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humanistic

humanistic Sentence Examples

  • in his mistaken humanistic zeal tried to improve them.

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  • The humanistic movement had created a common culture, a common language and sense of common nationality.

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  • There is told of him a story which illustrates the temper of the early humanistic revival in Italy.

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  • Thus the active humanistic life, called into existence by the enthusiasm of the pope, was not without its dark side.

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  • Milton, the greatest humanistic poet of the English race, lent his pen and moral energies during the best years of his life to securing that principle on which modern political systems at present rest.

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  • encouraged the search for manuscripts, and Vienna became a great humanistic centre.

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  • They gradually entered into the spirit of their age, assumed the style of despots and made use of the humanistic movement, then at its height, to place themselves in a new relation to Italy.

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  • It is necessary to dwell at length upon Poggio's devotion to the task of recovering the classics, and upon his disengagement from all but humanistic interests, because these were the most marked feature of his character and career.

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  • The two systems were nothing more as yet than two different ways of interpreting a phrase of Porphyry, and they remained unnoticed in the for nearly two centuries not so much for its dialectics S' and philosophy as for its humanistic culture.

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  • A peculiar literary feud in Germany served, about 1515, to throw into sharp contrast the humanistic party, which had been gradually developing during the previous fifty years, and the conservative, monkish, scholastic group, who found their leader among the Dominicans of the university of Cologne.

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  • But such attacks were rare and isolated and were not intended to effect a breach in the solid ramparts of the medieval Church, but rather to exhibit the ingenuity of the critic. In the libraries collected under humanistic influences the patristic writers, both Latin and Greek, and the scholastic doctors are conspicuous.

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  • His comprehensive work on the training of the future orator includes an outline of general education, which had an important influence on the humanistic schools of the Italian Renaissance.

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  • The Renaissance theory of a humanistic education is illustrated by several treatises still extant.

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  • Among the most distinguished pupils of the latter was Leonardo Bruni, who, about 1405, wrote " the earliest humanistic tract on education expressly addressed to a lady."

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  • In July 1801, under the consulate, there were two courses, (r) nine to twelve, - elementary knowledge, including elements of Latin; (2) above twelve, - a higher course, with two alternatives, " humanistic " studies for the " civil," and purely practical studies for the " military " section.

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  • Ptype union of evangelical doctrine and humanistic culture.

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  • 1728), was never weary of attacking scholarship of the old humanistic type and everything that savoured of antiquarian pedantry, and it was mainly his influence that made German the language of university lectures and of scientific and learned literature.

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  • Each had its turn of supremacy, and in his early years it seemed as if the humanistic influence would gain the final victory.

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  • The humanistic influence was sufficiently strong to save him from wrecking his life in monkish mortification, and even to keep him for a time on the side of the party of progress.

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  • to Florence was of extreme importance; for this town was the real home of the new art, and the intellectual focus of all the humanistic movements in Italy.

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  • So Bruno constructed a personified nature, and the scientific and humanistic era began.

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  • He caused a scheme of humanistic education to be formulated, and gave employment at his court to rhetoricians, of whom Alcuin was the most considerable.

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  • and Leo X., not to mention intervening popes who showed themselves tolerant of humanistic culture, were heroes of the classical revival.

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  • The operation of this humanistic spirit has now to be traced.

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  • In philosophy, properly so called, the humanistic scorn for medieval dullness and obscurity swept away theological metaphysics as valueless.

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  • The four main instruments of the reaction were the papacy, which had done so much by its sympathy with the revival to promote the humanistic spirit it now dreaded, the strength of Spain, and two Spanish institutions planted on Roman soil - the Inquisition and the Order of Jesus.

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  • The humanistic movement led these learned writers to engraft the graces of the antique upon their native literature, and to refine it by emulating the lucidity of Petrarch.

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  • That this is the right way of regarding the subject appears from the events of the first two decades of the 16th century, those years in which the humanistic revival attained its highest point in Italy.

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  • A desire for glory was one of the most deeply-rooted passions of his nature, and one of the points in which he most strikingly anticipated the humanistic scholars who succeeded him.

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  • He began to think of quitting the world, and pondered a plan for establishing a kind of humanistic convent, where he might dedicate himself, in the company of kindred spirits, to still severer studies and a closer communion with God.

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  • The remaining years of Petrarch's life, important as they were for the furtherance of humanistic studies, may be briefly condensed.

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  • This is the task of the philosophy of history, a peculiarly modern study, due to the growth of a humanistic and historical point of view.

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  • He gave himself, therefore, to humanistic studies and acquired reputation as a Latin poet, his best-known piece being one on the group of Laocoon.

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  • Other studies, however, besides those of law occupied him while in this city, and moved by the humanistic spirit of the age he eagerly developed his classical knowledge.

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  • Caroli brought a counter-charge against the Geneva divines of Sabellianism and Arianism, because they would not enforce the Athanasian creed, and had not used the words "Trinity" and "Person" in the confession they had drawn up. It was a struggle between the thoroughgoing humanistic reformer who drew his creed solely from the "word of God" and the merely semi-Protestant reformer who looked on the old creed as a priceless heritage.

