This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

hydrometer

hydrometer

hydrometer Sentence Examples

  • Hydrometer >>

  • The quantity of alcohol present in an aqueous solution is determined by a comparison of its specific gravity with standard tables, or directly by the use of an alcoholometer, which is a hydrometer graduated so as to read per cents by weight (degrees according to Richter) or volume per cents (degrees according to Tralles).

  • Acting on a principle quite different from any previously discussed is the capillary hydrometer or staktometer of Brewster, which is based upon the difference in the surface tension and density of pure water, and of mixtures of alcohol and water in varying proportions.

  • The capillary hydrometer consists simply of a small pipette with a bulb in the middle of the stem, the pipette terminating in a very fine capillary point.

  • In the laboratory the specific gravity is determined in a pyknometer by actual weighing, and on board ship by the use of an areometer or hydrometer.

  • Three types of areometer are in use: (I) the ordinary hydrometer of invariable weight with a direct reading scale, a set of from five to ten being necessary to cover the range of specific gravity from 1 000 to 1.031 so as to take account of sea-water of all possible salinities; (2) the " Challenger " type of areometer designed by J.

  • HYDROMETER (Gr.

  • It is upon this principle that the hydrometer is constructed, and it obviously admits of two modes of application in the case of fluids: either we may compare the weights of floating bodies which are capable of displacing the same volume of different fluids, or we may compare the volumes of the different fluids which are displaced by the same weight.

  • The hydrometer is said by Synesius Cyreneus in his fifth letter to have been invented by Hypatia at Alexandria,' but appears to have been neglected until it was reinvented by Robert Boyle, whose "New Essay Instrument," as described in the Phil.

  • for June 1675, differs in no essential particular from Nicholson's hydrometer.

  • This seems to be the first reference to the hydrometer in modern times.

  • 89, Citizen Eusebe Salverte calls attention to the poem "De Ponderibus et Mensuris" generally ascribed to Rhemnius Fannius Palaemon, and consequently 300 years older than Hypatia, in which the hydrometer is described and attributed to Archimedes.

  • for 1675, is generally known as the common hydrometer.

  • The quantity of mercury or shot inserted depends upon the density of the liquids for which the hydrometer is to be employed, it being essential that the whole of the bulb should be immersed in the heaviest liquid for which the instrument is used, while the length and diameter of the stem must be such that the hydrometer will float in the lightest liquid for which it is required.

  • of liquid dis placed) when the surface of the liquid in which the hydrometer floats coincides with the lowest division of the scale, A the area of the transverse section of the stem, 1 the length of a scale division, n the number of divisions on the stem, and W the weight of the instrument.

  • w n be the weights of unit volume of the liquids in which the hydrometer sinks to the divisions o, I, 2 ...

  • The plan commonly adopted to obviate the necessity of inconveniently long stems is to construct a number of hydrometers as nearly alike as may be, but to load them differently, so that the scaledivisions at the bottom of the stem of one hydrometer just overlap those at the top of the stem of the preceding.

  • long, will be equivalent to a single hydrometer with a stem of 30 in.

  • This difficulty may be met, as in Keene's hydrometer, by having all the weights of precisely the same volume but of different masses, and never using the instrument except with one of these weights attached.

  • 2) "After having made several fruitless trials with ivory, because it imbibes spirituous liquors, and thereby alters its gravity, he (Mr Clarke) at last made a copper hydrometer, represented in fig.

  • The upper part of this wire is filed flat on one side, for the stem of the hydrometer, with a mark at m, to which it sinks exactly in proof spirits.

  • - Clarke's it sinks to A), or nth under proof (as when it Hydrometer.

  • The correction for temperature thus afforded was not sufficiently accurate for excise purposes, and William Speer in his essay on the hydrometer (Tilloch's Phil.

  • Clarke's hydrometer, however, remained the standard instrument for excise purposes from 1787 until it was displaced by that of Sikes.

  • Desaguliers himself constructed a hydrometer of the ordinary type for comparing the specific gravities of different kinds of water (Desaguliers's Experimental Philosophy, ii.

  • The first important improvement in the hydrometer after its reinvention by Boyle was introduced by G.

  • characteristics of Fahrenheit's hydrometer and of Boyle's essay instrument.

  • In comparing the densities of different liquids, it is clear that this instrument is precisely equivalent to that of Fahrenheit, and must be employed in the same manner, weights being placed in the top scale only until the hydrometer sinks to the mark on the wire, when the specific gravity of the liquid will be proportional to the weight of the instrument together with the weights in the scale.

  • The above example illustrates how Nicholson's or Fahrenheit's hydrometer may be employed as a weighing machine for small weights.

  • This error diminishes as the diameter of the stem is reduced, but is sensible in the case of the thinnest stem which can be employed, and is the chief source of error in the employment of Nicholson's hydrometer, which otherwise would be an instrument of extreme delicacy and precision.

  • It is possible by applying a little oil to the upper part of the bulb of a common or of a Sikes's hydrometer, and carefully placing it in pure water, to cause it to float with the upper part of the bulb and the whole of the stem emerging as indicated in fig.

