This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

hypothalamus

hypothalamus

hypothalamus Sentence Examples

  • Granulomas in the hypothalamus or posterior pituitary can cause diabetes insipidus.

    1
    0
  • MRI scans of these patients indicate that there is some loss of brain tissue in the hypothalamus itself, suggesting that the neurons responsible for secreting orexins have died.

    1
    1
  • Infection also involves motor cortex, hypothalamus, and globus pallidus, brainstem nuclei, reticular formation, cerebellar roof nuclei, and vermis.

    0
    0
  • This hormone is secreted by the pituitary gland and monitored by thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH ), which is produced in the hypothalamus gland.

    0
    0
  • This study revealed that the action of Hoodia's steroidal glycoside was directly on the hypothalamus, the part of the brain controlling appetite.

    0
    0
  • Levels of cortisol and adrenocorticotrophic hormone, aldosterone, insulin and regulation by the hypothalamus are all implicated too.

    0
    0
  • Within the brain, the hypothalamus produces gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) which is secreted into the pituitary gland (1 ).

    0
    0
  • hypothalamus that control hunger and control satiety.

    0
    0
  • Feeding is controlled by a part of the brain called the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • Brain Model Tutorial A good page for learning the various parts of the brain including hypothalamus etc. 4* .

    0
    0
  • The amygdala then stimulates the hypothalamus to produce corticotropin-releasing hormone.

    0
    0
  • Clients & Therapists Clients and therapists start by translating the unconscious messages that trigger the hypothalamus to produce the symptoms of illness.

    0
    0
  • Diseases affecting the hypothalamus In contrast, damage to the hypothalamus often leads to frank obesity.

    0
    0
  • The former is produced by the hypothalamus responding to lowered levels of salt in the blood.

    0
    0
  • They are controlled by the pituitary gland, which is controlled by the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • These results indicate that disruption of the nucleus accumbens or lateral hypothalamus alter the expression of emotional behaviors.

    0
    0
  • The posterior hypothalamus in the regulation of wakefulness and paradoxical sleep.

    0
    0
  • hypothalamus glands, which help your body release its sequestered stores of growth hormone.

    0
    0
  • hypothalamus hormone, is integrally involved in appetite control, weight maintenance, and lowering the levels of CYP450.

    0
    0
  • hypothalamus area at the front of the brain that is involved in controlling many things, such as body temperature and sexual function.

    0
    0
  • hypothalamus in the brain and controlled by the kidneys.

    0
    0
  • hypothalamus in the sensation of fatigue.

    0
    0
  • hypothalamus of the brain.

    0
    0
  • neuropeptide precursor protein that is abundant in the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • These are all regulated from an area of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus, which is in the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • parasympathetic activity can also respond to the hypothalamus, which controls the nucleus of the solitary tract.

    0
    0
  • Nerve impulses from the hypothalamus stimulate the posterior pituitary to produce ADH when the osmotic pressure of the blood rises.

    0
    0
  • Hormonal effects can be caused either by damage to the pituitary gland itself or to the hypothalamus, which controls the pituitary.

    0
    0
  • prostaglandin synthesis in the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • This resetting of the hypothalamus is usually caused by small molecules called pyrogens in the blood.

    0
    0
  • sagittal section, right below the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • PYY acts on the hypothalamus to enhance satiety and is under investigation as an anti-obesity agent.

    0
    0
  • This resetting of the hypothalamus is usually caused by small molecules called pyrogens in the blood.

    0
    0
  • Look right here on the sagittal section, right below the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • PYY acts on the hypothalamus to enhance satiety and is under investigation as an anti-obesity agent.

    0
    0
  • The hypothalamus is a small area of the brain that helps control the reproductive functions as well as many other important bodily functions.

    0
    0
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone is released by the hypothalamus in the brain, where it moves to the pituitary gland.

    0
    0
  • In the brain's hypothalamus, a special supra chiasmatic nucleus (SCN) responds by sending messages to the other parts of the body to get you moving, including hormones.

    0
    0
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the body's internal clock is located in the brain at the base of the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • When this information contradicts the established rhythm of the body's internal clock, the hypothalamus attempts to adjust by triggering activities and functions that the body is not yet ready for, resulting in the symptoms of jet lag.

    0
    0
  • The "thermostat" that controls this process is located in the hypothalamus, a small structure located deep within the brain.

    0
    0
  • A stroke or tumor can damage the hypothalamus, causing the body's thermostat to malfunction.

    0
    0
  • Normal menstrual periods are the result of proper functioning and synchronization of the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and ovaries.

    0
    0
  • The hypothalamus is the part of the brain that controls body temperature, cellular metabolism, and such basic functions as appetite for food, the sleep/wake cycle, and reproduction.