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  • His satire is incisive, but in a scholarly and humanistic way; it does not appeal to popular passions with the fierce directness which enabled the master of Catholic satire, Thomas Murner, to inflict such telling blows.

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  • Ptype union of evangelical doctrine and humanistic culture.

    1
    2
  • The operation of this humanistic spirit has now to be traced.

    1
    2
  • A desire for glory was one of the most deeply-rooted passions of his nature, and one of the points in which he most strikingly anticipated the humanistic scholars who succeeded him.

    1
    2
  • Ludwig Wiese's scheme of 1856 insisted on the retention of Latin verse as well as Latin prose, and showed less favour to natural science, but it awakened little enthusiasm, while the attempt to revive the old humanistic Gymnasium led to a demand for schools of a more modern type, which issued in the recognition of the Realgymnasium (1859).

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  • It is true that down to the 15th century there were many Teutonic Scots who had difficulty in expressing themselves in " Ynglis," and that, at a later date, the literary vocabulary was strongly influenced by the Latin habit of Scottish culture; but the difficulty was generally academic, arising from a scholarly sensitiveness to style in the use of a medium which had no literary traditions; perhaps also from medieval and humanistic contempt of the vulgar tongue; in some cases from the cosmopolitan circumstance of the Scot and the special nature of his appeal to the learned world.

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  • Withholding drugs on the economically justifiable grounds of protection of property rights, is an obvious disgrace in humanistic terms.

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  • As a theoretical assumption, it also underpins the broad field of humanistic social psychology (Harré and Secord, 1972 ).

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  • Education may reveal the real, not sterilized, history of science, which includes humanistic aspects of the scientific enterprise.

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  • Meanwhile he received a careful education at Lorenzo's brilliant humanistic court under such men as Angelo Poliziano, the classical scholar, Pico della Mirandola, the philosopher and theologian, the pious Marsilio Ficino who endeavoured to unite the Platonic cult with Christianity and the poet Bernardo Dovizio Bibbiena.

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  • He became an Italian in taste and sympathy, entering with enthusiasm into the humanistic ardour of the earlier Renaissance, encouraging men of letters at his court, administering his kingdom on the principles of an enlightened despotism, and lending his authority to establish that equilibrium in the peninsula upon which the politicians of his age believed, not without reason, that Italian independence might be secured.

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  • They gradually entered into the spirit of their age, assumed the style of despots and made use of the humanistic movement, then at its height, to place themselves in a new relation to Italy.

    0
    0
  • The humanistic movement had created a common culture, a common language and sense of common nationality.

    0
    0
  • There is told of him a story which illustrates the temper of the early humanistic revival in Italy.

    0
    0
  • It is necessary to dwell at length upon Poggio's devotion to the task of recovering the classics, and upon his disengagement from all but humanistic interests, because these were the most marked feature of his character and career.

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  • A statue by Donatello and a picture by Antonio del Pollajuolo remained to commemorate a citizen who chiefly for his services to humanistic literature deserved the notice of posterity.

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  • The two systems were nothing more as yet than two different ways of interpreting a phrase of Porphyry, and they remained unnoticed in the for nearly two centuries not so much for its dialectics S' and philosophy as for its humanistic culture.

    0
    0
  • A peculiar literary feud in Germany served, about 1515, to throw into sharp contrast the humanistic party, which had been gradually developing during the previous fifty years, and the conservative, monkish, scholastic group, who found their leader among the Dominicans of the university of Cologne.

    0
    0
  • In Socinianism (see below) we have perhaps the only instance of humanistic antecedents leading to the formation of a religious sect.

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  • But such attacks were rare and isolated and were not intended to effect a breach in the solid ramparts of the medieval Church, but rather to exhibit the ingenuity of the critic. In the libraries collected under humanistic influences the patristic writers, both Latin and Greek, and the scholastic doctors are conspicuous.

    0
    0
  • And it is mostly in the "humanistic" book of Proverbs that we find allusions to the "tree of life" (Prov.

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  • His comprehensive work on the training of the future orator includes an outline of general education, which had an important influence on the humanistic schools of the Italian Renaissance.

    0
    0
  • The Renaissance theory of a humanistic education is illustrated by several treatises still extant.

    0
    0
  • Among the most distinguished pupils of the latter was Leonardo Bruni, who, about 1405, wrote " the earliest humanistic tract on education expressly addressed to a lady."

    0
    0
  • In July 1801, under the consulate, there were two courses, (r) nine to twelve, - elementary knowledge, including elements of Latin; (2) above twelve, - a higher course, with two alternatives, " humanistic " studies for the " civil," and purely practical studies for the " military " section.

    0
    0
  • 1728), was never weary of attacking scholarship of the old humanistic type and everything that savoured of antiquarian pedantry, and it was mainly his influence that made German the language of university lectures and of scientific and learned literature.

