Hudson Sentence Examples

hudson
  • The drainage of Manitoba is entirely northeastward to Hudson Bay.

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  • On the crest of the hill is the fine Hudson County Boulevard, about 19 m.

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  • It was formerly employed by the Hudson's Bay Company as part of a canoe route to the fur lands of the north.

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  • Along Hudson Bay shore there is a strip of similar rocks, and a long row of small islands of the same age, with great sheets of trap or diabase forming the tops of the hills.

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  • In 1828, on behalf of the Delaware && Hudson Canal Company, which had determined to build a line, 16 m.

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  • The chief groups, all yielding coco-nuts, pandanus fruit and yams, are Funafuti or Ellice, Nukulailai or Mitchell, Nurakita or Sophia, Nukufetau or De Peyster, Nui or Egg, Nanomana or Hudson, and Niutao or Lynx.

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  • Half a century later a party of trappers of the Hudson's Bay Company entered Nevada and plied their trade along the Humboldt river.

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  • The second Quaternary formation is the Port Hudson, occurring within 20 m.

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  • The first governor of the island, General Wilks, was soon superseded, it being judged that he was too amenable to influence from Napoleon; his successor was Sir Hudson Lowe.

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  • Forster published a Catalogue of the Animals of North America in London in 1771, and the following year described in the Philosophical Transactions a few birds from Hudson Bay.

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  • Sackett's Harbor is served by the New York Central & Hudson River railway.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River railway, and by passenger and freight steamboat lines on the Hudson river.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Albany (New York Central & Hudson River) railways, and by two inter-urban electric lines.

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  • Dobbs Ferry is served by the Hudson River division of the New York Central railway.

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  • The region was repeatedly raided by camp followers of each army; earthworks and a fort, commanding the Hudson ferry and the ferry to Paramus, New Jersey, were built; the British army made Dobbs Ferry a rendezvous, after the battle of White Plains, in November 1776, and the continental division under General Benjamin Lincoln was here at the end of January 1777.

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  • The village is served by the New York Central & Hudson River railway, by the Buffalo, Lockport & Rochester electric railway, and by the Erie Canal.

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  • Jersey City is served by several inter-urban electric railways and by the tunnels of the Hudson & Manhattan railroad company to Dey St.

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  • It is served by the Delaware && Hudson (being a terminus of one of its, branches) and the Rutland (New York Central system) railways..

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  • Being ordered to co-operate with Grant, who was then before Vicksburg, he invested the defences of Port Hudson, Louisiana, in May 1863, and after three attempts to carry the works by storm he began a regular siege.

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  • Pursuing their courses eastward the North and South Saskatchewan rivers unite in the Saskatchewan (Cree, rapid-flowing river), which finds its way to Lake Winnipeg, and thence by way of Nelson river to Hudson Bay.

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  • Fort Chipewyan was long known in Hudson's Bay Company history as the great depot of the Mackenzie river district.

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  • The North-West Company of Montreal occupied the northern part of Alberta district before the Hudson's Bay Company succeeded in coming from Hudson Bay to take possession of it.

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  • Butler occupied that city The navigation of the river being secured by this success and by later operations in the north ending in July 1863 with the capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, the state was wholly at the mercy of the Union armies.

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  • The south and west coast of Greenland was then re-discovered by John Davis in July 1585, though previous explorers, as Cortereal, Frobisher and others, had seen it, and at the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 17th century the work of Davis (1586-1588), Hudson (1610) and Baffin (1616) in the western seas afforded some knowledge of the west coast.

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  • A few rivers in the south drain into the Mississippi through Iowa, while a smaller area in the extreme north is drained through the Lake of the Woods and Rainy Lake into Hudson Bay.

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  • This lake drained southward into the Gulf of Mexico via the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers, until the ice sheet which had prevented its natural drainage to the north had melted sufficiently to allow it to be drained off into Hudson Bay by way of the Nelson River.

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  • An old Indian trail between the Hudson and Connecticut valley ran through the township, and was once a leading outlet of the Berkshire country.

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  • He had already, in 1808, removed from Kinderhook to Hudson, and in 1816 he took up his residence in Albany, where he continued to reside until he entered Jackson's cabinet in 1829.

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  • It is served by the Lehigh Valley and the New York Central & Hudson River railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • It is served by the Erie, the Lehigh Valley, the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, the Central of New Jersey, the Delaware & Hudson, and the Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley railways; there is an electric railway from Pittston to Scranton, and a belt-line electric railway connects Pittston with Avoca, Nanticoke, Plymouth and Wilkes-Barre.

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  • It is a port of call for ships trading with the north of Europe as well as for vessels outward bound to the Arctic regions, Hudson Bay and Canada.

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  • Albany is a terminus of the New York Central & Hudson River, the Delaware & Hudson and the West Shore railways, and is also served by the Boston & Maine railway, by the Erie and Champlain canals (being a terminus of each), by steamboat lines on the Hudson river and by several inter-urban electric railways connecting with neighbouring cities.

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  • Gibson and begun in 1883; St Peter's Episcopal Church (French Gothic), of Hudson River bluestone; Emmanuel Baptist Church, of white granite; the Madison Avenue Reformed Church; and St Joseph's (Roman Catholic), of bluestone and Caen stone with marble trimmings.

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  • From this time the town, on account of its favourable commercial and strategic position at the gateway of the Iroquois country and at the head of navigation on the Hudson river, was for a century and a half one of the most important places in the colonies.

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  • His body was placed in a temporary tomb in Riverside Drive, in New York City, overlooking the Hudson river.'

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  • Utica is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and several lines leased by it, including the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg; the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; the New York, Ontario & Western; and the West Shore railways; by the Erie Canal, and by interurban electric railways.

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  • Rome is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg (controlled by the New York Central), the New York, Ontario & Western, and the Utica & Mohawk Valley (electric) railways.

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  • Till 1858 Victoria was a post of the Hudson's Bay Company.

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  • The importance of the fur of this animal as an article of commerce may be judged of from the fact that 15,000 skins were sold in one year by the Hudson's Bay Company as long ago as 1743.

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  • It was a post of the Hudson's Bay Company in 1828-1846, and was protected by a large stockade, to which settlers fled for protection when attacked by the Indians.

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  • It is an important railway centre, being served by the Delaware & Hudson, the Erie, and the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railways; and an extensive system of electric railways connects it with the suburbs and neighbouring towns.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the New York, Ontario & Western, the West Shore and the Oneida (electric) railways (the last connecting with Utica and Syracuse), and by the Erie Canal.

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  • Delaware river and bay were first explored on behalf of the Dutch by Henry Hudson in 1609, and more thoroughly in 1615-1616 by Cornelius Hendrikson, whose reports did much to cause the incorporation of the Dutch West India Company.

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  • It is served by the Erie, the Wabash, the Lehigh Valley, the West Shore, and the New York Central & Hudson River railways, by three interurban electric lines and by the Erie Canal.

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  • Amongst the best known of the furrows of the continental shelf are the Cape Breton Deep, in the Bay of Biscay, the Hudson Furrow, southward of New York, the so-called Congo Canon, the Swatch of No Ground off the Ganges delta, the Bottomless Pit off the Niger delta, and numerous similar furrows on the west coast of North America and outside the fjords of Norway, Iceland and the west of Scotland, as well as in the.

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  • The Persian Gulf nowhere exceeds 50 fathoms, the southern part of Hudson .Bay does not exceed Too fathoms except at one spot, though in the less-known fjords of the northern part depths up to 200 fathoms have been reported.

