dimensions of about 3 by i z ft.; the outer circuit of the city wall measures about 22 m.

    0
    0
  • It is perhaps the very rapidity of the movement that is likely to retard its progress, and to fail to carry with it the wealthy clients and the decorators they employ, or perhaps even to increase the disposition to cling to the reproductions of the styles of the i i th and i 8th centuries.

    0
    0
  • Its length is about 3 yds., its width about i 2.

    0
    0
  • Tschitschibabin (Ber., 1908, 41, p. 2421), however, has shown that Ullmann and Borsum's preparation was para-benzhydroltetraphenylmethane (C 6 H 5) 2 CH C 6 H 4 C(C 6 H 5) 3 i and the view that solid triphenylmethyl is hexaphenylethane has much in its favour.

    0
    0
  • The Orion stars have the highest temperature of all and have admittedly the greatest surfaceluminosity, but the extreme brilliancy of i Orionis in proportion to its mass must be mainly due to a small density.

    0
    0
  • The propositions maintained in the argument are - "(1) That something has existed from eternity; (2) that there has existed from eternity some one immutable and independent being; (3) that that immutable and independent being, which has existed from eternity, without any external cause of its existence, must be self-existent, that is, necessarily existing; (4) what the substance or essence of that being is, which is self-existent or necessarily existing, we have no idea, neither is it at all possible for us to comprehend it; (5) that though the substance or essence of the self-existent being is itself absolutely incomprehensible to us, yet many of the essential attributes of his nature are strictly demonstrable as well as his existence, and, in the first place, that he must be of necessity eternal; (6) that the self-existent being must of necessity be infinite and omnipresent; (7) must be but one; (8) must be an intelligent being; (9) must be not a necessary agent, but a being endued with liberty and choice; (to) must of necessity have infinite power; (I I) must be infinitely wise, and (12) must of necessity be a being of infinite goodness, justice, and truth, and all other moral perfections, such as become the supreme governor and judge of the world."

    0
    0
  • In reality, the sensation and the belief arc sufficient; when I feel a sensible pressure, I cannot help believing in its reality, and therefore judging that it is real, without any tertium quid - an idea of pressure, or of existence or of pressure existing - intervening between the sensation and the belief.

    0
    0
  • The displacer (E),which takes its motion through a rod (I) from a rocking lever (F) connected by a short link to the crank-pin, is itself the regenerator, its construction being such that the air passes up and down through it as in one of the original Stirling forms. The cooler is a water vessel (G) through which water circulates from a tank (H).

    0
    0
  • The town gives its name to a great battle in which, on the 20th and 21st of May 1813, Napoleon I.

    0
    0
  • Argand had been led to deny that such an expression as i 2 could be expressed in the form A+Bi, - although, as is well known, Euler showed that one of its values is a real quantity, the exponential function of --7112.

    0
    0
  • The most important apparent exceptions to Raoult's law in dilute solutions are the cases, (I) in which the molecules of the dissolved substance in solution are associated to form compound molecules, or dissociated to form other combinations with the solvent, in such a way that the actual number of molecules n in the solution differs from that calculated from the molecular weight corresponding to the accepted formula of the dissolved substance; (2) the case in which the molecules of the vapour of the solvent are associated in pairs or otherwise so that the molecular weight m of the vapour is not that corresponding to its accepted formula.

    0
    0
  • Under Catherine II., a town, Sophia, was built close by, but its inhabitants were transferred to Tsarskoye Selo under Alexander I.

    0
    0
  • Under Carazo i s administration the boundary question between Nicaragua and Costa Rica had been settled by arbitration, the president of the United States acting as arbitrator.

    0
    0
  • In Church Street and its vicinity still stand several specimens of the i 7th-century style of architecture of eastern Germany.

    0
    0
  • District, and including both banks of Rock Creek, with its wild and picturesque beauty, is a tract of i 600 acres, known as Rock Creek Park.

    0
    0
  • Let a be the radius of the rolling sphere, c that of the spherical surface which is the locus of its centre, and let x, y, I be the co-ordinates of this centre relative to axes through 0, the centre of the fixed sphere.

    0
    0
  • Hence the velocity of sliding is that due to this rotation about I, with the radius IT; that is to say, its value is (ai+ai).IT; (26)

    0
    0
  • F = T1 Ti = T1 (I ef9) Ta(ef 1)j When a belt connecting a pair of pulleys has the tensions of its two sides originally equal, the pulleys being at rest, and when the pulleys are next set in motion, so that one of them drives the other by means of the belt, it is found that the advancing side of the belt is exactly as much tightened as the returning side is slackened, so that the mean tension remains unchanged.