  • The universal hydrometer of G.

  • 254, is merely Nicholson's hydrometer with the screw at C projecting through the collar into which it is screwed, and terminating in a sharp point above the cup G.

  • The hydrometer therefore displaced woo grains of distilled water at 60°F.and hence the specific gravity of any other liquid was at once indicated FIG.

  • Charles's balance areometer is similar to Nicholson's hydrometer, except that the lower basin admits of inversion, thus enabling the instrument to be employed for solids lighter than water, the inverted basin serving the same purpose as the pointed screw in Atkins's modification of the instrument.

  • Adie's sliding hydrometer is of the ordinary form, but can be adjusted for liquids of widely differing specific gravities by drawing out a sliding tube, thus changing the volume of the hydrometer while its weight remains constant.

  • The hydrometer of A.

  • Baume, which has been extensively used in France, consists of a common hydrometer graduated in the following manner.

  • The first of these was found by immersing the hydrometer in pure water, and marking the stem at the level of the surface.

  • The hydrometer was plunged in these solutions in order, and the, stem having been marked at the several surfaces, the degrees so obtained were numbered I, 2, 3, ...

  • The instrument thus adapted to the determination of densities exceeding that of water was called the hydrometer for salts.

  • The hydrometer intended for densities less than that of water, or the hydrometer for spirits, is constructed on a similar principle.

  • The densities corresponding to the several degrees of Baume's hydrometer are given by Nicholson (Journal of Philosophy, i.

  • 89) as follows: - Baume's Hydrometer for Spirits.

  • Baume's Hydrometer for Salts.

  • Cartier's hydrometer was very similar to that of Baume, Cartier having been employed by the latter to construct his instruments for the French revenue.

  • In Speer's hydrometer the stem has the form of an octagonal prism, and upon each of the eight faces a scale is engraved, indicating the percentage strength of the spirit corresponding to the several divisions of the scale, the eight scales being adapted respectively to the temperature 35°, 40°, 45 50°, 55, 60°, 65° and 70° F.

  • - Jones's instrument, and to the instrument loaded with the Hydrometer.

  • If the mercury in the thermometer stand above this zero the spirit must be reckoned weaker than the hydrometer indicates by the number on the thermometer scale level with the top of the mercury, while C f if the thermometer indicate a temperature a? ?!

  • At the side of each of the four scales on the stem of the hydrometer is en r ' graved a set of small numbers indicating the contraction in volume which would be experienced if the requisite amount of water (or spirit) were added to bring the sample tested to the proof strength The hydrometer constructed by Dicas of Liverpool is provided with a sliding scale which FIG.

  • Quin's universal hydrometer is described in the Transactions of the Society of Arts, viii.

  • Atkins's hydrometer, as originally constructed, is described in Nicholson's Journal, 8vo, 276.

  • The instrument is provided with a sliding rule, with scales corresponding to the several weights, which indicate the specific gravity corresponding to the several divisions of the hydrometer scale compared with water at 55° F.

  • Tralles's hydrometer differs from Gay-Lussac's only in being graduated at 4° C. instead of 15° C., and taking alcohol of density 7939 at 15.5° C. for pure alcohol instead of 7947 as taken by GayLussac (Keene's Handbook of Hydrometry).

  • In Beck's hydrometer the zero of the scale corresponds to density 1 000 and the division 30 to density.

  • In the centesimal hydrometer of Francceur the volume of the stem between successive divisions of the scale is always, oath of the whole volume immersed when the instrument floats in water at 4° C. In order to graduate the stem the instrument is first weighed, then immersed in distilled water at 4° C., and the line of flotation 7.1 F marked zero.

  • The length of 100 divisions of the scale, or the length of the uniform stem the volume of which would be equal to that of the hydrometer up to the zero graduation, Francceur called the "modulus" of the hydrometer.

  • Dr Bones of Montpellier constructed a hydrometer which was based upon the results of his experiments on mixtures of alcohol and water.

  • - Sikes's longed so as to contain only 10 of these divisions, Hydrometer.

  • the other 90 being provided for by the addition of 9 weights to the bottom of the instrument as in Clarke's hydrometer.

  • Sikes's hydrometer, on account of its similarity to that of Bories, appears to have been borrowed from that instrument.

  • - Atkins's Hydrometer.

  • The following table gives the specific gravities corresponding to the principal graduations on Sikes's hydrometer at 60° F.

  • The merit of Sikes's system lies not so much in the hydrometer as in the complete system of tables by which the readings of the instrument are at once converted into percentage of proof-spirit.

  • Table showing the Densities corresponding to the Indications of Sikes's Hydrometer.

  • In the above table for Sikes's hydrometer two densities are given corresponding to each of the degrees 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90, indicating that the successive weights belonging to the particular instrument for which the table has been calculated do not quite agree.

  • A table which indicates the weight per gallon of spirituous liquors for every degree of Sikes's hydrometer is printed in 23 and 24 Vict.