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  • Thus are formed the " mud-holes " of the Hudson Furrow so welcome as guides telling their position to ship captains making New York harbour in a fog.

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  • Hudson Bay is blocked by ice for .a great part of the year, and the Gulf of St Lawrence is blocked every winter.

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  • In the financial troubles between 1850 and 1860 it is said that more than half the railways north of the Ohio river and between the Hudson and the Missouri rivers were at some time his clients.

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  • His father, James Clinton (1736-1812), served as a captain of provincial troops in the French and Indian War, and as a brigadier-general in the American army in the War of Independence, taking part in Montgomery's attack upon Quebec in 1775, unsuccessfully resisting at Fort Montgomery, along the Hudson, in 1777 the advance of Sir Henry Clinton, accompanying General John Sullivan in 177 9 in his expedition against the Iroquois in western New York, and in 1781 taking part in the siege of Yorktown, Virginia.

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  • In 1810 he was a member of a commission to explore a route for a canal between Lake Erie and the Hudson river, and in 1811 he and Gouverneur Morris were sent to Washington to secure Federal aid for the undertaking, but were unsuccessful.

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  • It was governed by a local council nominated by the Hudson's Bay Company.

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  • Commencing in the Arctic region, the Eskimo in his kayak, consisting of a framework of driftwood or bone covered with dressed sealskin, could paddle down east Greenland, up the west shore to Smith Sound, along Baffin Land and Labrador, and the shores of Hudson Bay throughout insular Canada and the Alaskan coast, around to Mount St Elias, and for many miles on the eastern shore of Asia.

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  • As for the second, the elements of savage voracity and wastefulness, of uncertainty as to cubical contents on uneven surface, and of the number of mouths to fill, make it hazardous to construct a chronological table on a shell-heap. Hudson's village sites in Patagonia contain pottery, and that brings them all into the territory of Indian archaeology.

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  • As early as 1801 Morris became interested in projects for improving the communication between the Hudson river and Lake Erie, and from 1810 to 1816 he was chairman of the board of canal commissioners, which after exploring the country prepared plans for the Erie Canal.

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  • The former were led by Leisler, the latter by Peter Schuyler (1657-1724), Nicholas Bayard (c. 1644-1707), Stephen van Cortlandt (1643-1700),William Nicolls (16 57-- 1723) and other representatives of the aristocratic Hudson Valley families.

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  • South of the Highlands, in New Jersey, but extending to the very banks of the Hudson,.

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  • On the New York side of the Hudson the rocks are crystalline, the surface a region of low hills, a continuation of the crystalline area of Connecticut, and comparable with the Piedmont plateau of the Southern states.

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  • The Hudson (q.v.) is essentially a New York stream, though it receives some drainage from the New England States through its small eastern tributaries.

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  • A low gap also leads northward from the Hudson to the Champlain Valley across a pass only 147 ft.

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  • The lower Hudson, below Troy, is really a fiord, the stream valley being drowned by the sea through subsidence of the land.

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  • The mainland, opposite the western end of Long Island, is traversed by the lower Hudson and other channels - submerged valleys - which form a branching bay with several islands, the largest of which are Staten and Manhattan Islands.

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  • The western bank of the lower Hudson is in New Jersey.

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  • This sand has not been brought by the Hudson itself, for that river drops most of its sediment load far up stream, in its long tidal channel.

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  • Thus it happens that from Buffalo to New York City there is a chain of busy manufacturing centres along the natural highway followed by the Erie Canal and the Hudson river.

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  • The lower valley of the Hudson is noted for its crops, of rye.

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  • The shad fishery is mainly in the lower waters of the Hudson river, and the catch diminished so rapidly from 1901 that in 1904 it was only about one-eighth of the average for the decade from 1890 to 1900.

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  • The extensive deposits of clay in the Hudson Valley together with the easy water communications with New York City have made this valley the greatest brick-making region in the world; in 1906 the common bricks made here numbered 1,230,692,000.

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  • Those popularly known as " bluestones " belong to the Hamilton period of the Devonian formation and occur mainly between the Hudson and Delaware rivers.

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  • The first railway in the state and the second in operation in the United States was the Mohawk & Hudson, opened from Albany to Schenectady in 1831.

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  • The first great trunk line in the country was that of the Erie railway, opened from Piermont, on the Hudson river, to Dunkirk, on Lake Erie, in 1853.

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  • The New York Central & Hudson River railway, nearly parallel with the water route from New York City to Buffalo, was formed by the union, in 1869, of the New York Central with the Hudson River railway.

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  • The West Shore railway, which follows closely the route of the New York Central & Hudson River, was also the result of a consolidation, completed in 1881, of several shorter lines.

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  • A project adopted by the state for the enlargement of the Erie provides for a new route up the Hudson from Troy to Waterford and thence to the Mohawk river above Cohoes Falls.

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  • Within its limits from the upper Hudson westward to the Genesee river was the home of that powerful confederacy of Indian tribes, the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas and Senecas, known to the French as the Iroquois and to the English as the Five (later Six) Nations.

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  • Of much less influence in New York were several Algonquian tribes in the lower valley of the Hudson and along the sea coast,.

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  • New York Bay and the Hudson river were discovered by Giovanni da Verrazano in 1524, and were probably seen by Estevan Gomez in 1525; for many years following French vessels occasionally ascended the Hudson to trade with the Indians.

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  • On the 3rd of September Henry Hudson, in the employ of the Dutch East India Company, entered New York Bay in the " Half Moon " in search of the " northwest passage."

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  • But more than one-half of the families proceeded up the Hudson to Fort Orange, the successor of Fort Nassau, at the mouth of Tawasentha Creek, and there founded what is now Albany.

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  • On both sides of the entrance to Delaware Bay Samuel Godyn, Samuel Blomaert and five other directors who were admitted to partner ship in the second year (1630) established the manor and colony of Swaanendael; on a tract opposite the lower end of Manhattan Island and including Staten Island, Michael Pauw established the manor and colony of Pavonia; on both sides of the Hudson and extending in all directions from Fort Orange (Albany) Kilian van Rensselaer established the manor and colony of Rensselaerwyck.

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  • It was a settled point of British military policy throughout the war to hold New York City, and from it, as a base, to establish a line of fortified posts along the Hudson by means of which communication might be maintained with another base on Lake Champlain.

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  • In the following year (1776) the British began their offensive operations for the control of the Hudson; an army under Sir William Howe was to capture New York City and get control of the lower Hudson, while another army under Sir Guy Carleton was to retake Crown Point and Ticonderoga and get control of the upper Hudson.

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  • This brought on the battle of White Plains late in October, in which Howe gained no advantage; and from here both armies withdrew into New Jersey, the British capturing Fort Washington on the way, the Americans leaving behind garrisons to guard the Highlands of the Hudson.

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  • The British government intended that Howe should co-operate with Burgoyne by fighting his way up the Hudson, but as the secretary of state for the colonies neglected to send him such instructions this was not undertaken until early in October, and then an expedition for the purpose was placed under the command of Sir Henry Clinton.

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  • The American cause was strengthened this year also by several victories along the lower Hudson of which General Anthony Wayne's storming of the British fort at Stony Point was the most important.

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  • The closing episode of the war as far as New York was concerned was the discovery of Benedict Arnold's attempt in 1780 to betray West Point and other colonial posts on the Hudson to the British.

