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howe

howe

howe Sentence Examples

  • From Cape Howe to Melbourne the fall may be taken at from 30 in.

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  • of Cape Howe.

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  • To the west lie the small groups of coral islets - Mopiha (Lord Howe), Ura (Scilly) and Bellingshausen (discovered by Otto von Kotzebue, 1824).

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  • Besides the three larger islands numerous satellites belong to the subregion, as Lord Howe, Norfolk and Kermadec islands, with the Chatham, Auckland and Macquarie groups.

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  • RICHARD HOWE HOWE, Earl (1726-1799), British admiral, was born in London on the 8th of March 1726.

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  • He was the second son of Emmanuel Scrope Howe, 2nd Viscount Howe, who died governor of Barbadoes in March 1735, and of Mary Sophia Charlotte, a daughter of the baroness Kilmansegge, afterwards countess of Darlington, the mistress of George I.

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  • Richard Howe entered the navy in the "Severn," one of the squadron sent into the south seas with Anson in 1740.

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  • Howe next served in the West Indies in the "Burford," and was present in her when she was very severely damaged in the unsuccessful attack on La Guayra on the 18th of February 1742.

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  • While the peace between the War of the Austrian Succession and the Seven Years' War lasted, Howe held commands at home and on the west coast of Africa.

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  • By the death of his elder brother, killed near Ticonderoga on the 6th of July 1758, he became Viscount Howe - an Irish peerage.

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  • The rebellion of the colonies was making rapid progress, and Howe was known to be in sympathy with the colonists.

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  • He had sought the acquaintance of Benjamin Franklin, who was a friend of his sister Miss Howe, a clever eccentric woman well known in London society, and had already tried to act as a peacemaker.

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  • It was doubtless because of his known sentiments that he was selected to command in America, and was joined in commission with his brother Sir William Howe, the general at the head of the land forces, to make a conciliatory arrangement.

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  • Being greatly outnumbered, Howe had to stand on the defensive, but he baffled the French admiral at Sandy Hook, and defeated his attempt to take Newport in Rhode Island by a fine combination of caution and calculated daring.

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  • On the arrival of Admiral John Byron from England with reinforcements, Howe left the station in September.

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  • Though Howe was now nearly seventy, and had been trained in the old school, he displayed an originality not usual with veterans, and not excelled by any of his successors in the war, not even by Nelson, since they had his example to follow and were served by more highly trained squadrons than his.

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  • In 1782 he was created Viscount Howe of Langar, and in 1788 Baron and Earl Howe.

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  • Lord Howe married, on the 10th of March 1758, Mary Hartop, the daughter of Colonel Chiverton Hartop of Welby in Leicestershire, and had issue two daughters.

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  • 1861) became 4th Earl Howe in 1900.

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  • Samuel Gridley Howe >>

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  • There is considerable material of value, especially for local history, in the Ohio Archaeological and Historical Society Publications (Columbus, 1887), and in Henry Howe, Historical Collections of Ohio (1st ed., Cincinnati, 1847; Centennial edition [enlarged], 2 vols., Columbus, 1889-1891).

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  • Howe, and for association with Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller; the Massachusetts school for idiotic and feebleminded children (1839); and the Massachusetts charitable eye and ear infirmary (1824), all receive financial aid from the commonwealth, which has representation in their management.

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  • The Pentland range contains many points of interest and beauty, but these are mostly accessible only to the pedestrian, although the hills are crossed by roads, of which the chief are those by Glencorse burn and the Cauld Stane Slap. Habbie's Howe, the scene of Allan Ramsay's pastoral The Gentle Shepherd, is some 2 m.

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  • In the year 1776, General Howe sent a detachment of his army under General Henry Clinton to seize Newport as a base of operations for reducing New England, and the city was occupied by the British on the 8th of December 1776.

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  • On the 9th of August Sullivan crossed to the north end of the island of Rhode Island, but as the Frenchmen were disembarking on Conanicut Island, Lord Howe arrived with the British fleet.

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  • Count D'Estaing hastily re-embarked his troops and sailed out to meet Howe.

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  • On the 30th the Americans, learning of the approach of Lord Howe's fleet with 5000 troops under Clinton, decided to abandon the island.

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  • At the same time he was occupied in a controversy on the conformity question with John How (or Howe) on the practice of "occasional conformity."

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  • De Wolfe Howe; S.

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  • On the one hand are Andrewes, Hall, Chillingworth, Jeremy Taylor, Barrow and South; on the other Baxter, Calamy, the Goodwins, Howe, Owen, Bunyan, in each case but a few names out of many.

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  • ii., Howe's Annals of Iowa (Iowa City, 1882-1884); Series 3, The Annals of Iowa, published by the Historical Department of Iowa (Des Moines, 1893-); Iowa Historical Record (Iowa City, 1885-1902); Iowa Journal of History and Politics (Iowa City, 1903 seq.); and G.

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  • With John Adams and Edward Rutledge he was selected by Congress to discuss with Admiral Howe (September 1776, at Staten Island) the terms of peace proposed by Howe, who had arrived in New York harbour in July 1776, and who had been an intimate friend of Franklin; but the discussion was fruitless, as the American commissioners refused to treat " back of this step of independency."

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  • Howe (q.v.), whose reforms in charity methods were felt through all the charitable interests of the state.

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  • Howe.

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  • After the battle of Bunker Hill, Gage was superseded by General (Sir William) Howe, and returned to England.

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  • In the following year (1776) the British began their offensive operations for the control of the Hudson; an army under Sir William Howe was to capture New York City and get control of the lower Hudson, while another army under Sir Guy Carleton was to retake Crown Point and Ticonderoga and get control of the upper Hudson.

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  • Howe, with a force of British and Loyalists vastly superior in equipment and numbers to Washington's untrained militia, landed in July on Staten Island and late in August defeated Washington at the battle of Long Island within the present limits of Brooklyn borough.

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  • Washington prepared to withstand the British behind fortifications on Harlem Heights, but discovering that Howe was attempting to outflank him by landing troops in the rear he retreated to the mainland, leaving only a garrison at Fort Washington, and established a line of fortified camps on the hills overlooking the Bronx river as far as White Plains.

