Hypotonia sentence example

hypotonia
  • Hypotonia, or severely decreased muscle tone, is seen primarily in children.
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  • Hypotonia is a symptom that can be caused by many different conditions.
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  • Hypotonia, also called floppy infant syndrome or infantile hypotonia, is a condition of decreased muscle tone.
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  • Hypotonia is also characterized by problems with mobility and posture, lethargy, weak ligaments and joints, and poor reflexes.
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  • Hypotonia does not, however, affect intellect.
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  • No demographic information as of 2004 was available for hypotonia, since it is a symptom of an underlying disorder.
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  • The study followed 243 infants with hypotonia for three to seven years.
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  • Cerebellar ataxia: a movement disorder which with its sudden onset, often following an infectious viral disease, causes hypotonia.
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  • The following are common symptoms associated with hypotonia.
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  • Hypotonia is normally discovered within the first few months of life.
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  • Most of the disorders associated with hypotonia also cause other symptoms that, when taken together, suggest a specific disorder and cause for the hypotonia.
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  • Specific diagnostic tests used will vary depending on the suspected cause of the hypotonia.
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  • Is the hypotonia always the same or does it seem worse at certain times?
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  • Karyotype: a test that performs a chromosomal analysis from a blood test, used to determine whether the hypotonia is the result of a genetic disorder.
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  • Hypotonia can be assessed because muscle fibers have a smaller diameter than that of normal muscle.
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  • When hypotonia is caused by an underlying condition, that condition is treated first, followed by symptomatic and supportive therapy for the hypotonia.
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  • No specific treatment is required to treat mild congenital hypotonia, but children with this problem may periodically need treatment for common conditions associated with hypotonia, such as recurrent joint dislocations.
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  • Treatment programs to help increase muscle strength and sensory stimulation programs are developed once the cause of the child's hypotonia is established.
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  • Some SLPs are also trained to work with oral/motor problems, such as swallowing, and other feeding difficulties resulting from hypotonia.
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  • Hypotonia can be lifelong, but in some cases, muscle tone improves over time.
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  • Children with mild hypotonia may not experience developmental delay, although some children acquire gross motor skills (sitting, walking, running, jumping) more slowly than most.
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  • As of 2004 there was no prevention for hypotonia.
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  • E. "Benign congenital hypotonia is not a diagnosis."
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  • Trifiro G., et al. "Neonatal hypotonia: don't forget the Prader-Willi syndrome."
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  • H., et al. "Infant with inadequate feeding and weight gain, progressive respiratory difficulty, hypotonia, and weakness, with onset at birth."
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  • Peroxisomal disorder patients have decreased muscle tone (hypotonia), which in the most severe cases is generalized, while in less severe cases, is usually restricted to the neck and trunk muscles.
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  • The symptoms of asphyxia neonatorum are bluish or gray skin color (cyanosis), slow heartbeat (bradycardia), stiff or limp limbs (hypotonia), and a poor response to stimulation.
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  • They also have unusual facial features, poor muscle tone (hypotonia), small head size (microcephaly), and mental retardation.
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  • Infants with cri du chat also typically have low birth weight, slow growth, a small head (microcephaly), and poor muscle tone (hypotonia).
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  • Hypotonia (poor muscle tone) is also common, leading to problems with eating and slow, but normal development.
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  • Individuals with cri du chat have a 10 percent mortality during infancy due to complications associated with congenital heart defects, hypotonia, and feeding difficulties.
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  • Hypotonia is the most common symptom of motor dysfunction in newborns and infants.
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  • The challenge in correctly diagnosing a "floppy" child lies in distinguishing between central and neuromuscular hypotonia.
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  • Normal or increased deep tendon reflexes suggest central hypotonia.
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  • Because of weak, floppy muscles (hypotonia), babies learn to sit up, crawl, and walk much later than their normal peers.
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  • Newborns with PWS generally have poor muscle tone, (hypotonia) and do not feed well.
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  • Infants with PWS have weak muscle tone (hypotonia).
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  • This hypotonia causes problems with sucking and eating so that infants with PWS may initially have problems gaining weight.
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  • Hypotonia may also During infancy, babies with PWS may also sleep more than normal and have problems controlling their temperature.
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  • The need for speech therapy, due to speech difficulties caused by hypotonia, should be assessed.
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