Humanism sentence example

humanism
  • The new humanism agreed with the Renaissance in its unreserved recognition of the old classical world as a perfect pattern of culture.
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  • This return to the ideals of antiquity did not remain confined to Italy, but the humanism of the northern countries presents no close parallel to the Italian renaissance.
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  • Humanism in its earliest stages was uncritical.
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  • Humanism implied the rejection of those visions of a future and imagined state of souls as the only absolute reality, which had fascinated the imagination of the middle ages.
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  • The first school' which came into being under the immediate influence of humanism was that founded at St Paul's by Dean 1 See also the article Schools.
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  • For the moment the balance of his faculties seemed to be restored by a revival of the antagonistic sentiment of humanism which he had imbibed from the Oxford circle of friends, and specially from Erasmus.
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  • Under the generous patronage of Nicholas humanism made rapid strides.
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  • The new humanism was a kind of revival of the Renaissance, which had been retarded by the Reformation in Germany and by the Counter-Reformation in Italy, or had at least been degraded to the dull classicism of the schools.
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  • These letters, of which 311 are extant, are filled chiefly with pious meditations, but they further form a mine of information as to the literary and social conditions of the time, and are the most reliable authority for the history of humanism in the Carolingian age.
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  • It was but one of many; and it was concerned with the two subjects which perhaps least deeply influence the lives of the mass of men - literary humanism and art.
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  • Though this cause was unsuccessful, Ambrose is interesting as typical of the new humanism which was growing up within the church.
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  • Edward Lyttelton (1897), while a temperate and effective restatement of the case for the classics may be found in Sir Richard Jebb's Romanes Lecture on " Humanism in Education " (1899).
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  • In the last third of the 18th century two important movements came into play, the " naturalism " of Rousseau and the " new humanism."
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  • It was an attitude of mind, not a body of doctrine; its nearest parallel is probably to be found in the eclectic strivings of the Renaissance philosophy and the modernizing tendencies of cisalpine humanism.
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  • Laurie Taylor writes: Jim Herrick 's account of humanism does much to trace its historical development and its philosophical underpinnings.
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  • He continues to be credited as an influential contributor to science, especially in the areas of evolution, humanism and even eugenics, which has always been an extremely controversial topic and continues to be so.
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  • Hegius's chief claim to be remembered rests not upon his published works, but upon his services in the cause of humanism.
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  • Only in familiar letters, prolegomena, and prefaces do we find the man Ficino, and learn to know his thoughts and sentiments unclouded by a mist of citations; these minor compositions have therefore a certain permanent value, and will continually be studied for the light they throw upon the learned circle gathered round Lorenzo in the golden age of humanism.
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  • Ludwig Geiger published a large number of biographical and literary works and made a special study of German humanism.
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  • Enriched by new ethical and religious elements, Czech philosophy manifests itself in Masaryk's works as a new realism or humanism.
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  • The bishops were, for the most part, elegant triflers, as pliant as reeds, with no fixed principles and saturated with a false humanism.
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  • He was not so much a scientific scholar as a keen and brilliant man of letters and a widely influential apostle of humanism.
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  • The spirit and the age of humanism and the Reformation effected and witnessed important developments in the study of the Old Testament.
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  • This all-round application of the pragmatic method has received the name of "humanism."
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  • Faust has been well called the "divine comedy" of 18th-century humanism.
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  • The word "doubt" has made historians think of intellectual difficulties - of the "theological scepticism" taught by Occam and Biel, of the disintegrating criticism of Humanism.
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  • Petrarch first opened a new method in scholarship, and revealed what we denote as humanism.
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  • As the facts, however, stand before us, it is impossible to dissociate the rejection of the other world as the sole reality, the joyous acceptance of this world as a place to live and act in, the conviction that "the proper study of mankind is man," from humanism.
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  • It was not merely in what they had acquired and assimilated from the classics that these poets showed the transformation effected in the field of literature by humanism.