    0
    0
  • To take a simple case, suppose a shaft supported on two bearings to carry a disk of weight W at its centre, I and let the centre of gravity of the disk be at a distance e from the axis of rotation, this small distance being due to imperfections of material or faulty construction.

    0
    0
  • Let da be the deviation of angular velocity to be produced in the interval dt, and I the moment of the inertia of the body about an axis through its centre of gravity; then 1/8Id(&) = Iada is the variation of the bodys actual energy.

    0
    0
  • Then its motion may be analysed into (I) a translation of its centre of gravity; and (2) a rotation about an axis through its centre of gravity perpendicular to its plane of motion.

    0
    0
  • Dhuspas, the Thospia of Ptolemy, gave its name to the district of Thospitis, the modern Thosp. The Biainian dynasty, of which Sarduris I.

    0
    0
  • At Brechin, famous like Abernethy for its round tower, the Culdee prior and his monks helped to form the chapter of the diocese founded by David I.

    0
    0
  • The first i is a history of secular events from the Creation to his own time, and in its later portions gives valuable information regarding the history of south-east Europe and western Asia.

    0
    0
  • But Tacitus, though he mentions the rumours, declares that its origin was uncertain, and in spite of such works as Profumo's Le fonti ed i tempi dello incendio Neroniano (1905), there is no proof of his guilt.

    0
    0
  • This dates most probably from the early part of the 11th century, but it received its present form mainly during the reign of the emperor Frederick I.

    0
    0
  • Rarest of all is the magnificent mountain sheep. Game is protected zealously, i not successfully, by the state, and it was officially estimated in 1898 that there were then probably 7000 elk, as many mountain sheep, 25,000 antelope and roo,000 deer within its borders (by far the greatest part in Routt and Rio Blanco counties).

    0
    0
  • And it is this law, with its clauses, that I mean when.

    0
    0
  • A relative pronoun immediately precedes its verb and can only be separated from it by an infixed pronoun, thus Dafydd a'i prynodd, " (it is) David who bought it," yno y'm gweli, " (it is) there that thou wilt see me."

    0
    0
  • But in neither form is it free from later interpolation; and its untrustworthiness is shown by its conflicting with data 1 I is now generally recognized, thanks to Volquardsen and others, that Ephorus is the principal authority followed by Diodorus, except in the chapters relating to Sicilian history.

    0
    0
  • A good idea of its heterogeneity is afforded by the English translations of Talmudic and other commentaries by P. I.

    0
    0
  • Although the name (which apparently had its origin in Britannia Major, the name given to the island to distinguish it from Britannia Minor or Brittany) had, in earlier times, been often used both by English and by foreign writers, especially for rhetorical and poetical purposes, it was not till after the accession of James I.

    0
    0
  • Sweden possesses little coal, and pig-iron is produced with charcoal only; its quality is excellent, but Sweden's proportion to the world's produce is hardly more than I %, whereas in the 17th and 18th centuries, before the use of coal elsewhere, it was much greater.

    0
    0
  • Every simple continued fraction must converge to a definite limit; for its value lies between that of the first and second convergents and, since f ?n _ _1 I, L t.

    0
    0
  • Hydarnids held its ground; and to these must be added, in the east of Asia Minor, the kingdoms of Pontus and Cappadocia, founded c. 301, by the Persians Mithradates I.

    0
    0
  • The nominal value of the copper money was 20 shahis equal to I kran, but in some places the copper money circulated at the rate of 80 shahis to the kran, less than its intrinsic value; at other places the rates varied between 70 and 25 shahis, and the average circulating value in all Persia was over 40.

    0
    0
  • There are therefore in most prescriptions (i) a basis or chief ingredient intended to cure (curare), (2) an adjuvant to assist its action and make it cure quickly (cito), (3) a corrective to prevent or lessen any undesirable effect (tuto), and (4) a vehicle or excipient to make it suitable for administration and pleasant to the patient (jucunde).

    0
    0
  • Ancient writers tell us that its original Pelasgian name was Agylla, and that the Etruscans took it and called it Caere (when this occurred is not known), I A limestone well adapted for building.

    0
    0
  • I can see nothing which will put a stop to this mischievous propaganda but some striking proof of the intention of Her Majesty's government nDt to be ousted from its position in South Africa.

    0
    0
  • The means of mitigating the damage done by this disease are (i) the selection of varieties found to resist its attacks; (2) the collection and destruction of diseased tubers so that none are left in the soil to become a menace to future crops; (3) care that no tubers showing traces of the disease are planted; (4) spraying with Bordeaux mixture at intervals from midsummer onwards.