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  • It was during the first administration of Governor Seward that the anti-rent agitation in the Hudson river counties began.

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  • The North-West Territories were secured as a part of confederated Canada by the purchase of the rights of the Hudson's Bay Company, and the establishment of Manitoba as a province in 1870.

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  • Glens Falls is served by the Delaware & Hudson and the Hudson Valley (electric) railways.

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  • The falls of the Hudson here furnish a fine water-power, which is utilized, in connexion with steam and electricity, in the manufacture of lumber, paper and wood pulp, women's clothing, shirts, collars and cuffs, &c. In 1905 the village's factory products were valued at $4,780,331.

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  • The story of the struggle of the rival British and American companies to control the fur trade, with the final dominance of the Hudson's Bay Company has been told under Oregon and need not be repeated.

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  • North of the river, the Hudson's Bay Company discouraged settlement, believing that the final determination of the boundary controversy would make that stream the dividing line.

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  • Others soon followed in spite of the efforts of the chief factor of the Hudson's Bay Company, Dr John M ` Loughlin, and these permanent settlers finally carried the day.

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  • The main range of the Rocky Mountains separates that part which is drained west into the'Columbia river and the Pacific Ocean from that which is drained east into the Missouri and Mississippi rivers and the Gulf of Mexico, and from a very small part which is drained north-east into Hudson Bay; the water-parting which in Montana separates the drainage into Hudson Bay from the drainage into the Gulf of Mexico crosses only the north-west region of Teton county.

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  • The report of Lewis and Clark attracted many traders and trappers, and within a few years the Missouri Fur Company, the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, the Hudson Bay Company and the American Fur Company had established fortified trading posts on the Missouri, the Yellowstone, the Marias, the Milk and other rivers; the most prominent among these was Fort Benton, which was established in 1846 at the head of navigation on the Missouri, and was made the headquarters of the American Fur Company.

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  • Waddell has shown that, in some cases, it is convenient to erect simple independent spans, by building them out as cantilevers and converting them into independent - (5) The Poughkeepsie bridge over the Hudson, built 1886-1887.

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  • He was commissioned lieutenant in April 1861, and in the Civil War served on the steamsloop "Mississippi" (1861-1863) during Farragut's passage of the forts below New Orleans in April 1862, and at Port Hudson in March 1863; took part in the fighting below Donaldsonville, Louisiana, in July 1863; and in 1864-1865 served on the steam-gunboat "Agawam" with the North Atlantic blockading squadron and took part in the attacks on Fort Fisher in December 1864 and January 1865.

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  • Only by way of the Hudson and Mohawk valleys, and round about the southern termination of the system were there easy routes to the interior of the country, and these were long closed by hostile aborigines and jealous French or Spanish colonists.

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  • The northern portion of this ridge forms the water-parting between the streams that empty into Hudson Bay and those that flow into the Gulf of Mexico.

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  • The Red river flows in a winding channel along the eastern boundary and empties into Lake Winnipeg in Canada, thence reaching Hudson Bay through the Nelson river.

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  • David Thompson (1770-1857), an employee at different times of the Hudson's Bay and North-West Fur companies, explored the region of the Missouri river in 1797-1798, and thus anticipated the work of Lewis and Clark, who entered the present limits of the state in 1804 and wintered among the Mandans,constructingFortMandan in what is nowMcLean county.

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  • The firstreal homeseekers to enter the state of whom there is any record were a colony of Scottish Highlanders who had first settled at Kildonan (Winnipeg) in 1812 under a grant from the Hudson's Bay Company to Thomas Douglas, 5th earl of Selkirk.

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  • In 1664 the duke of York became proprietor of the newly erected province of New York and by his grant in the same year to Berkeley and Carteret of all that portion which lay west of the Hudson river, Staten Island became properly a part of New Jersey, but in 1668 the duke decided that all islands within New York Bay which could be circumnavigated in twenty-four hours should be adjudged to New York.

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  • The city is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the Wabash, the Erie, the Lehigh Valley, the West Shore and the Michigan Central railways, and by the International Electric railway and the Niagara, St Catharines & Toronto (electric) railway.

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  • Henry Hudson discovered the island in 1607 and called it Hudson's Tutches or Touches.

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  • At this time the minor fortress of Port Hudson was established to guard the rear of Vicksburg.

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  • In the meanwhile Banks had moved upstream from New Orleans, and laid siege to Port Hudson.

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  • Scranton is served by the Erie, the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, the Central of New Jersey, the New York, Ontario & Western, the Delaware & Hudson, and the Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley railways.

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  • For the varieties and modifications of the trophi we simply refer to Hudson's figure above.

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  • Hudson in 1871 and found in numbers several times since, these appendages have acquired a new and quite special development.

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  • Water - town is served by the New York Central & Hudson River railway.

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  • Largely upon the representations of Howe, Burgoyne and others, it was determined to shift the field from Boston to New York city, from there to hold the line of the Hudson river in co-operation with a force to move down from Canada under Carleton and Burgoyne, and thus effectually to isolate New England.

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  • His left flank was thrown across the East river beyond the village of Brooklyn, while his front and right on the harbour and North or Hudson river were open to a combined naval and military attack.

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  • Burgoyne marched from Canada in June 1 777, with a strong expeditionary force, to occupy Albany and put himself in touch with Howe at the other end of the Hudson.

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  • Driving the Americans under General Arthur St Clair out of Ticonderoga, and making his way through the deep woods with difficulty, he reached the Hudson at Fort Edward on the 30th of July.

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  • Thereafter (except in the winter of 1779, at Morristown) Washington made West Point on the Hudson the headquarters of his army, but Clinton avowed himself too weak to attack him there.

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  • In 1783 several Edgartown families joined the association made up of Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, Providence and Newport whalers, who founded Hudson, on the Hudson river, in Columbia county, New York.

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  • The middle section of the Appalachians, rather arbitrarily limited by the Hudson and the James rivers, may be described first because it contains the best representation of the three longitudinal belts of which the mountain system as a whole is The Middle composed.

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  • The rivers which most perfectly exemplify this habit are the Delaware, Susquehanna and Potomac; the Hudson, the north-eastern boundary of the middle section, is peculiar in having headwaters in the Adirondacks as well as in the Catskills (northern part of the plateau); the James, forming the south-western boundary of the section, rises in the inner valleys of the stratified belt, instead of in the plateau.

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  • For the most part the rivers follow open valleys along belts of weak strata; but they frequently pass through sharp-cut notches in the na1row ridges of the stratified beltthe Delaware water-gap is one of the deepest of these notches; and in the harder rocks of the crystalline belt they have eroded steep-walled gorges, of which the finest is that of the Hudson, because of the greater height and breadth of the crystalline highlands there than at points where the other rivers cross it.

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  • The border of this part of the plateau descends eastward by a single strong escarpment to the Hudson valley, from which the mountains present a fine appearance, and northward by two escarpments (the second being called the Helderberg Mountains) to the Mohawk Valley, north of which rise the Adirondacks; but to the south west the dissected highland continues into Pennsylvania and Virginia, where it is commonly known as the Alleghany plateau.

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  • Certain extraordinary features were produced when the retreat of the ice sheet had progressed so far as to open an eastward outlet for the marginal lakes along the depression between the northward slope of the Appalachian plateau in west-central New York and the southward slope of the melting ice sheet; for when this eastward outlet came to be lower than the south-westward outlet across the height of land to the Ohio or Mississippi river, the discharge of the marginal lakes was changed from the Mississippi system to the Hudson system.