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  • To the Germans, as to all nations of that epoch, the Bible came as a new book, because they now read it for the first time with eyes opened by humanism.
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  • But humanism, first of all in its protagonist Erasmus, afterwards in the long 'a ' list of critical scholars and editors, Lipsius, Heinsius sc and Grotius, in the printers Elzevir and-Plantin, developed ship. itself from the centre of the Leiden university with massive energy, and proved that it was still a motive force of intellectual progress.
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  • Humanism, before it affected the bulk of the English people, had already permeated Italian and French literature.
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  • One sees at a glance what an engine of controversy it was to be; yet for a while it remained but a phase of humanism.
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  • To this " humanism " the Reformation seemed at first more' hostile than the Roman hierarchy; indeed, the extent to which this latter had allowed itself to become paganized by the Renaissance was one of the points that especially roused the Reformers' indignation.
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  • Schiller has proposed the general term " humanism."
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  • Thus Bernard is a Platonist and yet the representative of a "return to Nature" which curiously anticipates the humanism of the early Renaissance.
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  • In France it had ~ originally no revolutionary character whatever; it proceeded from traditional Gallican theories and from the innovating principle of humanism, and it began as a protest against Roman decadence and medieval scholasticism.
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  • Sir Julian Huxley, perhaps goaded by his repeated bouts of clinical depression, wrestled with humanism in increasing darkness of thought.
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  • At the moment the Sartre list is reading existentialism and Humanism together.
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  • Extreme religious fundamentalism is very far removed from Humanism.
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  • Why do we spend so much time and energy trying to promote humanism?
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  • And post modern secular humanism denies ultimate truth itself.
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  • How to include non-religious pupils in RE Why should you include humanism in RE?
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  • They see humanism not as a belief system on a par with religion but as an opinion on a par with a political policy.
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  • Indeed, the history of secular humanism is enough to make many find faith in God.
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  • There's no question that at the moment we're fighting against a rising tide of atheistic secular humanism in the educational establishment.
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  • Adam Smith himself had a dash of civic humanism.
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  • I said, ' Call it Marxist humanism ' .
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  • The same flood of liberal humanism which has broken the back of the Church of England, flooded also across Western Catholicism.
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  • First, some negative ones: ideas of what radical religious humanism is not, rather than what it might be.
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  • That is why South Place Ethical Society (Conway Hall) has just published a fourth edition of my book humanism for secondary schools.
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  • This is done by those millions in the West who embrace godless secular humanism or materialistic naturalism.
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  • I know little which is more likely to put most ordinary unbelievers off Humanism for good.
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  • Laurie Taylor writes: " Jim Herrick's account of humanism does much to trace its historical development and its philosophical underpinnings.
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  • Marxism understands a dialectical unity of humanism and naturalism in determining the origins and aspects of consciousness.
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  • First and foremost of these was Erasmus; others were Hermann von dem Busche, the missionary of humanism, Conrad Goclenius (Gockelen), Conrad Mutianus (Muth von Mudt) and pope Adrian VI.
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  • At the same time, in opposition to Grote, he maintains that the appearance of the sophists marked a new departure, in so far as they were the first professors of " higher education " as such; that they agreed in the rejection of " philosophy "; that the education which they severally gave was open to criticism, inasmuch as, with the exception of Socrates, they attached too much importance to the form, too little to the matter, of their discourses and arguments; that humanism, rhetoric, politic and disputation were characteristic not of all sophists collectively, but of sections of the profession; that Plato was not the first to give a special meaning to the term " sophist " and to affix it upon the professors of education; and, finally, that Plato's evidence is in all essentials trustworthy.
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  • Humanism, a word which will often recur in the ensuing paragraphs, denotes a specific bias which the forces liberated in the Renaissance took from contact with the ancient world, - the particular form assumed by human self-esteem at that epoch, - the ideal of life and civilization evolved by the modern nations.