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  • This brought on the battle of White Plains late in October, in which Howe gained no advantage; and from here both armies withdrew into New Jersey, the British capturing Fort Washington on the way, the Americans leaving behind garrisons to guard the Highlands of the Hudson.

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  • The British government intended that Howe should co-operate with Burgoyne by fighting his way up the Hudson, but as the secretary of state for the colonies neglected to send him such instructions this was not undertaken until early in October, and then an expedition for the purpose was placed under the command of Sir Henry Clinton.

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  • The immediate proposal is said to have come from George Brown; the large political idea had long been advocated by Macdonald and Alexander Galt in Upper Canada - by Joseph Howe and others in the maritime provinces.

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  • The people of Nova Scotia in particular, dissatisfied with the way in which their province had been drawn into the Union, maintained a fierce opposition to the Ottawa government, until their leader, Joseph Howe, fearing an armed rising, came to an agreement with Macdonald and accepted a seat in his cabinet.

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  • Treaties and military operations were at first of no avail, but in 1876 the United States government took steps to reduce them to submission, and Generals George Crook (1828-1890), Alfred Howe Terry (1827-1890) and John Gibbon (1827-1896), with 2700 troops (besides the Crow scouts) were sent against the Sioux under Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and others.

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  • The Howe truss of 1830 and the Pratt truss of 1844 are examples.

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  • The Howe truss had timber chords and a lattice of timber struts, with vertical iron ties.

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  • As railway loads increased and greater spans were demanded, the Howe truss was stiffened by timber arches on each side of each girder.

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  • Released on parole, he bore a verbal message from Lord Howe to the Continental Congress, which led to the fruitless conference on Staten Island.

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  • HUBERT HOWE BANCROFT (1832-), American historical writer, was born at Granville, Ohio, on the 5th of May 1832.

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  • It was in this house that Lord Howe on the nth of September 1776 held a peace conference with Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Edward Rutledge representing the Continental Congress.

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  • The British army under Sir William Howe landed at the Narrows on the 3rd of July 1777 and until the close of the war Staten Island was held by the British and Loyalists.

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  • The following islands may be classified as oceanic, but not with any of the three main divisions: the Bonin Islands, north of the Marianas, belonging to Japan; Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands (to New South Wales); Easter Island (to Chile); the Galapagos Islands (to Ecuador).

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  • General (Sir) William Howe, who succeeded Gage in the chief command in October, and Generals (Sir) Henry Clinton and John Burgoyne were sent out at once with reinforcements.

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  • In moral effect the battle proved anything but a defeat to the Americans, who now drew a cordon of works around Boston, hemming Howe's army in a contracted, and, as it proved, untenable, position.

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  • On the 3rd of July Washington took command of the American army at Cambridge and proceeded with what is known as the "siege of Boston," which was marked by no special incident, and closed with the evacuation of the town by the British on the 17th of March 1776, Howe sailing away to Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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  • Largely upon the representations of Howe, Burgoyne and others, it was determined to shift the field from Boston to New York city, from there to hold the line of the Hudson river in co-operation with a force to move down from Canada under Carleton and Burgoyne, and thus effectually to isolate New England.

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  • Howe, heavily reinforced from home, sailed on the 10th from Halifax to New York and on the 5th of July encamped on Staten Island.

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  • Howe drove Washington out of it, and forced the abandonment of the whole of Manhattan Island by three welldirected movements upon the American left.

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  • On the 15th of September Howe crossed the East river above the city, captured 300 of the militia defending the lines and occupied the city.

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  • Delaying until the 12th of October, Howe again moved forward by water into Westchester county, and marching toward White Plains forced another retreat on Washington.

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  • Instead of pressing Washington further, Howe then returned to Manhattan Fort Island, and on the 16th of November captured Fort Washing- ton.

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  • Following up the occupation of New York, Howe proceeded in 1 777 to capture Philadelphia.

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  • Burgoyne marched from Canada in June 1 777, with a strong expeditionary force, to occupy Albany and put himself in touch with Howe at the other end of the Hudson.

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  • In 1778 Sir Henry Clinton succeeded Howe in the chief command in America.

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  • On the 29th of December of this year Colonel Archibald Campbell (1739-1791) with an expeditionary corps of 35 00 men from Clinton's army in New York, captured Savannah, Georgia, defeating the American force under General Robert Howe.

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  • General Benjamin Lincoln, succeeding Howe, undertook to drive the British out of Georgia, but General Augustine Prevost, who had commanded in Florida, moved up and compelled Lincoln to retire to Charleston.

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  • The naval force at the disposal of the admirals commanding on the station, who until Lord Howe took up the command on the 12th of July 1776 were Samuel Graves and Molyneux Shuldham, was insufficient to patrol the long line of coast.

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  • Howe at Boston, in seeking stores for the army and in supplying naval brigades.

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  • The British government, having neglected to occupy the Straits of Gibraltar in time, despatched Admiral Byron from Plymouth on the 9th of June with thirteen sail of the line to join Admiral (Lord) Howe, Sir William's brother, in America, and collected a strong force at home, called the Western Squadron, under Viscount Keppel.

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  • Howe then concentrated his force of nine small line-of-battle ships at Sandy Hook on the 29th of June, and on the 11 th of July he learnt that d'Estaing was approaching.

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  • Howe, who had received a small reinforcement, followed.

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  • Howe received no help from Byron, whose badly appointed fleet was damaged and scattered by a gale on the 3rd of July in midAtlantic. His ships dropped in by degrees during September.

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  • Howe resigned on the 2 5th of that month, and was succeeded by Byron.

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  • At home Howe relieved Gibraltar for the last time in September and October 1782.

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  • C. Howe, The City, the Hope of Democracy (ibid., 1905); and Charles Zueblin, American Municipal Progress (ibid., 1902).

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  • See Henry Howe, Historical Collections of Ohio (Columbus, 1891).

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  • Headed by Joseph Howe, the advocates of repeal swept the province at the Dominion election.

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  • The local assembly, in which 36 out of 38 members were committed to repeal, passed an address to Her Majesty praying her not to " reduce this free, happy and hitherto self-governed province to the degraded condition of a servile dependency of Canada," and sent Howe with a delegation to London to lay the petition at the foot of the throne.