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  • The drift deposits thereabouts are so heavy that the present divides between the drainage basins of Hudson Bay, Lake Superior and the Gulf of Mexico evidently stand in no very definite relation to the preglacial divides.

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  • The continent being interrupted on its eastern side by the Gulf of Mexico and Hudson Bay, with the Great Lakes between these two large water bodies, the northward bending of the July isotherms is most pronounced in the western part of the United States.

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  • In January the northern water areas of the continent are frozen and snow-covered; Hudson Bay becomes unduly cold, and the greatest southward bending of the isotherms is somewhat east of the continental axis, with an extension of its effects out upon the Atlantic; but the southward bending isotherms are somewhat looped back about the unfrozen waters of the lower Great Lakes.

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  • Syracuse is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the West Shore, and the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railways, by the Erie Canal and the Oswego Canal, which joins the Erie within the city limits, and by several electric inter-urban lines.

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  • The greatly varied Arctic coast line of Canada with its large islands, inlets and channels is too much clogged with ice to be of much practical use, but Hudson Bay, a mediterranean sea 850 m.

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  • Of the nine provinces of Canada only two have no coast line on salt water, the western prairie provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan; but Manitoba and Ontario have a seaboard only on Hudson Bay and its southern extension James Bay respectively, and there is no probability that the shallow harbours of the latter bay will ever be of much importance for shipping, though Churchill Harbour on the west side of Hudson Bay may become an important grain port.

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  • The physical features of Canada are comparatively simple, and drawn on a large scale, more than half of its surface sloping gently inwards towards the shallow basin of Hudson Bay, with higher margins to the south-east and south-west.

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  • In the main it is a broad trough, wider towards the north than towards the south, and unsymmetrical, Hudson Bay occupying much of its north-eastern part, while to the west broad plains rise gradually to the foot-hills of the Rocky Mountains, the eastern member of the Cordillera which follows the Pacific coast of America.

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  • The mountain structures originated in three great orogenic periods, the earliest in the Archean, the second at the end of the Palaeozoic and the third at the end of the Mesozoic. The Archean mountain chains, which enclosed the present region of Hudson Bay, were so ancient that they had already been worn down almost to a plain before the early Palaeozoic sediments were laid down.

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  • The great central area of Canada is drained towards Hudson Bay, but its two largest rivers have separate watersheds, the Mackenzie flowing north-west to the Arctic Ocean and the St Lawrence north-east towards the Atlantic, the one to the south-west and the other to the south-east of the Archean protaxis.

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  • From the map it will be noticed that the largest and most thickly strewn lakes occur within five hundred or a thousand miles of Hudson Bay, and belong to the Archean protaxis or project beyond its edges into the Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks which lean against it.

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  • North of the divide between the St Lawrence system and Hudson Bay there are many large rivers converging on that inland sea, such as Whale river, Big river, East Main, Rupert and Nottaway rivers coming in from Ungava and northern Quebec; Moose and Albany rivers with important tributaries from northern Ontario; and Severn, Nelson and Churchill rivers from the south-west.

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  • The divide between the rivers flowing west and those flowing east and north is very sharp in the southern Rocky Mountains, but there are two lakes, the Committee's Punch Bowl and Fortress Lake, right astride of it, sending their waters both east and west; and there is a mountain somewhat south of Fortress Lake whose melting snows drain in three directions into tributaries of the Columbia, the Saskatchewan and the Athabasca, so that they are distributed between the Pacific, the Atlantic (Hudson Bay) and the Arctic Oceans.

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  • St Lawrence and Hudson Bay in eastern Canada also presents one or two lakes draining each way, but in a much less striking position, since the water-parting is flat and boggy instead of being a lofty range of mountains.

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  • This vast area, shaped like a broad-limbed V or U, with Hudson Bay in the centre, is made up chiefly of monotonous and barren Laurentian gneiss and granite; but scattered through it are important stretches of Keewatin and Huronian rocks intricately folded as synclines in the gneiss, as suggested earlier, the bases of ancient mountain ranges.

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  • As one advances northward the timber grows smaller and includes fewer species of trees, and finally the timber line is reached, near Churchill on the west coast of Hudson Bay and somewhat farther south on the Labrador side.

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  • There are no permanent ice sheets known on the mainland of north-eastern Canada, but some of the larger islands to the north of Hudson Bay and Straits are partially covered with glaciers on their higher points.

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  • North-west and north-east of Hudson Bay it becomes too severe for the growth of trees as seen on the " barren grounds," and there may be perpetual ice beneath the coating of moss which serves as a non-conducting covering for the " tundras."

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  • Leaving out the maritime provinces, southern Ontario, southern Alberta and the Pacific coast region on the one hand, and the Arctic north, particularly near Hudson Bay, on the other, Canada has snowy and severe winters, a very short spring with a sudden rise of temperature, short warm summers, and a delightful autumn with its " Indian summer."

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  • The wildfowl are, particularly in the west, in great numbers; their breeding-grounds extending from Manitoba and the western prairies up to Hudson Bay, the barren lands and Arctic coasts.

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  • In 1869 the North-west Territories were purchased from the Hudson's Bay Company, from a corner of which Manitoba was carved in the next year.

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  • The unorganized territories are sparsely inhabited by Indians, the people of the Hudson's Bay Company's posts and a few missionaries.

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  • Numerous smaller canals bring Ottawa into connexion with Lake Champlain and the Hudson river via Montreal; by this route the logs and sawn lumber of Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick find their destination.

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  • Though the English, led by Sir Hovenden Walker, made in 1711 an effort to take Quebec which proved abortive, they seized Nova Scotia; and when the treaty of Utrecht was made in 1713, France admitted defeat in America by yielding to Britain her claims to Hudson Bay, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia.

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  • McDougall was in 1868 sent to England to negotiate with the Hudson's Bay Company (q.v.) for the extinction of its claims, and to arrange with the imperial government for the transfer of the territory.

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  • An act authorizing the change of control was passed by the imperial parliament in July 1868; the arrangement made with the Hudson's Bay Company was accepted by the Canadian parliament in June 1869; and the deed of surrender from the Hudson's Bay Company to Her Majesty is dated November 19th, 1869.

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  • The Canadian Northern railway, already constructed from the Great Lakes westward to the neighbourhood of the Rockies, and with water and rail connexions reaching eastward to Quebec, began to transform itself into a complete transcontinental system, with an extension to the Hudson Bay.

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  • The red larch grows usually on higher and drier ground, ranging from the Virginian mountains to the shores of Hudson Bay; the black larch is found often on moist land, and even in swamps.

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  • Fishkill Landing is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways; by railway ferry and passenger ferries to Newburgh, connecting with the West Shore railway; by river steamboats and by electric railway to Matteawan.

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  • The departmental stores and offices of the Hudson's Bay Company and its Fort Garry court, which stand on Main Street South, are worthy of that ancient company.

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  • It is served by branches of the Pennsylvania and the New York Central & Hudson River railways and by electric interurban railways.

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  • The fort and the settlement were named in honour of General William Jenkins Worth (1794-1849), a native of Hudson, New York, who served in the War of 1812, commanded the United States forces against the Seminole Indians in 1841-1842, served under both General Taylor and General Scott in the Mexican War, distinguishing himself at Monterey (where he earned the brevet of major-general) and in other engagements, and later commanded the department of Texas.

