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hyde

hyde

hyde Sentence Examples

  • His favorites were "In His Eyes" from Jekyll and Hyde and "Chase the Clouds Away" by Chuck Mangione.

  • He was, however, elected on the council of state, and was the only Presbyterian in it; he was at once accused by Scot, along with Whitelocke, of corresponding with Hyde.

  • The materials, however, were mainly those of the hall set up in Hyde Park for the Great Exhibition of 1851.

  • In 1712 the Blue Hill lands were divided between Milton and Braintree, and in 1868 part of Milton was included in the new township of Hyde Park.

  • These votes, however, were cancelled later, on the 26th of July, under the pressure of the royalist city mob which invaded the two Houses; but the two speakers, with eight peers and fifty-seven members of the Commons, themselves joined the army, which now advanced to London, overawing all resistance, escorting the fugitive members in triumph to Westminster on the 6th of August, and obliging the parliament on the 10th to cancel the last votes, with the threat of a regiment of cavalry drawn up by Cromwell in Hyde Park.

  • He died on the 25th of June 1729, when his son Peregrine Hyde (1691-1731) became 3rd duke.

  • He carried out the wishes of the new sovereign and after the intrigues of a few months he had the satisfaction of securing the dismissal of Lawrence Hyde, earl of Rochester, from his post as lord treasurer.

  • Hyde and Alexander Hyde.

  • William Hyde Wollaston >>

  • m., about one-half of which is contained in Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde county.

  • Thomas Carey contestants (Carey's rebellion) William Glover Edward Hyde, deputy-governor Thomas Pollock, president of the council.

  • He immediately began to complain to Hyde, earl of Clarendon, of the poverty of the see, and based claims for a better benefice on a certain secret service, which he explained on the 20th of January 1661 to be the sole invention of the Eikon Basilike, The Pourtraicture of his sacred Majestic in his Solitudes and Sufferings put forth within a few hours after the execution of Charles I.

  • Also Hyde, Historia Religionis veterum Purarum (Oxon, 1700); Windischmann, Zoroastrische Studien (Berlin, 1863); A.

  • His absolute independence was as little gained as if he had camped out in Hyde Park; relatively he lived the life of a recluse.

  • Early in 1886 he struck the public taste with precision in his wild symbolic tale of The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.

  • On this occasion, however, though strongly drawn to the beautiful island, he stayed not longer than six weeks, and proceeded to Sydney, where, early in 1890, he published, in a blaze of righteous anger, his Father Damien: an Open Letter to the Rev. Dr Hyde of Honolulu, in vindication of the memory of Father Damien and his work among the lepers of the Pacific. At Sydney he was very ill again: it was now obvious that his only chance of health lay within the tropics.

  • Lord Bryce married, in 1880, Elizabeth Marion, daughter of Thomas Ashton, of Hyde, and sister of the 1st Lord Ashton of Hyde.

  • The Roman Catholic Cathedral of St Mary lies on the north-east side of Hyde Park; it is a splendid Gothic structure, the finest in Australia.

  • At the top of King Street there is a statue of Queen Victoria and close by a statue of Prince Albert, at the entrance to Hyde Park, in which the most elevated spot is occupied by a statue of Captain Cook.

  • Hyde Park is a plateau almost in the centre of the city, which in the early days of Sydney was used as a race-course.

  • WILLIAM HYDE WOLLASTON (1766-1828), English chemist and natural philosopher, was born at East Dereham, Norfolk, on the 6th of April 1766, the second of seventeen children.

  • His private record was not as good as his public. In December 1660 he admitted to having contracted, under discreditable circumstances, a secret marriage with Anne Hyde (1637-1671), daughter of Lord Clarendon, in the previous September.

  • By Anne Hyde James had eight children, of whom two only, Mary and Anne, both queens of England, survived their father.

  • Some ill-considered imputations upon Father Damien by a Presbyterian minister produced a memorable tract by Robert Louis Stevenson (An Open Letter to the Rev. Dr Hyde, 1890).

  • It rose on the heights of Hampstead, traversed Paddington, may be traced in the course of the Serpentine lake in Hyde Park, ran parallel to and east of Sloane Street, and joined the Thames close to Chelsea Bridge.

  • The northern enters the county in Hammersmith as Uxbridge Road, crosses Kensington and borders the north side of Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park as Bayswater Road.

  • The southern highway enters Hammersmith, crosses the centre of Kensington as Kensington Road and High Street, borders Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park as Kensington Gore and Knightsbridge, with terraces of fine residences, and merges into Piccadilly.

  • This beautiful street, with its northward branches, Park Lane, from which splendid houses overlook Hyde Park, and Bond Street, lined with handsome shops, may be said to focus the fashionable life of London.

