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huguenots

huguenots Sentence Examples

  • Calvin, a French student of Picard origin, created the type of Protestantism to which the majority of French Huguenots adhered.

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  • More settlers were landed from time to time, including a number of orphan girls from Amsterdam, and during1688-1689the colony was greatly strengthened by the arrival of some three hundred Huguenots (men, women and children), who were located at Stellenbosch, Drakenstein, Frenchhoek and Paarl.

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  • A few years later Cardinal St Croix reckoned that the Huguenots were one half of the population.

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  • Only in Jersey and Guernsey, whither large numbers of Huguenots had fled after the St Bartholomew massacre, was Presbyterianism fully permitted.

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  • - The earliest Presbyterian emigration consisted of French Huguenots under the auspices of Admiral Coligny, led to Port Royal, South Carolina, by Jean Ribaut in 1562, and to Florida (near the present St Augustine) by Rene de Laudonniere in 1564, and by Ribaut in 1565.

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  • Meanwhile Spanish fanaticism, the suppression of the Huguenots in France and the Catholic policy of Austria combined to strengthen their authority as pontiffs.

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  • He distinguished himself in the field and found time to lead a body of troops to aid the king of France against the Huguenots.

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  • In the following year, Jean Ribaut (1520-1565), with a band of French Huguenots, landed first near St Augustine and then at the mouth of the St Johns river, which he called the river of May, and on behalf of France claimed the country, which he described as " the fairest, fruitfullest and pleasantest of all the world "; but he made his settlement on an island near what is now Beaufort, South Carolina.

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  • -c. 1586), with another party of Huguenots, established Fort Caroline at the mouth of the St Johns, but the colony did not prosper, and in 1565 Laudonniere was about to return to France when (on the 28th of August) he was reinforced by Ribaut and about 300 men from France.

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  • In order to secure the interest of Coligny, he gave out that his projected colony was intended to serve as a place of refuge for the persecuted Huguenots.

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  • A plain slab still marks the place of his tomb, before the high altar; but his bones were scattered by the Huguenots in 1562.

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  • At home there were two opponents to be dealt with: the Huguenots and the feudal nobility.

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  • The overthrow of the Huguenots in 1629 made Richelieu's position seemingly unassailable, but the next year it received its severest test.

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  • The year of Richelieu's triumph over the Huguenots (1629) was also that of the Emperor Ferdinand's triumph in Germany, marked by the Edict of Restitution, and France was threatened by a united Germany.

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  • The theology of the Indian Syrian Christians is of a Nestorian type, and Cosmas Indicopleustes (6th century) puts us on the right track when he says that the Christians whom he found in Ceylon and Malabar had come from Persia (probably as refugees from persecution, like the Huguenots in England and the Pilgrim Fathers in America).

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  • He is best known, however, as a historian of the Huguenots.

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  • His work, which appeared in three parts, entitled respectively History of the Rise of the Huguenots of France (2 vols., 1879), The Huguenots and Henry of Navarre (2 vols., 1886), and The Huguenots and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (2 vols., 1895), is characterized by painstaking thoroughness, by a judicial temper, and by scholarship of a high order.

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  • His brother, Charles Washington Baird (1828-1887), a graduate of New York University (1848) and of the Union Theological Seminary (1852), and the minister in turn of a Dutch Reformed church at Brooklyn, New York, and of a Presbyterian church at Rye, New York, also was deeply interested in the history of the Huguenots, and published a scholarly work entitled The History of the Huguenot Emigration to America (2 vols., 1885), left unfinished at his death.

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  • In France, indeed, the Catholic pulpit now came to its perfection, stimulated, no doubt, by the toleration accorded to the Huguenots up to 1685 and by the patronage of Louis XIV.

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  • The religious reformation caused a considerable amount of expatriation, culminating in the expulsion of the Huguenots from France.

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  • Ritter,' Vieta was brought up as a Catholic, and died in the same creed; but there can be no doubt that he belonged to the Huguenots for several years.

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  • The religious troubles drove him thence, and Rohan, the wen-known chief of the Huguenots, took him under his special protection.

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  • The French Huguenots found their privileges decreased, and then, in 1685, the edict was altogether withdrawn.