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  • Hudson Taylor in 1853 went to China as the agent of a number of folk in England who feared that missionary work was becoming too mechanical.

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  • Hudson Taylor, the founder of the China Inland Mission, and James Gilmour, the apostle of Mongolia, are pre-eminent.

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  • It is served by the Delaware & Hudson, and the New York, Ontario & Western railways, and by an interurban electric line.

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  • Archbald, named in honour of James Archbald, formerly chief engineer of the Delaware & Hudson railway, was a part of Blakely township (incorporated in 1818) until 1877, when it became a borough.

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  • The history of furs can be read in Marco Polo, as he grows eloquent with the description of the rich skins of the khan of Tatary; in the early fathers of the church, who lament their introduction into Rome and Byzantium as an evidence of barbaric and debasing luxury; in the political history of Russia, stretching out a powerful arm over Siberia to secure her rich treasures; in the story of the French occupation of Canada, and the ascent of the St Lawrence to Lake Superior, and the subsequent contest to retain possession against England; in the history of early settlements of New England, New York and Virginia; in Irving's Astoria; in the records of the Hudson's Bay Company; and in the annals of the fairs held at Nizhniy Novgorod and Leipzig.

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  • These are the Hudson's Bay Co., Russian Fur Co., Alaska Commercial Co., North American Commercial Co., Russian Sealskin Co., Harmony Fur Co., Royal Greenland Fur Co., American Fur Co., Missouri Co.

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  • The Hudson's Bay Co.'s sales take place before the others, and, as no reserves are placed on any lot, the results are taken as exactly indicating current values.

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  • The best come from Hudson Bay territory and are valuable.

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  • Found in Alaska, Hudson Bay territory, Archangel and Greenland.

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  • The darkest and best come from Labrador and Hudson Bay, and the ordinary sorts from the northwest of the United States and, as with silver and other kinds, the quality is inferior when taken from warmer latitudes.

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  • Animals of this species are generally small in size and inhabit the extreme northern sections of Hudson Bay, Newfoundland, Greenland, Labrador and Siberia.

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  • Those from the Hudson Bay district and Sweden are the best and are very similar.

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  • The finest skins are found in the East Main and the Esquimaux Bay, in the Hudson's Bay Company's districts, and the poorest in Alaska.

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  • The best are the full furred ones of a very pale bluish-grey with fine flowing black top hair, which are obtained from the Hudson Bay district.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by electric lines to New York City, Yonkers, New Rochelle, &c. The city has various manufactures, but in the main is a residential suburb of New York; the finest residences are in the eastern, central and north-eastern sections, the last being known as Chester Hill; the foreign-born element is largely concentrated in the western part.

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  • Mount Vernon is in the township of Eastchester, which was settled from Connecticut in 1664, possibly in the hope of pushing Connecticut's boundary nearer the Hudson.

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  • It is served by the West Shore (which here crosses Rondout Creek on a high bridge), the New York Ontario & Western, the Ulster & Delaware, and the Wallkill Valley railways, by a ferry across the river to Rhinecliff, where connexion is made with the New York Central & Hudson River railroad, and by steamboat lines to New York, Albany and other river points.

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  • In 1664 James, duke of York, granted that part of his American territory between the Hudson and Delaware rivers to Sir George Carteret and John, Lord Berkeley, and in Carteret's honour this tract received the name of New Jersey.

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  • Considerable interest attaches to the diamonds found in Wisconsin, Michigan and Ohio near the Great Lakes, for they are here found in the terminal moraines of the great glacial sheet which is supposed to have spread southwards from the region of Hudson Bay; several of the drift minerals of the diamantiferous region of Indiana have been identified as probably of Canadian origin; no diamonds have however yet been found in the intervening country of Ontario.

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  • The reduction of Vicksburg (4th of July) and Port Hudson (9th of July), with other operations, restored complete control of the Mississippi, severing the Southern Confederacy.

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  • The bulk of its water empties by the Mackenzie river into the Arctic Ocean, but a small portion finds its way by the Ark-i-linik river into Hudson's Bay.

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  • It has been found that northern Ontario beyond the divide between the Great Lakes and Hudson Bay possesses many millions of acres of arable land, clay deposits in a post-glacial lake, like those in the southern part of the province, running from east to west from Lake Abitibbi to a point north of Lake Nipigon.

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  • The latter lake with Rainy Lake and other connected bodies of water belong to the Hudson Bay system of waters, their outlet being by Winnipeg river to Lake Winnipeg, from which flows Nelson river.

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  • In Ontario the Albany, Moose, Missanabi and Abitibbi flow into Hudson Bay, but none of these rivers is navigable except for canoes.

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  • From its centre at Quebec French civilization extended along the Mississippi and the Great Lakes, and also northwards to Hudson's Bay.

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  • Farther north, in what is now New Ontario, their English rivals, the Hudson's Bay Company, had more or less permanent posts, especially at Fort Albany and Moose Factory.

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  • Thereafter for almost twenty years, Ontario was traversed only by wandering bands of trappers, chiefly belonging to the Hudson's Bay Company; but in 1782 bands of American loyalists began to occupy the fertile country along the Bay of Quinte, and in the Niagara peninsula, the first settlement being made in 1782 at Kingston.

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  • P. Dawson (26), in charge of the British Polar Station at Fort Rae in 1882-1883, " The Indians and voyageurs of the Hudson Bay Company, who often pass their nights in the open, say that it [sound] is not uncommon.

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  • This was General Burgoyne's force of 7000 men which marched from Canada in June 1777 with the view of reaching the upper Hudson and combining with British troops from New York to isolate New England from the colonies below.

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  • The township consists of a narrow strip of land along the western bank of the Hudson, and at the southern extremity of the Palisades.

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  • Baffin Land is separated from Greenland by Baffin Bay and Davis Strait, from Ungava by Hudson Strait, from Keewatin and Melville Peninsula by Fox Channel and Fury-and-Hecla Strait, from Boothia Peninsula and North Somerset by the Gulf of Boothia and Prince Regent Inlet, and from North Devon by Lancaster Sound.

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  • Alexandria was occupied on the 7th of May 1863, but the troops were soon withdrawn for the Port Hudson attack.

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  • It is served by the Ulster & Delaware, by the Susquehanna division of the Delaware & Hudson, and by the Oneonta & Mohawk Valley (electric) railways.

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  • The principal manufactures are machineshop products (the Delaware & Hudson has repair and machine shops at Oneonta), knit goods, silk goods, lumber and planing mill products, &c. The first settlement was made about 1780.

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  • About 1820 the Hudson's Bay Company established a post here, but there was no permanent settlement until after the middle of the 19th century.

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  • The mountains form the water-parting between the Hudson and the St Lawrence rivers.

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  • On the south and southwest the waters flow either directly into the Hudson, which rises in the centre of the group, or else reach it through the Mohawk.

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  • The most important streams within the area are the Hudson, Black, Oswegatchie, Grass, Raquette, Saranac and Ausable rivers.

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  • There are four Hudson's Bay Company's posts on its banks, including Fort Albany at its mouth.

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  • As early as 1874 a tunnel under the Hudson river from Hoboken to New York had been started but abandoned because of seemingly insuperable difficulties of construction.

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  • Later the system was extended to connect with the Erie and Pennsylvania terminals in Jersey City, and in 1909 the tunnel under the Hudson river to downtown New York was finished.