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  • Far less plastic and form-loving than the Italian, the German intelligence was more penetrative, earnest, disputative, occupied with substantial problems. Starting with theological criticism, proceeding to the stage of solid studies in the three learned languages, German humanism occupied the attention of a widely scattered sect of erudite scholars; but it did not arouse the interest of the whole nation until it was forced into a violently militant attitude by Pfefferkorn's attack on Reuchlin.
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  • The distinguishing characteristics of French humanism are vivid intelligence, critical audacity and polemical acumen, perspicuity of exposition, learning directed in its applications by logical sense rather than by artistic ideals of taste.
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  • Humanism, I submit, can help humanity overcome ancient rivalries and create a new world order.
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  • N early all religions have their origins in Secular Humanism.
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  • This is done by those millions in the West who embrace Godless secular humanism or materialistic naturalism.
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  • When we attempt to estimate Petrarch's position in the history of modern culture, the first thing which strikes us is that he was even less eminent as an Italian poet than as the founder of Humanism, the inaugurator of the Renaissance in Italy.
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  • I am not saying humanism should be this, only that it's one way to try it.
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  • The only religious movement that can be regarded as even rather vaguely the outcome of humanism is the Socinian.
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  • But if the literary side of humanism has been a barrier to the progress of scientific history, the discovery and elucidation of texts first made that progress possible.
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  • The maxim of Protagoras, for example, "Man is the measure of all things," has a different purpose; it was meant to point to the truth that man rather than nature is the primary object of human study: it is a doctrine of humanism rather than of relativism.
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  • To arbitrary and unverifiable metaphysical speculation, and to forms of "absolutism" which have lost touch with human interests, this humanism is particularly destructive.
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  • Thus he never lost his sympathy with humanism and with its great German representative, Erasmus.
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  • In its original form the poem was the dramatization of a specific and individualized story; in the years of Goethe's friendship with Schiller it was extended to embody the higher strivings of r8th-century humanism; ultimately, as we shall see, it became, in the second part, a vast allegory of human life and activity.
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  • For humanism, which was the vital element in the Revival of Learning, consists mainly of a just perception of the dignity of man as a rational, volitional and sentient being, born upon this earth with a right to use it and enjoy it.
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  • Thus in the plays of Rucellai, Trissino, Sperone and other tragic poets the nobler elements of humanism, considered as a revelation of the world and man, obtained no free development.
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  • Therefore there was narrow scope for imitation, and the right spirit of humanism displayed itself in a passionate study of perspective, nature and the nude.
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  • To this point the awakened intelligence of the Renaissance, instructed by humanism, polished by the fine arts, expanding in genial conditions of diffused wealth, had brought the Italians at a period when the rest of Europe was comparatively barbarous.
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  • Like Italian men of letters, these pioneers of humanism gave a classic turn to their patronymics; unfamiliar names, Crotus Rubeanus and Pierius Graecus, Capnion and Lupambulus Ganymedes, Oecolampadius and Melanchthon, resounded on the Rhine.
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  • The doctors of the universities were too wedded to their antiquated manuals and methods, too satisfied with dullness, too proud of titles and diplomas, too anxious to preserve ecclesiastical discipline and to repress mental activity, for a genial spirit of humanism to spread freely.
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  • The point of contact between humanism and the Reformation in Germany has to be insisted on; for it is just here that the relation of the Reformation to the Renaissance in general makes itself apparent.
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  • The revival of learning produced in Spain no slavish imitation as it did in Italy, no formal humanism, and, it may be added, very little of fruitful scholarship. The Renaissance here, as in England, displayed essential qualities of intellectual freedom, delight in life, exultation over rediscovered earth and man.
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  • He holds a high place in the history of humanism by the foundation of the College de France; he did not found an actual college, but after much hesitation instituted in 1530, at the instance of Guillaume Bude (Budaeus), Lecteurs royaux, who in spite of the opposition of the Sorbonne were granted full liberty to teach Hebrew, Greek, Latin, mathematics, &c. The humanists Bude, Jacques Colin and Pierre Duchatel were the king's intimates, and Clement Marot was his favourite poet.