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  • Howe enlisted the support of John Bright and other members of parliament, but the imperial government was firm, and the duke of Buckingham, as colonial secretary, soon informed the governor-general in a despatch that consent could not be given for the withdrawal of Nova Scotia from the Dominion.

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  • Meanwhile Howe, convinced of the impossibility of effecting separation, and fearing disloyal tendencies which had manifested themselves in some of its advocates, entered into negotiations with Dr Tupper in London, and later with the Dominion government, for better financial terms than those originally arranged for Nova Scotia in the federal system.

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  • These terms having been agreed to, Howe, as a pledge of his approval and support, accepted a seat as secretary of state in the Dominion cabinet.

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  • Longley'S Joseph Howe (1905) And J.

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  • - Under the name of Aristotle, three treatises on the good of man have come down to us, Mica Nuco i tkaa (irpos NLKOµaXov, Porphyry), Howe, Eub ipta (7r Os Eiibjµov, Porphyry), and 'HBLKa µeyaXa; so like one another that there seems no tenable hypothesis except that they are the manuscript writings of one man.

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  • This group, so named by Abel Tasman in 1643, is also called Leuenewa or Lord Howe, and is densely inhabited by natives said to be of Polynesian origin.

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  • with John Adams and Benjamin Franklin to confer on terms of peace with Lord Howe on Staten Island in September 1776.

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  • Under Howe and Rodney he distinguished himself in the West Indies, and at the victory of April 12th, 1782, he was in command of one of Rodney's frigates.

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  • Howe (1816-1883) as postmaster-general in President Arthur's cabinet, taking an active part in the suppression of the Louisiana Lottery, and in September 1884 succeeded Charles J.

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  • de Wolfe Howe, The Life and Letters of George Bancroft (New York, 1908).

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  • Hubert Howe Bancroft >>

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  • SAMUEL GRIDLEY HOWE (1801-1876), American philanthropist, was born at Boston, Massachusetts, on the 10th of November 1801.

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  • Howe, was a ship-owner and cordage manufacturer; and his mother, Patty Gridley, was one of the most beautiful women of her day.

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  • Young Howe was educated at Boston and at Brown University, Providence, and in 1821 began to study medicine in Boston.

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  • 1850), a Boston physician who had started a movement there as early as 1826 for establishing a school for the blind, he had learnt of the similar school founded in Paris by Valentin Haiiy, and it was proposed to Howe by a committee organized by Fisher that he should direct the establishment of a "New England Asylum for the Blind" at Boston.

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  • Howe was director, and the life and soul of the school; he opened a printing-office and organized a fund for printing for the blind - the first done in America; and he was unwearied in calling public attention to the work.

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  • It must suffice here to chronicle the remaining more important facts in Dr Howe's life, outside his regular work.

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  • In Rome, in 1844, his eldest da q ghter, Julia Romana (afterwards the wife of Michael Anagnos, Dr Howe's assistant and successor), was born, and in September the travellers returned to America, and Dr Howe resumed his activities.

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  • An appropriation of $2500 per annum was made for training ten idiot children under Dr Howe's supervision, and by degrees the value of his School for Idiotic and Feeble-minded Youths, which, starting in South Boston, was in 1890 removed to Waltham, was generally appreciated.

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  • Whittier had in his lifetime commemorated him in his poem "The Hero," in which he called him "the Cadmus of the blind"; and in 1901 a centennial celebration of his birth was held at Boston, at which, among other notable tributes, Senator Hoar spoke of Howe as "one of the great figures of American history."

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  • A Memoir of Dr Howe by his wife appeared in 1876.

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  • Howe, edited by Laura E.

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  • William Howe, 5th viscount Howe >>

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  • Lord Howe, commander-in-chief of the British in America, who had received no instructions binding him in detail to co-operate with Burgoyne, moved southward and captured Philadelphia.

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  • De Wolfe Howe, George von Lengerke Meyer: His Life and Services (1920).

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  • Elsewhere in central Scotland such a wide depression is known as a howe, as in the Howe of Fife between the Ochil and Lomond Hills.

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  • JOSEPH HOWE (1804-1873), Canadian statesman, was born at Halifax, Nova Scotia, on the 13th of December 1804, the son of John Howe (1752-1835), a United Empire Loyalist who was for many years king's printer and postmaster-general for the Maritime Provinces and the Bermudas.

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  • Largely owing to Howe's statesmanship responsible government was finally conceded in 1848 by the imperial authorities, and was thus gained without the bloodshed and confusion which marked its acquisition in Ontario and Quebec. In 1850 he was appointed a delegate to England on behalf of the Intercolonial railway, for which he obtained a large imperial guarantee.

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  • Howe's eloquence, and still more his unfailing wit and high spirits, made him for many years the idol of his province.

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  • See also Public Letters and Speeches of Joseph Howe (Halifax, 1909).

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  • Joseph Howe, by George Monro Grant (reprinted Halifax, 1904), is a brilliant sketch.

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  • Julia Ward Howe >>

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  • Howe (Ast.

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  • At the peace of 1783 he was placed on half-pay; but, on the outbreak of the war of the French Revolution, he was appointed to the command of the 74-gun ship "Defence," under Lord Howe; and in her he had an honourable share in the battle on the 1st of June 1794.

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  • Morse, Elias Howe, De Witt Clinton (colossal bronze statue by Henry Kirke Brown), Henry Ward Beecher, Peter Cooper, Horace Greeley, Henry Bergh, Henry George and James Gordon Bennett.

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  • JULIA WARD HOWE (1819-1910), American author and reformer, was born in New York City on the 27th of May 1819.

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  • In 1843 she married Dr Samuel Gridley Howe, with whom she spent the next year in England, France, Germany and Italy.

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  • She assisted Dr Howe in editing the Commonwealth in 1851-1853.

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  • Her lyric poetry, thanks to her temperament, and possibly to her musical training, was her highest literary form: she published Passion Flowers (anonymously, 1854), Words for the Hour (1856), Later Lyrics (1866), and From Sunset Ridge: Poems Old and New (1898); her most popular poem is The Battle Hymn of the Republic, written to the old folk-tune associated with the song of "John Brown's Body," when Mrs Howe was at the front in 1861, and published (Feb.