    0
    0
  • The fifteen volumes of its Memorias, published from 1721 to 1756, show the excellent work done by its members, among whom were Caetano de Sousa, author of the colossal Historia da Casa Real portugueza, Barbosa Machado, compiler of the invaluable Bibliotheca Lusitana, and Soares da Silva, chronicler of the reign of King John I.

    0
    0
  • Hence if V is the volume of a mass M of liquid bounded by a surface whose area is S, the integral M = f f f pdx dydz, (I) where the integration is to be extended throughout the volume V, may be divided into two parts by considering separately the thin shell or skin extending from the outer surface to a depth within which the density and other properties of the liquid vary with the depth, and the interior portion of the liquid within which its properties are constant.

    0
    0
  • I or the curvature of any surface at a given point may be completely defined in terms of the positions of its principal normal sections and their radii of curvature.

    0
    0
  • At the close of the Peloponnesian War the Spartans gave to the people of Delos the management of their own affairs; but the Athenian predominance was soon after restored, and survived an appeal to the amphictyony of Delphi in 345 B.C. During Macedonian times, from 322 to 166 B.C., Delos again became independent; during this period the shrine was enriched by offerings from all quarters, and the temple and its possessions were administered by officials called i€poirocol.

    0
    0
  • In front of it was the cavalry division, with its main body in line with the main body of the I.

    0
    0
  • It appeared in history in 613, its origin being traced to Arnulf (Arnoul), bishop of Metz, and Pippin, long called Pippin of Landen, but more correctly Pippin the Old or Pippin I.

    0
    0
  • A great impulse to its trade was given in 18 9 8 by the opening of a free harbour adjoining the suburb of Lastadie on the east bank of the Oder; this embraces a total area of i 50 acres and quays with a length of 14,270 ft.

    0
    0
  • A neutral government is bound - (i) to use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming or equipping within its jurisdiction of any vessel, which it has reasonable ground to believe is intended to cruise or to carry on war against a power with which it is at peace, and also to use like diligence to prevent the departure from its jurisdiction of any vessel intended to cruise or carry on war as above, such vessel having been specially adapted, in whole or in part, within such jurisdiction, to warlike use; (2) not to permit or suffer either belligerent to make use of its ports or waters as the base of naval operations against the other, or for the purpose of the renewal or augmentation of military supplies or arms or the recruitment of men; (3) to exercise due diligence in its own ports and waters, and as to all persons within its jurisdiction to prevent any violation of the foregoing obligation and duties.

    0
    0
  • In the particular case when the radii are in the ratio of I to 3 the epicycloid (curve a) will consist of three cusps external to the circle and placed at equal distances along its circumference.

    0
    0
  • This curve is the envelope of a line of constant length, which moves so that its extremities are always on two fixed lines at right angles to each other, i.e.of the line xla+y//= I, with the condition a 2 + 1 3 2 = I/a, a constant.

    0
    0
  • Where the crest of the ridge enters the state its elevation is 1539 ft.; at High Point, i 4 m.

    0
    0
  • The public debt in 1906 was £85,641,734, equal to £56, I's.

    0
    0
  • The wasp, for instance, is said to ply its wings at the rate of i io, and the common house-fly at the rate of 330 beats per second.

    0
    0
  • When the wing is made to vibrate, its several portions travel through the spaces d b f, j k 1, g h i, and e a c in exactly the same interval of time.

    0
    0
  • The principal other public buildings are the church of St Margaret with a beautiful portal and a lofty tower, founded in the 12th century, twice burnt down, and rebuilt in its present form in 1652; the church of the Augustinian convent, with an altar-piece by the painter Simon Jacobs; the theatre; the fire insurance bank and the life insurance bank; the ducal palace, in the Italian villa style, with a winter garden and picture gallery; the buildings of the ducal legislature; the hospital; the old town-hall, dating from the i ith century; the old residence of the painter Lucas Cranach, now used as a girls' school; the ducal stable; and the Friedrichsthal palace, now used as public offices.

    0
    0
  • He supported the church in its conflicts with the civil powers in Venice, France and England, and sharply criticized James I.

    0
    0
  • This town, visited by Livingstone, Stanley and Cameron, until lately one of the greatest markets in Africa, has ceased to exist, and its site, when I last saw it, was occupied by a single house.

    0
    0
  • It is usual in both girders and beams to provide not only for the safe support of the greatest possible distributed load, but for the greatest weight, such as that of a safe or other heavy piece of furniture which may be moved over the floor at its weakest points, the centres of the girders and beams. It must always be borne in mind that the formulae for the ultimate strength of the " I " beams only hold good when the upper chord or flange is supported laterally.

