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hunting

hunting

hunting Sentence Examples

  • I don't think she's as impressed with your hunting skills as you are, Bordeaux.

  • Looked like a hunting party of fifteen or twenty.

  • There is on one to connect me to New Hampshire though this little group who thought they were so clever hiding in that silly business in Keene might suspect that the one they hunted is now hunting them!

  • Jonny had begun disappearing in the evenings with most of the vamps, and she knew he was out hunting humans.

  • They plotted together during the hunting trip you and your brother took the day before he died.

  • It isn't hunting season, is it?

  • But it definitely isn't hunting season, and there's no good reason for anyone to be shooting.

  • "I'll be hunting demons today," he said, needing a release for his fury.

  • They left the bull where it lay, reasoning that if they removed it, the bear might go hunting fresh meat.

  • Maybe they were hunting up the road.

  • They aren't supposed to be hunting on private land without permission, and ours is posted anyway.

  • If you need to rest, take a break before you go hunting.

  • That's the other issue I've been dealing with, when not hunting you down to make you cry.

  • No more hunting, tracking, targeting, hurting, killing, or anything else.

  • She replaced the sweater and began hunting in earnest.

  • Every demon on this mortal planet is hunting Sasha.

  • "They went hunting for Sasha," Megan added.

  • We have been hunting here in the forest.

  • While hunting, he compared each victim to her.

  • That means a lot to me, I don't feel much like hunting though.

  • We have a group hunting them there.

  • No, actually I thought you might have gone out hunting.

  • You can't even feed on Elisabeth and you're still not hunting.

  • Josh, Bill and Alex had gone hunting for them the day after the attack, but they lost the trail in some rocks on her back 40 acres.

  • I have a real mission to execute hunting down insurgents.

  • "It was a good hunting day," Kelli said, excitement in her voice.

  • If I'm doing the hunting, you're eating demons.

  • They were hunting down your buddy Vinnie.

  • So how did you learn all your hunting skills?

  • I enjoyed hunting with my father.

  • Our hunting trip was the first time in months, wasn't it?

  • He'd grudgingly gone on the hunting trip, not wanting to leave Claire behind by herself.

  • Jonny's probably hunting now.

  • She needed a little sleep while the vamps were out hunting.

  • Hunting, extermination, as methodical and merciless as he knew himself capable of.

  • He needed more weapons before he began hunting them down.

  • I'm probably gonna start hunting down Others today.

  • ` He lost her somewhere around the bar and enjoyed the idea of hunting his next meal-toy.

  • He wasn't hunting for dinner; he was moving with too much purpose.

  • It was better than hunting in a club.

  • Instead of going through the drive through every day to eat, it's like hunting your prey down.

  • You've GPS chipped me, killed six women, warned me about betraying you and now, you're hunting me down like a people-burger.

  • A collection of woody plants, one of the largest and finest in the world, and a broad forest and hunting preserve, known as Pisgah Forest (ioo,000 acres), are also maintained by the owner.

  • His Geheimes Jagdbuch, containing about 2500 words, is a treatise purporting to teach his grandsons the art of hunting.

  • He was also fond of hunting, and for this reason usually lived at Adrianople.

  • They neither plant nor have they any manufactures except their rude bamboo and rattan vessels, the fish and game traps which they set with much skill, and the bows, blow-pipes and bamboo spears with which they and the produce of their hunting and fishing.

  • The town is one of the best hunting centres in the county, being within reach of several meets.

  • He was exceedingly fond of horses and hunting, leaping ditches prudently avoided by the foreign ambassadors.

  • The same authority tells us that he was initiated by his father in those field sports, such as hunting and hawking, which formed one of his recreations in after life.

  • They were enduring of toil, hunger, and cold whenever fortune laid it on them, given to hunting and hawking, delighting in the pleasure of horses, and of all the weapons and garb of war.

  • They are described as light-eyed and red-haired, and lived by hunting in their thick forests.

  • Beetles and larvae are frequently carnivorous in habit, hunting for small insects under stones, or pursuing the soft-skinned grubs of beetles and flies that bore in woody stems or succulent roots.

  • basin, thinly-peopled and available only for cattle-breeding and for hunting, is quite isolated from Russia by the Timan ridge.

  • Fishing and hunting are the most important sources of livelihood.

  • Hunting and shooting give occupation to a great number of persons.

  • Apart from hunting and fishing, the exploitation of the forests provides the principal occupation of the inhabitants.

  • Hunting is an occupation of considerable importance in N.

  • Here, about 1590, was founded an independent military colony called the Setch, the members of which, recognizing no authority but that of their own elected officers, lived by fishing, hunting and making raids on the Tatars, and were always ready to assist their less fortunate countrymen in resisting Polish aggression.

  • In Ireland, in Cromwell's time, wolves were particularly troublesome, and said to be increasing in numbers, so that special measures were taken for their destruction, such as the offering of large rewards for their heads, and the prohibition (in 1652) of the exportation of "wolf-dogs," the large dogs used for hunting the wolves.

  • In one courtyard of this temple are deposited the celebrated ten stone drums which bear poetical inscriptions commemorative of the hunting expeditions of King Suan (827-781 B.C.), in whose reign they are believed, though erroneously, to have been cut; and in another stands a series of stone tablets on which are inscribed the names of all those who have obtained the highest literary degree of Tsin-shi for the last five centuries.

  • The success of procryptic coloration depends, however, very largely upon stillness, and the instinct to keep stationary without moving a limb is a marked characteristic of all spiders unless engaged in hunting or fleeing from imminent danger.

  • Among the animals are the puma, manatee (sea cow), alligator and crocodile, but the number of these has been greatly diminished by hunting.

  • Cory's Hunting and Fishing Florida (Boston, 1896) and A.

  • Long drouths prevail in this region and there is no inducement for settlement, the nomadic Indians visiting it only on their hunting expeditions.

  • Dogs are kept by the savages for hunting.

  • In 399 he was killed by one of his favourites while hunting; according to another account he was the victim of a conspiracy.

  • In order to spare Gutrune's feelings it is arranged that his death shall appear as an accident in a hunting party.

  • While the hunting party is resting Siegfried tells stories of his boyhood, thus recalling the antecedents of this drama with a charming freshness and sense of dramatic and musical repose.

  • He had no taste except for ornament, and no serious interest except in amusements, versemaking, hunting and tournaments.

  • So great a success was scored that other shows were held in the same year at Birmingham and Edinburgh; while the Cleveland Agricultural Society also established a show of foxhounds at Redcar, the latter being the forerunner of that very fine show of hounds which is now held at Peterborough every summer and is looked upon as the out-of-season society gathering of hunting men and women.

  • The bark is completely dog-like, and the primitive hunting instincts have been cultivated into a marvellous aptitude for herding sheep and cattle.

  • The hairless dogs of Central Africa are greyhounds employed chiefly in hunting antelopes, and there are somewhat similar varieties in China, Central and South America.

  • It is silent when hunting, and has long ears shaped like vine leaves.

  • These are large dogs, hunting by smell, with massive structure, large drooping ears, and usually smooth coats, without fringes of hair on the ears, limbs or tail.

  • The dachshund, or badger hound, is of German origin, and like the basset hound was originally an elongated distorted hound with crooked legs, employed in baiting and hunting badgers, but now greatly improved and made more definite by the arts of the breeder.

  • The German boarhound is one of the largest races of dogs, originally used in Germany and Denmark for hunting boars or deer, but now employed chiefly as watchdogs.

  • The act of 1670 gave to informers a pecuniary interest (they were to have one-third of the fine imposed) in hunting down Nonconformists who broke the law, and this and other statutes were unduly strained to secure convictions.

  • Hence a regular commerce in slaves was established, which was based on the " systematically-prosecuted hunting of man," and indicated an entire perversion of the primitive institution, which was essentially connected with conquest.

  • The hunting of human beings to make them slaves was greatly aggravated by the demand of the European colonies.

  • What in popular usage are spoken of as the instincts of animals, for example, the hunting of prey by foxes and wolves, or the procedure of ants in their nests, are generally joint products of hereditary and acquired factors.

  • Hagenau dates from the beginning of the 12th century, and owes its origin to the erection of a hunting lodge by the dukes of Swabia.

  • On the site of the hunting lodge he founded an imperial palace, in which were preserved the jewelled imperial crown, sceptre, imperial globe, and sword of Charlemagne.

  • Their favourite pursuits were fighting, either against a common enemy or among themselves, hunting, hawking and listening to the minstrels who celebrated their exploits.

  • Each of the inspectorates is divided into districts, each district having, in addition to the chief settlement or coloni, several outlying posts and Eskimo hunting stations, each presided over by an udligger, who is responsible to the colonibestyrer, or superintendent of the district.

  • The Samoyedes, who now maintain themselves by hunting and fishing on the lower Ob, partly mixed in the S.

  • The Yalmal peninsula, where they find great facilities for hunting, is especially venerated by the Ob Ostiak Samoyedes, and there they have one of their chief idols, Khese.

  • Alice was followed (in the "Lewis Carroll" series) by Phantasmagoria, in 1869; Through the Looking-Glass, in 1871; The Hunting of the Snark (1876); Rhyme and Reason (1883); A Tangled Tale (1885); and Sylvie and Bruno (in two parts, 1889 and 1893).

  • When Robert's departure for the First Crusade left Normandy in the hands of Rufus (1096) Henry took service under the latter, and he was in the royal hunting train on the day of Rufus's death (August 2nd,.

  • The greater part of his time was spent hunting.

  • Queen Elizabeth's or Fair Mead hunting lodge, a picturesque half-timbered building, is preserved under the Epping Forest Preservation Act.

  • Hunting.

  • - Hunting is a profitable occupation, the male population of whole villages in the hilly and woody tracts setting out in October for a month's hunting.

  • It is estimated that about one-half of the Russian agricultural population supplement their income by engaging in non-agricultural pursuits, but not more than 18 to 22% carry on domestic trades, the others finding occupation in the carrying trade - which is still important, even since the construction of the railway - in hunting (chiefly squirrel-hunting) and in work in the mines.

  • south-east of Pontiac, Cass and Elizabeth lakes), and there is good hunting and fishing in the vicinity.

  • For fox-hunting, see HUNTING.

  • The range of Taygetus is well watered and was in ancient times covered with forests which afforded excellent hunting to the Spartans, while it had also large iron mines and quarries of an inferior bluish marble, as well as of the famous rosso antico of Taenarum.

  • By Matilda, who died in Normandy on the 3rd of November 1083, William had four sons, Robert, duke of Normandy, Richard, who was killed whilst hunting, and the future kings, William II.

  • But before taking further steps he retired to Versailles, then a hunting lodge, and there, listening to two of Richelieu's friends, Claude de Saint-Simon, father of the memoir writer, and Cardinal La Valette, sent for Richelieu in the evening, and while the salons of the Luxembourg were full of expectant courtiers the king was reassuring the cardinal of his continued favour and support.

  • On returning to the Vet, Potgieter learned that a hunting party of Boers which had crossed the Vaal had been attacked by the Matabele, who had also killed Boer women and children.

  • For the feet the sandal (o-avbaXov, Ti&Xov) was the usual wear; for hunting and travelling high boots were worn.

  • A high hunting boot was called compagus.

  • They were distinguished by their mode of hunting, climbing a tree to survey their game, and then pursuing it with trained horses and dogs.

  • The Indians in hunting them employ the grison (Galictis vittata), a member of the weasel family, which is trained to enter the crevices of the rocks where the chinchillas lie concealed during the day.

  • Remains of a theatre and of a late mosaic pavement with hunting scenes have been found, three of the bridges across the Bacchiglione and Retrone are of Roman origin, and arches of the aqueduct exist outside Porta S.

  • soil or souil, the miry wallowing ground of a wild boar, whence the hunting phrase " to take soil," of a beast of the chase taking to water or marshy ground.

  • Hughes (aondon, 1896); Aus ibn Hajar of the Bani Tamin, famous for his descriptions of weapons and hunting scenes (ed.

  • m., and is used for sheep grazing; Muskeget Island, which has excellent hunting, and of which about one-half is a public park; and the Gravel Islands and other islets.

  • They lived chiefly by hunting and fishing.

  • These reliefs represent both sacred subjects and scenes of war and hunting, mixed with grotesque monsters, such as specially delighted the rude, vigorous nature of the Lombards; they are all richly decorative in effect, though strange and unskilful in detail.

  • Francis showed an even greater love for violent exercises, such as hunting, which was his ruling passion, and tennis, and for tournaments, masquerades and amusements of all kinds.

  • Hunting, tennis, jewelry and his gallantry were the chief preoccupations of his life.

  • It is hunted by the Arabs for its flesh and to test the speed of their horses and greyhounds; it is during these hunting parties that the young are captured for menagerie purposes.

  • We are startled to find him telling Tacitus of his interest in hunting the wild boar, but he is careful to add that, while the beaters were at work, he sat beside the nets and was busily taking notes, thus combining the cult of Minerva with that of Diana (i.

  • He died on the 5th of November 1370 from the effects of an injury received while hunting.

  • The females have a wonderful power of finding their burrows on returning from their hunting expeditions.

  • He entrusted the government to the Jesuits; refused either to summon the Cortes or to marry, although the Portuguese crown would otherwise pass to a foreigner, and devoted himself wholly to hunting, martial exercises and the severest forms of asceticism.

  • 41) the hunting of the Calydonian boar is represented on a fragment of a frieze from a heroum.

  • His health was uniformly good, owing perhaps to his moderation in eating and drinking, and to his love for hunting and swimming.

  • The king shared his fondness for hunting and rapidly advanced him in favour.

  • Protests follow against hunting and fishing rights, restrictions on wood-cutting, and excessive demands made on peasants.

  • Melton is the centre of a celebrated hunting district, in connexion with which there are large stables in the town.

  • Exmoor is noted for its stag hunting.

  • Capture begins among the lower tribes with the hand, without devices, developing knack and skill in seizing, pursuing, climbing, swimming, and maiming without weapons; and proceeds to gathering with devices that take the place of the hand in dipping, digging, hooking and grasping; weapons for striking, whether clubs, missiles or projectiles; edged weapons of capture, which were rare in America; piercing devices for capture, in lances, barbed spears, harpoons and arrows; traps for enclosing, arresting and killing, such as pens, cages, pits, pen-falls, nets, hooks, nooses, clutches, adhesives, deadfalls, impalers, knife traps and poisons; animals consciously and unconsciously aiding in capture; fire in the form of torches, beacons, burning out and smoking out; poisons and asphyxiators; the accessories to hunting, including such changes in food, dress, shelter, travelling, packing, mechanical tools and intellectual apparatus as demanded by these arts.

  • Finally, in this connexion, the first steps in domestication, beginning with the improvement of natural corrals or spawning ground, and hunting with trained dogs and animals.

  • Labour organizations for hunting, communal hunt and migrations had to do with the animal world.

  • Myths, folk-lore, hunting charms, fetishes, superstitions and customs were based on the same idea.

  • Society was organized in most cases on animal clans, and religion was largely zoomorphic. The hunting tribes knew well the nature and habits of animals, their anatomy, their migrations, and could interpret their voices.

  • The Dene (Tinneh) myths resembled those of the Eskimo, and all the hunting tribes of eastern Canada and United States and the Mississippi valley have a mythology based upon their zootechny and their totemism.

  • The religious concep tions of the fishing tribes on the Pacific coast between Mount St Elias and the Columbia river are worked out by Boas; the transformation from the hunting to the agricultural mode of life was accompanied by changes in belief and worship quite as radical.

  • The old apparatus of hunting and fishing is quite primitive.

  • He published Presidential Problems (New York, 1904), made up in part of lectures at Princeton University, and Fishing and Hunting Sketches (1906).

  • It may be added that an ancient gold goblet depicts the hunting and taming of the wild aurochs.

  • The patroon received his estate in perpetual inheritance and had the exclusive right of hunting and fishing upon it.

  • The natives cultivate maize, plantains, bananas, pineapples, limes, pepper, cotton, &c., and live easily on the products of their gardens, with occasional help from fishing and hunting.

  • His African Game Trails, the record of his scientific hunting expedition in Africa in 1909-10, is much more than a narrative of adventures on a wild continent.

  • Clowes; The Rough Riders (1899); Oliver Cromwell (1901); the following works on hunting and natural history, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman (1886), Ranch Life and Hunting Trail (1888), The Wilderness Hunter (1893), Big Game Hunting in the Rockies and on the Plains (1899; a republication of Hinting Trips of a Ranchman and The Wilderness Hunter), The Deer Family (1902), with other authors, and African Game Trails (1910); and the essays, American Ideals (2 vols., 1897) and The Strenuous Life (1900); and State Papers and Addresses (1905) and African and European Addresses (1910).

  • He died in a hunting accident on the 25th of August 1699.

  • The " zodiac of labours " was replaced in French castles and hotels by a " zodiac of pleasures," in which hunting, hawking, fishing and dancing were substituted for hoeing, planting, reaping and ploughing.8 It is curious to find the same sequence of symbols employed for the same decorative purposes in India as in Europe.

  • After he succeeded to the throne in 1788 his one serious occupation was hunting.

  • It is now found in greatest abundance in Norway, Russia and Siberia, where hunting the bear is a favourite sport, and where, when dead, its remains are highly valued.