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  • However, he received the news of the massacre of St Bartholomew (23rd of August 1572) with joy, and publicly celebrated the event, having been led to believe, according to his apologists, that France had been miraculously delivered, and that the Huguenots had suffered justly as traitors.

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  • Michel de l'HOpital, the chancellor, who opened the assembly, was an advocate of toleration; he deprecated the abusive use of the terms " Lutherans," " Papists " and " Huguenots," and advocated deferring all action until a council should have been called.

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  • The government remained tolerant toward the movement, and in January 1562 the Huguenots were given permission to hold public services outside the walls of fortified towns and were not forbidden to meet in private houses within the walls.

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  • was admirably fitted to reunite France once more, and, after a superficial conversion to the Catholic faith, to meet the needs of his former co-religionists, the Huguenots.

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  • Jealous of their " sharing the State with the king," Richelieu twenty-five years later reduced the exceptional privileges of the Huguenots, and with the advent of Louis XIV.

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  • But the Huguenots, under the inspiration of Coligny, made three attempts to found colonies to the south - at Rio de Janeiro in 1555-1567, near the present Beaufort, South Carolina, in 1562, and in Florida in 1565.

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  • It was a marked characteristic of the English colonists, and a strong element in their prosperity, that they were hospitable in welcoming men of other races, - Germans from the Palatinate, and French Huguenots driven out by persecution who brought with them some capital, more intelligence and an enduring hatred of Roman Catholic France.

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  • Therefore he carried on the policy of excluding the Huguenots - the only colonizing element among his subjects, - and drove them into the English plantations.

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  • during the 16th century, and it was greatly improved by the landgrave Charles (1 6 541 73 o), who welcomed many Huguenots who founded the upper new town.

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  • During the Wars of Religion, the Huguenots repeatedly made unsuccessful attempts to seize the fortress, which opened its gates to Henry IV.

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  • He became leader of the Huguenots, but after several years' fighting was taken prisoner of war.

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  • Claude (c. 1500-1567), baron of Chateauneuf-sur-Cher, Sebastien's brother, was a secretary of finance; he had charge of negotiations with England in 1555 and 1559, and was several times commissioned to treat with the Huguenots in the king's name.

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  • Huguenots and Dutch were aided just enough to keep them going in the struggles which warded danger off from England's shores.

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  • Laynez took a leading part in the colloquy of Poissy in 1561 between the Catholics and Huguenots; and obtained a legal footing from the states-general for colleges of the Society in France.

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  • Their hostility to the Huguenots forced on the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, and their war against their Jansenist opponents did not cease till the very walls of Port Royal were demolished in 1710, even to the very abbey church itself, and the bodies of the dead taken with every mark of insult from their graves and literally flung to the dogs to devour.

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  • The Spanish ambassador in Paris declared in 1570 that he had been for two years engaged in collecting contributions from English churches for the assistance of the Huguenots in France; and he drew up a memorial depicting the dangers of Mary Stuart's presence in England and of the project for her marriage with Norfolk.

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  • An essential element in the new policy was the substitution of an alliance with France for the old Burgundian friendship. The affair of San Juan de Ulua and the seizure of the Spanish treasure-ships in 1568 had been omens of the inevitable conflict with Spain; Ridolfi's plot and Philip II.'s approaches to Mary Stuart indicated the lines upon which the struggle would be fought; and it was Walsingham's business to reconcile the Huguenots with the French government, and upon this reconciliation to base an Anglo-French alliance which might lead to a grand attack on Spain, to the liberation of the] Netherlands, to the destruction of Spain's monopoly in the New World, and to making Protestantism the dominant force in Europe.

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  • infuriated Catherine de Medicis, and the prospect of France being dragged at the heels of the Huguenots infuriated the Catholics.

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  • He continued to urge the necessity of more vigorous intervention on behalf of the Protestants abroad, though now his clients were the Dutch rather than the Huguenots.

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  • The cotton trade was soon afterwards introduced; and silk manufacture was begun by the Huguenots, who had settled in Dublin in considerable numbers after the revocation of the edict of Nantes.

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  • At a meeting of the statesgeneral held at Orleans in the December following, the prince of Conde, after being arrested, was condemned to death, and extreme measures were being enacted against the Huguenots; but the deliberations of the Assembly were broken off, and the prince was saved from execution, by the king's somewhat sudden death, on the 5th of the month, from an abscess in the ear.