    0
    0
  • In flat forms of masonry floor construction the level of its bottom is placed somewhat below the bottom of the " I " beams and girders, so that when it is plastered a continuous surface of at least an inch of mortar will form a fire-proof protection for the lower flanges of the beams and girders.

    0
    0
  • It is said to have been a town of some note as early as the 9th century; and its castle, of which there are hardly any remains, was the residence of David I.

    0
    0
  • Haverfordwest owes its origin to the advent of the Flemings, who were permitted by Henry I.

    0
    0
  • I; hence its present form is earlier than 166 B.C. It represents a primitive and very sensuous view of the eternal Messianic kingdom on earth, seeing that the righteous beget woo children before they die.

    0
    0
  • But the foundation of Franzensbad as a watering-place really dates from 1793, when Dr Adler built here the first Kurhaus, and the place received its name after the emperor Francis I.

    0
    0
  • Jacob's Cavern (q.v.), near Pineville, McDonald county, disclosed on exploration skeletons of men and animals, rude implements, &c. Crystal Cave, near Joplin, Jasper county, has its entire surface lined with calcite crystals and scalenohedron formations, from I ft.

    0
    0
  • The latter is considered below; " The Black .,, it is i nd i cat i ve of the chemical elements from which the lines can proceed, and its state at the time of emission; the former is indicative only of the rate of loss of energy from the sun by radiation, and is inwoven with a remarkable group of physical theory and experiment, known as the theory of the black body, or as black radiation.

    0
    0
  • Its mean distance from the sun is 1.46 times i that of the earth; but, besides, the eccentricity of its orbit is large (0.22), so that at the most favourable opportunity it can come within one-seventh of the distance of the sun.

    0
    0
  • Casale Monferrato was given by Charlemagne to the church of Vercelli, but obtained its liberty from Frederick I.

    0
    0
  • The end knife-edges are adjusted and tightly jammed into exact position by means of wedge pieces and set screws, and the beam is furnished with delicate adjusting weights at its top. The position of the beam with respect to the horizontal is shown by a horizontal pointer (not shown) projecting from one end of it, which plays past a scale, each division of which corresponds to the i l oth or i hth of a grain according to the size and delicacy of the machine.

    0
    0
  • The box, I, has a hinged bottom with a projecting click finger which, as the box de - scends, plays idly over the staves of a ladder arc. When the weight is removed from the platform, the counterbalance, E, causes the finger, G, to run back to its zero position, carrying with it the finger M, and causing the click finger of the box, I, to trip open the bottom of the box and let the penny fall out.

    0
    0
  • Next, a pair of mesenteries, marked II,II in the diagram, is developed in the sulcular chamber, its musclebanners facing the same way as those of I, I.

    0
    0
  • The essential features which distinguish this from other systems are (I) the limitation of the number of different symbols, only ten being used, however large the number to be represented may be; (2) the use of the zero to indicate the absence of number; and (3) the principle of local value, by which a symbol in effect represents different numbers, according to its position.

    0
    0
  • The series of halves 2 in the one case, and of thirds in the I O I other, are entirely different series of 2 fractional numbers, but we can corn ‚ 0 0 pare them by putting each in its proper position in relation to the series of sixths.

    0
    0
  • For multiplication by a proper fraction or a decimal, it is sometimes convenient, especially when we are dealing with mixed quantities, to convert the multiplier into the sum or difference of a number of fractions, each of which has i as its numerator.

    0
    0
  • Of its recent public monuments may be mentioned one to Joseph Victor von Scheffel (1826-1886); a bronze equestrian statue of the emperor William I.

    0
    0
  • The chief object in his third budget in 1846the reduction of the duty on corn to I s.

    0
    0
  • This note was presented almost at the moment the tsar learned that the French and British fleets had entered the Black Sea, and the Russian government, instead of considering it, withdrew its ministers from London and Paris; the French i and British ambassadors were thereupon withdrawn from St Petersburg.

    0
    0
  • The works of this school are little read, but in time its results penetrate the teaching in schools and universities, and then the pages of literary historians; it is represented in England by a fairly good organization, the Royal Historical Society (with which the Camden Society has been amalgamated), and by an excellent periodical, The English Historical Review (founded in 1884), while some sort of propaganda is attempted by the Historical Association (started in I 906).

    0
    0
  • The expression 2 is that of the number of the disposable constants in a curve of the order m with nodes and cusps (in fact that there shall be a node is I condition, a cusp 2 conditions) and the equation (9) thus expresses that the curve and its reciprocal contain each of them the same number of disposable constants.