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  • But no substantial philosophy of any kind emerged from humanism; the political lucubrations of the scholars were, like their ethical treatises, for the most part rhetorical.
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  • Humanism, as it actually appeared in Italy, was positive in its conception of the problems to be solved, pagan in its contempt for medieval mysticism, invigorated for sensuous enjoyment by contact with antiquity, yet holding in itself the germ of new religious aspirations, profounder science and sterner probings of the mysteries of life than had been attempted even by the ancients.
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  • So much had to be premised in order to make it clear in what relation humanism stood to the Renaissance, since the Italian work of Dante, Petrarch and Boccaccio is sufficient to indicate the re-birth of the spirit after ages of apparent deadness.
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  • The object of the foregoing paragraphs has been to show in what way the positive, inquisitive, secular, exploratory spirit of the Renaissance, when toned and controlled by humanism, penetrated the regions of literature, art, philosophy and science.
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  • Humanism, in its revolt against the middle ages, was, as we have seen already, mundane, pagan, irreligious, positive.
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  • Humanism has never been in the narrow sense of that term Protestant; still less has it been strictly Catholic. In Italy it fostered a temper of mind decidedly averse to theological speculation and religious earnestness.
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  • Petrarch's ideal of humanism was essentially a noble one.
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  • Had Petrarch been possessed with a passion for some commanding principle in politics, morality or science, instead of with the thirst for selfglorification and the ideal of artistic culture, it is not wholly impossible that Italian humanism might have assumed a manlier and more conscientious tone.
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  • Other encyclicals, such as those on Christian marriage (Arcanum divinae sapientiae, 10th February 1880), on the Rosary (Supremi apostolatus oficii, 1st September 1883, and Superiore anno, 5th September 1898), and on Freemasonry (Humanism genus, 20th April 1884), dealt with subjects on which his predecessor had been accustomed to pronounce allocutions, and were on similar lines.
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  • The old schools and universities were being quietly interpenetrated by the new spirit of humanism, when the sky was suddenly darkened by the clouds of religious conflict.
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  • While The " new Rousseau sought his ideal in a form of education and human- of culture that was in close accord with nature, the German apostles of the new humanism were convinced that they had found that ideal completely realized in the old Greek world.
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  • It was in vain that this cultured prince, imbued with the principles of humanism, represented to the cardinals that this new path would lead quickly to the goal, but that this goal could not be unity but a triple schism.
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  • Humanism was now an actuality.
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  • In the fields of science and philosophy humanism wrought similar important changes.
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  • The academies of the day represented the prevailing intellectual tendency of Renaissance humanism, namely, an absorbing enthusiasm for classic letters and for the transcendental speculations of Platonic and neo-Platonic mysticism, not unmixed with the traditions and practice of medieval alchemy, astrology and necromantics.
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  • Further discussion of the question of Douglas's alleged Humanism will be found in Courthope's History of English Poetry, i.
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  • Philosophy, as Haureau finely says, was the passion of the 13th century; but in the 15th humanism, art and the beginnings of science and of practical discovery were busy creating a new world, which was destined in due time to give birth to a new philosophy.
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  • In these chapters pre-eminently appears that element of "discretion," as St Gregory calls it, or humanism as it would now be termed, which without doubt has.
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  • It marked, moreover, in the condition of armed resistance against established authority which was forced upon it by the Counter-Reformation, a firm resolve to assert political liberty, leading in the course of time to a revolution with which the rebellious spirit of the Revival was sympathetic. This being the relation of humanism in general to reform, French learning in particular displayed such innovating boldness as threw many of its most conspicuous professors into the camp at war with Rome.
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  • That attempt to extinguish honest thought prepared the Reformation; and humanism after 1518 was absorbed in politico-religious warfare.
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  • But, while the Renaissance aimed at reproducing the Augustan age of Rome, the new humanism found its golden age in Athens.
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