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  • Many subsequent attempts were made at the North-West Passage from 1576 to 1616, which have left on our modern maps the imperishable names of Frobisher, Davis, Hudson and Baffin.

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  • In 1826 American hunters first crossed to the coast; in 1830 the Hudson's Bay Company began operations in northern California.

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  • Two squares north of the Senate officebuilding is the Union Railway Station (1908; 343 by 760 ft.; cost, $4,000,000), designed by Daniel Hudson Burnham, consisting of a main building of white granite (from Bethel, Vermont) and two wings, and facing a beautiful plaza.

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  • During the Roman republic of 1849, he, as medical officer, organized the ambulance service, and, after the fall of Rome, withdrew to Genoa, where he worked with Sir James Hudson for the liberation of the political prisoners of Naples, but held aloof from the Mazzinian conspiracies.

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  • It is served by the Delaware & Hudson railway, and is connected with Saratoga Springs, Albany, and Schenectady by electric lines.

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  • Vanderbilt in 1866 became attorney for the New York & Harlem railway, in 1869 was appointed attorney of the newly consolidated New York Central & Hudson river railway, of which he soon became a director, and in 1875 was made general counsel for the entire Vanderbilt system of railways.

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  • He became second vice-president of the New York Central & Hudson river in 1869 and was its president in 1885-1898, and in 1898 was made chairman of the board of directors of the Vanderbilt system.

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  • But we have the same phenomenon in single varieties of man, such as the American, which inhabits alike the frozen wastes of Hudson's Bay and Tierra del Fuego, and the hottest regions of the tropics, - the low equatorial valleys and the lofty plateaux of the Andes.

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  • Pop. (1905, state census), 45 4 It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and the Northern Central railways and by electric railway to Branchport, and has steamboat connexions with Hammondsport at the head of Keuka Lake.

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  • The Hudson's Bay Company has great interest in Edmonton, but is vigorously opposed by a strong French firm, Revillon Freres of Paris.

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  • Early in the 19th century the Hudson's Bay Company also established a fort at this point.

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  • As freighters for the Hudson's Bay Company many of these settlers made, with their ox or pony carts, the long journey over the natural prairie roads to Fort Garry, fording or swimming the streams, carrying furs for a thousand miles or more on the eastern trip, and returning brought loads of merchandise for the company.

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  • On the green stand a monument erected by the state in 1799 to the memory of the minute-men who fell in that engagement, a drinking fountain surmounted by a bronze statue (1900, by Henry Hudson Kitson) of Captain John Parker, who was in command of the minute-men, and a large boulder, which marks the position of the minute-men when they were fired upon by the British.

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  • See Charles Hudson, History of the Town of Lexington (Boston, 1868), and the publications of the Lexington Historical Society, (1890 seq.).

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  • The oldest settlement in the vicinity was made by the Hudson's Bay Fur Company on the west side of the Boise river, before 1860; the present city, chartered in 1864, dates from 1863.

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  • Chippendale, Christopher Stonehenge Complete (Thames and Hudson, London, 2004) ISBN 0500284679.

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  • He occasionally contributed papers to the Albany Institute, in the years 1824 and 1825, on chemical and mechanical subjects; and in the latter year, having been unexpectedly appointed assistant engineer on the survey of a route for a state road from the Hudson river to Lake Erie, a distance somewhat over 300 m., he at once embarked with zeal and success in the new enterprise.

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  • Molineux's chart, published by Hakluyt about 1600, was Hudson's.

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  • Next year Hudson was again sent by the Muscovy Company to open a passage to China, this time by the north-east route between Spitzbergen and Novaya Zemlya, which had been attempted by his predecessors and especially by the Dutch navigator William Barents.

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  • Towards the end of 1608 Hudson "had a call" to Amsterdam, where he saw the celebrated cosmographer the Rev. Peter Plancius and the cartographer Hondius, and after some delay, due to the rivalry which was exhibited in the attempt to secure his services, he undertook for the Dutch East India Company his important third voyage to find a passage to China either by the north-east or north-west route.

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  • The latter plan was adopted, and on the 14th of May Hudson set his face towards the Chesapeake and China.

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  • On the 4th of October the "Half-Moon" weighed for the Texel, and on the 7th of November arrived at Dartmouth, where she was seized and detained by the English government, Hudson and the other Englishmen of the ship being commanded not to leave England, but rather to serve their own country.

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  • The voyage had fallen short of Hudson's expectations, but it served many purposes perhaps as important to the world.

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  • Hudson's confidence in the existence of a North-West Passage had not been diminished by his three failures, and a new company was formed to support him in a fourth attempt, the principal promoters being Sir Thomas Smith (or Smythe), Sir Dudley Digges and John (afterwards Sir John) Wolstenholme.

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  • Hudson sailed from London in the little ship "Discovery" of 55 tons, on the 17th of April 1610, and entered the strait which now bears his name about the middle of June.

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  • Sailing steadily westward he entered Hudson Bay on the 3rd of August, and passing southward spent the next three months examining the eastern shore of the bay.

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  • Discontent became rife, and on the ship breaking out of the ice in the spring Henry Hudson had a violent quarrel with a dissolute young fellow named Henry Greene, whom he had befriended by taking him on board, and who now retaliated by inciting the discontented part of the crew to put Hudson and eight others (including the sick men) out of the ship. This happened on the 22nd of June 1611.

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  • Although it is certain that the four great geographical landmarks which to-day serve to keep Hudson's memory alive, namely the Hudson Bay, Strait, Territory and River, had repeatedly been visited and even drawn on maps and charts before he set out on his voyages, yet he deserves to take a very high rank among northern navigators for the mere extent of his discoveries and the success with which he pushed them beyond the limits of his predecessors.

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  • The rich fisheries of Spitzbergen and the fur industry of the Hudson Bay Territory were the immediate fruit of his labours.

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  • Of equal importance is the Hudson, whose lower waters, forming the north-eastern boundary of New Jersey for a distance of 22 m., drain a very small part of the state, but have contributed materially to the state's commercial develop ment.

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  • Farms were smallest in Hudson county, where the average size was 7.9 acres, and largest in Sussex county, where the average size was 143.4 acres.

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  • A small amount of shad is taken also in the Hudson river.

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  • The eastern terminals of the southern and western lines running from New York City are situated on the western shore of the Hudson river, in Weehawken, Hoboken or Jersey City; whence passengers and freight are carried by ferry to New York.

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  • Jersey City and Hoboken are also connected with New York by tunnels under the Hudson river.

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  • The lower Hudson is navigable for the largest ocean-going steamers.

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  • The Delaware and Raritan canal 2 was long a very 1 The Pennsylvania railway has constructed tunnels under the Hudson river, and has erected a large terminal station on Manhattan Island.

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  • The state acts concurrently with New York in preserving the natural beauties of the Palisades of the Hudson river; and in 1909 the Palisades Interstate Park, with a front of 13 m.

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  • The state supports the following charitable and correctional institutions all under the inspection of a State Department of Charities and Correction (1905); hospitals for the insane at Trenton and Morris Plains; a training-school for feeble-minded children (partly supported by the state) and a home for feeble-minded women at Vineland; a sanatorium for tuberculous diseases at Glen Gardner; a village for epileptics, with a farm of 700 acres, near Skillman, Somerset county; a state home (reform school) for boys near Jamesburg, Middlesex county, and for girls in Ewing township, near Trenton; a state reformatory for criminals sixteen to thirty years of age, near Rahway; a state prison at Trenton; a home for disabled soldiers at Kearney,' Hudson county; a home for disabled soldiers, sailors and their wives at Vineland"; and a school for the deaf at Trenton.