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  • Howe (1876), Life of Margaret Fuller (1883), in the "Famous Women" series, Sketches of Representative Women of New England (1905) and her own Reminiscences (Boston, 1899).

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  • Mrs Howe died on the 17th of October 1910.

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  • Richard Howe, Earl Howe >>

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  • He sailed on the 13th of April, and between the 11th and the 22nd of July, blockaded Howe at Sandy Hook, but did not venture to attack him, though greatly superior in force.

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  • In concert with the American generals, he planned an attack on Newport, preparatory to which he compelled the British to destroy some war vessels that were in the harbour; but before the concerted attack could take place, he put to sea against the English fleet, under Lord Howe, when owing to a violent storm, which arose suddenly and compelled the two fleets to separate before engaging in battle, many of his vessels were so shattered that he found it necessary to put into Boston for repairs.

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  • Appointed first to the "Orion" and then to the "Queen" in the Channel Fleet, under the command of Lord Howe, he took part in the three days' naval engagement with the Brest fleet, which terminated in a glorious victory on the 1st of June 1794.

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  • Howe, T.

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  • In Worcester, or within a radius of a dozen miles of it, were the homes of Elias Howe, inventor of the sewing machine; Eli Whitney, inventor of the cotton gin; Erastus Bigelow (1814-1879), inventor of the carpet weaving machine; Dr Russell L.

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  • in length, extends from Cape Howe (37° 30') at the south-eastern corner of Australia to Point Danger in 28° 7' S.

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  • de Wolfe Howe, Memoirs of the Life and Services of the Right Reverend Alonzo Potter, D.D.

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  • Baxter was in prison: Howe was driven into exile: Henry was arrested.

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  • During the War of Independence, General Washington and his army entered New Brunswick on the 28th of November 1776, but on the approach of the enemy evacuated it, and from the 3rd of December 1776 to the 13th of April 1777 it was occupied by the British under Lord Howe.

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  • English Puritanism lives in the affections of modern readers more than the Protestant schoolmen of the Continent do - Richard Baxter, John Owen, John Howe, Thos.

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  • At sea the French had sustained a severe defeat from Lord Howe, and several of their colonies had been taken by the British.

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  • It is situated on the left bank of the Eden, in the middle of the Howe (Hollow) of Fife, and is sometimes written Cupar-Fife to distinguish it from Coupar-Angus in Perthshire.

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  • de Wolfe Howe, American Bookmen (New York, 1898); and the introduction by Mowbray Morris to Macmillan's uniform edition of Cooper's novels (London, 1900).

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  • John Cleveland, the Royalist poet, was born at Loughborough in 1613, John Howe the painter in 1630 and Richard Pulteney the botanist in 1730.

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  • Howe in command, determined to abandon Philadelphia, captured in the previous year, and move his troops direct to New York through New Jersey.

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  • It was in Connecticut that Elias Howe and Allen B.

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  • From the opening notes of Howe's acoustic guitar and Squire's growling bass, this is Yes back in top form.

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  • Swansea ' keeper Roger Freestone was caught out by an awkward bounce but managed to claim the loose ball before Howe could take advantage.

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  • Mark Howe Services of lighting cameraman working in TV for 20 years - Digibeta with or without crew.

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  • A proposed Lord Howe Island Marine Reserve: protecting the southernmost coral reef in the World.

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  • One notable was George Howe, a former felon, who became the continent's first printer.

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  • Kevin Howe (MG Rover chief executive, pictured right) certainly hoped so, but in the end, the deal floundered.

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  • gamekeeper employed by the tenants of Earl Howe's Acton estate, resides in the old house in a portion of Acton Place.

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  • middle-of-the-road politicians like Geoffrey Howe and Francis Pym.

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  • midshipman on board the Queen Charlotte with Lord Howe, by whom he was made lieutenant 3 Nov. 1790.

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  • In 1790 he was signal midshipman on board the Queen Charlotte with Lord Howe, by whom he was made lieutenant 3 Nov. 1790.

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  • miller aged 42 lodging at the Lord Howe's Public House, St. Gregory's.

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  • Geoffrey Howe, Britain's foreign minister, was explicit.

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  • runner-upme Howe Bess was in the runners-up slot and Melody was back in fifth.

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  • seaside for the day, to Hove, to accompany Mark Howe to the 30th anniversary celebrations for OAC GB.

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  • of Cape Howe.

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  • From Cape Howe to Melbourne the fall may be taken at from 30 in.

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  • To the west lie the small groups of coral islets - Mopiha (Lord Howe), Ura (Scilly) and Bellingshausen (discovered by Otto von Kotzebue, 1824).

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  • Besides the three larger islands numerous satellites belong to the subregion, as Lord Howe, Norfolk and Kermadec islands, with the Chatham, Auckland and Macquarie groups.

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  • RICHARD HOWE HOWE, Earl (1726-1799), British admiral, was born in London on the 8th of March 1726.

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  • He was the second son of Emmanuel Scrope Howe, 2nd Viscount Howe, who died governor of Barbadoes in March 1735, and of Mary Sophia Charlotte, a daughter of the baroness Kilmansegge, afterwards countess of Darlington, the mistress of George I.

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  • Richard Howe entered the navy in the "Severn," one of the squadron sent into the south seas with Anson in 1740.

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  • Howe next served in the West Indies in the "Burford," and was present in her when she was very severely damaged in the unsuccessful attack on La Guayra on the 18th of February 1742.

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  • While the peace between the War of the Austrian Succession and the Seven Years' War lasted, Howe held commands at home and on the west coast of Africa.

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  • By the death of his elder brother, killed near Ticonderoga on the 6th of July 1758, he became Viscount Howe - an Irish peerage.

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  • The rebellion of the colonies was making rapid progress, and Howe was known to be in sympathy with the colonists.

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  • He had sought the acquaintance of Benjamin Franklin, who was a friend of his sister Miss Howe, a clever eccentric woman well known in London society, and had already tried to act as a peacemaker.

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  • It was doubtless because of his known sentiments that he was selected to command in America, and was joined in commission with his brother Sir William Howe, the general at the head of the land forces, to make a conciliatory arrangement.

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  • Being greatly outnumbered, Howe had to stand on the defensive, but he baffled the French admiral at Sandy Hook, and defeated his attempt to take Newport in Rhode Island by a fine combination of caution and calculated daring.