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  • NICOLAS DE HARLAY SANCY, SEIGNEUR DE (1546-1629), French soldier and diplomatist, belonged to the Protestant branch of the family of Harlay but adopted the Catholic religion in 1572 during the massacres of the Huguenots.

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  • of France against the Huguenots; and he lent his aid to Philip II.

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  • That he celebrated the night of St Bartholomew was due to the fact that, according to his information, the step was a last resort to ensure the preservation of the royal family and the Catholic religion from the attacks of the revolutionary Huguenots.

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  • In France the Huguenots were shorn of almost all their military power, a process completed by the fall of La Rochelle in 1628.

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  • Others of the same order evangelized Paraguay in 1582, while the Huguenots sent forth under a French knight of Malta a body of devoted men to attempt the formation of a Christian colony at Rio Janeiro.

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  • As ambassador in France he exerted himself to induce Elizabeth to aid the Huguenots, and took a part in the war of religion.

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  • The question of her marriage was all important, and her chances were not improved by the scandal of Chastelard, whether he acted as an emissary of the Huguenots, sent to smirch her character, or merely played the fatuous fool in his own conceit.

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  • In 1629 the town was taken by Louis XIII., and by the peace of Alais the Huguenots gave up their right to places de secrete (garrison towns) and other privileges.

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  • Augustus also entered into communication with the Huguenots; but his aversion to foreign complications prevailed, and the incipient friendship with the elector palatine soon gave way to serious dislike.

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  • During the religious wars it valiantly resisted Gaspard de Coligny in 1570, but was taken by the Huguenots in 1587.

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  • Don Juan; Norma; Sonnambula; I Puritani; Lucia, I., II.; Lucrezia, I., II.; La Juive; Robert le Diable; Les Huguenots; Le Prophete, 1-4.

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  • In the words of Saint-Simon, the Huguenots were " a sect that had become a state within the state, dependent on the king no more than it chose, and ready on the slightest pretext to embroil the whole country by an appeal to arms."

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  • With heresy he was at first unwilling to interfere, for he was aware of the commercial value of the Huguenots; but when the king resolved to make all France Roman Catholic, he followed him and urged his subordinates to do all that they could to promote conversions.

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  • Henry, who had some sympathy with the Huguenots, died at Pau on the 25th of May 1555.

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  • Their difficult labours even seemed on the point of success when the assemblage of prelates refused assent, and the conference broke up on the 9th of October - a result which barred the way to a pacific understanding with the Huguenots.

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  • In 1562 he aided the Huguenots with troops, and he was frequently in communication with the insurgents in the Netherlands; but his efforts to form a union of the Protestants were fruitless.

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  • The massacre of St Bartholomew - occurring as he was about to accompany the bishop of Valence on an embassy to Poland - induced him with other Huguenots to retire to Geneva, where he was received with open arms, and was appointed a professor in the academy.

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  • He served in that year in the campaign against the Huguenots, but in the autumn was again in exile, this time in England.

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  • It suffered severely from the invasions of the Northmen in 845 and the succeeding years, and of the English in the 12th and 15th centuries; the Huguenots took it in 1585, and the Vendean royalists were repulsed near it in 1793.

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  • 1595) a marshal of France and knight of the order of the Holy Ghost since its institution in 1578, fought against the Huguenots under the last of the Valois kings; but he was among the first to recognize Henry IV., and was appointed governor of Champagne and of Brittany, where he had to fight against the League.

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  • Shortly afterwards several of the Huguenots who had sought refuge at the Cape after the revocation of the edict of Nantes were placed in the new settlement.

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  • The present inhabitants are largely descended from these Huguenots.

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  • The discovery in 1560 of the "conspiracy of Amboise," a plot of the Huguenots to remove Francis II.

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  • He had numerous admirers in Holland, and amongst the Huguenots of France.

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  • The first Dutch settlers planted small vineyards, while the cuttings of French vines introduced by the Huguenots about 1688 have given rise to an extensive culture in the southwestern districts of the colony.

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  • The Huguenots, however, owing to the policy of the Company, which in 1701 directed that Dutch only should be taught in the schools, ceased by the middle of the 18th century to be a distinct body, and the knowledge or French disappeared.

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  • But the friendship was never warm; Elizabeths relations with the Huguenots on the one hand and her fear of French designs on the Netherlands on the other prevented much cordiality.

