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humiliations

humiliations Sentence Examples

  • On these conditions Mary obtained the hearty support of the states Against France, but her humiliations were not yet at an end; two of her privy councillors, accused of traitorous intercourse with the enemy, were, despite her entreaties, seized, tried and beheaded (April 3).

  • Even then the new league would not fight and allowed Louis to retain his conquests by the truce of Regensburg (1685), but none the less these humiliations gave rise to a more closelyknit and aggressive coalition, which was organized in 1686 and known as the League of Augsburg.

  • The main cause of the humiliations William suffered from parliament lay in his incapacity to understand the party or cabinet system.

  • But the precarious tenure of their possession had been deeply impressed on them by the disasters and humiliations they had undergone in these districts during the reign of Domitian.

  • The memory of these humiliations played their part in developing later the autocratic ideas of Louis.

  • Each of his great humiliations followed as the natural result of crimes or blunders.

  • Polygamy prevailed among the chiefs and rulers, and women were subject to all the humiliations of the tabu system, which subjected them to many privations, and kept them socially in a condition of inferiority to the other sex.

  • The disasters and humiliations which befell Tyre during this and the foregoing period might suggest that its prosperity had been seriously damaged.

  • It is easy, therefore, to imagine what humiliations and privations must have awaited the novice who had still to earn a name.

  • But Henrys bitter humiliations transformed his character; they brought out all his latent capacities of manliness.

  • Incessant war, both at home and in Italy, had deprived it of its force; it had lost moral influence by humiliations, of which the scene at Canossa was an extreme type.

  • She was beaten, and the peace of Lunville added fresh humiliations to those imposed upon her by the previous war.

  • Austria had to undergo further losses and humiliations, notably by the treaty of Vienna (1809), before the outcome of Napoleon's Russian campaign in 1812 gave her the opportunity for recuperation and revenge.

  • In fact the peace of Copenhagen came as a welcome break in an interminable series of disasters and humiliations.

  • In the following year \% ellingtons victory at Vitoria signalled the ruin of the French cause in Spain; while Prussia threw off the yoke of France, and Austria, realizing after cautious delay her chance of retrieving the humiliations of 1809, joined the alliance, and in concert with Russia and the other German powers overthrew Napoleon at Leipzig.

  • It might have been said that even at that time intrigue to get rid of him had yet to cease in his own party; and but a few years before, a man growing old, he was still in the lowest deeps of his disappointments and humiliations.

  • The rekindling of the Imperial idea is understood as a timely act of revolt and redemption: of revolt against continuous humiliations deeply felt, redemption from the fate of nations obviously weak and suspected of timidity.

  • whimpers of pain and the humiliations of the sick room.

  • On the one hand he was exposed to numberless humiliations on the part of the representatives of official Russia, who made it clear to him that he was expected to play the part of a y oi fain�t; on the other he was compelled to make terms with the Bulgarian politicians, who, intoxicated with newly won liberty, prosecuted their quarrels with a crude violence which threatened to subvert his authority and to plunge the nation in anarchy.

  • On these conditions Mary obtained the hearty support of the states Against France, but her humiliations were not yet at an end; two of her privy councillors, accused of traitorous intercourse with the enemy, were, despite her entreaties, seized, tried and beheaded (April 3).

  • Liberals were by no means inclined to despair of accomplishing this task; for hatred of the foreigners, and of the despots restored by their bayonets, had been deepened by the humiliations and cruelties suffered during the war into a passion common to all Italy.

  • Even then the new league would not fight and allowed Louis to retain his conquests by the truce of Regensburg (1685), but none the less these humiliations gave rise to a more closelyknit and aggressive coalition, which was organized in 1686 and known as the League of Augsburg.

  • The main cause of the humiliations William suffered from parliament lay in his incapacity to understand the party or cabinet system.

  • But the precarious tenure of their possession had been deeply impressed on them by the disasters and humiliations they had undergone in these districts during the reign of Domitian.

  • The memory of these humiliations played their part in developing later the autocratic ideas of Louis.

  • Each of his great humiliations followed as the natural result of crimes or blunders.

  • Polygamy prevailed among the chiefs and rulers, and women were subject to all the humiliations of the tabu system, which subjected them to many privations, and kept them socially in a condition of inferiority to the other sex.

  • The disasters and humiliations which befell Tyre during this and the foregoing period might suggest that its prosperity had been seriously damaged.

  • It is easy, therefore, to imagine what humiliations and privations must have awaited the novice who had still to earn a name.

  • But Henrys bitter humiliations transformed his character; they brought out all his latent capacities of manliness.

  • Incessant war, both at home and in Italy, had deprived it of its force; it had lost moral influence by humiliations, of which the scene at Canossa was an extreme type.

  • She was beaten, and the peace of Lunville added fresh humiliations to those imposed upon her by the previous war.

  • Austria had to undergo further losses and humiliations, notably by the treaty of Vienna (1809), before the outcome of Napoleon's Russian campaign in 1812 gave her the opportunity for recuperation and revenge.

  • In fact the peace of Copenhagen came as a welcome break in an interminable series of disasters and humiliations.

  • In the following year \% ellingtons victory at Vitoria signalled the ruin of the French cause in Spain; while Prussia threw off the yoke of France, and Austria, realizing after cautious delay her chance of retrieving the humiliations of 1809, joined the alliance, and in concert with Russia and the other German powers overthrew Napoleon at Leipzig.

  • It might have been said that even at that time intrigue to get rid of him had yet to cease in his own party; and but a few years before, a man growing old, he was still in the lowest deeps of his disappointments and humiliations.

  • The rekindling of the Imperial idea is understood as a timely act of revolt and redemption: of revolt against continuous humiliations deeply felt, redemption from the fate of nations obviously weak and suspected of timidity.

  • Just as in a clock, the result of the complicated motion of innumerable wheels and pulleys is merely a slow and regular movement of the hands which show the time, so the result of all the complicated human activities of 160,000 Russians and French--all their passions, desires, remorse, humiliations, sufferings, outbursts of pride, fear, and enthusiasm--was only the loss of the battle of Austerlitz, the so-called battle of the three Emperors--that is to say, a slow movement of the hand on the dial of human history.

  • Rather, it dragged on in whimpers of pain and the humiliations of the sick room.

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