    0
    0
  • For a curve of the order the expression Zm(m - I) - 6 - K is termed the " deficiency " (as to this more hereafter); the equation (to) expresses therefore that the curve and its reciprocal have each of them the same deficiency.

    0
    0
  • When thousands after thousands are dragooned out of their country for the sake of their religion, or sent to row in the galleys for selling salt against law, - when the liberty of every individual is at the mercy of every prostitute, pimp or parasite that has access to power or any of its basest substitutes, - my mind, I own, is not at once prepared to be satisfied with gentle palliatives for such disorders" (Francis to Burke, November 3, 1790).

    0
    0
  • This subject, which is discussed in the article Molecule, has for its purpose (I) the derivation of a physical structure of a gas which will agree with the experimental observations of the diverse physical properties, and (2) a correlation of the physical properties and chemical composition.

    0
    0
  • The name of Wye belongs also to two smaller English rivers - (I) a right-bank tributary of the Derbyshire Derwent, rising in the uplands near Buxton, and having part of its early course through one of the caverns characteristic of the district; (2) a left-bank tributary of the Thames, watering the valley of the Chilterns in which lies Wycombe and joining the main river near Bourne End.

    0
    0
  • Within its precincts were buried Queen Margaret and Malcolm Canmore; their sons Edgar and Alexander I., with his queen; David I.

    0
    0
  • If in the West Athanasianism is a datum, but unexamined, and not valued for its own sake, Augustinianism is a bold interpretation of the essential piety of the West, but an interpretation which not i even piety can long endure - morally burdensome if religiously mpressive.

    0
    0
  • Church History proper; C. The depicting of the present state of the Church; (I) its faith - Dogmatics; the belief of one branch of the Church; (2) its outward condition - Statistics; these should be universal.

    0
    0
  • I have champed up all that chaff about the ego and the non-ego, noumena and phenomena, and all the rest of it, too often not to know that in attempting even to think of these questions, the human intellect flounders at once out of its depth."

    0
    0
  • Races appear to have been established here as early as James I's residence at Nonsuch, but they did not assume a permanent character until 1730.

    0
    0
  • But his position in both theology and law was more narrowly traditional than that of ash-Shafi`i; he rejected all reasoning, whether orthodox or heretical in its conclusions, and stood for acceptance on tradition (nagl) only from the Fathers.

    0
    0
  • As we saw, his distinction between practical and speculative Wisdom belongs to the deepest of his disagreements with his master; and in the case of StKatoQ5vi again he distinguishes the wider use of the term to express Law-observance, which (he says) coincides with the social side of virtue generally, and its narrower use for the virtue that " aims at a kind of equality," whether (I) in the distribution of wealth, honour, &c., or (2) in commercial exchange, or (3) in the reparation of wrong done.

    0
    0
  • Thus the summum bonum for man is objectively God, subjectively the happiness to be derived from loving vision of his perfections; although there is a lower kind of happiness to be realized here 1 Abelard afterwards retracted this view, at least in its extreme form; and in fact does not seem to have been fully conscious of the difference between (I) unfulfilled intention to do an act objectively right, and (2) intention to do what is merely believed by the agent to be right.

    0
    0
  • To indicate the method of proof, observe that the determinant on the left-hand side, qua linear function of its columns, may be I The reason is the connexion with the corresponding theorem for the multiplication of two matrices.

    0
    0
  • C. Kapteyn's inquiry in i 901; so that the range of uncertainty as to its position continues unsatisfactorily wide.

    0
    0
  • The scheme of doctrine of the first four general councils, in all its vagueness as to these points, was to be maintained; so far as the controversy had gone, the disputants on either side were to be held free from censure, but to resume it I The name seems to occur first in John of Damascus.

    0
    0
  • In order to improve the condition of affairs in congested districts, the board was empowered (I) to amalgamate small holdings either by directly aiding migration or emigration of occupiers, or by recommending the Land Commission to facilitate amalgamation, and (2) generally to aid and develop out of its resources agriculture, forestry, the breeding of live-stock, weaving, spinning, fishing and any other suitable industries.

    0
    0
  • The date of its reconquest is uncertain, but it must have been before the time of Ramiro I.

    0
    0
  • Her name is commonly connected with apr€µi i s - pure, unpolluted.

    0
    0
  • But the hypothesis that Cronus is a late derivation from KpovtSr i s and Kpoviwv is by no means universally accepted.

    0
    0
  • Cond and Coligny, who, having obtained liberty of conscience in January 1561, now demanded liberty of worship. The colloquy at Poissy between the cardinal of Lorraine and Theodore Bean (September 1561), did not end in the agreement hoped for, and the duke of Guise so far abused its spirit as to embroil the French Calvinists with the German I

    0
    0