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  • A great expedition to Re, under Buckinghams command (1627), intended to succour the Huguenots of La Rochelle against their sovereign, ended in disaster.

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  • Huguenots >>

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  • Huguenots, justifying himself on the ground that their nonepiscopal ordination had not been of their own seeking, and at the Savoy conference in 1661 he tried hard to effect a reconciliation with the Presbyterians.

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  • EDICT OF NANTES, the law promulgated in April 1598 by which the French king, Henry IV., gave religious liberty to his Protestant subjects, the Huguenots.

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  • This gave a new impetus to the emigration of the Huguenots, which had been going on for some years, and England, Holland and Brandenburg received numbers of thrifty and industrious French families.

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  • The history of the French Protestants, to which the edict of Nantes belongs, is dealt with in the articles France: History,and Huguenots.

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  • Baird, The Huguenots and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (London, 1895); C. Benoist, La Condition des Protestants sous le regime de l'edit de Nantes et apres sa revocation (Paris, 1900); A.

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  • Other Huguenots attempted other industries, but commercial restraints brought them to nought.

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  • The fall of Michel de lHpital, who had so often guaranteed the loyalty of the Thhd Huguenots, ruined the moderate party (May 1568).

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  • The politiques, as the supporters of religious tolerance and an energetic repression of faction were called, offered their alliance to the Huguenots, but these, having foimed Fifth themselves, by means of the Protestant Union, into wa..

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  • to impotence; fortunately for him, howBergerac ever, the break of the Huguenots with the MalSeveith contents, and the divisions in the court of Navarre War and and in the various parties at La Rochelle, allowed peace of Henry III., after two little wars in the south west, ~ during which fighting gradually degenerated into brigandage, to sign terms of peace at Bergerac (1577),

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  • In his state-papers Richelieu has shown that at the outset he desired that the Huguenots should share no longer in public affairs, that the nobles should cease to behave as rebellious subjects, and the powerful RICh.

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  • The Catholic Valtellina, freed from the claims of the Protestant Grisons, became an independent state under the joint protection of France and Spain; the question of the right of passage was left open, to trouble France during the campaigns that followed; but the immediate gain, so far as Richelieu was concerned, was that his hands were freed to deal with the Huguenots.

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  • La Rochelle was now invested, the Huguenots were hard pressed also on land, and, but for the reluctance of the Dutch to allow their ships to be used for such a purpose, an end might have been made of the Protestant opposition in France; as it was,, Richelieu was forced to accept the mediation of England and conclude a treaty with the Huguenots (February 1626).

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  • The taking of La R~chelle was a 1eae~ of crushing blow to the Huguenots, and the desperate ~ alliance which~ Rohan, entrenched in the Cvennes, entered into with Philip IV.

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  • The first settlement of importance was made in 1688 by Huguenots, some of whom were natives of La Rochelle.

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  • In France, Louis was proving his own despotic ways by revoking the edict of Nantes which had allowed the Huguenots some toleration.

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  • Dublin also prospered in many ways, and for years the leading goldsmiths and jewelers in that city were Huguenots or their descendants.

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  • They sought to destroy the French Protestants or the French Huguenots.

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  • Baird, The Huguenots and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1895), vol.

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  • During the troubles in the Cevennes (see Huguenots) he softened to the utmost of his power the rigour of the edicts, and showed himself so indulgent even to what he regarded as error, that his memory was long held in veneration amongst the Protestants of that district.

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  • A few years later Cardinal St Croix reckoned that the Huguenots were one half of the population.

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  • Only in Jersey and Guernsey, whither large numbers of Huguenots had fled after the St Bartholomew massacre, was Presbyterianism fully permitted.

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  • - The earliest Presbyterian emigration consisted of French Huguenots under the auspices of Admiral Coligny, led to Port Royal, South Carolina, by Jean Ribaut in 1562, and to Florida (near the present St Augustine) by Rene de Laudonniere in 1564, and by Ribaut in 1565.

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  • Under Pierre de Guast, sieur de Monts, Huguenots settled in Nova Scotia in 1604 but did not remain after 1607.

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  • C. Kervyn de Lettenhove, Les Huguenots et les Gueux 1560-1585 (6 vols., 1883-1885); Th.