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  • In the following year Estevan Gomez, a Portuguese sailor in the service of the emperor Charles V., in his reputed voyage southward from Labrador, is said to have made note of the Hudson and Delaware rivers.

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  • It is very probable, also, that French traders soon afterward penetrated the region along the lower Hudson.

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  • Voyages to this region for exploration, trade and settlement, however, may be said to have really begun with the year 1609, when Henry Hudson explored the region between Sandy Hook and Raritan Bay and sailed up the river which now bears his name.

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  • After this voyage came Dutch traders, who established themselves on Manhattan Island and soon spread across the Hudson river into what are now Hudson and Bergen counties.

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  • On the western bank of the Hudson the trading post of Hobocanhackingh, on the site of the present city of Hoboken, was established at an early date.

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  • The Dutch and Swedes between the Delaware and the Hudson were mostly traders, and therefore did not make many permanent settlements or establish forms of government.

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  • The 1 As early as 1613, Captain Samuel Argall, on his way to Virginia, after breaking up some Jesuit settlements at Port Royal, and Mount Desert, passed through the Narrows near the mouth of the Hudson, and finding a group of Dutch traders, made them haul down their flag and replace it with that of England.

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  • Moreover, when he had learned that the duke had parted with New Jersey he convinced him that it was a great loss, and in the effort to save what was possible, Staten Island was taken from the proprietors on the plea that one arm of the Hudson flowed along its western border.

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  • When Washington, in the autumn of 1776, was no longer able to hold the lower Hudson he retreated across New Jersey to the Delaware near Trenton and seizing every boat for miles up the river he placed his dispirited troops on the opposite side and left the pursuing army no means of crossing.

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  • Nyack is served by the Northern Railroad of New Jersey (a branch of the Erie), and is connected by ferry with Tarrytown, nearly opposite, on the eastern bank of the Hudson.

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  • The Hudson's Bay Company absorbed its rival, the North-west Company, in 1821, and thus secured a practical monopoly of the fur trade of the North and West.

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  • As early as 1841 the Americans in Oregon began to feel the need of some form of civil government, as the regulations of the Hudson's Bay Company were the only laws then known to the country.

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  • After this year the flow of immigrants steadily increased, about 1400 arriving in 1844, and 3000 in 1845.1 Signs of hostility to the Hudson's Bay Company now began to appear among the American population, and in 1845 the provisional government sought to extend its jurisdiction north of the Columbia river, where the Americans had hitherto refrained from settling.

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  • The Erie canal leading from Buffalo to the Hudson river at Troy, and connecting with Lake Ontario at Oswego, had a capacity for boats 98 ft.

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  • Westborough was separated from it in 1717, Southborough in 1727, and a part of Berlin in 1784; parts of it were annexed to Northborough in 1807, to Bolton in 1829 and to Hudson in 1866; and it annexed parts of Framingham in 1791, and of Southborough in 1843.

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  • Whymper's party, three members of which (Lord Francis Douglas, the Rev. C. Hudson and Mr Hadow) with the guide, Michel Croz, perished by a slip on the descent.

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  • Washington turned to the left, crossed the Hudson above, and encamped for the remainder of the season at White Plains, New York, within striking distance of the city.

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  • At last, in July 1781, Rochambeau's force was able to leave Rhode Island and, marching across Connecticut, joined Washington on the Hudson.

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  • Schenectady is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, and the Delaware && Hudson railways, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Albany, Troy, Saratoga, Amsterdam, Johnstown and Gloversville.

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  • The first two railways in the state made Schenectady their terminus, the Mohawk & Hudson opening to Albany in September 1831 and the Saratoga & Schenectady in July 1832; the original station of the Mohawk & Hudson is still standing.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the New York, New Haven & Hartford, the West Shore, the Central New England, and the Poughkeepsie & Eastern (merged in the Central New England) railways, and by river steamboat lines on the Hudson.

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  • On the Hudson here is the course for the intercollegiate boat-races in which the American college crews (save those of Yale and Harvard, which row on the Thames at New London) have rowed annually, beginning in 1895, except in 1896, when the race was rowed at Saratoga.

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  • Immediately north of Poughkeepsie is the Hudson River State Hospital for the Insane (1871); in the city are the Vassar Brothers' Hospital (1878), with which a nurses' training school is connected; the Vassar Brothers' Home (1881) for aged and infirm men; the Poughkeepsie Orphan House and Home for the Friendless (1847); the Old Ladies' Home (1870); the Pringle Memorial Home (1899), for aged and indigent men, and the Adriance Memorial Library (45,000 volumes in 1909).

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  • Batavia is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the Erie, and the Lehigh Valley railways.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson river, and the West Shore railways, by the Utica & Mohawk Valley Electric railroad, and by the Erie canal.

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  • It has also during most of the year steamboat service on the Hudson.

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  • Van der Donck encouraged others to remove to his lands along the Hudson river, and in 1649 he built a saw-mill near the mouth of the Nepperhan Creek, which for many years was called "Saw-Mill river."

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  • The duel was fought at Weehawken on the Jersey shore of the Hudson opposite the City of New York.

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  • The "Hudson's Bay Company," which still exists as a commercial concern, is dealt with under its own heading, but most of the thirteen British North American colonies were in their inception chartered companies very much in the modern acceptation of the term.

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  • That this is so is clearly shown in the case of the Hudson's Bay Company as at present constituted.

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  • On the Sound, in Hudson Park, is a monument commemorating the landingplace of the first Huguenot settlers.

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  • Iron products were manufactured throughout the 18th century, nails were made before 1716 and were exported from the colony, and it was in Connecticut that cannon were cast for the Continental troops and the chains were made to block the channel of the Hudson river to British ships.

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  • Mr Hudson led the Council's successful bid to obtain Unitary status.

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  • A variety of vehicles are used by the team (including a chameleon Rolls Royce called Hudson ).

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  • It's a testament to the screen charisma of Kate Hudson that The Skeleton Key is half-way watchable.

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  • But still only die-hard Hudson fans or desperate horror junkies will find The Skeleton Key worth unlocking.

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  • George Hudson who was born in 1800 and who became a draper in York.

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  • The area inspired the Hudson River School of painting, a sort of early American pastoral idyll.

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  • Hudson's prose throughout is densely adjectival and often indiscriminate.

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  • Down came poor Mr Hudson upon his fat paunch.

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  • Such profound pessimism disables the power of Hudson's trenchant criticisms of Wired magazine.

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  • October to to doubling as the of stars Hudson river day cruise and.

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  • He was hired by both the Hudson's Bay Company and American Fur Company and worked as a guide for white trappers.

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  • Hudson River Adventures A nice touch arrives in st wwwbestourcomsince victoria cruises.

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  • He was the son of Philip Livingston (1686-1749), and grandson of Robert Livingston (1654-1725), who was born at Ancrum, Scotland, emigrated to America about 1673, and received grants (beginning in 1686) to "Livingston Manor" (a tract of land on the Hudson, comprising the greater part of what are now Dutchess and Columbia counties).

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  • After the British conquest of 1763 the west became the scene of a rapidly increasing fur trade, and for many years there was keen rivalry between the Hudson's Bay Company, with its headquarters in England, and the North-West Company of Montreal.