  • The straight highway from the northwest which as Edgware Road joins Oxford Street at the Marble Arch (the north-eastern entrance to Hyde Park) is coincident with the Roman Watling Street.

  • The royal parks, namely St James's, Green and Hyde Park, and Kensington Gardens, stretch in an irregular belt for nearly 3 m.

  • Hyde Park, to the west, belonged originally to the manor of Hyde, which was attached to Westminster Abbey, but was taken by Henry VIII.

  • Two of its gateways are noteworthy, namely that at Hyde Park Corner at the southeast and the Marble Arch at the north-east.

  • Hyde Park contains the Serpentine, a lake 15.00 yds.

  • In Piccadilly Clarendon House, erected in 1664 by Edward Hyde, earl of Clarendon, became Albemarle House when acquired by the duke of Albemarle in 1675.

  • Many street improvements were carried out, it is true, in the last half of the 19th century, the dates of the principal being as follows: 1854, Cannon Street; 1864, Southwark Street; 1870, Holborn Viaduct; 1871, Hamilton Place, Queen Victoria Street; 1876, Northumberland Avenue; 1882, Tooley Street; 1883, Hyde Park Corner; 1884, Eastcheap; 1886, Shaftesbury Avenue; 1887, Charing Cross Road; 1890-1892, Rosebery Avenue.

  • At the beginning of the 20th century several important local widenings of streets were put in hand, as for example between Sloane Street and Hyde Park Corner, in the Strand and at the Marble Arch (1908).

  • St George's; Hyde Park Corner (1733).

  • Fashionable society takes its pastimes at such centres as the grounds of the Hurlingham and Ranelagh clubs, at Fulham and Barnes respectively, where polo and other games are played; and Rotten Row, the horse-track in Hyde Park, is the favourite resort of riders.

  • Thomas Hyde and Thomas Greaves.

  • Lydian) chiefs, and in later times Hyde was said to be the older name of Sardis, or the name of its citadel.

  • Hyde, A Bibliography of the Works of Emanuel Swedenborg (743 pp., Swedenborg Society).

  • In 1676 he was appointed chaplain to Lawrence Hyde (afterwards earl of Rochester), ambassador-extraordinary to the king of Poland, and of his visit he sent an interesting account to Edward Pococke in a letter, dated Dantzic, 16th December, 1677, which was printed along with South's Posthumous Works in 1717.

  • Hyde de Neuville, Notice sur le comte de Villele (Paris, 1899); and M.

  • CAMERA LUCIDA, an optical instrument invented by Dr William Hyde Wollaston for drawing in perspective.

  • Hyde, George Herbert and his Times (1907), and the "Oxford" edition of his poems by A.

  • Three weeks later the fleet under Sir Hyde Parker and Nelson sailed through the Sound on its way to Copenhagen.

  • Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury .

  • The accompanying illustration is reduced from a painting made from one of two which were driven in Hyde Park by Mr. Sheriff Parkins in the early part of the 10th century.

  • From 1841 until his death on the 6th of April 1860 he lived near Hyde Park, in Dutchess county, New York.

  • He arrived in March, and was able to confine the small British force under Sir Hyde Parker at Gros Islet Bay in Santa Lucia.

  • On the 27th of March he joined Sir Hyde Parker at Santa Lucia, and Guichen retired to Fort Royal in Martinique.

  • A desperate battle was fought on the Dogger Bank on the 5th of August between Sir Hyde Parker and the Dutch admiral Zoutman, both being engaged in protecting trade; but Holland did not affect the general course of the war.

  • The works of Mr Jeremiah Curtin and Dr Douglas Hyde are useful for Ireland; for Scotland, Kirk's Secret Commonwealth has already been quoted.

  • "FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT (1882-), American politician, was born in Hyde Park, N.Y., Jan.

  • Cheshire printers, which are made at Hyde, Stockport, Glossop and elsewhere, are commonly 34 in.

  • Rochester, named in honour of Lawrence Hyde, earl of Rochester, was incorporated as a town by a royal charter in 1722, but no settlement was made here until 1728.

  • During the administration of Governor Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury, many members joined the Episcopal Church and others removed to New Jersey.

  • On the restoration of the monarchy, through the influence of Richard Baxter with Lord Chancellor Hyde, the charter already granted by Cromwell was renewed, and its powers were enlarged.

  • The command of the British fleet was given to Sir Hyde Parker, an amiable man of no energy and little ability.

  • Sir Hyde Parker was, however, unwilling to go up the Baltic with the Danes unsubdued behind him, or to divide his force.

  • Sir Hyde Parker accepted his offer, and added two ships of the line to the ten asked for by Nelson.

  • As the wind was from the south-east Sir Hyde Parker was unable to make the proposed attack from the north.

  • Sir Hyde Parker, who saw the danger of Nelson's position, became anxious, and sent his second, Captain Robert Waller Ottway, to him with a message authorizing him to retire if he thought fit.

  • Before Ottway, who had to go in a row-boat, reached the "Elephant," Sir Hyde Parker had reflected that it would be more magnanimous in him to take the responsibility of ordering the retreat.

  • The crown prince, who was shaken by the spectacle of the battle, allowed himself to be drawn into a reply, and to be referred to Sir Hyde Parker.

  • Fire was suspended by the Danes to allow of time to receive Sir Hyde Parker's answer.

  • Sir Hyde Parker was assured by the Russian minister at Copenhagen that the new tsar Alexander I.

  • On the 17th it instructed Sir Hyde Parker to agree to a suspension of hostilities, and not to take active measures against Russia so long as the Reval squadron did not put to sea.

  • On the 21st of April, having now received a full account of the battle at Copenhagen, it recalled Sir Hyde Parker, whose vacillating conduct and want of enterprise had become manifest.

  • He had, besides, a relish for Hobbes's wit (as he used to say, " Here comes the bear to be baited "), and did not like the old man the less because his presence at court scandalized the bishops or the prim virtue of Chancellor Hyde.

  • In 1905 he was Hyde Lecturer at the Sorbonne.

  • On the 31St March 1883, ten weeks after the arrival of the first draft of recruits, about 5600 men went through the ceremonial parade movements as practised by the British guards in Hyde Park, with unusual precision.

  • At the franchise meeting in Hyde Park in 1884 it was unable to get a hearing.

  • south of Stalybridge is the town of Hyde.

  • ANNE (1665-1714), queen of Great Britain and Ireland, second daughter of James, duke of York, afterwards James II., and of Anne Hyde, daughter of the 1st earl of Clarendon, was born on the 6th of February 1665.

  • of Hyde Park Corner, London.

  • Hyde and his son.

  • Thomas Hyde (1636-1703) studied the religion of the ancient Persians; John Spencer (1630-1693) analysed the laws of the Hebrews; and Lord Herbert of Cherbury (De Religione Gentilium, 1645) endeavoured to trace all religions back to five " truly Catholic truths " of primitive faith, the first being the existence of God.

  • to the west, accompanied by Hyde and others who formed his council.

  • He retired (17th of February) to Pendennis Castle at Falmouth, and on the approach of Fairfax (2nd of March) to Scilly, where he remained with Hyde till the 16th of April.

  • Thence he fled to Jersey, and finally refusing all the overtures from the parliament, and in opposition to the counsels of Hyde, who desired the prince to remain on English territory, he repaired to the queen at Paris, where he remained for two years.

  • The projected invasion of Ireland was delayed through want of funds till it was too late; Hyde's mission to Spain, in the midst of Cromwell's successes, brought no assistance, and Charles now turned to Scotland for aid.

  • As long as Cromwell lived there appeared little hope of the restoration of the monarchy, and Charles and Hyde had been aware of the plots for his assassination, which had aroused no disapproval.

  • Charles, by Hyde's advice, had not interfered in the movement, and had avoided inconvenient concessions to the various factions by referring all to a " free parliament."

  • Hyde, Parochial Annals of Bengal (1901); K.

  • Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury.

  • The first European scholar to direct attention to the Avesta was Hyde of Oxford, in his Historia Religionis Veterum Persarum eoramque Magorum (1700), which, however, failed to awake any lasting interest in the sacred writings of the Parsees.

  • An estate of the value of -L200 a year was settled on the boy, and he was sent in succession to a private school at Hyde, Abbey near Winchester, to Eton in 1781, and to Christchurch, Oxford, in 1787.

  • "DOUGLAS HYDE (1860-), Irish scholar and writer, known in Ireland as the Craoibhin Aoibhinn (i.e.

  • " delightful little branch," an allegorical name for Ireland, in folk-song), was born in 1860, the youngest son of the Rev. Arthur Hyde, of Frenchpark, co.

  • Roscommon, and nearest living representative of the Castle Hyde family of co.

  • For some years Dr. Hyde's work for " Irish Ireland " made little progress; but in 1899 an attack upon the Irish language, before a Vice-regal Committee to inquire into intermediate education, gave him his chance.

  • In 1905 Dr. Hyde set out on a tour through America to collect money for the League, and returned after seven months with £Ii,000.

  • It was probably owing to Dr. Hyde's influence with his fellow commissioners that Trinity College, following their recommendations, established a moderatorship and gold medal in Celtic studies.

  • Dr. Hyde was the first to collect the Love Songs of Connacht, which he published in 1894, and which he translated into verse and also into the sort of English prose afterwards adopted by Lady Gregory and by Synge.

  • The mitred abbots in England were those of Abingdon, St Alban's, Bardney, Battle, Bury St Edmund's, St Augustine's Canterbury, Colchester, Croyland, Evesham, Glastonbury, Gloucester, St Benet's Hulme, Hyde, Malmesbury, Peterborough, Ramsey, Reading, Selby, Shrewsbury, Tavistock, Thorney, Westminster, Winchcombe, St Mary's York.

  • Later generations have learned by repeated experience that the eloquence of Hyde Park orators is not the voice of England; there were some even then-among those not immediately responsible for keeping orderwho urged the government to ti-ust the people;l but with the object-lesson of France before them it is not altogether surprising that ministers refused to believe ih the harmlessness of societies, which not only kept up a fraternal correspondence with the National Convention and the Jacobi.

  • The Liberals could see no more than that he appeared to be committed to international engagements, the logical outcome of which might beas an orator of the Opposition put itthat Cossacks would be encamped in Hyde Park for the purpose of overawing the House of Commons.

  • The cabinet determined to prohibit a meeting which the keform League decided to hold in Hyde Park on the 23rd of July, and closed the gates of the park on the people.

  • For the riot in Hyde Park led almost directly to a new Reform Act, and to the transfer of power from the middle classes to the masses of the people.

  • See Hyde, Veterum Persarum religio, pp. 449, 548 (ed.

  • She wrote to him again and again, pressing for an appointment to consult on an important matter of business: would meet him at the fountain of the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park.

  • 431), and the place of the Lydian capital Sardis is taken by Hyde (Il.

  • 8vo); the Memoires of Bourrienne, of Hyde de Neuville and of Rohu; Lenotre, Tournebut (on the arrest); Lejean, Biographie bretonne; and the bibliography to the article Vendee.

  • His favorites were "In His Eyes" from Jekyll and Hyde and "Chase the Clouds Away" by Chuck Mangione.

  • aestheticsosal combines the esthetics of the Hyde Park building with the footprint of the South Transept.

  • almighty scramble saw Hyde hit the bar three times before the ball was cleared.

  • Ice cream was then a great luxury in the post-war austerity of Hyde.

  • He saw the prisoner coming along the road from the direction of Hyde, and noticing his pockets were somewhat bulky he stopped him.

  • cohabiting with a woman in George-street, Hyde.

  • Are the information signs for gigs at Hyde Park set up to deliberately confuse?

  • At Rosemoor are collections of Cornus and Ilex, while Hyde Hall holds the collections of Malus (ornamental crab apple) and Viburnum.

  • Paul Robertson went close for Hyde 3 minutes later with a rising effort which just cleared the crossbar.

  • dewy grass of nearby Hyde Park.

  • A Hyde corner in fact, as the ball was swiftly cleared downfield.

  • Filed under: Media Musings -- wonderful electric @ 5:00 pm Live 8 London is being held in Hyde Park.

  • His experiments in the design of glasshouses were to lead to the greatest greenhouse of all in Hyde Park.

  • By the age of 12, he was working in the family business, pushing a handcart around Hyde, selling ice cream.

  • By Bus The Airbus A6 departs hourly to Victoria Coach Station, Hyde Park Corner, Marble Arch, and Baker Street.

  • The Hyde Park show would, in fact, prove to be the last high hurrah.

  • Hyde Flippo Francis, the narrator, is a witty, sardonic, sarcastic, cynical, philosophical, romantic idealist.

  • investiture held on Hyde Park on the 26th June 1857.

  • He was presented with the Victoria Cross at the first investiture on Hyde Park on 26th June 1857.

  • Already the cartoonists are portraying Brown as a kind of Dr. Hyde figure Ð a dark and threatening character with a lantern jaw.

  • The god of wine grows jealous of his art, He only fires the head, but Hyde the heart.

  • assemble 12 noon Hyde Park, Rally in Trafalgar Square.

  • As he enters puberty, the line between his two selves - his Jekyll and Hyde - is blurred still further.

  • BBC Nature notes A common redstart has been seen in the trees in Hyde Park, London, this week.

  • Drafted by Edward Hyde, it rejected the remonstrance but in reasoned and conciliatory tones calculated to appeal to patriotism and loyalty.

  • sarcastic wit worthy of David Hyde Pierce on his best day.

  • Bugsy then hit the 'keepers legs before an almighty scramble saw Hyde hit the bar three times before the ball was cleared.