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  • The beginning of his rule inherited a war with France and Holland; the former consequent on Cromwell's failure to obtain terms for the Huguenots or the cession of Dunkirk, and the latter - for which he was not responsible - the result of commercial rivalry, of disputes concerning the rights of neutrals, of bitter memories of Dutch misdeeds in the East Indies, and of dynastic causes arising from the stadtholder, William II.

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  • against the Huguenots in France.

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  • Meanwhile Spanish fanaticism, the suppression of the Huguenots in France and the Catholic policy of Austria combined to strengthen their authority as pontiffs.

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  • He distinguished himself in the field and found time to lead a body of troops to aid the king of France against the Huguenots.

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  • In the following year, Jean Ribaut (1520-1565), with a band of French Huguenots, landed first near St Augustine and then at the mouth of the St Johns river, which he called the river of May, and on behalf of France claimed the country, which he described as " the fairest, fruitfullest and pleasantest of all the world "; but he made his settlement on an island near what is now Beaufort, South Carolina.

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  • -c. 1586), with another party of Huguenots, established Fort Caroline at the mouth of the St Johns, but the colony did not prosper, and in 1565 Laudonniere was about to return to France when (on the 28th of August) he was reinforced by Ribaut and about 300 men from France.

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  • On the revocation of the edict of Nantes he fled to Holland, and received a pension from William of Orange, who commissioned him to write an account of the persecuted Huguenots (Plaintes des Protestants cruellement opprimes dans le royaume de France, 1686).

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  • In order to secure the interest of Coligny, he gave out that his projected colony was intended to serve as a place of refuge for the persecuted Huguenots.

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  • As soon, however, as he thought his power secure, he threw off the mask, and began to harass and oppress the Huguenots by every means he could devise.

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  • A plain slab still marks the place of his tomb, before the high altar; but his bones were scattered by the Huguenots in 1562.

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  • At home there were two opponents to be dealt with: the Huguenots and the feudal nobility.

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  • The overthrow of the Huguenots in 1629 made Richelieu's position seemingly unassailable, but the next year it received its severest test.

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  • The year of Richelieu's triumph over the Huguenots (1629) was also that of the Emperor Ferdinand's triumph in Germany, marked by the Edict of Restitution, and France was threatened by a united Germany.

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  • The theology of the Indian Syrian Christians is of a Nestorian type, and Cosmas Indicopleustes (6th century) puts us on the right track when he says that the Christians whom he found in Ceylon and Malabar had come from Persia (probably as refugees from persecution, like the Huguenots in England and the Pilgrim Fathers in America).

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  • He is best known, however, as a historian of the Huguenots.

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  • His work, which appeared in three parts, entitled respectively History of the Rise of the Huguenots of France (2 vols., 1879), The Huguenots and Henry of Navarre (2 vols., 1886), and The Huguenots and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (2 vols., 1895), is characterized by painstaking thoroughness, by a judicial temper, and by scholarship of a high order.

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  • His brother, Charles Washington Baird (1828-1887), a graduate of New York University (1848) and of the Union Theological Seminary (1852), and the minister in turn of a Dutch Reformed church at Brooklyn, New York, and of a Presbyterian church at Rye, New York, also was deeply interested in the history of the Huguenots, and published a scholarly work entitled The History of the Huguenot Emigration to America (2 vols., 1885), left unfinished at his death.

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  • In France, indeed, the Catholic pulpit now came to its perfection, stimulated, no doubt, by the toleration accorded to the Huguenots up to 1685 and by the patronage of Louis XIV.

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  • The religious reformation caused a considerable amount of expatriation, culminating in the expulsion of the Huguenots from France.

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  • Ritter,' Vieta was brought up as a Catholic, and died in the same creed; but there can be no doubt that he belonged to the Huguenots for several years.

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  • The religious troubles drove him thence, and Rohan, the wen-known chief of the Huguenots, took him under his special protection.

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  • The French Huguenots found their privileges decreased, and then, in 1685, the edict was altogether withdrawn.

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  • However, he received the news of the massacre of St Bartholomew (23rd of August 1572) with joy, and publicly celebrated the event, having been led to believe, according to his apologists, that France had been miraculously delivered, and that the Huguenots had suffered justly as traitors.

