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hutton

hutton

hutton Sentence Examples

  • In 1855 Hutton and Bagehot became joint-editors of the National Review, a new monthly, and conducted it for ten years.

  • During this time Hutton's theological views, influenced largely by Coleridge, and more directly by F.

  • Hutton took charge of the literary side of the paper, and by degrees his own articles became and remained up to the last one of the best-known features of serious and thoughtful English journalism.

  • In 1858 he had married Eliza Roscoe, a cousin of his first wife; she died early in 1897, and Hutton's own death followed on the 9th of September of the same year.

  • Considering that this book was written before the time of Haller, or Bonnet, or Linnaeus, or Hutton, it surely deserves more respectful consideration than it usually receives.

  • Schulze, Abrisz einer Geschichte der Bruder-Mission (1901); Seifferth, Church Constitution of the Bohemian and Moravian Brethren (1866); De Schweinitz, History of the Unitas Fratrum (1885); Wauer, Beginnings of the Brethren's Church in England (1901); Hamilton, History of the Moravian Church in the 28th and 19th Centuries (1900); Hutton, History of the Moravian Church (1909); Moravian Church Book (1902); Moravian Almanac (annual).

  • Having settled at Cambridge in 1796, Gregory first acted as sub-editor on the Cambridge Intelligencer, and then opened a bookseller's shop. In 1802 he obtained an appointment as mathematical master at Woolwich through the influence of Charles Hutton, to whose notice he had been brought by a manuscript on the "Use of the Sliding Rule"; and when Hutton resigned in 1807 Gregory succeeded him in the professorship. Failing health obliged him to retire in 1838, and he died at Woolwich on the 2nd of February 1841.

  • Hutton, Mr Potts and others are to be found in the Transactions and Proceedings of the New Zealand Institute.

  • The society first met at James Hutton's shop, 'The Bible and Sun,' Wild Street, west of Temple Bar.

  • Matthew Hutton, 1 5951606.

  • Matthew Hutton, 1 7471757.

  • Hutton, The Anglican Ministry, with a preface by Cardinal J.

  • See also John Wallis, Opera Mathematica (1693-1699), and Charles Hutton, Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary (1815), article " Algebra."

  • Hutton.

  • Charles Hutton >>

  • See Watt, Bibliotheca Britannica; Hutton.

  • Hutton, Comte's Theory of Man's Future (1877), Comte, the Man and the Founder (1891), Comte's Life and Work (1892); E.

  • CHARLES HUTTON (1737-1823), English mathematician, was born at Newcastle-on-Tyne on the 14th of August 1737.

  • There is reason to believe, on the evidence of two pay-bills, that for a short time in 1755 and 1756 Hutton worked in Old Long Benton colliery; at any rate, on Ivison's promotion to a living, Hutton succeeded to the Jesmond school, whence, in consequence of increasing pupils, he removed to Stote's Hall.

  • This account appeared in the Philosophical Transactions for 1778, was afterwards reprinted in the second volume of his Tracts on Mathematical and Philosophical Subjects, and procured for Hutton the degree of LL.D.

  • This undertaking, the mathematical and scientific parts of which fell to Hutton's share, was completed in 1809, and filled eighteen volumes quarto.

  • See John Bruce, Charles Hutton (Newcastle, 1823).

  • James Hutton >>

  • Hutton, Popular Account of the Thugs and Dacoits (London, 18 57).

  • A brief sketch of its geological history is given by Hutton, Trans.

  • Hutton and James Drummond, The Animals of New Zealand (New Zealand, 1905); Sir W.

  • Hutton, some 700-500 years ago.

  • In fact, the whole skeletons of the wings and of the shoulder girdle seem to have been lost, excepting Anomalopteryx dromaeoides, which, according to Hutton,' had still some vestiges.

  • From Maskelyne's observations Charles Hutton deduced a density for the earth 4.5 times that of water (ib.

  • Hutton (1895); Archbishop Laud Commemoration, ed.

  • Besides those already mentioned, his works include An Outline of the First Principles of Horticulture (1832), An Outline of the Structure and Physiology of Plants (1832), A Natural System of Botany (1836), The Fossil Flora of Great Britain (with William Hutton, 1831-1837), Flora Medica (1838), Theory of Horticulture (1840), The Vegetable Kingdom (1846), Folia Orchidacea (1852), Descriptive Botany (1858).

  • One of his favourite places of resort in these years was a club of which Dr Hutton, Dr Black, Dr Adam Ferguson, John Clerk the naval tactician, Robert Adam the architect, as well as Smith himself, were original members, and to which Dugald Stewart, Professor Playfair and other eminent men were afterwards admitted.

  • Hutton erroneously states that it contains the logarithms to 8 places, and his account has been followed by most writers.

  • It has been thought necessary to give in detail the facts relating to the conversion of the logarithms, as unfortunately Charles Hutton in his history of logarithms, which was prefixed to the early editions of his Mathematical Tables, and was also published as one of his Mathematical Tracts, has charged Napier with want of candour in not telling the world of Briggs's share in the change of system, and he expresses the suspicion that " Napier was desirous that the world should ascribe to him alone the merit of this very useful improvement of the logarithms."

  • According to Hutton's view, the words, " it is to be hoped that his posthumous work " ...

  • Hutton's suggestions are all the more to be regretted as they occur as a history which is the result of a good deal of investigation and which for years was referred to as an authority by many writers.

  • For more detailed information relating to Napier, Briggs and Vlacq, and the invention of logarithms, the reader is referred to the life of Briggs in Ward's Lives of the Professors of Gresham College (London, 1740); Thomas Smith's Vitae quorundam eruditissimorum et illustrium virorum (Vita Henrici Briggii) (London, 1707); Mark Napier's Memoirs of John Napier already referred to, and the same author's Naperi libri qui supersunt (1839); Hutton's History; de Morgan's article already referred to; Delambre's Histoire de l'Astronomie moderne; the report on mathematical tables in the Report of the British Association for 1873; and the Philosophical Magazine for October and December 1872 and May 1873.

  • In the years1791-1807Francis Maseres published at London, in six volumes quarto " Scriptores Logarithmici, or a collection of several curious tracts on the nature and construction of logarithms, mentioned in Dr Hutton's historical introduction to his new edition of Sherwin's mathematical tables..

  • The work went through several editions during the 18th century, and was at length superseded in 1785 by Hutton's tables, which continued in successive editions to maintain their position for a century.

  • In 1783 appeared at Paris the first edition of Francois Callet's tables, which correspond to those of Hutton in England.

  • Hutton founded on Sherwin and Callet on Gardiner, and the editions of Vega form a separate offshoot from the original tables.

  • A full and valuable account of these methods is given in Hutton's " Construction of Logarithms," which occurs in the introduction to the early editions of his Mathematical Tables, and also forms tract 21 of his Mathematical Tracts (vol.

  • James Hutton (1726-1797) had set forth (1788) the principle that during all geological time there has been no essential change in the character of events, and that uniformity of law is perfectly consistent with mutability in the results.

  • 12 (1809); C. Hutton's Phil.

  • 159 seq.; Hutton, Tracts, I.

  • It had been previously pointed out by Captain Hutton.

  • Rigaud, Memoirs of Bradley (1832), and in Charles Hutton, Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary (1795); a particularly clear and lucid account is given in H.

  • Hutton, Life and Writings of Sir Thomas More (1891).

  • Trail, Life and Writings of Robert Simson (1812); C. Hutton, Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary (1815).

  • See also Hutton's Church of the Sixth Century (1897); J.

  • See C. Hutton, Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary (1815).

  • - The largest list of Afghan birds that we know of is given by Captain Hutton in the J.

  • On the eastern slope of First Mountain are Hutton Park, containing the grounds of the Essex County Country Club, and Llewellyn Park, a beautiful residential tract of 750 acres, named in honour of its originator, Llewellyn S.

  • Hutton, Philip Augustus (in the Foreign Statesmen series, London, 1896).

  • de Vergennes, minister of foreign affairs, who employed him in 1782 in negotiating, with the English commissioner Dr James Hutton, the recognition of the independence of the United States (1782), and in preparing a treaty of commerce with Great Britain (1786).(1786).

  • Semnopithecus schistaceus was found by Captain Hutton at an elevation of 11,000 feet in the Himalayas, leaping actively among fir-trees whose branches were laden with snow-wreaths.

  • It is, in fact, as notorious an example of over-successful acclimatization as the rabbit, but in Hutton and Drummond's recent work on the New Zealand animals (London, 1905) it is not regarded in this light, considering that some very common exotic birds were needed to keep down the insects, which it certainly did.

  • Hutton (1868), Ethel Wedgwood (1906), and (more literally) Sir F.

  • Hutton in the Diet.

  • Hutton's edition of S.

  • In 1778 he re-edited Jacques Ozanam's Recreations mathdmatiques, afterwards published in English by Charles Hutton (4 vols., London, 1803).

  • Hutton published Tauler's Sermons for Festivals under the title of The Inner Way.

  • To its publication the influence exerted by James Hutton on the progress of geological knowledge is largely due.

  • His lives of Matthew Stewart, Hutton, Robison, many of his reviews, and above all his "Dissertation" are of the utmost value.

  • Hutton, who in 1881 wrote that the word "was suggested by Huxley at a meeting held previous to the formation of the now defunct Metaphysical Society at Mr Knowles's house on Clapham Common in 1869, in my hearing.

  • Hutton here gives a variant etymology for the word, which may be therefore taken as partly derived from &-yvwanros (the "unknown" God), and partly from an antithesis to "gnostic"; but the meaning remains the same in either case.

  • The name, as Huxley said, "took"; it was constantly used by Hutton in the Spectator and became a fashionable label for contemporary unbelief in Christian dogma.

  • Hutton himself frequently misrepresented the doctrine by describing it as "belief in an unknown and unknowable God"; but agnosticism as defined by Huxley meant not belief, but absence of belief, as much distinct from belief on the one hand as from disbelief on the other; it was the half-way house between the two, where all questions were "open."

  • Hutton (1873); Sir William Petty's Down Survey, edited by T.

  • Hutton describes his specimens as sucking the juices of flies, which they had stuck down with their slime, and they have been observed in captivity to devour the entrails which have been removed from their fellows, and to eat raw sheep's liver.

  • Among the species described may be mentioned P. leuckarti (Saenger), P. insignis (Dendy), P. oviparus (Dendy), P. viridimaculatus (Dendy), P. novae zealandiae (Hutton), but it is by no means certain that future research will maintain these.

  • Hutton on the Anglican Ministry (1879) and an article on Biblical criticism in the Nineteenth Century (February 1884).

  • Hutton as "unequalled for grandeur of outline, purity of taste and radiance of total effect"; while his latest and longest, "The Dream of Gerontius," is generally recognized as the happiest effort to represent the unseen world that has been made since the time of Dante.

  • Hutton in the Expositor (September, October and November 1890).

  • Hutton (Dublin, 1873); and S.

  • One of the bestknown European species is Lycopodites falcatus, originally described by Lindley and Hutton from the Inferior Oolite of Yorkshire.

  • Hutton, Sigismondo Malatesta (London, 1906).

  • Bill Shannon's career began as a trainee accountant with Hutton, Turner, Lawson, now part of Ernst & Young.

  • This is complete balderdash; Hutton's terms of reference were to investigate the circumstances surrounding Dr. Kelly's death.

  • Hutton, B. D. the rector, who died in 1704, and several other benefactions.

  • I discovered the second cavern of Bones at Hutton hill.

  • confesses ignorance, as to how the judge leading the inquiry (Lord Hutton) was appointed.

  • cronyessage to the doubtless, well-stuffed, John Hutton and his political cronies.

  • The Hutton inquiry has shown that John Scarlett, chair of the JIC, produced a draft dossier on 10th September.

  • Even the genteel Hutton inquiry has exposed the fabricated nature of the infamous Iraq weapons dossier for all to see.

  • Erin hutton take explained how these.

  • founded in the 16th century, Hutton Grammar School is one of the oldest schools in the country.

  • Others may know, but Land-Care confesses ignorance, as to how the judge leading the inquiry (Lord Hutton) was appointed.

  • jollycks about Bush, Blair and the Hutton Report coming quick and hard, jollied along by Thomas's cheery demeanor.

  • The generic approximation lemma (pdf, ps, bibtex) Graham Hutton and Jeremy Gibbons.

  • old schoolin the 16th century, Hutton Grammar School is one of the oldest schools in the country.

  • K.A. GOODGE and J.C. Hutton (2000) Translational regulation of proinsulin biosynthesis and proinsulin biosynthesis and proinsulin conversion in the pancreatic beta-cell.

  • K.A. GOODGE and J.C. Hutton (2000) Translational regulation of proinsulin biosynthesis and proinsulin conversion in the pancreatic beta-cell.

  • puny by comparison (John Hutton anyone?

  • However, Hutton does not give any interpretation of the purpose of egg rolling.

  • From the Human Rights Act to Hutton to the new supreme court, we are seeing growing judicial scrutiny of the government.

  • For example Will Hutton, in last week's Observer, argued the secular world must object to Islamic sexism.

  • In a planned shake-up of welfare reforms, Mr Hutton said the name for Incapacity Benefit would also change.

  • About the Author Matthew Hutton is a non-practising solicitor (admitted 1979 ), who has specialized in tax for over 25 years.

  • trainee accountant with Hutton, Turner, Lawson, now part of Ernst & Young.

  • The only yellowhammers in our area seem to be at Hutton Roof and I managed to see one on the 25th.

  • RICHARD HOLT HUTTON (1826-1897), English writer and theologian, son of Joseph Hutton, Unitarian minister at Leeds, was born at Leeds on the 2nd of June 1826.

  • In 1855 Hutton and Bagehot became joint-editors of the National Review, a new monthly, and conducted it for ten years.

  • During this time Hutton's theological views, influenced largely by Coleridge, and more directly by F.

  • Hutton took charge of the literary side of the paper, and by degrees his own articles became and remained up to the last one of the best-known features of serious and thoughtful English journalism.

  • In 1858 he had married Eliza Roscoe, a cousin of his first wife; she died early in 1897, and Hutton's own death followed on the 9th of September of the same year.

  • Considering that this book was written before the time of Haller, or Bonnet, or Linnaeus, or Hutton, it surely deserves more respectful consideration than it usually receives.

  • Schulze, Abrisz einer Geschichte der Bruder-Mission (1901); Seifferth, Church Constitution of the Bohemian and Moravian Brethren (1866); De Schweinitz, History of the Unitas Fratrum (1885); Wauer, Beginnings of the Brethren's Church in England (1901); Hamilton, History of the Moravian Church in the 28th and 19th Centuries (1900); Hutton, History of the Moravian Church (1909); Moravian Church Book (1902); Moravian Almanac (annual).

  • Having settled at Cambridge in 1796, Gregory first acted as sub-editor on the Cambridge Intelligencer, and then opened a bookseller's shop. In 1802 he obtained an appointment as mathematical master at Woolwich through the influence of Charles Hutton, to whose notice he had been brought by a manuscript on the "Use of the Sliding Rule"; and when Hutton resigned in 1807 Gregory succeeded him in the professorship. Failing health obliged him to retire in 1838, and he died at Woolwich on the 2nd of February 1841.

  • Hutton, Mr Potts and others are to be found in the Transactions and Proceedings of the New Zealand Institute.

  • The society first met at James Hutton's shop, 'The Bible and Sun,' Wild Street, west of Temple Bar.

  • Matthew Hutton, 1 5951606.

  • Matthew Hutton, 1 7471757.

  • Hutton, The Anglican Ministry, with a preface by Cardinal J.

  • See also John Wallis, Opera Mathematica (1693-1699), and Charles Hutton, Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary (1815), article " Algebra."

  • Charles Hutton >>

  • 's Gravesande's Essai de perspective (1711), Robert Smith's Compleat System of Optics (1738), Joseph Harris's Treatise on Optics (1775), Charles Hutton's Philosophical and Mathematical Dictionary, and other books on optics and physics of that period.

  • See Watt, Bibliotheca Britannica; Hutton.

  • Hutton, Comte's Theory of Man's Future (1877), Comte, the Man and the Founder (1891), Comte's Life and Work (1892); E.

  • CHARLES HUTTON (1737-1823), English mathematician, was born at Newcastle-on-Tyne on the 14th of August 1737.

  • There is reason to believe, on the evidence of two pay-bills, that for a short time in 1755 and 1756 Hutton worked in Old Long Benton colliery; at any rate, on Ivison's promotion to a living, Hutton succeeded to the Jesmond school, whence, in consequence of increasing pupils, he removed to Stote's Hall.

  • This account appeared in the Philosophical Transactions for 1778, was afterwards reprinted in the second volume of his Tracts on Mathematical and Philosophical Subjects, and procured for Hutton the degree of LL.D.

  • This undertaking, the mathematical and scientific parts of which fell to Hutton's share, was completed in 1809, and filled eighteen volumes quarto.

  • See John Bruce, Charles Hutton (Newcastle, 1823).

  • James Hutton >>

  • Hutton, Popular Account of the Thugs and Dacoits (London, 18 57).

  • The new movement began actively ology of with James Hutton in the later years of the 18th century, and was forwarded by the studies of William Smith in England and of Cuvier in France; but the really efficient champion of the conception that the earth is very old was Sir Charles Lyell, who published the first edition of his epoch-making Principles of Geology only a few years before Queen Victoria came to the throne.

  • A brief sketch of its geological history is given by Hutton, Trans.

  • Hutton and James Drummond, The Animals of New Zealand (New Zealand, 1905); Sir W.

  • Hutton, some 700-500 years ago.

  • In fact, the whole skeletons of the wings and of the shoulder girdle seem to have been lost, excepting Anomalopteryx dromaeoides, which, according to Hutton,' had still some vestiges.

  • From Maskelyne's observations Charles Hutton deduced a density for the earth 4.5 times that of water (ib.

  • Hutton (1895); Archbishop Laud Commemoration, ed.

  • Besides those already mentioned, his works include An Outline of the First Principles of Horticulture (1832), An Outline of the Structure and Physiology of Plants (1832), A Natural System of Botany (1836), The Fossil Flora of Great Britain (with William Hutton, 1831-1837), Flora Medica (1838), Theory of Horticulture (1840), The Vegetable Kingdom (1846), Folia Orchidacea (1852), Descriptive Botany (1858).

  • In the orchard stands a tomb, that of the puritan Sir Robert Hutton (d.

  • One of his favourite places of resort in these years was a club of which Dr Hutton, Dr Black, Dr Adam Ferguson, John Clerk the naval tactician, Robert Adam the architect, as well as Smith himself, were original members, and to which Dugald Stewart, Professor Playfair and other eminent men were afterwards admitted.

  • Hutton erroneously states that it contains the logarithms to 8 places, and his account has been followed by most writers.

  • It has been thought necessary to give in detail the facts relating to the conversion of the logarithms, as unfortunately Charles Hutton in his history of logarithms, which was prefixed to the early editions of his Mathematical Tables, and was also published as one of his Mathematical Tracts, has charged Napier with want of candour in not telling the world of Briggs's share in the change of system, and he expresses the suspicion that " Napier was desirous that the world should ascribe to him alone the merit of this very useful improvement of the logarithms."

  • According to Hutton's view, the words, " it is to be hoped that his posthumous work " ...

  • Hutton's suggestions are all the more to be regretted as they occur as a history which is the result of a good deal of investigation and which for years was referred to as an authority by many writers.

  • For more detailed information relating to Napier, Briggs and Vlacq, and the invention of logarithms, the reader is referred to the life of Briggs in Ward's Lives of the Professors of Gresham College (London, 1740); Thomas Smith's Vitae quorundam eruditissimorum et illustrium virorum (Vita Henrici Briggii) (London, 1707); Mark Napier's Memoirs of John Napier already referred to, and the same author's Naperi libri qui supersunt (1839); Hutton's History; de Morgan's article already referred to; Delambre's Histoire de l'Astronomie moderne; the report on mathematical tables in the Report of the British Association for 1873; and the Philosophical Magazine for October and December 1872 and May 1873.

  • In the years1791-1807Francis Maseres published at London, in six volumes quarto " Scriptores Logarithmici, or a collection of several curious tracts on the nature and construction of logarithms, mentioned in Dr Hutton's historical introduction to his new edition of Sherwin's mathematical tables..

  • The work went through several editions during the 18th century, and was at length superseded in 1785 by Hutton's tables, which continued in successive editions to maintain their position for a century.

  • In 1783 appeared at Paris the first edition of Francois Callet's tables, which correspond to those of Hutton in England.

  • Hutton founded on Sherwin and Callet on Gardiner, and the editions of Vega form a separate offshoot from the original tables.

  • A full and valuable account of these methods is given in Hutton's " Construction of Logarithms," which occurs in the introduction to the early editions of his Mathematical Tables, and also forms tract 21 of his Mathematical Tracts (vol.

  • His reactionary and retarding ideas as a special creationist and his advocacy of the cataclysmic theory of change exerted a baneful influence until overthrown by the uniformitarianism of James Hutton (1726-1797) and Charles Lyell (1797-1875) and the evolutionism of Darwin.

  • James Hutton (1726-1797) had set forth (1788) the principle that during all geological time there has been no essential change in the character of events, and that uniformity of law is perfectly consistent with mutability in the results.

  • 12 (1809); C. Hutton's Phil.

  • Gregory's series and the identities 7 r /4 =5 tan1 + + 2 tan-',A (Euler, 1779), 7r/4 = tani ++2 tan-' s (Hutton, 1776), neither of which was nearly so advantageous as several found by Charles Hutton, calculated 7r correct to 136 places."

  • 159 seq.; Hutton, Tracts, I.

  • It had been previously pointed out by Captain Hutton.

  • Rigaud, Memoirs of Bradley (1832), and in Charles Hutton, Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary (1795); a particularly clear and lucid account is given in H.

  • Hutton, Life and Writings of Sir Thomas More (1891).

  • Trail, Life and Writings of Robert Simson (1812); C. Hutton, Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary (1815).

  • See also Hutton's Church of the Sixth Century (1897); J.

  • See C. Hutton, Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary (1815).

  • - The largest list of Afghan birds that we know of is given by Captain Hutton in the J.

  • On the eastern slope of First Mountain are Hutton Park, containing the grounds of the Essex County Country Club, and Llewellyn Park, a beautiful residential tract of 750 acres, named in honour of its originator, Llewellyn S.

  • Hutton, Philip Augustus (in the Foreign Statesmen series, London, 1896).

  • de Vergennes, minister of foreign affairs, who employed him in 1782 in negotiating, with the English commissioner Dr James Hutton, the recognition of the independence of the United States (1782), and in preparing a treaty of commerce with Great Britain (1786).(1786).

  • Semnopithecus schistaceus was found by Captain Hutton at an elevation of 11,000 feet in the Himalayas, leaping actively among fir-trees whose branches were laden with snow-wreaths.

  • It is, in fact, as notorious an example of over-successful acclimatization as the rabbit, but in Hutton and Drummond's recent work on the New Zealand animals (London, 1905) it is not regarded in this light, considering that some very common exotic birds were needed to keep down the insects, which it certainly did.

  • Hutton (1868), Ethel Wedgwood (1906), and (more literally) Sir F.

  • Hutton in the Diet.

  • Hutton's edition of S.

  • In 1778 he re-edited Jacques Ozanam's Recreations mathdmatiques, afterwards published in English by Charles Hutton (4 vols., London, 1803).

  • Hutton published Tauler's Sermons for Festivals under the title of The Inner Way.

  • To its publication the influence exerted by James Hutton on the progress of geological knowledge is largely due.

  • His lives of Matthew Stewart, Hutton, Robison, many of his reviews, and above all his "Dissertation" are of the utmost value.

  • Hutton, who in 1881 wrote that the word "was suggested by Huxley at a meeting held previous to the formation of the now defunct Metaphysical Society at Mr Knowles's house on Clapham Common in 1869, in my hearing.

  • Hutton here gives a variant etymology for the word, which may be therefore taken as partly derived from &-yvwanros (the "unknown" God), and partly from an antithesis to "gnostic"; but the meaning remains the same in either case.

  • The name, as Huxley said, "took"; it was constantly used by Hutton in the Spectator and became a fashionable label for contemporary unbelief in Christian dogma.

  • Hutton himself frequently misrepresented the doctrine by describing it as "belief in an unknown and unknowable God"; but agnosticism as defined by Huxley meant not belief, but absence of belief, as much distinct from belief on the one hand as from disbelief on the other; it was the half-way house between the two, where all questions were "open."

  • Hutton (1873); Sir William Petty's Down Survey, edited by T.

  • Hutton describes his specimens as sucking the juices of flies, which they had stuck down with their slime, and they have been observed in captivity to devour the entrails which have been removed from their fellows, and to eat raw sheep's liver.

  • Among the species described may be mentioned P. leuckarti (Saenger), P. insignis (Dendy), P. oviparus (Dendy), P. viridimaculatus (Dendy), P. novae zealandiae (Hutton), but it is by no means certain that future research will maintain these.

  • Hutton on the Anglican Ministry (1879) and an article on Biblical criticism in the Nineteenth Century (February 1884).

  • Hutton as "unequalled for grandeur of outline, purity of taste and radiance of total effect"; while his latest and longest, "The Dream of Gerontius," is generally recognized as the happiest effort to represent the unseen world that has been made since the time of Dante.

  • Hutton in the Expositor (September, October and November 1890).

  • Hutton (Dublin, 1873); and S.

  • One of the bestknown European species is Lycopodites falcatus, originally described by Lindley and Hutton from the Inferior Oolite of Yorkshire.

  • Hutton, Sigismondo Malatesta (London, 1906).

  • Most of them I met first in the house of my good friend, Mr. Laurence Hutton.

  • Mrs. Hutton is a true and tried friend.

  • Mr. Hutton introduced me to many of his literary friends, greatest of whom are Mr. William Dean Howells and Mark Twain.

  • TO MRS. KATE ADAMS KELLER New York, March 31, 1895. ...Teacher and I spent the afternoon at Mr. Hutton's, and had a most delightful time!...

  • Almost two weeks ago we called at Mr. Hutton's and had a delightful time.

  • I am sure you would like to know Mr. and Mrs. Hutton, they are so kind and interesting.

  • TO MRS. LAURENCE HUTTON 37 Concord Avenue, Cambridge, Mass.

  • But Johnson, and "The Plague" and everything else must wait a few minutes this afternoon, while I say, thank you, my dear Mrs. Hutton....

  • TO MRS. LAURENCE HUTTON [Wrentham] May 29, 1898. ...My work goes on bravely.

  • TO MRS. LAURENCE HUTTON 12 Newbury Street, Boston, October 23, 1898.

  • TO MRS. LAURENCE HUTTON 12 Newberry Street, Boston.

  • TO MRS. LAURENCE HUTTON 12 Newbury Street, Boston, January 17, 1899. ...Have you seen Kipling's "Dreaming True," or "Kitchener's School?"

  • TO MRS. LAURENCE HUTTON [Boston] May 28th [1899]. ...We have had a hard day.

  • TO MRS. LAURENCE HUTTON Wrentham, July 29, 1899. ...I passed in all the subjects I offered, and with credit in advanced Latin....

  • Mrs. Hutton had already written to mother, asking her to telegraph if she was willing for me to have other advisers besides herself and Teacher.

  • TO MRS. LAURENCE HUTTON 14 Coolidge Avenue, Cambridge, December 27, 1900. ...So you read about our class luncheon in the papers?

  • "Toleration," she said once, when she was visiting her friend Mrs. Laurence Hutton, "is the greatest gift of the mind; it requires the same effort of the brain that it takes to balance oneself on a bicycle."

  • With the rest of the runners and riders looking puny by comparison (John Hutton anyone?

  • Hutton reservoir simulation model An Eclipse 100 simulation model was provided by Kerr McGee for archiving.

  • However, Hutton does not give any interpretation of the purpose of egg rolling.

  • From the Human Rights Act to Hutton to the new supreme court, we are seeing growing judicial scrutiny of the government.

  • For example Will Hutton, in last week 's Observer, argued the secular world must object to Islamic sexism.

  • In a planned shake-up of welfare reforms, Mr Hutton said the name for Incapacity Benefit would also change.

  • Hutton snarled back that there were 1500 more GPs than in 1997, more were in training but more needed to be done.

  • About the Author Matthew Hutton is a non-practising solicitor (admitted 1979), who has specialized in tax for over 25 years.

  • Health minister John Hutton today spearheaded a new drive to recruit more NHS staff from underprivileged backgrounds.

  • The only Yellowhammers in our area seem to be at Hutton Roof and I managed to see one on the 25th.

  • Lauren Hutton makeup is especially made for those of us who are over 40 and don't feel the makeup selection on the market is appropriate for women our age.

  • The idea for this line came about when Ms Hutton herself was disappointed at the array of makeup available for older women.

  • The Lauren Hutton Face Disc is a large compact featuring several different shades of makeup designed to highlight those areas needing enhancement and conceal those areas we'd rather others didn't see.

  • The blush in the Lauren Hutton Face Disc collection can also double as a lip tint.

  • Thanks to the Lauren Hutton Face Disc collection, the challenge ends.

  • The same color is visible on a corresponding brush from the Lauren Hutton makeup brush collection.

  • This may sound like an awful lot of work, but in reality the Lauren Hutton makeup takes minutes to apply.

  • If this is out of your price range, you might peruse eBay where Lauren Hutton makeup products have been seen selling at a discount.

  • Foundation, lipstick and mascara aren't included with the Lauren Hutton Face Disc.

  • If you're frustrated by makeup geared towards the younger generation, you might give the Lauren Hutton Face Disc a try.

  • This a catch-and-release tournament has welcomed such stars as Jane Seymour, Laurence Fishburne and Lauren Hutton.

  • The version that appears on this soundtrack was recorded by the Danny Hutton Hitters, led by Hutton, the former vocalist for Three Dog Night.

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