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  • On the arrival of Admiral John Byron from England with reinforcements, Howe left the station in September.

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  • But Howe was eminent in the handling of a great multitude of ships, the enemy was awkward and unenterprising, and the operation was brilliantly carried out.

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  • Though Howe was now nearly seventy, and had been trained in the old school, he displayed an originality not usual with veterans, and not excelled by any of his successors in the war, not even by Nelson, since they had his example to follow and were served by more highly trained squadrons than his.

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  • In 1782 he was created Viscount Howe of Langar, and in 1788 Baron and Earl Howe.

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  • Lord Howe married, on the 10th of March 1758, Mary Hartop, the daughter of Colonel Chiverton Hartop of Welby in Leicestershire, and had issue two daughters.

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  • Their son, Richard William Curzon (1796-1870), who succeeded his paternal grandfather as Viscount Curzon in 1820, was created Earl Howe in 1821; he was succeeded by his son, George Augustus (1821-1876), and then by another son, Richard William (1822-1900), whose son Richard George Penn Curzon-Howe (b.

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  • 1861) became 4th Earl Howe in 1900.

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  • Samuel Gridley Howe >>

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  • There is considerable material of value, especially for local history, in the Ohio Archaeological and Historical Society Publications (Columbus, 1887), and in Henry Howe, Historical Collections of Ohio (1st ed., Cincinnati, 1847; Centennial edition [enlarged], 2 vols., Columbus, 1889-1891).

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  • Howe, and for association with Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller; the Massachusetts school for idiotic and feebleminded children (1839); and the Massachusetts charitable eye and ear infirmary (1824), all receive financial aid from the commonwealth, which has representation in their management.

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  • The Pentland range contains many points of interest and beauty, but these are mostly accessible only to the pedestrian, although the hills are crossed by roads, of which the chief are those by Glencorse burn and the Cauld Stane Slap. Habbie's Howe, the scene of Allan Ramsay's pastoral The Gentle Shepherd, is some 2 m.

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  • Howe (q.v.), was sent to instruct her at home.

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  • In the year 1776, General Howe sent a detachment of his army under General Henry Clinton to seize Newport as a base of operations for reducing New England, and the city was occupied by the British on the 8th of December 1776.

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  • On the 9th of August Sullivan crossed to the north end of the island of Rhode Island, but as the Frenchmen were disembarking on Conanicut Island, Lord Howe arrived with the British fleet.

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  • Count D'Estaing hastily re-embarked his troops and sailed out to meet Howe.

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  • On the 30th the Americans, learning of the approach of Lord Howe's fleet with 5000 troops under Clinton, decided to abandon the island.

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  • At the same time he was occupied in a controversy on the conformity question with John How (or Howe) on the practice of "occasional conformity."

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  • De Wolfe Howe; S.

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  • On the one hand are Andrewes, Hall, Chillingworth, Jeremy Taylor, Barrow and South; on the other Baxter, Calamy, the Goodwins, Howe, Owen, Bunyan, in each case but a few names out of many.

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  • ii., Howe's Annals of Iowa (Iowa City, 1882-1884); Series 3, The Annals of Iowa, published by the Historical Department of Iowa (Des Moines, 1893-); Iowa Historical Record (Iowa City, 1885-1902); Iowa Journal of History and Politics (Iowa City, 1903 seq.); and G.

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  • With John Adams and Edward Rutledge he was selected by Congress to discuss with Admiral Howe (September 1776, at Staten Island) the terms of peace proposed by Howe, who had arrived in New York harbour in July 1776, and who had been an intimate friend of Franklin; but the discussion was fruitless, as the American commissioners refused to treat " back of this step of independency."

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  • Howe (q.v.), whose reforms in charity methods were felt through all the charitable interests of the state.

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  • After the battle of Bunker Hill, Gage was superseded by General (Sir William) Howe, and returned to England.

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  • In the following year (1776) the British began their offensive operations for the control of the Hudson; an army under Sir William Howe was to capture New York City and get control of the lower Hudson, while another army under Sir Guy Carleton was to retake Crown Point and Ticonderoga and get control of the upper Hudson.

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  • Howe, with a force of British and Loyalists vastly superior in equipment and numbers to Washington's untrained militia, landed in July on Staten Island and late in August defeated Washington at the battle of Long Island within the present limits of Brooklyn borough.

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  • Washington prepared to withstand the British behind fortifications on Harlem Heights, but discovering that Howe was attempting to outflank him by landing troops in the rear he retreated to the mainland, leaving only a garrison at Fort Washington, and established a line of fortified camps on the hills overlooking the Bronx river as far as White Plains.

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  • This brought on the battle of White Plains late in October, in which Howe gained no advantage; and from here both armies withdrew into New Jersey, the British capturing Fort Washington on the way, the Americans leaving behind garrisons to guard the Highlands of the Hudson.

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  • The British government intended that Howe should co-operate with Burgoyne by fighting his way up the Hudson, but as the secretary of state for the colonies neglected to send him such instructions this was not undertaken until early in October, and then an expedition for the purpose was placed under the command of Sir Henry Clinton.

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  • The immediate proposal is said to have come from George Brown; the large political idea had long been advocated by Macdonald and Alexander Galt in Upper Canada - by Joseph Howe and others in the maritime provinces.

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  • The people of Nova Scotia in particular, dissatisfied with the way in which their province had been drawn into the Union, maintained a fierce opposition to the Ottawa government, until their leader, Joseph Howe, fearing an armed rising, came to an agreement with Macdonald and accepted a seat in his cabinet.

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  • Treaties and military operations were at first of no avail, but in 1876 the United States government took steps to reduce them to submission, and Generals George Crook (1828-1890), Alfred Howe Terry (1827-1890) and John Gibbon (1827-1896), with 2700 troops (besides the Crow scouts) were sent against the Sioux under Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and others.

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  • The Howe truss of 1830 and the Pratt truss of 1844 are examples.

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  • The Howe truss had timber chords and a lattice of timber struts, with vertical iron ties.

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  • As railway loads increased and greater spans were demanded, the Howe truss was stiffened by timber arches on each side of each girder.

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  • Released on parole, he bore a verbal message from Lord Howe to the Continental Congress, which led to the fruitless conference on Staten Island.