    0
    0
  • The hypothalamus also secretes hormones that regulate the pituitary gland.

    0
    0
  • The hypothalamus and pituitary may fail to produce enough hormone to stimulate the ovaries to produce their hormones.

    0
    0
  • Disorders of the hypothalamus or the pituitary gland: These problems may be associated with brain tumors.

    0
    0
  • In some cases the doctor may order an MRI to rule out tumors affecting the hypothalamus or pituitary gland.

    0
    0
  • Tumors of the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland or abnormalities of the reproductive organs usually require surgery.

    0
    0
  • The growth process begins in the lower part of the forebrain in a small organ called the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • The hypothalamus releases hormones that regulate the production of other hormones.

    0
    0
  • When the hypothalamus releases growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), the anterior pituitary is stimulated to release growth hormone (GH).

    0
    0
  • Body temperature is set by the thermoregulatory center, located in an area in the brain called the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • In the complex process that produces fever, cytokines cause the thermoregulatory center in the hypothalamus to reset the normal temperature level.

    0
    0
  • If the hypothalamus requires more heat, shivering occurs.

    0
    0
  • Some believe it is physical, from the body, while others believe it is mental, from the hypothalamus region of the brain.

    0
    0
  • Probably the best known of these conditions is growth hormone deficiency, which is associated with the pituitary and hypothalamus glands.

    0
    0
  • Neurosurgical techniques in the brain such as implanting tiny electrodes directly into the cerebellum or cutting a portion of the hypothalamus have very specific uses and have had mixed results.

    0
    0
  • The gene allows cells in the hypothalamus (the part of the brain that regulates sleep behavior) to receive messages from other cells.

    0
    0
  • In the late 1990s, three independent research groups discovered a neuropeptide system in the hypothalamus, the part of the brain that regulates body temperature and appetite.

    0
    0
  • The nerve cells, or neurons, in this part of the hypothalamus secrete substances known as hypocretins or orexins, which regulate the sleep/wake cycle in humans.

    0
    0
  • As of the early 2000s, narcolepsy is thought to be an orexin deficiency syndrome; that is, it develops when a person's hypothalamus does not secrete enough orexins to keep the person from falling asleep at inappropriate times.

    0
    0
  • Hypocretins-Chemicals secreted in the hypothalamus that regulate the sleep/wake cycle.

    0
    0
  • This variation is normal and is usually the result of imperfect coordination between the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland, and the ovaries.

    0
    0
  • Oligomenorrhea that occurs in adolescents is often caused by immaturity or lack of synchronization between the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and ovaries.

    0
    0
  • The hypothalamus is the part of the brain that controls body temperature, cellular metabolism, and such basic functions as appetite for food, the sleep/wake cycle, and reproduction.

    0
    0
  • The hypothalamus also secretes hormones that regulate the pituitary gland.

    0
    0
  • In a few cases the doctor may order an MRI to rule out tumors affecting the hypothalamus or pituitary gland.

    0
    0
  • Glandular therapy can assist in bringing about a balance in the glands involved in the reproductive cycle, including the hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid, ovarian, and adrenal glands.

    0
    0
  • Puberty is initiated by hormonal changes triggered by a part of the brain called the hypothalamus, which stimulates the pituitary gland, which in turn activates other glands as well.

    0
    0
  • Beginning as early as age eight in girls-and two years later, on average, in boys-the hypothalamus signals hormonal change that stimulates the pituitary.

    0
    0
  • Under normal conditions, the pituitary receives input from another brain structure, the hypothalamus, located at the base of the brain.

    0
    0
  • This input from the hypothalamus regulates the pituitary's release of hormones.

    0
    0
  • For example, the hypothalamus produces growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), which directs the pituitary to release GH.

    0
    0
  • Input from the hypothalamus should also direct the pituitary to stop releasing hormones.

    0
    0
  • In acromegaly, the pituitary continues to release GH and ignores signals from the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • Limbic system-A group of structures in the brain that includes the hypothalamus, amygdala, olfactory bulbs, and hippocampus.

    0
    0
  • As of the early 2000s, there are accurate blood tests for most of the hormones in the body, including those from the pituitary and even some from the hypothalamus.

    0
    0
  • Individuals with PWS lack the ability to feel full or satiated because of a flaw in the hypothalamus part of their brain, which normally registers feelings of hunger and satiety.

    0
    0
  • These drugs work by affecting the hypothalamus area of the brain, where chemicals that trigger satiety are regulated.

    0
    0
  • Though studies of the hCG diet are ongoing, it is believed that the diet works because hCG affects the functioning of the hypothalamus by promoting consumption of excessive amounts of adipose deposits.

    0
    0
  • In 2002, they examined the region of the brain's hypothalamus containing the arcuate nucleus, or ARC.

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →