This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

humus

humus

humus Sentence Examples

  • It is covered with a thick sheet of black earth, a kind of loess, that is mixed with humus.

    99
    52
  • The nitrogen in decaying roots, in the dead stems. and leaves of plants, and in humus generally is sooner or later changed into a nitrate, the change being effected by bacteria.

    45
    20
  • The turf is taken off either with the breast plough - a paring tool pushed forward from the breast or thighs by the workman - or with specially constructed paring ploughs or shims. The depth of the sod removed should not be too thick or burning is difficult and too much humus is destroyed unnecessarily, nor should it be too thin or the roots of the herbage are not effectually destroyed.

    33
    14
  • Loess, often thin and always containing little humus, also covers large areas on the high, semi-arid plains in the western part of the state.

    30
    12
  • The general surface of the interior highland consists of bare rolling moor-like country, with a great amount of red claylike soil, while the valleys have a rich humus of bluish-black alluvium.

    30
    12
  • Loess, often thin and always containing little humus, also covers large areas on the high, semi-arid plains in the western part of the state.

    30
    12
  • Hymenomycetes are a very large group containing over 11,000 species, most of which live in soil rich in humus or on fallen wood or stems, a few only being parasites.

    21
    13
  • Hymenomycetes are a very large group containing over 11,000 species, most of which live in soil rich in humus or on fallen wood or stems, a few only being parasites.

    21
    13
  • Other species, especially the alligators, make a very large nest of leaves, twigs and humus, scraping together a mound about a yard high and two or more yards in diameter.

    20
    8
  • Loamy soils contain a considerable quantity (30-45%) of clay, and smaller quantities of lime, humus and sand.

    20
    10
  • Other species, especially the alligators, make a very large nest of leaves, twigs and humus, scraping together a mound about a yard high and two or more yards in diameter.

    19
    8
  • On the light, poor sands of Saxony Herr Schultz, of Lupitz, made use of serradella, yellow lupins and vetches as green manures for enriching the land in humus and nitrogen, and found the addition of potash salts and phosphates very profitable for the subsequent growth of potatoes and wheat.

    18
    6
  • This is especially true of the flood plains where the annual inundations prevent the formation of humus and retard forest growth.

    16
    13
  • Lime in the caustic state is beneficially applied to soils which contain an excess of inert vegetable matter, and hence may be used for the improvement of old garden soils saturated with humus, or of peaty soils not thoroughly reclaimed.

    14
    7
  • Rejecting the old notion that plants derive their nourishment from humus, he taught that they get carbon and nitrogen from the carbon dioxide and ammonia present in the atmosphere, these compounds being returned by them to the atmosphere by the processes of putrefaction and fermentation - which latter he regarded as essentially chemical in nature - while their potash, soda, lime, sulphur, phosphorus, &c., come from the soil.

    14
    8
  • mineral salts, especially calcium carbonate, often rich in acidic humous compounds, and characterized by oak and birch woods, siliceous pasture, and heaths with much acidic humus in the sandy soil.

    11
    6
  • It is best adapted for application to clays and fen lands and should not be practised on shallow light sands or gravelly soils, since the humus so necessary for the fertility of such areas is reduced too much and the soil rendered too porous and liable to suffer from drought.

    10
    6
  • In eastern Oregon the soils are of an entirely different type, being usually of a greyish appearance, lacking in humus, and composed of volcanic dust and alluvium from the uplands.

    10
    6
  • It is best adapted for application to clays and fen lands and should not be practised on shallow light sands or gravelly soils, since the humus so necessary for the fertility of such areas is reduced too much and the soil rendered too porous and liable to suffer from drought.

    10
    6
  • This tendency to destroy organic matter makes the repeated application of lime a pernicious practice, especially on land which contains little humus to begin with.

    9
    4
  • The more or less dormant nitrogen and other constituents of the humus are made immediately available to the succeeding crop, but the capital of the soil is rapidly reduced, and unless the loss is replaced by the addition of more manures the land may become sterile.

    8
    4
  • Humus, the remaining constituent of soil, is the term used for the decaying vegetable and animal matter in the soil.

    8
    13
  • When used on light dry land it tends to make the land drier, since it destroys the humus which so largely assists in keeping water in the soil.

    7
    4
  • These soils are in general rich, but deficient in nitrogen and somewhat in humus; and in limited areas white alkaline salts are injuriously in excess.

    7
    4
  • Anelytropsis papillosus, of which only three specimens are known, from the humus of forests in the state of Vera Cruz.

    7
    5
  • Psilotum lives epiphytically or in soil rich in humus, while Tmesipteris is epiphytic (and, it has been suggested, partially parasitic) upon stems of tree ferns: the former has small scale-like leaves; those of the latter are of considerable size.

    6
    2
  • It appears that with soils which are not rich in humus or not deficient in lime, calcium cyanamide is almost as good, nitrogen for nitrogen, as ammonium sulphate or sodium nitrate; but it is of doubtful value with peaty soils or soils containing little lime, nor is it usefully available as a top-dressing or for storing.

    6
    3
  • If the burningup of humus and the leaching of the soil could be prevented, there is no reason whyia cotton soil should not produce good crops continuously for an indefinite time.

    5
    2
  • From the outer cortical myceliuni, again, branches pass through the epidermis and grow out in the soil, In stich cases the roots of the plants are usuall) found spreading in soils which contain a large amount of humus, or decaying vegetable matter.

    4
    2
  • Physically and physiologically dry habitats, with the accompanying plant communities of sand dunes and sandy heaths with little humus in the soil.

    4
    2
  • Again, acidic humus does not form in calcareous soils; and hence one does not expect to find plants characteristic of acidic peat or humus on calcareous soils.

    4
    2
  • The result is a great destruction of the humus of the soil, and great leaching and washing, especially in the light loams of the hill country of the United States.

    4
    2
  • A perfect soil would be such a blend of sand, clay, chalk and humus as would contain sufficient clay and humus to prevent drought, enough sand to render it pervious to fresh air and prevent waterlogging, chalk enough to correct the tendency to acidity of the humus present, and would have within it various substances which would serve as food-materials to the crops.

    4
    2
  • For the carrying on of their functions they all need to be supplied with carbohydrates or other carbon compounds which they obtain ordinarily from humus and plant residues in the soil, or possibly in some instances from carbohydrates manufactured by minute green algae with which they live in close union.

    4
    2
  • Lime also assists in the decomposition of the organic matter or humus in the soil and promotes nitrification; hence it is of great value after green manuring or where the land contains much humus from the addition of bulky manures such as farm-yard dung.

    4
    2
  • The plain extending from Urfa to a dozen miles below Harran has a rich red-brown humus derived from the Nimrud Dagh east of Edessa.

    4
    2
  • From the outer cortical myceliuni, again, branches pass through the epidermis and grow out in the soil, In stich cases the roots of the plants are usuall) found spreading in soils which contain a large amount of humus, or decaying vegetable matter.

    4
    2
  • For the carrying on of their functions they all need to be supplied with carbohydrates or other carbon compounds which they obtain ordinarily from humus and plant residues in the soil, or possibly in some instances from carbohydrates manufactured by minute green algae with which they live in close union.

    4
    2
  • The water content of the soil, its mineral content, its humus content, its temperature, and its physical characteristics, such as its depth and the size of its component particles are all edaphic factors.

    4
    3
  • In the arctic zone they form to% of the flora; they will flourish in soils rich in humus which are too acid to support grasses.

    4
    3
  • 025 or 03%, respond freely to applications of phosphates; probably in such cases even the weak acid is capable of dissolving out phosphates from the humus or other compounds which yield little or none to the roots of grasses and clovers.