  • slitting mill in the Midlands at The Hyde.

  • slumped over the wheel in Hyde Park?

  • speakers at a rally at Hyde Park that attracted a crowd of over 250,000.

  • stoppage time, Hyde's three game barren scoring run came to an end from an unlikely source.

  • Five minutes into first half stoppage time, Hyde's three game barren scoring run came to an end from an unlikely source.

  • The aqueduct is followed by the short (308 yards) Hyde Bank Tunnel after which the scenery becomes more suburban than rural.

  • Tameside Leisure Pool Situated at Hyde, the Leisure Pool is a water wonderland for all the family.

  • He was, however, elected on the council of state, and was the only Presbyterian in it; he was at once accused by Scot, along with Whitelocke, of corresponding with Hyde.

  • The materials, however, were mainly those of the hall set up in Hyde Park for the Great Exhibition of 1851.

  • In 1712 the Blue Hill lands were divided between Milton and Braintree, and in 1868 part of Milton was included in the new township of Hyde Park.

  • These votes, however, were cancelled later, on the 26th of July, under the pressure of the royalist city mob which invaded the two Houses; but the two speakers, with eight peers and fifty-seven members of the Commons, themselves joined the army, which now advanced to London, overawing all resistance, escorting the fugitive members in triumph to Westminster on the 6th of August, and obliging the parliament on the 10th to cancel the last votes, with the threat of a regiment of cavalry drawn up by Cromwell in Hyde Park.

  • He died on the 25th of June 1729, when his son Peregrine Hyde (1691-1731) became 3rd duke.

  • He carried out the wishes of the new sovereign and after the intrigues of a few months he had the satisfaction of securing the dismissal of Lawrence Hyde, earl of Rochester, from his post as lord treasurer.

  • Hyde and Alexander Hyde.

  • William Hyde Wollaston >>

  • 739, when the editor, publisher and printer of the Freethinker were sentenced to imprisonment; but police court proceedings were taken as late as 1908 against an obscure Hyde Park orator who had become a public nuisance.

  • m., about one-half of which is contained in Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde county.

  • Thomas Carey contestants (Carey's rebellion) William Glover Edward Hyde, deputy-governor Thomas Pollock, president of the council.

  • He immediately began to complain to Hyde, earl of Clarendon, of the poverty of the see, and based claims for a better benefice on a certain secret service, which he explained on the 20th of January 1661 to be the sole invention of the Eikon Basilike, The Pourtraicture of his sacred Majestic in his Solitudes and Sufferings put forth within a few hours after the execution of Charles I.

  • Also Hyde, Historia Religionis veterum Purarum (Oxon, 1700); Windischmann, Zoroastrische Studien (Berlin, 1863); A.

  • His absolute independence was as little gained as if he had camped out in Hyde Park; relatively he lived the life of a recluse.

  • Early in 1886 he struck the public taste with precision in his wild symbolic tale of The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.

  • On this occasion, however, though strongly drawn to the beautiful island, he stayed not longer than six weeks, and proceeded to Sydney, where, early in 1890, he published, in a blaze of righteous anger, his Father Damien: an Open Letter to the Rev. Dr Hyde of Honolulu, in vindication of the memory of Father Damien and his work among the lepers of the Pacific. At Sydney he was very ill again: it was now obvious that his only chance of health lay within the tropics.

  • Lord Bryce married, in 1880, Elizabeth Marion, daughter of Thomas Ashton, of Hyde, and sister of the 1st Lord Ashton of Hyde.

  • The Roman Catholic Cathedral of St Mary lies on the north-east side of Hyde Park; it is a splendid Gothic structure, the finest in Australia.

  • At the top of King Street there is a statue of Queen Victoria and close by a statue of Prince Albert, at the entrance to Hyde Park, in which the most elevated spot is occupied by a statue of Captain Cook.

  • Hyde Park is a plateau almost in the centre of the city, which in the early days of Sydney was used as a race-course.

  • WILLIAM HYDE WOLLASTON (1766-1828), English chemist and natural philosopher, was born at East Dereham, Norfolk, on the 6th of April 1766, the second of seventeen children.

  • His private record was not as good as his public. In December 1660 he admitted to having contracted, under discreditable circumstances, a secret marriage with Anne Hyde (1637-1671), daughter of Lord Clarendon, in the previous September.

  • By Anne Hyde James had eight children, of whom two only, Mary and Anne, both queens of England, survived their father.

  • Some ill-considered imputations upon Father Damien by a Presbyterian minister produced a memorable tract by Robert Louis Stevenson (An Open Letter to the Rev. Dr Hyde, 1890).