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  • HUBERT HOWE BANCROFT (1832-), American historical writer, was born at Granville, Ohio, on the 5th of May 1832.

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  • It was in this house that Lord Howe on the nth of September 1776 held a peace conference with Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Edward Rutledge representing the Continental Congress.

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  • The British army under Sir William Howe landed at the Narrows on the 3rd of July 1777 and until the close of the war Staten Island was held by the British and Loyalists.

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  • The following islands may be classified as oceanic, but not with any of the three main divisions: the Bonin Islands, north of the Marianas, belonging to Japan; Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands (to New South Wales); Easter Island (to Chile); the Galapagos Islands (to Ecuador).

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  • General (Sir) William Howe, who succeeded Gage in the chief command in October, and Generals (Sir) Henry Clinton and John Burgoyne were sent out at once with reinforcements.

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  • In moral effect the battle proved anything but a defeat to the Americans, who now drew a cordon of works around Boston, hemming Howe's army in a contracted, and, as it proved, untenable, position.

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  • On the 3rd of July Washington took command of the American army at Cambridge and proceeded with what is known as the "siege of Boston," which was marked by no special incident, and closed with the evacuation of the town by the British on the 17th of March 1776, Howe sailing away to Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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  • Largely upon the representations of Howe, Burgoyne and others, it was determined to shift the field from Boston to New York city, from there to hold the line of the Hudson river in co-operation with a force to move down from Canada under Carleton and Burgoyne, and thus effectually to isolate New England.

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  • Howe, heavily reinforced from home, sailed on the 10th from Halifax to New York and on the 5th of July encamped on Staten Island.

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  • Howe drove Washington out of it, and forced the abandonment of the whole of Manhattan Island by three welldirected movements upon the American left.

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  • (See Long Island.) Howe has been criticized, rightly or wrongly, for failing to make full use of his victory.

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  • On the 15th of September Howe crossed the East river above the city, captured 300 of the militia defending the lines and occupied the city.

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  • Delaying until the 12th of October, Howe again moved forward by water into Westchester county, and marching toward White Plains forced another retreat on Washington.

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  • Instead of pressing Washington further, Howe then returned to Manhattan Fort Island, and on the 16th of November captured Fort Washing- ton.

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  • Following up the occupation of New York, Howe proceeded in 1 777 to capture Philadelphia.

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  • (See Germantown.) Howe's victorious progress in Pennsylvania was neutralized by disasters farther north.

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  • Burgoyne marched from Canada in June 1 777, with a strong expeditionary force, to occupy Albany and put himself in touch with Howe at the other end of the Hudson.

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  • In 1778 Sir Henry Clinton succeeded Howe in the chief command in America.

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  • On the 29th of December of this year Colonel Archibald Campbell (1739-1791) with an expeditionary corps of 35 00 men from Clinton's army in New York, captured Savannah, Georgia, defeating the American force under General Robert Howe.

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  • General Benjamin Lincoln, succeeding Howe, undertook to drive the British out of Georgia, but General Augustine Prevost, who had commanded in Florida, moved up and compelled Lincoln to retire to Charleston.

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  • The naval force at the disposal of the admirals commanding on the station, who until Lord Howe took up the command on the 12th of July 1776 were Samuel Graves and Molyneux Shuldham, was insufficient to patrol the long line of coast.

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  • Howe at Boston, in seeking stores for the army and in supplying naval brigades.

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  • The British government, having neglected to occupy the Straits of Gibraltar in time, despatched Admiral Byron from Plymouth on the 9th of June with thirteen sail of the line to join Admiral (Lord) Howe, Sir William's brother, in America, and collected a strong force at home, called the Western Squadron, under Viscount Keppel.

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  • Howe then concentrated his force of nine small line-of-battle ships at Sandy Hook on the 29th of June, and on the 11 th of July he learnt that d'Estaing was approaching.

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  • Howe, who had received a small reinforcement, followed.

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  • Howe received no help from Byron, whose badly appointed fleet was damaged and scattered by a gale on the 3rd of July in midAtlantic. His ships dropped in by degrees during September.

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  • Howe resigned on the 2 5th of that month, and was succeeded by Byron.

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  • At home Howe relieved Gibraltar for the last time in September and October 1782.

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  • C. Howe, The City, the Hope of Democracy (ibid., 1905); and Charles Zueblin, American Municipal Progress (ibid., 1902).

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  • See Henry Howe, Historical Collections of Ohio (Columbus, 1891).

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  • Headed by Joseph Howe, the advocates of repeal swept the province at the Dominion election.

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  • The local assembly, in which 36 out of 38 members were committed to repeal, passed an address to Her Majesty praying her not to " reduce this free, happy and hitherto self-governed province to the degraded condition of a servile dependency of Canada," and sent Howe with a delegation to London to lay the petition at the foot of the throne.

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  • Howe enlisted the support of John Bright and other members of parliament, but the imperial government was firm, and the duke of Buckingham, as colonial secretary, soon informed the governor-general in a despatch that consent could not be given for the withdrawal of Nova Scotia from the Dominion.

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  • Meanwhile Howe, convinced of the impossibility of effecting separation, and fearing disloyal tendencies which had manifested themselves in some of its advocates, entered into negotiations with Dr Tupper in London, and later with the Dominion government, for better financial terms than those originally arranged for Nova Scotia in the federal system.

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  • These terms having been agreed to, Howe, as a pledge of his approval and support, accepted a seat as secretary of state in the Dominion cabinet.

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  • Longley'S Joseph Howe (1905) And J.

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  • - Under the name of Aristotle, three treatises on the good of man have come down to us, Mica Nuco i tkaa (irpos NLKOµaXov, Porphyry), Howe, Eub ipta (7r Os Eiibjµov, Porphyry), and 'HBLKa µeyaXa; so like one another that there seems no tenable hypothesis except that they are the manuscript writings of one man.

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  • This group, so named by Abel Tasman in 1643, is also called Leuenewa or Lord Howe, and is densely inhabited by natives said to be of Polynesian origin.

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  • with John Adams and Benjamin Franklin to confer on terms of peace with Lord Howe on Staten Island in September 1776.

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  • Under Howe and Rodney he distinguished himself in the West Indies, and at the victory of April 12th, 1782, he was in command of one of Rodney's frigates.