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  • During the - latter part of the century its monarchs were en- of gaged in a bloody struggle with a powerful religious political party, the Huguenots, who finally won a toleration which they continued to enjoy until the revocation of the edict of Nantes in 1685.

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  • Michel de l'HOpital, the chancellor, who opened the assembly, was an advocate of toleration; he deprecated the abusive use of the terms " Lutherans," " Papists " and " Huguenots," and advocated deferring all action until a council should have been called.

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  • The government remained tolerant toward the movement, and in January 1562 the Huguenots were given permission to hold public services outside the walls of fortified towns and were not forbidden to meet in private houses within the walls.

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  • was admirably fitted to reunite France once more, and, after a superficial conversion to the Catholic faith, to meet the needs of his former co-religionists, the Huguenots.

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  • Jealous of their " sharing the State with the king," Richelieu twenty-five years later reduced the exceptional privileges of the Huguenots, and with the advent of Louis XIV.

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  • During the Religious Wars of the 16th century Auch remained Catholic, except for a short occupation in 1569 by the Huguenots under Gabriel, count of Montgomery.

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  • But the Huguenots, under the inspiration of Coligny, made three attempts to found colonies to the south - at Rio de Janeiro in 1555-1567, near the present Beaufort, South Carolina, in 1562, and in Florida in 1565.

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  • It was a marked characteristic of the English colonists, and a strong element in their prosperity, that they were hospitable in welcoming men of other races, - Germans from the Palatinate, and French Huguenots driven out by persecution who brought with them some capital, more intelligence and an enduring hatred of Roman Catholic France.

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  • Therefore he carried on the policy of excluding the Huguenots - the only colonizing element among his subjects, - and drove them into the English plantations.

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  • during the 16th century, and it was greatly improved by the landgrave Charles (1 6 541 73 o), who welcomed many Huguenots who founded the upper new town.

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  • During the Wars of Religion, the Huguenots repeatedly made unsuccessful attempts to seize the fortress, which opened its gates to Henry IV.

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  • He became leader of the Huguenots, but after several years' fighting was taken prisoner of war.

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  • Claude (c. 1500-1567), baron of Chateauneuf-sur-Cher, Sebastien's brother, was a secretary of finance; he had charge of negotiations with England in 1555 and 1559, and was several times commissioned to treat with the Huguenots in the king's name.

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  • Huguenots and Dutch were aided just enough to keep them going in the struggles which warded danger off from England's shores.

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  • Laynez took a leading part in the colloquy of Poissy in 1561 between the Catholics and Huguenots; and obtained a legal footing from the states-general for colleges of the Society in France.

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  • Their hostility to the Huguenots forced on the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, and their war against their Jansenist opponents did not cease till the very walls of Port Royal were demolished in 1710, even to the very abbey church itself, and the bodies of the dead taken with every mark of insult from their graves and literally flung to the dogs to devour.

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  • The Spanish ambassador in Paris declared in 1570 that he had been for two years engaged in collecting contributions from English churches for the assistance of the Huguenots in France; and he drew up a memorial depicting the dangers of Mary Stuart's presence in England and of the project for her marriage with Norfolk.

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  • An essential element in the new policy was the substitution of an alliance with France for the old Burgundian friendship. The affair of San Juan de Ulua and the seizure of the Spanish treasure-ships in 1568 had been omens of the inevitable conflict with Spain; Ridolfi's plot and Philip II.'s approaches to Mary Stuart indicated the lines upon which the struggle would be fought; and it was Walsingham's business to reconcile the Huguenots with the French government, and upon this reconciliation to base an Anglo-French alliance which might lead to a grand attack on Spain, to the liberation of the] Netherlands, to the destruction of Spain's monopoly in the New World, and to making Protestantism the dominant force in Europe.

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  • infuriated Catherine de Medicis, and the prospect of France being dragged at the heels of the Huguenots infuriated the Catholics.

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  • He continued to urge the necessity of more vigorous intervention on behalf of the Protestants abroad, though now his clients were the Dutch rather than the Huguenots.

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  • The cotton trade was soon afterwards introduced; and silk manufacture was begun by the Huguenots, who had settled in Dublin in considerable numbers after the revocation of the edict of Nantes.

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  • The first settlement in the bay was made by an expedition of French Huguenots under the command of Nicholas Durand Villegaignon, who established his colony on the small island that bears his name.

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  • At a meeting of the statesgeneral held at Orleans in the December following, the prince of Conde, after being arrested, was condemned to death, and extreme measures were being enacted against the Huguenots; but the deliberations of the Assembly were broken off, and the prince was saved from execution, by the king's somewhat sudden death, on the 5th of the month, from an abscess in the ear.

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  • NICOLAS DE HARLAY SANCY, SEIGNEUR DE (1546-1629), French soldier and diplomatist, belonged to the Protestant branch of the family of Harlay but adopted the Catholic religion in 1572 during the massacres of the Huguenots.

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  • of France against the Huguenots; and he lent his aid to Philip II.

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  • That he celebrated the night of St Bartholomew was due to the fact that, according to his information, the step was a last resort to ensure the preservation of the royal family and the Catholic religion from the attacks of the revolutionary Huguenots.

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  • In France the Huguenots were shorn of almost all their military power, a process completed by the fall of La Rochelle in 1628.

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  • Baird, The Huguenots and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1895).

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  • Others of the same order evangelized Paraguay in 1582, while the Huguenots sent forth under a French knight of Malta a body of devoted men to attempt the formation of a Christian colony at Rio Janeiro.

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  • As ambassador in France he exerted himself to induce Elizabeth to aid the Huguenots, and took a part in the war of religion.

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  • The question of her marriage was all important, and her chances were not improved by the scandal of Chastelard, whether he acted as an emissary of the Huguenots, sent to smirch her character, or merely played the fatuous fool in his own conceit.

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  • In 1629 the town was taken by Louis XIII., and by the peace of Alais the Huguenots gave up their right to places de secrete (garrison towns) and other privileges.

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  • Augustus also entered into communication with the Huguenots; but his aversion to foreign complications prevailed, and the incipient friendship with the elector palatine soon gave way to serious dislike.

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  • During the religious wars it valiantly resisted Gaspard de Coligny in 1570, but was taken by the Huguenots in 1587.

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  • Don Juan; Norma; Sonnambula; I Puritani; Lucia, I., II.; Lucrezia, I., II.; La Juive; Robert le Diable; Les Huguenots; Le Prophete, 1-4.

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  • In the words of Saint-Simon, the Huguenots were " a sect that had become a state within the state, dependent on the king no more than it chose, and ready on the slightest pretext to embroil the whole country by an appeal to arms."

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  • Calvin, a French student of Picard origin, created the type of Protestantism to which the majority of French Huguenots adhered.

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  • With heresy he was at first unwilling to interfere, for he was aware of the commercial value of the Huguenots; but when the king resolved to make all France Roman Catholic, he followed him and urged his subordinates to do all that they could to promote conversions.

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  • Henry, who had some sympathy with the Huguenots, died at Pau on the 25th of May 1555.

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  • Their difficult labours even seemed on the point of success when the assemblage of prelates refused assent, and the conference broke up on the 9th of October - a result which barred the way to a pacific understanding with the Huguenots.

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  • In 1562 he aided the Huguenots with troops, and he was frequently in communication with the insurgents in the Netherlands; but his efforts to form a union of the Protestants were fruitless.

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  • More settlers were landed from time to time, including a number of orphan girls from Amsterdam, and during1688-1689the colony was greatly strengthened by the arrival of some three hundred Huguenots (men, women and children), who were located at Stellenbosch, Drakenstein, Frenchhoek and Paarl.

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  • The massacre of St Bartholomew - occurring as he was about to accompany the bishop of Valence on an embassy to Poland - induced him with other Huguenots to retire to Geneva, where he was received with open arms, and was appointed a professor in the academy.

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  • He served in that year in the campaign against the Huguenots, but in the autumn was again in exile, this time in England.

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  • It suffered severely from the invasions of the Northmen in 845 and the succeeding years, and of the English in the 12th and 15th centuries; the Huguenots took it in 1585, and the Vendean royalists were repulsed near it in 1793.

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  • 1595) a marshal of France and knight of the order of the Holy Ghost since its institution in 1578, fought against the Huguenots under the last of the Valois kings; but he was among the first to recognize Henry IV., and was appointed governor of Champagne and of Brittany, where he had to fight against the League.

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  • Shortly afterwards several of the Huguenots who had sought refuge at the Cape after the revocation of the edict of Nantes were placed in the new settlement.