  • It rose on the heights of Hampstead, traversed Paddington, may be traced in the course of the Serpentine lake in Hyde Park, ran parallel to and east of Sloane Street, and joined the Thames close to Chelsea Bridge.

  • The northern enters the county in Hammersmith as Uxbridge Road, crosses Kensington and borders the north side of Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park as Bayswater Road.

  • The southern highway enters Hammersmith, crosses the centre of Kensington as Kensington Road and High Street, borders Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park as Kensington Gore and Knightsbridge, with terraces of fine residences, and merges into Piccadilly.

  • This beautiful street, with its northward branches, Park Lane, from which splendid houses overlook Hyde Park, and Bond Street, lined with handsome shops, may be said to focus the fashionable life of London.

  • The straight highway from the northwest which as Edgware Road joins Oxford Street at the Marble Arch (the north-eastern entrance to Hyde Park) is coincident with the Roman Watling Street.

  • The royal parks, namely St James's, Green and Hyde Park, and Kensington Gardens, stretch in an irregular belt for nearly 3 m.

  • Hyde Park, to the west, belonged originally to the manor of Hyde, which was attached to Westminster Abbey, but was taken by Henry VIII.

  • Two of its gateways are noteworthy, namely that at Hyde Park Corner at the southeast and the Marble Arch at the north-east.

  • Hyde Park contains the Serpentine, a lake 15.00 yds.

  • In Piccadilly Clarendon House, erected in 1664 by Edward Hyde, earl of Clarendon, became Albemarle House when acquired by the duke of Albemarle in 1675.

  • Many street improvements were carried out, it is true, in the last half of the 19th century, the dates of the principal being as follows: 1854, Cannon Street; 1864, Southwark Street; 1870, Holborn Viaduct; 1871, Hamilton Place, Queen Victoria Street; 1876, Northumberland Avenue; 1882, Tooley Street; 1883, Hyde Park Corner; 1884, Eastcheap; 1886, Shaftesbury Avenue; 1887, Charing Cross Road; 1890-1892, Rosebery Avenue.

  • At the beginning of the 20th century several important local widenings of streets were put in hand, as for example between Sloane Street and Hyde Park Corner, in the Strand and at the Marble Arch (1908).

  • Thus Sir John Wolfe Barry, as chairman of the Council of the Society of Arts in 1899, proposed to alleviate congestion of traffic by bridges over and tunnels under the streets at six points, namely - Hyde Park Corner, Piccadilly Circus, Ludgate Circus, Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road, Strand and Wellington Street, and Southwark Bridge and Upper Thames Street.

  • The postal area is divided into eight districts, commonly designated by initials (which it is customary to employ in writing addresses) - East Central (E.C., the City, north to Pentonville and City Roads, west to Gray's Inn Road and the Law Courts); West Central (W.C., from Euston Road to the Thames, and west to Tottenham Court Road); West (W., from Piccadilly and Hyde Park north to Marylebone and Edg 1 The report appeared in eight volumes, the first of which, containing the general conclusions to which allusion is here made, bore the number, as a blue-book, Cd.

  • St George's; Hyde Park Corner (1733).

  • Fashionable society takes its pastimes at such centres as the grounds of the Hurlingham and Ranelagh clubs, at Fulham and Barnes respectively, where polo and other games are played; and Rotten Row, the horse-track in Hyde Park, is the favourite resort of riders.

  • Thomas Hyde and Thomas Greaves.

  • The earliest reference to Sardis is in the Persae of Aeschylus (472 B.C.); in the Iliad the name Hyde seems to be given to the city of the Maeonian (i.e.

  • Lydian) chiefs, and in later times Hyde was said to be the older name of Sardis, or the name of its citadel.

  • Hyde, A Bibliography of the Works of Emanuel Swedenborg (743 pp., Swedenborg Society).

  • In 1676 he was appointed chaplain to Lawrence Hyde (afterwards earl of Rochester), ambassador-extraordinary to the king of Poland, and of his visit he sent an interesting account to Edward Pococke in a letter, dated Dantzic, 16th December, 1677, which was printed along with South's Posthumous Works in 1717.

  • Hyde de Neuville, Notice sur le comte de Villele (Paris, 1899); and M.

  • CAMERA LUCIDA, an optical instrument invented by Dr William Hyde Wollaston for drawing in perspective.

  • Hyde, George Herbert and his Times (1907), and the "Oxford" edition of his poems by A.

  • Three weeks later the fleet under Sir Hyde Parker and Nelson sailed through the Sound on its way to Copenhagen.

  • Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury .

  • The accompanying illustration is reduced from a painting made from one of two which were driven in Hyde Park by Mr. Sheriff Parkins in the early part of the 10th century.

  • From 1841 until his death on the 6th of April 1860 he lived near Hyde Park, in Dutchess county, New York.

  • He arrived in March, and was able to confine the small British force under Sir Hyde Parker at Gros Islet Bay in Santa Lucia.

  • On the 27th of March he joined Sir Hyde Parker at Santa Lucia, and Guichen retired to Fort Royal in Martinique.

  • A desperate battle was fought on the Dogger Bank on the 5th of August between Sir Hyde Parker and the Dutch admiral Zoutman, both being engaged in protecting trade; but Holland did not affect the general course of the war.

  • The works of Mr Jeremiah Curtin and Dr Douglas Hyde are useful for Ireland; for Scotland, Kirk's Secret Commonwealth has already been quoted.

  • "FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT (1882-), American politician, was born in Hyde Park, N.Y., Jan.

  • Cheshire printers, which are made at Hyde, Stockport, Glossop and elsewhere, are commonly 34 in.

  • Rochester, named in honour of Lawrence Hyde, earl of Rochester, was incorporated as a town by a royal charter in 1722, but no settlement was made here until 1728.

  • During the administration of Governor Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury, many members joined the Episcopal Church and others removed to New Jersey.

  • On the restoration of the monarchy, through the influence of Richard Baxter with Lord Chancellor Hyde, the charter already granted by Cromwell was renewed, and its powers were enlarged.

  • The command of the British fleet was given to Sir Hyde Parker, an amiable man of no energy and little ability.

  • Sir Hyde Parker was, however, unwilling to go up the Baltic with the Danes unsubdued behind him, or to divide his force.

  • Sir Hyde Parker accepted his offer, and added two ships of the line to the ten asked for by Nelson.

  • As the wind was from the south-east Sir Hyde Parker was unable to make the proposed attack from the north.

  • Sir Hyde Parker, who saw the danger of Nelson's position, became anxious, and sent his second, Captain Robert Waller Ottway, to him with a message authorizing him to retire if he thought fit.

  • Before Ottway, who had to go in a row-boat, reached the "Elephant," Sir Hyde Parker had reflected that it would be more magnanimous in him to take the responsibility of ordering the retreat.

  • The crown prince, who was shaken by the spectacle of the battle, allowed himself to be drawn into a reply, and to be referred to Sir Hyde Parker.

  • Fire was suspended by the Danes to allow of time to receive Sir Hyde Parker's answer.

  • Sir Hyde Parker was assured by the Russian minister at Copenhagen that the new tsar Alexander I.

  • On the 17th it instructed Sir Hyde Parker to agree to a suspension of hostilities, and not to take active measures against Russia so long as the Reval squadron did not put to sea.

  • On the 21st of April, having now received a full account of the battle at Copenhagen, it recalled Sir Hyde Parker, whose vacillating conduct and want of enterprise had become manifest.

  • He had, besides, a relish for Hobbes's wit (as he used to say, " Here comes the bear to be baited "), and did not like the old man the less because his presence at court scandalized the bishops or the prim virtue of Chancellor Hyde.

  • In 1905 he was Hyde Lecturer at the Sorbonne.

  • On the 31St March 1883, ten weeks after the arrival of the first draft of recruits, about 5600 men went through the ceremonial parade movements as practised by the British guards in Hyde Park, with unusual precision.

  • At the franchise meeting in Hyde Park in 1884 it was unable to get a hearing.

  • south of Stalybridge is the town of Hyde.

  • ANNE (1665-1714), queen of Great Britain and Ireland, second daughter of James, duke of York, afterwards James II., and of Anne Hyde, daughter of the 1st earl of Clarendon, was born on the 6th of February 1665.

  • of Hyde Park Corner, London.

  • Hyde and his son.

  • Thomas Hyde (1636-1703) studied the religion of the ancient Persians; John Spencer (1630-1693) analysed the laws of the Hebrews; and Lord Herbert of Cherbury (De Religione Gentilium, 1645) endeavoured to trace all religions back to five " truly Catholic truths " of primitive faith, the first being the existence of God.

  • From the Sassanian period we find an alpha- of tic and very legible character in use, derived from Sassanian an hiavi, and closely resembling the younger Pahlavi found in books, is I e oldest known manuscripts are of the 14th century All.3, thi Although the existence of the Zend language was known to the an ford scholar Thomas Hyde, the Frenchman Anquetil Duperron, r~ 0 went to the East Indiei~ in 1755 to visit the Parsee priests, was e.g - first to draw the attention of the learned world to the subject.

  • to the west, accompanied by Hyde and others who formed his council.

  • He retired (17th of February) to Pendennis Castle at Falmouth, and on the approach of Fairfax (2nd of March) to Scilly, where he remained with Hyde till the 16th of April.

  • Thence he fled to Jersey, and finally refusing all the overtures from the parliament, and in opposition to the counsels of Hyde, who desired the prince to remain on English territory, he repaired to the queen at Paris, where he remained for two years.

  • The projected invasion of Ireland was delayed through want of funds till it was too late; Hyde's mission to Spain, in the midst of Cromwell's successes, brought no assistance, and Charles now turned to Scotland for aid.

  • As long as Cromwell lived there appeared little hope of the restoration of the monarchy, and Charles and Hyde had been aware of the plots for his assassination, which had aroused no disapproval.

  • Charles, by Hyde's advice, had not interfered in the movement, and had avoided inconvenient concessions to the various factions by referring all to a " free parliament."

  • Hyde, Parochial Annals of Bengal (1901); K.

  • Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury.

  • The first European scholar to direct attention to the Avesta was Hyde of Oxford, in his Historia Religionis Veterum Persarum eoramque Magorum (1700), which, however, failed to awake any lasting interest in the sacred writings of the Parsees.

  • An estate of the value of -L200 a year was settled on the boy, and he was sent in succession to a private school at Hyde, Abbey near Winchester, to Eton in 1781, and to Christchurch, Oxford, in 1787.

  • "DOUGLAS HYDE (1860-), Irish scholar and writer, known in Ireland as the Craoibhin Aoibhinn (i.e.

  • " delightful little branch," an allegorical name for Ireland, in folk-song), was born in 1860, the youngest son of the Rev. Arthur Hyde, of Frenchpark, co.

  • Roscommon, and nearest living representative of the Castle Hyde family of co.

  • For some years Dr. Hyde's work for " Irish Ireland " made little progress; but in 1899 an attack upon the Irish language, before a Vice-regal Committee to inquire into intermediate education, gave him his chance.

  • In 1905 Dr. Hyde set out on a tour through America to collect money for the League, and returned after seven months with £Ii,000.

  • It was probably owing to Dr. Hyde's influence with his fellow commissioners that Trinity College, following their recommendations, established a moderatorship and gold medal in Celtic studies.

  • Dr. Hyde was the first to collect the Love Songs of Connacht, which he published in 1894, and which he translated into verse and also into the sort of English prose afterwards adopted by Lady Gregory and by Synge.

  • The mitred abbots in England were those of Abingdon, St Alban's, Bardney, Battle, Bury St Edmund's, St Augustine's Canterbury, Colchester, Croyland, Evesham, Glastonbury, Gloucester, St Benet's Hulme, Hyde, Malmesbury, Peterborough, Ramsey, Reading, Selby, Shrewsbury, Tavistock, Thorney, Westminster, Winchcombe, St Mary's York.

  • Equally well known are the college of agriculture under Prof. Liberty Hyde Bailey (b.

  • Later generations have learned by repeated experience that the eloquence of Hyde Park orators is not the voice of England; there were some even then-among those not immediately responsible for keeping orderwho urged the government to ti-ust the people;l but with the object-lesson of France before them it is not altogether surprising that ministers refused to believe ih the harmlessness of societies, which not only kept up a fraternal correspondence with the National Convention and the Jacobi.

  • The Liberals could see no more than that he appeared to be committed to international engagements, the logical outcome of which might beas an orator of the Opposition put itthat Cossacks would be encamped in Hyde Park for the purpose of overawing the House of Commons.

  • The cabinet determined to prohibit a meeting which the keform League decided to hold in Hyde Park on the 23rd of July, and closed the gates of the park on the people.

  • For the riot in Hyde Park led almost directly to a new Reform Act, and to the transfer of power from the middle classes to the masses of the people.

  • See Hyde, Veterum Persarum religio, pp. 449, 548 (ed.

  • She wrote to him again and again, pressing for an appointment to consult on an important matter of business: would meet him at the fountain of the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park.

  • 431), and the place of the Lydian capital Sardis is taken by Hyde (Il.

  • 8vo); the Memoires of Bourrienne, of Hyde de Neuville and of Rohu; Lenotre, Tournebut (on the arrest); Lejean, Biographie bretonne; and the bibliography to the article Vendee.

  • BBC Nature notes A common redstart has been seen in the trees in Hyde Park, London, this week.

  • Drafted by Edward Hyde, it rejected the Remonstrance but in reasoned and conciliatory tones calculated to appeal to patriotism and loyalty.

  • He aproaches life at the fort with a dry sarcastic wit worthy of David Hyde Pierce on his best day.

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