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  • Thence it crossed into the Dutch settlements on the Hudson and the Delaware, and mingled with other elements in Virginia, Maryland and the Carolinas.

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  • Troy is served by the Boston & Maine, the New York Central & Hudson River and the Delaware && Hudson railways, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Saratoga and Lake George on the north, Albany on the south and Schenectady and the cities of the populous Mohawk Valley on the west; it is at the head of river steamboat navigation on the Hudson, and has water communication by means of the Erie and Champlain canals with the Great Lakes and Canada.

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  • Of the three great continental river systems above mentioned, the Red River and its tributaries drain the western and west central slope northward through Lake Winnipeg into Hudson Bay; the other two being the St Lawrence system, to which the St Louis River and its branches and several smaller streams flowing into Lake Superior contribute their waters by way of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi, which with its tributaries drains about two-thirds of the state into the Gulf of Mexico.

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  • He prepared plans for the construction of a canal between the Hudson river and Lake Champlain before 1776, and, in 1792-1796, carried to a successful conclusion a more pretentious scheme for connecting the Hudson with Lake Ontario by way of the Mohawk, Oneida Lake and the Onondaga river.

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  • In a middle section of the system, from the Hudson river in southern New York to the James river in southern Virginia, the crystalline belt is narrowed, as if by the depression of its south-eastern part beneath the Atlantic Ocean or beneath the strata of the Atlantic coastal plain which now represents the ocean; but the stratified belt is here broadly developed in a remarkable series of ridges and valleys determined by the action of erosion on the many alternations of strong and weak folded strata; and the plateau assumes full strength southward from the monochinal Mohawk valley which separates it from the Adirondacks.

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  • But the Hudson is strikingly exceptional in this respect; it possesses a deep and navigable tide-water channel all through its gorge in the highlands, a feature which has usually been explained as the result of depression of the land, but may also be explained by glacial erosion without change of land-level; a feature which, in connection with the Mohawk Valley, has been absolutely determinative of the metropolitan rank reached by New York City at the Hudson mouth.

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  • From Labrador it ranges to the southern shores of Hudson's Bay and to those of the Great Bear Lake, and to the valley of the Yukon and the coast of Alaska, forming with the aspen, the larch, the balsam poplar, the banksian pine, the black and white spruces and the balsam fir, the great subarctic transcontinental forest; and southward it ranges through all the forest region of the Dominion of Canada and the northern states."

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  • On the site at the junction of the two rivers where Verandreye, the first white explorer to visit the Red river, had three-quarters of a century before this time erected Fort Rouge, and where some ten years earlier in the century the Nor'-Westers of Montreal had erected Fort Gibraltar, the Hudson's Bay Company, which at the time Lord Selkirk and his friends controlled, erected Fort Douglas, bearing the family name of the colonizer.

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  • Discontent became rife, and on the ship breaking out of the ice in the spring Hudson had a violent quarrel with a dissolute young fellow named Henry Greene, whom he had befriended by taking him on board, and who now retaliated by inciting the discontented part of the crew to put Hudson and eight others (including the sick men) out of the ship. This happened on the 22nd of June r 6 r 1.

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  • We sailed on the Hudson River and wandered about on its green banks, of which Bryant loved to sing.

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  • Mr. Burroughs told me about his home near the Hudson, and what a happy place it must be!

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  • October to to doubling as the of stars hudson river day cruise and.

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  • Keith Hudson... this is scintillating stuff... here is music of the highest caliber...

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  • Pat Hudson emphasizes the similarities between quantitative and qualitative approaches and their joint value in reconstructing the past.

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  • Missionary statesman Hudson Taylor had complete trust in God 's faithfulness.

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  • He was hired by both the Hudson 's Bay Company and American Fur Company and worked as a guide for white trappers.

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  • Nick Hudson, also formerly of Sandstorm Brass, has an enviable international reputation as a fine trombone soloist.

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  • Moving forward into the middle of the last century, we have names such as Doris Day and Rock Hudson, two little kittens called Doris and Rock would be bound to cause comment!

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  • Lyndhurst is a 67-acre estate along the Hudson River, north of New York City.

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  • Some of the most beautiful women in the world are not big busted--Kate Hudson, Keira Knightly, Natalie Portman, and Michelle Pfieffer... there is an endless list.

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  • Those gowns are perfect because they are based on the designer's famous celebrity clientele (like Kate Hudson and Beyonce), who then in turn wear the looks at the award shows and other red carpet events.

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  • In addition, if you loved the yellow dress that Kate Hudson wore in "How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days," you'll find it, along with the matching shoes, here!

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  • Probably one of the first and most notorious celebrity outings is that of the dashing Rock Hudson.

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  • Hudson was known as a ladies' man during his 30-year career, but when he came down with AIDs in the early 80's, he was treated like a walking plague while he searched the world for a cure.

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  • After his death, his life partner Marc Christian successfully sued the estate and brought to head speculations that Hudson was a gay celebrity.

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  • While Rock Hudson may have been one of the earliest celebrities to be outed, he certainly wasn't the last.

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  • We've told you about this split before, but more details have since emerged about the breakdown of Kate Hudson and Chris Robinson's five-year marriage.

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  • Katy Perry was born Katheryn Elizabeth Hudson in 1984, in Santa Barbara, California.

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  • Wilson, who is the brother of actor Luke Wilson, has been romatically linked to singer Sheryl Crow and actress Kate Hudson.

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  • The latest gossip finds the two together in New York City at the Hudson Hotel's VIP room.

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  • Jennifer Hudson's rise to stardom happened quickly, despite the fact that she was eliminated on the talent competition American Idol.

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  • Now, as an award winner and Academy Award nominee for her role in Dreamgirls, Hudson has a very successful career ahead of her.

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  • Jennifer Kate Hudson was born on September 12, 1981 in Chicago, Illinois.

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  • As a child, Hudson honed her skills singing in the church gospel choir.

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  • Hudson graduated from Dunbar Vocational Career Academy in 1999.

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  • In 2004, Jennifer Hudson auditioned for the third season of the singing competition American Idol in Atlanta, Georgia.

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  • Hudson progressed to the semifinalist round in Hollywood, but was not selected to participate as a finalist.

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  • During a wildcard round, judge Randy Jackson chose Hudson as a finalist.

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  • Jennifer Hudson was not immediately a fan favorite on the series, and received the second lowest number of votes several times during the competition.

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  • Jennifer Hudson's exit from the show, as the seventh of the finalists to be voted off, was met with criticism.

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  • Many believed there was a flaw in the voting system, and speculations of racism began when three African-American women, Latoya London, Hudson, and Fantasia Barrino, were in the bottom three.

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  • Further fueling Hudson's departure was a power outage in her hometown of Chicago on voting night.

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  • Hudson earned critical acclaim from some of the music industry's greats during her time on American Idol.

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  • Both Elton John and Barry Manilow found Hudson's performances to be flawless.

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  • Manilow performed a duet with Hudson on Ryan Seacrest's talk show the day after she was eliminated from American Idol.

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  • Despite her loss on American Idol, Jennifer Hudson continued to follow her dreams and was cast in 2005 as Effie White in the film musical Dreamgirls.

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  • Hudson's performance gained positive reviews from critics, and she proved to be the golden girl of the awards season.

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  • In all, Hudson has received over a dozen awards and nominations.

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  • A number of publications predicted that Jennifer Hudson would receive an Oscar nomination for her performance, with Variety comparing her to a "young Aretha."

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