    4
    4
  • The commonest impurities are: - (1) organic matter, humus, &c. (exemplified by clay-soils with an admixture of peat, oil shales, carbonaceous shales); (2) fossils (such as plants in the shales of the Lias and Coal Measures, shells in clays of all geological periods and in fresh water marls); (3) carbonate of lime (rarely altogether absent, but abundant.

    4
    4
  • Of Phanerogams, only the Dryas octopetala covers small areas of the debris, interspersed with isolated Cochlearia, &c., and, where a layer of thinner clay has been deposited in sheltered places, the surface is covered with saxifrages, &c.; and a carpet of mosses allows the arctic willow (Salix polaris) to develop. Where a thin sheet of humus, fertilized by lemmings, has accumulated, a few flowering plants appear, but even so their brilliant flowers spring direct from the soil, concealing the developed leaflets, while their horizontally spread roots grow out of proportion; only the Salix lanata rises to 7 or 8 in., sending out roots I in.

    4
    7
  • Of Phanerogams, only the Dryas octopetala covers small areas of the debris, interspersed with isolated Cochlearia, &c., and, where a layer of thinner clay has been deposited in sheltered places, the surface is covered with saxifrages, &c.; and a carpet of mosses allows the arctic willow (Salix polaris) to develop. Where a thin sheet of humus, fertilized by lemmings, has accumulated, a few flowering plants appear, but even so their brilliant flowers spring direct from the soil, concealing the developed leaflets, while their horizontally spread roots grow out of proportion; only the Salix lanata rises to 7 or 8 in., sending out roots I in.

    4
    7
  • Some menu favorites include humus, falafel, aubergines as well as mezze platter dinners.

    3
    0
  • The exhaustion of the soil under cotton culture is chiefly due to the loss of humus, and nature soon puts this back in the excellent climate of the cotton-growing belt.

    2
    1
  • An examination of the soil shows it to be composed of a vast number of small particles of sand, clay, chalk and humus, in which are generally imbedded larger or smaller stones.

    2
    1
  • Vegetable soils or moulds, or humus soils, contain a considerable percentage (more than 5) of humus, and embrace both the rich productive garden moulds and those known as peaty soils.

    2
    1
  • But as soon as the soil loses its fertile humus it produces only a few Phlomis, Alhagi camelorum, Psammae, Salsolaceae, Artemisiae, Peganum and some poppies and Chamomillae, but only in the spring.

    2
    1
  • Tobacco soils should be well drained and contain a Iarge percentage of humus.

    1
    0
  • In the extensive region covered with boulder-clay the black earth appears only in isolated places, and the soil consists for the most part of a sandy clay, containing a much smaller admixture of humus.

    0
    0
  • Few of the commonly cultivated crops can live in a soil consisting mainly of humus.

    0
    0
  • i nto compounds which when ploughed into the land become humus.

    0
    0
  • Tobacco soils should be well drained and contain a Iarge percentage of humus.

    0
    0
  • The genus Peziza (in its widest sense) may be taken as the type of the group. Most of them grow on living plants or on dead vegetable remains, very often on fallen wood; a number, however, are found growing on earth which is rich in humus.

    0
    0
  • In the Willamette Valley the soils are mostly clay loams, of a basaltic nature on the foothills and greatly enriched in the river bottom lands by washings from the hills and by deposits of rich black humus.

    0
    0
  • primula auricula grows in a humus rich soil on a well drained sunny site.

    0
    0
  • Erica cinerea is generally confined to dry, acid mineral soils with low humus litter accumulation (Banister 1965 ).

    0
    0
  • fertile humus rich well drained soil, in full sun or partial shade.

    0
    0
  • They prefer a well drained humus rich soil in a sunny position or light shade.

    0
    0
  • In time their decay adds humus to the soil, which becomes enriched by the increase of soluble plant foods.

    0
    0
  • Fungi are essential in breaking down dead organic matter to produce the humus which is needed for good soil structure - saprophytes.