    0
    0
  • Ludwig Wiese's scheme of 1856 insisted on the retention of Latin verse as well as Latin prose, and showed less favour to natural science, but it awakened little enthusiasm, while the attempt to revive the old humanistic Gymnasium led to a demand for schools of a more modern type, which issued in the recognition of the Realgymnasium (1859).

    0
    0
  • Each had its turn of supremacy, and in his early years it seemed as if the humanistic influence would gain the final victory.

    0
    0
  • The humanistic influence was sufficiently strong to save him from wrecking his life in monkish mortification, and even to keep him for a time on the side of the party of progress.

    0
    0
  • to Florence was of extreme importance; for this town was the real home of the new art, and the intellectual focus of all the humanistic movements in Italy.

    0
    0
  • Thus the active humanistic life, called into existence by the enthusiasm of the pope, was not without its dark side.

    0
    0
  • So Bruno constructed a personified nature, and the scientific and humanistic era began.

    0
    0
  • It is true that down to the 15th century there were many Teutonic Scots who had difficulty in expressing themselves in " Ynglis," and that, at a later date, the literary vocabulary was strongly influenced by the Latin habit of Scottish culture; but the difficulty was generally academic, arising from a scholarly sensitiveness to style in the use of a medium which had no literary traditions; perhaps also from medieval and humanistic contempt of the vulgar tongue; in some cases from the cosmopolitan circumstance of the Scot and the special nature of his appeal to the learned world.

    0
    0
  • He caused a scheme of humanistic education to be formulated, and gave employment at his court to rhetoricians, of whom Alcuin was the most considerable.

    0
    0
  • and Leo X., not to mention intervening popes who showed themselves tolerant of humanistic culture, were heroes of the classical revival.

    0
    0
  • In philosophy, properly so called, the humanistic scorn for medieval dullness and obscurity swept away theological metaphysics as valueless.

    0
    0
  • The four main instruments of the reaction were the papacy, which had done so much by its sympathy with the revival to promote the humanistic spirit it now dreaded, the strength of Spain, and two Spanish institutions planted on Roman soil - the Inquisition and the Order of Jesus.

    0
    0
  • The humanistic movement led these learned writers to engraft the graces of the antique upon their native literature, and to refine it by emulating the lucidity of Petrarch.

    0
    0
  • Milton, the greatest humanistic poet of the English race, lent his pen and moral energies during the best years of his life to securing that principle on which modern political systems at present rest.

    0
    0
  • That this is the right way of regarding the subject appears from the events of the first two decades of the 16th century, those years in which the humanistic revival attained its highest point in Italy.

    0
    0
  • in his mistaken humanistic zeal tried to improve them.

    0
    0
  • He began to think of quitting the world, and pondered a plan for establishing a kind of humanistic convent, where he might dedicate himself, in the company of kindred spirits, to still severer studies and a closer communion with God.

    0
    0
  • The remaining years of Petrarch's life, important as they were for the furtherance of humanistic studies, may be briefly condensed.

    0
    0
  • encouraged the search for manuscripts, and Vienna became a great humanistic centre.

    0
    0
  • This is the task of the philosophy of history, a peculiarly modern study, due to the growth of a humanistic and historical point of view.

    0
    0
  • He gave himself, therefore, to humanistic studies and acquired reputation as a Latin poet, his best-known piece being one on the group of Laocoon.

    0
    0
  • Other studies, however, besides those of law occupied him while in this city, and moved by the humanistic spirit of the age he eagerly developed his classical knowledge.

    0
    0
  • Caroli brought a counter-charge against the Geneva divines of Sabellianism and Arianism, because they would not enforce the Athanasian creed, and had not used the words "Trinity" and "Person" in the confession they had drawn up. It was a struggle between the thoroughgoing humanistic reformer who drew his creed solely from the "word of God" and the merely semi-Protestant reformer who looked on the old creed as a priceless heritage.

    0
    0
  • His satire is incisive, but in a scholarly and humanistic way; it does not appeal to popular passions with the fierce directness which enabled the master of Catholic satire, Thomas Murner, to inflict such telling blows.

    0
    0
  • After the humanistic movement of the Renaissance the style rector was also given to the chief masters of schools containing several classes, and in some parts of Germany (e.g.

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  • Education may reveal the real, not sterilized, history of science, which includes humanistic aspects of the scientific enterprise.

    0
    0
  • David Edwards has taught at Rhodes University in South Africa since 1972 and has a longstanding interest in humanistic and transpersonal psychotherapy.

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  • Art therapy, the use of the creative process to express and understand emotion, encompasses a broad range of humanistic disciplines, including visual arts, dance, drama, music, film, writing, literature, and other artistic genres.

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  • With Christian homeschooling you can minimize a humanistic worldview but you will not be able to completely eradicate all influences of it on your child.

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  • These interactive, humanistic qualities have long made the talking doll or plush toy a hit with the young set.

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