  • Mark, hunting in the forest, comes upon them sleeping in a cave, and as Tristan, who knows that the king is in the neighbourhood, has placed his sword between them, is convinced of their innocence.

  • William had, on the 8th of October, after his victory was assured, gone to his hunting seat at Dieren.

  • In 1763 the Kentucky country was claimed by the Cherokees as a part of their hunting grounds, by the Six Nations (Iroquois) as a part of their western conquests, and by Virginia as a part of the territory granted to her by her charter of 1609, although it was actually inhabited only by a few Chickasaws near the Mississippi river and by a small tribe of Shawnees in the north, opposite what is now Portsmouth, Ohio.

  • Other industries of a desultory character include the collection of archil, or Spanish moss, on the western side of the Californian peninsula, hunting herons for their plumes and alligators for their skins, honey extraction (commonly wild honey), and the gathering of cochineal and ni-in insects.

  • Whether this feature or a cult of the hunting type was the primary form, is so far an open question.

  • The lands included in the township of Litchfield (originally called Bantam) were bought from the Indians in1715-1716for 115, the Indians reserving a certain part for hunting.

  • When hunting antelope (prongbuck) and deer the coyotes spread out their pack into a wide circle, endeavouring to surround their game and keep it running inside their ring until exhausted.

  • There are different styles of riding adapted to the different purposes for which horses are ridden - on the road, in the school, hunting, racing, steeple-chasing and in the cavalry service - just as there are different horses more suitable by conformation, breeding and training for each.

  • When a person has become a fair road rider he has made some progress towards being a hunting man.

  • But if first principles are disregarded, and a follower of hounds believes in the system "it doesn't matter how you ride so long as you stick on," he will not only always be a "sight" but a menace in the hunting field.

  • Few self-taught riders attain to excellence; they may keep a good place in hunting, if possessed of plenty of courage, and mounted on a bold and not too tender-mouthed horse, but they never will be riders in the proper sense of the word.

  • For practical purposes the chief difference between a park seat and a hunting seat consists in the shortening of the stirrups some two or three holes.

  • The seat of the hunting man is the most important of any connected with amusement; he must sit firm, so as not to be thrown off when his horse leaps, or makes a mistake, and he must be able to save his horse under all circumstances, and to make as much of him as possible.

  • As with road riding, so with hunting, the actual length of the stirrups will depend a good deal upon the shape and action of the horse, but the nature of the animal and the peculiarities of the country ridden over will also have something to do with their adjustment.

  • Nothing but actual practice with hounds can teach a man how to ride where all kinds of going and obstacles of various sorts, natural and artificial, have to be encountered in a day's hunting.

  • The experience of a single day's hunting will teach the novice that gates are far oftener opened than jumped; it is therefore necessary that a hunter should be handy at opening them.

  • In most details the nearer a hunting man approaches to a steeple-chase jockey the better; but in the matter of the seat it must be remembered that a jockey's exertions last but a few minutes, while none can tell when the hunting man may finish his day's work; the jockey can therefore ride with more absolute grip during his race than the rider to hounds.

  • See also Horsemanship; Hunting; Cavalry; Racing And Steeple-Chase; and Polo.

  • it was the annual resort of the court during the hunting season.

  • They make incomparable guides for fishing, hunting and surveying parties, on which they will cheerfully undergo the greatest hardships, though tending to shrink from regular employment in cities or on farms.

  • They lie entangled in a vast net of sea-weed; are the resort of innumerable birds, and used to be largely frequented by seals and sea-otters, which, however, have been almost completely driven away by unregulated hunting.

  • On behalf of the committee appointed to deal with feudal rights, he presented to the Convention reports on the seignorial rights which were subject to compensation, on hunting and fishing rights, forestry, and kindred subjects.

  • During one of these, in 1195, Alexius, the emperor's brother, taking advantage of the latter's absence from camp on a hunting expedition, proclaimed himself emperor, and was readily recognised by the soldiers.

  • To the north are the vine-clad hills of the LOssnitz commanding views of the valley of the Elbe from Dresden to Meissen; behind them, on an island in a lake, is the castle of Moritzburg, the hunting box of the king of Saxony.

  • hunting was formerly prevalent.

  • While hunting for its food the bird makes a continual sniffing sound through the nostrils, which are placed at the extremity of the upper mandible.

  • It is clear from the frequent references to dogs and hawks in the charters that hunting and falconry were keenly pursued by the kings and their retinues.

  • Large herds of geese and pigeons are reared, while hunting and fishing constitute also important resources.

  • It contained an ancient abbey and a hunting château belonging to the dukes of Brabant.

  • was away hunting in Thrace, he was proclaimed emperor by the troops; he captured Isaac at Stagira in Macedonia, put out his eyes, and kept him henceforth a close prisoner, though he had been redeemed by him from captivity at Antioch and loaded with honours.

  • The knights wore a collar of golden hunting horns, whence the order was also known as the Order of the Horn.

  • Avoiding the fashionable and luxurious gymnasia, he devoted himself to military studies, hunting and border forays.

  • In August the conspirators were netted, and Mary was arrested at the gate of Tixall Park, whither Paulet had taken her under pretence of a hunting party.

  • The gain of the Milanese in 18J9 by the future king of Italy (1861) meant that Italy then won the valley of Livigno (between the Upper Engadine and Bormio), which is the only important bit it holds on the nonItalian slope of the Alps, besides the county of Tenda (obtained in 1575, and not lost in 1860), with the heads of certain glens in the Maritime Alps, reserved in 1860 for reasons connected with hunting.

  • In the 18th century wolves still roamed the country in such large numbers that hunting parties were organized against them; now they are unknown.

  • Busily engaged in secret negotiations with France, he had retired to his hunting seat at Dieren, when he fell ill with smallpox on the 27th of October.

  • The supply of some of the most valuable, such as sable, silver and natural black fox, sea otter and ermine, which are all taken from animals of a more or less shy nature, does very gradually decrease with persistent hunting and the encroachment of man upon the districts where they live, but the climate of these vast regions is so cold and inhospitable that the probabilities of man ever permanently inhabiting them in numbers sufficient to scare away or exterminate the fur-bearing wild animals is unlikely.

  • It was while hunting near Lake Mdlar that the news of the Stockholm massacre was brought to him by a peasant fresh from the capital, who told him, at the same time, that a price had been set upon his head.

  • The chapel contains the tombs of abbot John Hamilton and of the children of the 1st lord Paisley, and the recumbent effigy of Marjory, daughter of Robert Bruce, who married Walter, the Steward, and was killed while hunting at Knock Hill between Renfrew and Paisley (1316).

  • Though not strictly gregarious, lions appear to be sociable towards their own species, and often are found in small troops, sometimes consisting of a pair of old ones with their nearly fullgrown cubs, but occasionally of adults of the same sex; and there seerp.s to be evidence that several lions will associate for the purpose of hunting upon a preconcerted plan.

  • In the summer of 45 he was assassinated while hunting, and Gotarzes became king again.

  • They asked for a renewal of their ancient rights of fishing and hunting freely, for a speedier method of obtaining justice, and for the removal of new and heavy burdens.

  • But the way in which they usually diverge just over and in front of the eye has suggested the more probable idea, that they serve to guard these organs from thorns and spines while hunting for fallen fruits among the tangled thickets of rattans and other spiny plants.

  • Northern Ontario is still a valuable fur-bearing and hunting country, moose, caribou, fox, bear, otter, mink and skunk being found in large quantities.

  • The only inhabitants are a few wild tribes who live by hunting and collecting jungle produce.

  • This is a totally different thing from mere hunting for inscriptions, statues or other portable objects which will present a greater or less value in themselves even when torn from their context.

  • Hunting, Fishing, &c.In the desert hunting was carried on by hunters with bows and arrows, dogs and nets to check the game.

  • Together with hunting and fishing it is illustrated in many of the Memoirs of the Archaeological Survey of the same society.

  • Passing the various palettes with hunting scenes and animals (Plate II.

  • The general include tools for striking, slicing and scraping; the special tools are for fighting, hunting, agriculture, building and thread-work.

  • The arrow-heads of flint (64-66) and of bone (6869) were pointed, and also square-ended (67) for hunting (P.R.T.

  • Hunting Weapons.The forked lance of flint was at first wide with stTght hollow (73) from S.D.

  • On the death of al-Aziz on the 29tb of November 1198 in consequence of a hunting accident, his infant son Mahommed was raised to the throne with the title Malik al-Man~ur Nd~ir al-din, and his uncle al-Aftjal sent for from Sarkhad to take the post of regent or Atgbeg.

  • He was released on bail, and in February 1683, after the flight and death of Shaftesbury, he openly broke the implied conditions of his bail by paying a third visit to Chichester with Lord Grey and others on pretence of a hunting expedition.

  • The Gilyaks in the north support themselves by fishing and hunting.

  • of Poland, as a hunting box, and was often the scene of brilliant festivities.

  • HUNTING (the verbal substantive from "hunt"; O.

  • as a "sport," pursued on fixed rules and principles, that hunting is dealt with here.

  • According to Herodotus, Cyrus devoted the revenue of four great towns to meet the expenses of his hunting establishments.

  • 34-45) related to have occurred, incidentally show in what high estimation the recreation of hunting was held in Lydia.

  • 429 seq.), had developed at a very early period; they first found adequate literary expression in the work of Xenophon entitled Cynegeticus, 3 which expounds his principles and embodies his experience in his favourite art of hunting.

  • Hunting scenes are frequently represented in ancient works of art, especially the boar-hunt, and also that of the hare.

  • The immense vivaria or theriotropheia, in which various wild animals, such as boars, stags and roe-deer, were kept in a state of semidomestication, were developments which arose at a comparatively late period; as also were the venationes in the circus, although these are mentioned as having been known as early as 186 B.C. The bald and meagre poem of Grattius Faliscus on hunting (Cynegetica) is modelled upon Xenophon's prose work; a still extant fragment (315 lines) of a similar poem with the same title, of much later date, by Nemesianus, seems to have at one See Layard (Nineveh, ii.

  • caste; they either followed the chase on their own account, or acted as the attendants of the chiefs in their hunting excursions, taking charge of the dogs, and securing and bringing home the game.

  • Besides the noose and the net, the arrow, the dart and the hunting pole or venabulum were frequently employed.

  • The lion was occasionally trained as a hunting animal instead of the dog.

  • The partiality for the chase which the ancient Egyptians manifested was shared by the Assyrians and Babylonians, as is shown by the frequency with which hunting scenes are depicted on the walls of their temples and palaces; it is even said that their 1 See on this whole subject ch.

  • That the Romans had borrowed some things in the art of hunting from the Gauls may be inferred from the name canis gallicus (Spanish galgo) for a greyhound, which is to be met with both in Ovid and Martial; also in the words (canis) vertragus and segusius, both of Celtic origin.'

  • According to Strabo (p. 200) the Britons also bred dogs well adapted for hunting purposes.

  • The term "hunting" has come to be applied specially to the pursuit of such quarries as the stag or fox, or to following an artificially laid scent, with horse and hound.

  • Doubtless the early inhabitants of Britain shared to a large extent in the habits of the other Celtic peoples; the fact that they kept good hunting dogs is vouched for by Strabo; and an interesting illustration of the manner in which these were used is given in the inscription quoted by Orelli (n.

  • 4 Of his grandson Athelstan it is related by William of Malmesbury that after the victory of Brunanburgh he imposed upon the vanquished king of Wales a yearly tribute, which included a certain number of "hawks and sharp-scented dogs fit for hunting wild beasts."

  • on "Hunting."

  • At an early period stag hunting was a favourite recreation with English royalty.

  • Stag hunting begins on the 12th of August, and ends on the 8th of October; there is then a cessation until the end of the month, when the hounds are unkennelled for hind hunting, which continues up to Christmas; it begins again about Ladyday, and lasts till the 10th of May.

  • The mode of hunting with the Devon and Somerset hounds is briefly this: the whereabouts of a warrantable stag is communicated to the master by that important functionary the harbourer; two couple of steady hounds called tufters are then thrown into cover, and, having singled out a warrantable deer, follow him until he is forced to make for the open, when the body of the pack are laid on.

  • William Twici, indeed, who was huntsman-in-chief to Edward Fox II., and who wrote in Norman French a treatise on hunting, 6 mentions the fox as a beast of venery, but obviously as an altogether inferior object of sport.

  • The precise date of the establishment of the first English pack of hounds kept entirely for fox hunting cannot be accurately fixed.

  • Since fox hunting first commenced, however, the system of the sport has been much changed.

  • Hunting the Le Art de venerie, translated with preface and notes by Sir Henry Dryden (1893), new edition by Miss A.

  • At the present day, the woodlands are neither so large nor so numerous as they formerly were, while there are many more gorse covers; therefore, instead of hunting the drag up to it, a much quicker way of getting to work is to find a fox in his kennel; and, the hour of the meeting being later, the fox is not likely to be gorged with food, and so unable to take care of himself at the pace at which the modern foxhound travels.

  • Cub hunting carried out on a proper principle is one of the secrets of a successful season.

  • As soon as the young entry have recovered from the operation of "rounding," arrangements for cub hunting begin.

  • So far as the hounds are concerned, the object of cub hunting is to teach them their duty; it is a dress rehearsal of the November business.

  • Hare hunting, which must not be confounded with Coursing, is an excellent school both for men and for horses.

  • Hare hunting requires considerable skill; Beckford even goes so far as to say: "There is more of true hunting with harriers than with any other description of hounds..

  • Hare hunting is essentially a quiet amusement; no hallooing at hounds nor whip-cracking should be permitted; nor should the field make any noise when a hare is found, for, being a timid animal, she might be headed into the hounds' mouths.

  • There are the same difficulties to be contended with as in hunting with the ordinary harrier, and a very few days' running will teach the youthful sportsman that he cannot run at the same pace over sound ground and over a deep ploughed field, up hill and down, or along and across furrows.

  • Otter hunting, which is less practised now than formerly, begins just as all other hunting is drawing to a close.

  • When railways were first started in England dismal prophecies were made that the end of hunting would speedily be brought about.

  • Complaints are often raised about the cruelty of what is called tame stag hunting, and it became a special subject of criticism that a pack should still be kept at the Royal kennels at Ascot (it was abolished in 1901) and hunted by the Master of the Buckhounds; but it is the constant endeavour of all masters and hunt servants to prevent the infliction of any injury on the deer.

  • Several packs which hunt within these limits are not supposed, however, to belong to the "Shires," whereas a district of the Belvoir country is in Lincolnshire, and to hunt with the Belvoir is certainly understood to be hunting in the "Shires."

  • It is generally considered that the cream of the sport lies here, but with many of the packs which are generally described as "provincial" equally good hunting may be obtained.

  • But it must by no means be supposed that every man who goes out hunting desires to gallop at a great pace and to jump formidable obstacles, or indeed any obstacles at all.

  • Exceptional animals naturally do exceptional things, and a famous hound called Potentate is recorded by the 8th duke of Beaufort to have done notable service in the hunting field for eleven seasons.

  • It is his business to look after the pack which is not hunting, to walk them out, to prepare the food for the hunting pack so that it is ready when they return, and in the spring to attend to the wants of the matrons and whelps.

  • A kennel huntsman proper may be described as the man who does duty when the master hunts his own hounds, undertaking all the responsibilities of the huntsman except actually hunting the pack.

  • The mysteries of scent are certainly no better comprehended now than they were more than a hundred years ago when Peter Beckford wrote his Thoughts on Hunting.

  • There are many ways in which a whipper-in who is not intelligent and alert may spoil sport; indeed, the duke of Beaufort went so far as to declare that "in his experience, with very few exceptions, nine days out of ten that the whipper-in goes out hunting he does more harm than good."

  • With regard to the expenses of hunting, it is calculated that a master of hounds should be prepared to spend at the rate of £500 a year for every day in the week that his hounds are supposed to hunt.

  • Taking one thing with another, this is probably rather under than over the mark, and the cost of hunting three days a week, if the thing be really properly done, will most likely be nearer £ 2000 than £1500.

  • Few people realize what enormous sums of money are annually distributed in connexion with hunting.

  • Hunting Dog >>

  • This conversion, represented as having been brought about while he was hunting on Good Friday by a miraculous appearance of a stag bearing between his horns a cross or crucifix surrounded with rays of light, has frequently been made the subject of artistic treatment.

  • Subsequently Areas, when hunting, chanced to pursue his mother Callisto, who had been transformed into a bear, as far as the temple of Lycaean Zeus; to prevent the crime of matricide Zeus transported them both to the heavens (Ovid, Metam.

  • Brought up on the borderland between civilization and barbarism, constantly trekking, fighting and hunting, his education was necessarily of the most primitive character.

  • When not fighting natives in those early days Kruger was engaged in distant hunting excursions which took him as far north as the Zambezi.

  • Every year thousands spend the summer months in the wilderness, where cabins, hunting lodges, villas and hotels are numerous.

  • In the Adirondacks are some of the best hunting and fishing grounds in the eastern United States.

  • Owing to the restricted period allowed for hunting, deer and small game are abundant, and the brooks, rivers, ponds and lakes are well stocked with trout and black bass.

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