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  • The present inhabitants are largely descended from these Huguenots.

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  • The discovery in 1560 of the "conspiracy of Amboise," a plot of the Huguenots to remove Francis II.

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  • He had numerous admirers in Holland, and amongst the Huguenots of France.

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  • The first Dutch settlers planted small vineyards, while the cuttings of French vines introduced by the Huguenots about 1688 have given rise to an extensive culture in the southwestern districts of the colony.

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  • The Huguenots, however, owing to the policy of the Company, which in 1701 directed that Dutch only should be taught in the schools, ceased by the middle of the 18th century to be a distinct body, and the knowledge or French disappeared.

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  • But the friendship was never warm; Elizabeths relations with the Huguenots on the one hand and her fear of French designs on the Netherlands on the other prevented much cordiality.

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  • A great expedition to Re, under Buckinghams command (1627), intended to succour the Huguenots of La Rochelle against their sovereign, ended in disaster.

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  • Huguenots, justifying himself on the ground that their nonepiscopal ordination had not been of their own seeking, and at the Savoy conference in 1661 he tried hard to effect a reconciliation with the Presbyterians.

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  • EDICT OF NANTES, the law promulgated in April 1598 by which the French king, Henry IV., gave religious liberty to his Protestant subjects, the Huguenots.

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  • This gave a new impetus to the emigration of the Huguenots, which had been going on for some years, and England, Holland and Brandenburg received numbers of thrifty and industrious French families.

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  • The history of the French Protestants, to which the edict of Nantes belongs, is dealt with in the articles France: History,and Huguenots.

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  • Baird, The Huguenots and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (London, 1895); C. Benoist, La Condition des Protestants sous le regime de l'edit de Nantes et apres sa revocation (Paris, 1900); A.

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  • Silk Manufacture.-About the end of the 17th century French Huguenots settled in Dublin and started the manufacture of Irish poplin, a mixture of silk and wool.

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  • Other Huguenots attempted other industries, but commercial restraints brought them to nought.

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  • The fall of Michel de lHpital, who had so often guaranteed the loyalty of the Thhd Huguenots, ruined the moderate party (May 1568).

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  • The politiques, as the supporters of religious tolerance and an energetic repression of faction were called, offered their alliance to the Huguenots, but these, having foimed Fifth themselves, by means of the Protestant Union, into wa..

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  • to impotence; fortunately for him, howBergerac ever, the break of the Huguenots with the MalSeveith contents, and the divisions in the court of Navarre War and and in the various parties at La Rochelle, allowed peace of Henry III., after two little wars in the south west, ~ during which fighting gradually degenerated into brigandage, to sign terms of peace at Bergerac (1577),

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  • In his state-papers Richelieu has shown that at the outset he desired that the Huguenots should share no longer in public affairs, that the nobles should cease to behave as rebellious subjects, and the powerful RICh.

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  • The Catholic Valtellina, freed from the claims of the Protestant Grisons, became an independent state under the joint protection of France and Spain; the question of the right of passage was left open, to trouble France during the campaigns that followed; but the immediate gain, so far as Richelieu was concerned, was that his hands were freed to deal with the Huguenots.

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  • La Rochelle was now invested, the Huguenots were hard pressed also on land, and, but for the reluctance of the Dutch to allow their ships to be used for such a purpose, an end might have been made of the Protestant opposition in France; as it was,, Richelieu was forced to accept the mediation of England and conclude a treaty with the Huguenots (February 1626).

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  • The taking of La R~chelle was a 1eae~ of crushing blow to the Huguenots, and the desperate ~ alliance which~ Rohan, entrenched in the Cvennes, entered into with Philip IV.

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  • The first settlement of importance was made in 1688 by Huguenots, some of whom were natives of La Rochelle.

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  • Under Pierre de Guast, sieur de Monts, Huguenots settled in Nova Scotia in 1604 but did not remain after 1607.

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  • against the Huguenots in France.

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  • During the Religious Wars of the 16th century Auch remained Catholic, except for a short occupation in 1569 by the Huguenots under Gabriel, count of Montgomery.

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  • The first settlement in the bay was made by an expedition of French Huguenots under the command of Nicholas Durand Villegaignon, who established his colony on the small island that bears his name.

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  • Baird, The Huguenots and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1895).

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