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  • Howe (1816-1883) as postmaster-general in President Arthur's cabinet, taking an active part in the suppression of the Louisiana Lottery, and in September 1884 succeeded Charles J.

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  • de Wolfe Howe, The Life and Letters of George Bancroft (New York, 1908).

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  • Hubert Howe Bancroft >>

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  • SAMUEL GRIDLEY HOWE (1801-1876), American philanthropist, was born at Boston, Massachusetts, on the 10th of November 1801.

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  • Howe, was a ship-owner and cordage manufacturer; and his mother, Patty Gridley, was one of the most beautiful women of her day.

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  • Young Howe was educated at Boston and at Brown University, Providence, and in 1821 began to study medicine in Boston.

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  • 1850), a Boston physician who had started a movement there as early as 1826 for establishing a school for the blind, he had learnt of the similar school founded in Paris by Valentin Haiiy, and it was proposed to Howe by a committee organized by Fisher that he should direct the establishment of a "New England Asylum for the Blind" at Boston.

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  • Howe was director, and the life and soul of the school; he opened a printing-office and organized a fund for printing for the blind - the first done in America; and he was unwearied in calling public attention to the work.

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  • In 1837 Dr Howe went still further and brought the famous blind deaf-mute, Laura Bridgman (a.v.) to the school.

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  • It must suffice here to chronicle the remaining more important facts in Dr Howe's life, outside his regular work.

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  • In 1843 he married Julia Ward (see above), daughter of a New York banker, and they made a prolonged European trip, on which Dr Howe spent much time in visiting those public institutions which carried out the objects specially interesting to him.

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  • In Rome, in 1844, his eldest da q ghter, Julia Romana (afterwards the wife of Michael Anagnos, Dr Howe's assistant and successor), was born, and in September the travellers returned to America, and Dr Howe resumed his activities.

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  • An appropriation of $2500 per annum was made for training ten idiot children under Dr Howe's supervision, and by degrees the value of his School for Idiotic and Feeble-minded Youths, which, starting in South Boston, was in 1890 removed to Waltham, was generally appreciated.

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  • An enthusiastic humanitarian on all subjects, Dr Howe was an ardent abolitionist and a member of the Free Soil party, and had played a leading part at Boston in the movements which culminated in the Civil War.

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  • Whittier had in his lifetime commemorated him in his poem "The Hero," in which he called him "the Cadmus of the blind"; and in 1901 a centennial celebration of his birth was held at Boston, at which, among other notable tributes, Senator Hoar spoke of Howe as "one of the great figures of American history."

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  • A Memoir of Dr Howe by his wife appeared in 1876.

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  • Howe, edited by Laura E.

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  • William Howe, 5th viscount Howe >>

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  • Lord Howe, commander-in-chief of the British in America, who had received no instructions binding him in detail to co-operate with Burgoyne, moved southward and captured Philadelphia.

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  • De Wolfe Howe, George von Lengerke Meyer: His Life and Services (1920).

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  • Elsewhere in central Scotland such a wide depression is known as a howe, as in the Howe of Fife between the Ochil and Lomond Hills.

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  • JOSEPH HOWE (1804-1873), Canadian statesman, was born at Halifax, Nova Scotia, on the 13th of December 1804, the son of John Howe (1752-1835), a United Empire Loyalist who was for many years king's printer and postmaster-general for the Maritime Provinces and the Bermudas.

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  • Largely owing to Howe's statesmanship responsible government was finally conceded in 1848 by the imperial authorities, and was thus gained without the bloodshed and confusion which marked its acquisition in Ontario and Quebec. In 1850 he was appointed a delegate to England on behalf of the Intercolonial railway, for which he obtained a large imperial guarantee.

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  • Howe's eloquence, and still more his unfailing wit and high spirits, made him for many years the idol of his province.

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  • See also Public Letters and Speeches of Joseph Howe (Halifax, 1909).

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  • Joseph Howe, by George Monro Grant (reprinted Halifax, 1904), is a brilliant sketch.

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  • Julia Ward Howe >>

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  • Howe (Ast.

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  • At the peace of 1783 he was placed on half-pay; but, on the outbreak of the war of the French Revolution, he was appointed to the command of the 74-gun ship "Defence," under Lord Howe; and in her he had an honourable share in the battle on the 1st of June 1794.

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  • Morse, Elias Howe, De Witt Clinton (colossal bronze statue by Henry Kirke Brown), Henry Ward Beecher, Peter Cooper, Horace Greeley, Henry Bergh, Henry George and James Gordon Bennett.

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  • JULIA WARD HOWE (1819-1910), American author and reformer, was born in New York City on the 27th of May 1819.

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  • In 1843 she married Dr Samuel Gridley Howe, with whom she spent the next year in England, France, Germany and Italy.

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  • She assisted Dr Howe in editing the Commonwealth in 1851-1853.

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  • Her lyric poetry, thanks to her temperament, and possibly to her musical training, was her highest literary form: she published Passion Flowers (anonymously, 1854), Words for the Hour (1856), Later Lyrics (1866), and From Sunset Ridge: Poems Old and New (1898); her most popular poem is The Battle Hymn of the Republic, written to the old folk-tune associated with the song of "John Brown's Body," when Mrs Howe was at the front in 1861, and published (Feb.

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  • Howe (1876), Life of Margaret Fuller (1883), in the "Famous Women" series, Sketches of Representative Women of New England (1905) and her own Reminiscences (Boston, 1899).

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  • Her children were: Julia Romana Anagnos (1844-1886), who, like her mother, wrote verse and studied philosophy, and who taught in the Perkins Institution, in the charge of which her husband, Michael Anagnos (1837-1906), whose family name had been Anagnostopoulos, succeeded her father; Henry Marion Howe (b.

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  • 1850), and Maud Howe Elliott (b.

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  • Mrs Howe died on the 17th of October 1910.

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  • Richard Howe, Earl Howe >>

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  • He sailed on the 13th of April, and between the 11th and the 22nd of July, blockaded Howe at Sandy Hook, but did not venture to attack him, though greatly superior in force.

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  • In concert with the American generals, he planned an attack on Newport, preparatory to which he compelled the British to destroy some war vessels that were in the harbour; but before the concerted attack could take place, he put to sea against the English fleet, under Lord Howe, when owing to a violent storm, which arose suddenly and compelled the two fleets to separate before engaging in battle, many of his vessels were so shattered that he found it necessary to put into Boston for repairs.

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  • Appointed first to the "Orion" and then to the "Queen" in the Channel Fleet, under the command of Lord Howe, he took part in the three days' naval engagement with the Brest fleet, which terminated in a glorious victory on the 1st of June 1794.

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  • Howe, T.

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  • In Worcester, or within a radius of a dozen miles of it, were the homes of Elias Howe, inventor of the sewing machine; Eli Whitney, inventor of the cotton gin; Erastus Bigelow (1814-1879), inventor of the carpet weaving machine; Dr Russell L.

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  • in length, extends from Cape Howe (37° 30') at the south-eastern corner of Australia to Point Danger in 28° 7' S.

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  • de Wolfe Howe, Memoirs of the Life and Services of the Right Reverend Alonzo Potter, D.D.

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  • Baxter was in prison: Howe was driven into exile: Henry was arrested.

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  • During the War of Independence, General Washington and his army entered New Brunswick on the 28th of November 1776, but on the approach of the enemy evacuated it, and from the 3rd of December 1776 to the 13th of April 1777 it was occupied by the British under Lord Howe.

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  • English Puritanism lives in the affections of modern readers more than the Protestant schoolmen of the Continent do - Richard Baxter, John Owen, John Howe, Thos.

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  • At sea the French had sustained a severe defeat from Lord Howe, and several of their colonies had been taken by the British.

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  • It is situated on the left bank of the Eden, in the middle of the Howe (Hollow) of Fife, and is sometimes written Cupar-Fife to distinguish it from Coupar-Angus in Perthshire.

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  • de Wolfe Howe, American Bookmen (New York, 1898); and the introduction by Mowbray Morris to Macmillan's uniform edition of Cooper's novels (London, 1900).

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  • John Cleveland, the Royalist poet, was born at Loughborough in 1613, John Howe the painter in 1630 and Richard Pulteney the botanist in 1730.

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  • Howe in command, determined to abandon Philadelphia, captured in the previous year, and move his troops direct to New York through New Jersey.

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  • It was in Connecticut that Elias Howe and Allen B.

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  • We thought everything was arranged: but we found Monday that Mrs. Elliott would not be willing to let us invite more than fifty people, because Mrs. Howe's house is quite small.

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  • TO DR. EDWARD EVERETT HALE [Read by Dr. Hale at the celebration of the centenary of Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe, at Tremont Temple, Boston, Nov. 11, 1901.] Cambridge, Nov. 10, 1901.

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  • It is now sixty-five years since Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe knew that he had made his way through Laura Bridgman's fingers to her intelligence.

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  • The names of Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller will always be linked together, and it is necessary to understand what Dr. Howe did for his pupil before one comes to an account of Miss Sullivan's work.

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  • For Dr. Howe is the great pioneer on whose work that of Miss Sullivan and other teachers of the deaf-blind immediately depends.

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  • Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe was born in Boston, November 10, 1801, and died in Boston, January 9, 1876.

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  • Laura Bridgman was born at Hanover, New Hampshire, December 21, 1829; so she was almost eight years old when Dr. Howe began his experiments with her.

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  • Dr. Howe was an experimental scientist and had in him the spirit of New England transcendentalism with its large faith and large charities.

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  • After Laura's education had progressed for two months with the use only of raised letters, Dr. Howe sent one of his teachers to learn the manual alphabet from a deaf-mute.

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  • After the first year or two Dr. Howe did not teach Laura Bridgman himself, but gave her over to other teachers, who under his direction carried on the work of teaching her language.

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  • Too much cannot be said in praise of Dr. Howe's work.

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  • During this time she read Dr. Howe's reports.

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  • It was Dr. Howe who, by his work with Laura Bridgman, made Miss Sullivan's work possible: but it was Miss Sullivan who discovered the way to teach language to the deaf-blind.

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  • Somehow I had expected to see a pale, delicate child--I suppose I got the idea from Dr. Howe's description of Laura Bridgman when she came to the Institution.

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  • How ridiculous it is to say I had drunk so copiously of the noble spirit of Dr. Howe that I was fired with the desire to rescue from darkness and obscurity the little Alabamian!

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  • It was hoped that one so peculiarly endowed by nature as Helen, would, if left entirely to her own resources, throw some light upon such psychological questions as were not exhaustively investigated by Dr. Howe; but their hopes were not to be realized.

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  • Miss Sullivan has begun where Dr. Howe left off.

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  • Surely Dr. Howe is wrong when he says, "A teacher cannot be a child."

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  • This time Howe Bess was in the runners-up slot and Melody was back in fifth.

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  • Sue went to the seaside for the day, to Hove, to accompany Mark Howe to the 30th anniversary celebrations for OAC GB.

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  • Drum and triangle gently beat out a tattoo while Howe strums out the main melody.

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  • Although she rose to fame playing Rebecca Howe in Cheers, Alley is now best known for her constant struggles with her weight.

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  • Find great loose-fit stretch jeans at Revolve, which carries labels like Cheap Monday, 7 for All Mankind, Howe, Joe's Jeans, G-Star, Diesel, and Denim and Thread.

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  • Singer machine used the same stitch that Elias Howe had patented in 1846.

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  • Howe sued Singer for patent infringement and won the case in 1854.

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  • Singer had to pay Howe patent royalties from each machine sold.

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  • Not only did Singer have to pay retroactively, but he had to pay Howe $1.15 per machine sold from that point on.

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  • Thank you for letting me interview for the copywriter position at Sell 'em and Howe.

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  • When we both laughed as we discovered that our children attend the same school, it further confirmed to me why I would like to work for Sell 'em and Howe - because we share the same values.

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  • I'm looking forward to hearing from you soon as I am excited about my future with Sell 'em and Howe.

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  • Car Talk is recorded at the "Dewey, Cheetham, and Howe" office building in Harvard Square.

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  • Alley played Rebecca Howe on Cheers for six years, and gained popularity with each passing episode.

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  • Shay Howe provides visitors with a comprehensive free CSS tutorial.

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