  • Sikes's hydrometer was established for the purpose of collecting the revenue of the United Kingdom by Act of Parliament, 56 Geo.

  • c. 28, which established Sikes's hydrometer on a permanent footing.

  • It is the practice of the officers of the inland revenue to adjust Sikes's hydrometer at 62° F., that being the temperature at which the imperial gallon is defined as containing 10 lb avoirdupois of distilled water.

  • Keene, of the Hydrometer Office, London, has constructed an instrument after the model of Sikes's, but provided with twelve weights of different masses but equal volumes, and the instrument is never used without having one of these attached.

  • When loaded with either of the lightest two weights the instrument is specifically lighter than Sikes's hydrometer when unloaded, and it may thus be used for specific gravities as low as that of absolute alcohol.

  • Twaddell's hydrometer is adapted for densities greater than that of water.

  • It resembles Sikes's hydrometer in other respects, but is provided with eight weights.

  • The salinometer is a hydrometer originally intended to indicate the strength of the brine in marine boilers in which sea-water is employed.

  • Saunders's salinometer consists of a hydrometer which floats in a chamber through which the water from the boiler is allowed to flow in a gentle stream, at a temperature of 200° F.

  • The peculiarity of the instrument consists in the stream of water, as it enters the hydrometer chamber, being made to impinge against a disk of metal, by which it is broken into drops, thus liberating the steam, which would otherwise disturb the instrument.

  • The use of Sikes's hydrometer necessitates the employment of a considerable quantity of spirit.

  • (2) Where under any enactment Sykes's (sic) Hydrometer is directed to be used or may be used for the purpose of ascertaining the strength or weight of spirits, any means so authorized by regulations may be used instead of Sykes's Hydrometer and references to Sykes's Hydrometer in any enactment shall be construed accordingly.

  • In addition, it is quite common for them to use a hydrometer to randomly test spirits to determine their alcohol by volume.

  • If you have a battery hydrometer, the reading should be between 1.28 and 1.30.

  • The specific gravity of each batch in the stock solution should be checked at least weekly by designated staff with a calibrated hydrometer.

  • The more reliable narrow spectrum hydrometer gave a reading of 1.026 which actually would mean a saline figure of 35.

  • I believe you have to go back to using a conventional floating hydrometer.

  • hydrometer correction figure we arrive a salinity of 35 (ppt ), which is full strength seawater.

  • hydrometer readings are not really accurate enough for more than a general guide.

  • The quantity of alcohol present in an aqueous solution is determined by a comparison of its specific gravity with standard tables, or directly by the use of an alcoholometer, which is a hydrometer graduated so as to read per cents by weight (degrees according to Richter) or volume per cents (degrees according to Tralles).

  • Acting on a principle quite different from any previously discussed is the capillary hydrometer or staktometer of Brewster, which is based upon the difference in the surface tension and density of pure water, and of mixtures of alcohol and water in varying proportions.

  • The capillary hydrometer consists simply of a small pipette with a bulb in the middle of the stem, the pipette terminating in a very fine capillary point.

  • In the laboratory the specific gravity is determined in a pyknometer by actual weighing, and on board ship by the use of an areometer or hydrometer.

  • Three types of areometer are in use: (I) the ordinary hydrometer of invariable weight with a direct reading scale, a set of from five to ten being necessary to cover the range of specific gravity from 1 000 to 1.031 so as to take account of sea-water of all possible salinities; (2) the " Challenger " type of areometer designed by J.

  • HYDROMETER (Gr.

  • It is upon this principle that the hydrometer is constructed, and it obviously admits of two modes of application in the case of fluids: either we may compare the weights of floating bodies which are capable of displacing the same volume of different fluids, or we may compare the volumes of the different fluids which are displaced by the same weight.

  • The hydrometer is said by Synesius Cyreneus in his fifth letter to have been invented by Hypatia at Alexandria,' but appears to have been neglected until it was reinvented by Robert Boyle, whose "New Essay Instrument," as described in the Phil.

  • for June 1675, differs in no essential particular from Nicholson's hydrometer.

  • This seems to be the first reference to the hydrometer in modern times.

  • 89, Citizen Eusebe Salverte calls attention to the poem "De Ponderibus et Mensuris" generally ascribed to Rhemnius Fannius Palaemon, and consequently 300 years older than Hypatia, in which the hydrometer is described and attributed to Archimedes.

  • for 1675, is generally known as the common hydrometer.

  • The quantity of mercury or shot inserted depends upon the density of the liquids for which the hydrometer is to be employed, it being essential that the whole of the bulb should be immersed in the heaviest liquid for which the instrument is used, while the length and diameter of the stem must be such that the hydrometer will float in the lightest liquid for which it is required.

  • of liquid dis placed) when the surface of the liquid in which the hydrometer floats coincides with the lowest division of the scale, A the area of the transverse section of the stem, 1 the length of a scale division, n the number of divisions on the stem, and W the weight of the instrument.

Browse other sentences examples →