    0
    0
  • At equilibrium on the same soil type, a grassland soil contains more humus than an arable soil.

    0
    0
  • prefers moist humus rich soil in full sun to partial shade.

    0
    0
  • It likes a fertile, humus rich, well drained soil and is happy in sun or partial shade.

    0
    0
  • Outdoors, grow in light moderately fertile humus rich well drained soil, in full sun or partial shade.

    0
    0
  • It fares best in moist, humus rich, acid soil in deep or partial shade.

    0
    0
  • What remains is a rich humus which is used in the fields to boost food production.

    0
    0
  • Under the same farming system a clay soil will have more humus than a sandy soil.

    0
    0
  • When you have a new garden you can work organic humus, which should be done anyway, to loosen the poor soil.

    0
    0
  • It grows well in a good deep humus rich soil with added leaf mold, preferably neutral to acid.

    0
    0
  • humus layer, soil molds have replaced it.

    0
    0
  • humus content of a compost mix increases to a nearly constant value.

    0
    0
  • This biological activity produces a humus sludge which settles out in special humus tanks.

    0
    0
  • humus material or spent compost, peat if nothing else to hand.

    0
    0
  • humus levels increase or decrease only slowly.

    0
    0
  • In general, in the UK temperate climate, soil humus levels increase or decrease only slowly.

    0
    0
  • moist, humus rich, acid soil in deep or partial shade.

    0
    0
  • primula auricula grows in a humus rich soil on a well drained sunny site.

    0
    0
  • rich in humus and nitrogen is preferable.

    0
    0
  • The water content of the soil, its mineral content, its humus content, its temperature, and its physical characteristics, such as its depth and the size of its component particles are all edaphic factors.

    0
    0
  • In one sense, the accumulation of humus and peat is a biological factor, as it is related to the work of organisms in the soil; but the occurrence or otherwise of these organisms in the soil is probably related to definite edaphic and climatic conditions.

    0
    0
  • Physically and physiologically dry habitats, with the accompanying plant communities of sand dunes and sandy heaths with little humus in the soil.

    0
    0
  • mineral salts, especially calcium carbonate, often rich in acidic humous compounds, and characterized by oak and birch woods, siliceous pasture, and heaths with much acidic humus in the sandy soil.

    0
    0
  • Again, acidic humus does not form in calcareous soils; and hence one does not expect to find plants characteristic of acidic peat or humus on calcareous soils.

    0
    0
  • It is covered with a thick sheet of black earth, a kind of loess, mixed with 5 to 15% of humus, due to the decomposition of an herbaceous vegetation, which developed luxuriantly during the Lacustrine period on a continent relatively dry even at that epoch.

    0
    0
  • In the extensive region covered with boulder-clay the black earth appears only in isolated places, and the soil consists for the most part of a sandy clay, containing a much smaller admixture of humus.

    0
    0
  • Mosses and lichens are distinctive, as also are the birch, the dwarf willow and several shrubs; but where the soil is drier, and humus has been able to accumulate, a variety of herbaceous flowering plants, some of them familiar in W.

    0
    0
  • But it gave some impetus to the practice of green manuring with leguminous crops, which are equally capable with such a crop as mustard of enriching the soil in humus, whilst in addition they bring into the soil from the atmosphere a quantity of nitrogen available for the use of subsequent crops of any kind.

    0
    0
  • The result is a great destruction of the humus of the soil, and great leaching and washing, especially in the light loams of the hill country of the United States.

    0
    0
  • The exhaustion of the soil under cotton culture is chiefly due to the loss of humus, and nature soon puts this back in the excellent climate of the cotton-growing belt.

    0
    0
  • If the burningup of humus and the leaching of the soil could be prevented, there is no reason whyia cotton soil should not produce good crops continuously for an indefinite time.

    0
    0
  • Some two hundred species of flowering plants struggle for a precarious existence in the tundra region, the frozen ground and the want of humus militating against them more than the want of warmth.

    0
    0
  • This is especially true of the flood plains where the annual inundations prevent the formation of humus and retard forest growth.

    0
    0
  • It appears that with soils which are not rich in humus or not deficient in lime, calcium cyanamide is almost as good, nitrogen for nitrogen, as ammonium sulphate or sodium nitrate; but it is of doubtful value with peaty soils or soils containing little lime, nor is it usefully available as a top-dressing or for storing.

    0
    0
  • An examination of the soil shows it to be composed of a vast number of small particles of sand, clay, chalk and humus, in which are generally imbedded larger or smaller stones.

    0
    0
  • Humus, the remaining constituent of soil, is the term used for the decaying vegetable and animal matter in the soil.

    0
    0
  • Few of the commonly cultivated crops can live in a soil consisting mainly of humus.

    0
    0
  • A perfect soil would be such a blend of sand, clay, chalk and humus as would contain sufficient clay and humus to prevent drought, enough sand to render it pervious to fresh air and prevent waterlogging, chalk enough to correct the tendency to acidity of the humus present, and would have within it various substances which would serve as food-materials to the crops.

    0
    0
  • 025 or 03%, respond freely to applications of phosphates; probably in such cases even the weak acid is capable of dissolving out phosphates from the humus or other compounds which yield little or none to the roots of grasses and clovers.

    0
    0
  • The nitrogen in decaying roots, in the dead stems. and leaves of plants, and in humus generally is sooner or later changed into a nitrate, the change being effected by bacteria.

    0
    0
  • The steps in the breaking down of the highly complex nitrogenous proteid compounds contained in the humus of the soil, or applied to the latter by the farmer in the form of dung and organic refuse generally, are many and varied; most frequently the insoluble proteids are changed by various kinds of putrefactive bacteria into soluble proteids (peptones, &c.), these into simpler amido-bodies, and these again sooner or later into compounds of ammonia.

    0
    0
  • The fertility of a soil is dependent upon a number of factors, some of which, such as the addition of fertilizers or manures, increase the stock of available food materials in the soil (see Manure), while others, such as application of clay or humus, chiefly influence the fertility of the land by improving its physical texture.

    0
    0
  • Lime also assists in the decomposition of the organic matter or humus in the soil and promotes nitrification; hence it is of great value after green manuring or where the land contains much humus from the addition of bulky manures such as farm-yard dung.

    0
    0
  • This tendency to destroy organic matter makes the repeated application of lime a pernicious practice, especially on land which contains little humus to begin with.

    0
    0
  • The more or less dormant nitrogen and other constituents of the humus are made immediately available to the succeeding crop, but the capital of the soil is rapidly reduced, and unless the loss is replaced by the addition of more manures the land may become sterile.

    0
    0
  • When used on light dry land it tends to make the land drier, since it destroys the humus which so largely assists in keeping water in the soil.

    0
    0
  • The turf is taken off either with the breast plough - a paring tool pushed forward from the breast or thighs by the workman - or with specially constructed paring ploughs or shims. The depth of the sod removed should not be too thick or burning is difficult and too much humus is destroyed unnecessarily, nor should it be too thin or the roots of the herbage are not effectually destroyed.

    0
    0
  • i nto compounds which when ploughed into the land become humus.

    0
    0
  • On the light, poor sands of Saxony Herr Schultz, of Lupitz, made use of serradella, yellow lupins and vetches as green manures for enriching the land in humus and nitrogen, and found the addition of potash salts and phosphates very profitable for the subsequent growth of potatoes and wheat.

    0
    0
  • Rejecting the old notion that plants derive their nourishment from humus, he taught that they get carbon and nitrogen from the carbon dioxide and ammonia present in the atmosphere, these compounds being returned by them to the atmosphere by the processes of putrefaction and fermentation - which latter he regarded as essentially chemical in nature - while their potash, soda, lime, sulphur, phosphorus, &c., come from the soil.

    0
    0
  • Anelytropsis papillosus, of which only three specimens are known, from the humus of forests in the state of Vera Cruz.

    0
    0
  • The plain extending from Urfa to a dozen miles below Harran has a rich red-brown humus derived from the Nimrud Dagh east of Edessa.

    0
    0
  • Loamy soils contain a considerable quantity (30-45%) of clay, and smaller quantities of lime, humus and sand.

    0
    0
  • Vegetable soils or moulds, or humus soils, contain a considerable percentage (more than 5) of humus, and embrace both the rich productive garden moulds and those known as peaty soils.

    0
    0
  • Lime in the caustic state is beneficially applied to soils which contain an excess of inert vegetable matter, and hence may be used for the improvement of old garden soils saturated with humus, or of peaty soils not thoroughly reclaimed.

    0
    0
  • The genus Peziza (in its widest sense) may be taken as the type of the group. Most of them grow on living plants or on dead vegetable remains, very often on fallen wood; a number, however, are found growing on earth which is rich in humus.

    0
    0
  • In the arctic zone they form to% of the flora; they will flourish in soils rich in humus which are too acid to support grasses.

    0
    0
  • These soils are in general rich, but deficient in nitrogen and somewhat in humus; and in limited areas white alkaline salts are injuriously in excess.

    0
    0
  • In the Willamette Valley the soils are mostly clay loams, of a basaltic nature on the foothills and greatly enriched in the river bottom lands by washings from the hills and by deposits of rich black humus.

    0
    0
  • In eastern Oregon the soils are of an entirely different type, being usually of a greyish appearance, lacking in humus, and composed of volcanic dust and alluvium from the uplands.

    0
    0
  • But as soon as the soil loses its fertile humus it produces only a few Phlomis, Alhagi camelorum, Psammae, Salsolaceae, Artemisiae, Peganum and some poppies and Chamomillae, but only in the spring.

    0
    0
  • Psilotum lives epiphytically or in soil rich in humus, while Tmesipteris is epiphytic (and, it has been suggested, partially parasitic) upon stems of tree ferns: the former has small scale-like leaves; those of the latter are of considerable size.

    0
    0
  • The general surface of the interior highland consists of bare rolling moor-like country, with a great amount of red claylike soil, while the valleys have a rich humus of bluish-black alluvium.

    0
    0
  • The commonest impurities are: - (1) organic matter, humus, &c. (exemplified by clay-soils with an admixture of peat, oil shales, carbonaceous shales); (2) fossils (such as plants in the shales of the Lias and Coal Measures, shells in clays of all geological periods and in fresh water marls); (3) carbonate of lime (rarely altogether absent, but abundant.

    0
    0
  • However, when Ginkgo is commercially grown, a soil rich in humus and nitrogen is preferable.

    0
    0
  • Composting helps produce microorganisms breaking them into organic matter called humus, a material rich in nutrients.

    0
    0
  • Humus helps keep soil moist, can stop plant disease and reduce or eliminate pests.

    0
    0
  • Brambles grow best in a wide range of soils but do best when planted on well-drained, deep, fertile soil that is high in humus . It requires full sunlight.

    0
    0
  • Organically rich humus when added to the soil makes a great difference to the gowth of the plant.

    0
    0
  • China, and is hardy, thriving in light moist humus, and covered during early summer with white funnel-shaped flowers in small clusters, followed by fragrant oval berries, at first red, but black and sweet when ripe.

    0
    0
  • Though fully hardy with us, it grows slowly and only thrives in moist open soils rich in humus.

    0
    0
  • Adding compost or humus to your soil prior to planting may be all the fertilizer you need, aside from occasional dressings of compost tea (a mixture of compost and water.

    0
    0
  • Build your soil structure with the addition of organic matter like humus, and additives like soluble calcium and iron.

    0
    0
  • This is accomplished not just by adding compost or humus to the soil but also by growing and alternating a varied selection of plants.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →