House-of-commons sentence example

house-of-commons
  • The duke of Dorset's reappointment to the lord-lieutenancy in 1751, with his son Lord George Sackville as secretary of state for Ireland, strengthened the primate's position and enabled him to triumph over the popular party on the constitutional question as to the right of the Irish House of Commons to dispose of surplus Irish revenue, which the government maintained was the property of the Crown.

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  • In 1892 he became a member of the British House of Commons as an Irish Nationalist, being elected for South Longford.

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  • In 1766 he was called upon to give evidence before a committee of the House of Commons upon the affairs of Bengal.

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  • An ardent opponent of Catholic Emancipation, he delivered in 1807 a speech on the subject which helped to give the deathblow to the Grenville administration, upon which he became chancellor of the exchequer under the duke of Portland, whom in 1809 he succeeded in the premiership. Notwithstanding that he had the assistance in the cabinet of no statesman of the first rank, he succeeded in retaining office till he was shot by a man named Bellingham, a bankrupt with a grievance, who had vainly applied to him for redress, in the lobby of the House of Commons on the 11th of May 1812.

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  • It has four members in the Canadian Senate and ten in the House of Commons.

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  • As an orator Charles Lucas appears to have had little power, and he made no mark in the House of Commons.

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  • In 1754 he became attorney-general, and for the next two years acted as leader of the House of Commons under the administration of the duke of Newcastle.

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  • Macaulay terms, him, justly enough, "the father of modern Toryism, of Toryism modified to suit an order of things in which the House of Commons is the most powerful body in the state."

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  • In 1863 he moved in the House of Commons a resolution of sympathy with the Poles, and two months later was made a junior lord of the admiralty.

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  • The ordinance establishing the special tribunal for the trial was passed by a remnant of the House of Commons alone, from which all dissentients were excluded by the army.

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  • By 1868 both political parties in the House of Commons had committed themselves to the policy of state purchase of the telegraphs.

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  • The excess expenditure caused the Post Office during two or three years to make temporary application of Savings Banks' balances to telegraph expenditure, an expedient which was disapproved of by both the Treasury and the House of Commons.

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  • Hanbury, Financial Secretary to the Treasury and representative in the House of Commons of the PostmasterGeneral, advocated the granting of licences to local authorities.

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  • He obtained a seat in parliament; and in spite of Danby's endeavour to seize his papers by an order in council, on the 10th of December 1678 caused two of the incriminating letters written by Danby to him to be read aloud to the House of Commons by the Speaker.

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  • Edmund Burke says "Magna Carta, if it did not give us originally the House of Commons, gave us at least a House of Commons of weight and consequence."

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  • In 1858 he resumed this office in Lord Derby's second administration, being returned to the House of Commons as member for Stamford.

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  • One of these provided that all matters relating to the government shall be transacted in the Privy Council, and that all resolutions "shall be signed by such of the Privy Council as shall advise and consent to the same"; and another declared that all office-holders and pensioners under the Crown shall be incapable of sitting in the House of Commons.

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  • He entered the House of Commons as Liberal member for Berwick-on-Tweed in 1885, but he was best known as a country gentleman with a taste for sport, and as amateur champion tennis-player.

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  • His repugnance to public life had been strongly expressed to his father in a letter of a very early date, in which he begged that the money which a seat in the House of Commons would cost might be expended in a mode more agreeable to him.

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  • In April 1647 he was returned for Radnorshire to the House of Commons.

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  • Finally the city of London - not only as the converted champion of religious liberty but as the convinced apologist of the Jews - sent Baron Lionel de Rothschild to knock at the door of the unconverted House of Commons as parliamentary representative of the first city in the world " (Wolf, loc. cit.).

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  • He himself returned to the House of Commons at a by-election for Widnes in Sept.

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  • In this ministry Conway took office as secretary of state, with the leadership of the House of Commons.

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  • Roebuck, for the appointment of a select committee to enquire into the conduct of the war, was carried in the House of Commons by a.

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  • He wished to establish a strong ministry,, which should be responsible like an English ministry, but to an assembly chosen to represent the people of France better than the English House of Commons at that time represented England.

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  • Long before his death, Bright's references in public speeches to the achievements of the Anti-Corn Law League were received with respectful impatience, and Peel's famous speech on the repeal of the corn laws would not convince the German Reichstag or a modern House of Commons.

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  • The 6th duke sat in the House of Commons as Conservative M.P. for Midlothian, 1853-1868 and 1874-1880; his wife, a daughter of the 1st duke of Abercorn, held the office of mistress of the robes.

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  • He was chaplain to Robert Rich, second earl of Warwick, and preached before the House of Commons in 1640.

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  • He was elected to the Canadian House of Commons in the general election of 1908, and was reelected in 1911 and 1917.

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  • He remained in office in 1761, when his brother Lord Temple and his brother-in-law Pitt resigned upon the question of the war with Spain, and in the administration of Lord Bute he was entrusted with the leadership of the House of Commons.

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  • In 1783 the first petition to the House of Commons for the abolition of the slave trade and slavery went up from the Quakers; and in the long agitation which ensued the Society took a prominent part.

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  • In 1776 it was moved in the House of Commons by David Hartley, son of the author of Observations on Man, that " the slave trade was contrary to the laws of God and the rights of men "; but this motion - the first which was made on the subject - failed.

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  • In consequence of the numerous petitions presented to parliament, a committee of privy council was appointed by the crown in 1788 to inquire concerning the slave trade; and Pitt moved that the House of Commons should early in the next session take the subject into consideration.

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  • At length in 1833 the ministry of Earl Grey took the question in hand and carried the abolition with little difficulty, the measure passing the House of Commons on the 7th of August, 1833 and receiving the Royal assent on the 28th.

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  • Notwithstanding protracted and strenuous opposition on the part of the government, the House of Commons passed a resolution against the continuance of the transitional system.

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  • But his most distinguished effort at the bar was undoubtedly the speech for the House of Commons in the famous case of Stockdale v.

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  • In 1859 he was made lord chancellor of Great Britain, probably on the understanding that Bethell should succeed as soon as he could be spared from the House of Commons.

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  • His opponents had confidently predicted that he would fail utterly in the House of Commons.

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  • On the 17th of February 1843 an extraordinary scene took place in the House of Commons.

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  • And when relations with America were becoming critical and menacing in consequence of the depredations committed on American commerce by vessels issuing from British ports, he brought the question before the House of Commons in a series of speeches of rare clearness and force.

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  • But in the month of March there were discussions in the House of Commons on the alleged necessity of constructing large defensive works in Canada.

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  • On the following day there was a remarkable scene in the House of Commons.

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  • In 1715 he entered the House of Commons as Lord Stanhope of Shelford and member for St Germans, and when the impeachment of James, duke of Ormonde, came before the House, he used the occasion (5th of August 1715) to put to proof his old rhetorical studies.

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  • From 1818 to 1820, and again in 1826-29, he sat in the House of Commons as member for Truro.

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  • Harcourt's formal resignation of the leadership of the Opposition, he was elected to fill the position in the House of Commons with the general assent of the party.

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  • Once prime minister, his personal popularity proved to be a powerful unifying influence in a somewhat heterogeneous party; and though the illness and death (August 30, 1906) of his wife (daughter of General Sir Charles Bruce), whom he had married in 1860, made his constant attendance in the House of Commons impossible, his domestic sorrow excited widespread sympathy and appealed afresh to the affection of his political followers.

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  • He had spoken in the House of Commons on the 13th of February, but since then had been prostrated and unable to transact business, his illness dating really from a serious heart attack in the night of the 13th of November at Bristol, after a speech at the Colston banquet.

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  • His own special "leads" were few, owing to the personal reasons given above; his declaration at the Queen's Hall, London, early in 1907, in favour of drastic land reform, served only to encourage a number of extremists; and the Liberal enthusiasm against the House of Lords, violently excited in 1 9 06 by the fate of the Education Bill and Plural Voting Bill, was rather damped than otherwise, when his method of procedure by resolution of the House of Commons was disclosed in 1907.

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  • In 1847 he entered the House of Commons as member for Whitby, retaining the seat till the end of his life.

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  • In 1855 he refused from Lord Palmerston an office not connected with foreign affairs, was elected lord rector of Aberdeen university, and on 15th June moved a resolution in the House of Commons (defeated by a large majority) declaring that in public appointments merit had been sacrificed to private influence and an adherence to routine.

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  • This principle, first asserted by a resolution of the House of Commons in the earl of Danby's case (May 5, 1679), forms one of the provisions of the Act of Settlement, 12 & 13 Will.

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  • On the 10th of November 1834 Lord Althorp succeeded to his father's peerage, and thereby vacated the leadership of the House of Commons.

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  • He did not offer himself for re-election at Newark, and remained outside the House of Commons during the great struggle of the coming year.

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  • The Corn Bill passed the House of Lords on the 28th of June 1846, and on the same day the government were beaten in the House of Commons on an Irish Coercion Bill.

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  • In February 1852 the Whig government was defeated on a Militia Bill, and Lord John Russell was succeeded by Lord Derby, formerly Lord Stanley, with Mr Disraeli, who now his constant companions were Homer and Dante, and entered office for the first time, as chancellor of the exchequer and leader of the House of Commons.

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  • As soon as the new parliament met a vote of want of confidence in the ministry was moved in the House of Commons.

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  • He was succeeded by Lord Russell, and Gladstone, retaining the chancellorship of the exchequer, became for the first time leader of the House of Commons.

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  • Lord Derby became prime minister, with Disraeli as chancellor of the exchequer and leader of the House of Commons.

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  • In the following session Religious Tests in the universities were abolished, and a bill to establish secret voting was carried through the House of Commons.

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  • On the 12th of March 1874 he informed Lord Granville that he could give only occasional attendance in the House of Commons during the current session, and that he must " reserve his entire freedom to divest himself of all the was carried, but the abolition of the paper-duty was defeated in the House of Lords.

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  • He made his last speech in the House of Commons on the 1st of March 1894, acquiescing in some amendments introduced by the Lords into the Parish Councils Bill; and on the 3rd of March he placed his resignation in the queen's hands.

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  • From the first his ability had won him admiration in the House of Commons.

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  • He declined to accept the revolution settlement as final, or to think with Burke that the constitution of the House of Commons could not be bettered.

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  • Plausible excuses were made for the alliance, but to the country at large this union, formed with a man whom he had denounced for years, had the appearance of an unscrupulous conspiracy to obtain office on any terms. In the House of Commons the coalition was strong enough to drive Shelburne from office on the 24th of February.

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  • During the first of these periods he deepened his unpopularity by assailing the undoubted prerogatives of the crown, by claiming for the House of Commons the right to override not only the king and the Lords but the opinion of the country, and by resisting a dissolution.

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  • On his return he resumed his regular attendance in the House of Commons.

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  • After the death of George Ponsonby in 1817 Tierney became the recognized leader of the opposition in the House of Commons.

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  • He declared himself a Tory, attached himself to Harley (afterwards Lord Oxford), then speaker, whom he now addressed as "dear master," and distinguished himself by his eloquence in debate, eclipsing his schoolfellow, Walpole, and gaining an extraordinary ascendancy over the House of Commons.

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  • He vigorously promoted the bill in the House of Commons and opposed granting supplies till it should pass.

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  • A celebrated debate on this question took place in the House of Commons in January 1690; but the evident intention of the Whigs to perpetuate their own ascendancy by tampering with the franchise contributed largely to the Tory reaction which resulted in the defeat of the Whigs in the elections of that year.

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  • The report was received so cordially in the House of Commons that Mr. Montagu was able to claim at the end of the debate as " a remarkable fact " that all speakers admitted the principle of self-government for India.

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  • The church of All Saints (1905) commemorates Spencer Perceval, prime minister, who was assassinated in the House of Commons in 1812.

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  • On the 4th of January 1642, however, when the king entered the House of Commons to seize the five members, Lenthall behaved with great prudence and dignity.

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  • On the 26th of July a mob invaded the House of Commons and obliged it to rescind the ordinance re-establishing the old parliamentary committee of militia; Lenthall was held in the chair by main force and compelled to put to the vote a resolution inviting the king to London.

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  • Unmindful now of the privileges of parliament, he consented to appear as a witness against the regicide Thomas Scot, for words spoken in the House of Commons while Lenthall was in the chair.

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  • Manning, Lives of the Speakers of the House of Commons.

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  • Among the later productions of his pen were, besides the Plan of a Reform in the Election of the House of Commons, pamphlets entitled Proceedings in the House of Commons on the Slave Trade (1796), Reflections on the Abundance of Paper in Circulation and the Scarcity of Specie (1810), Historical Questions Exhibited (1818), and a Letter to Earl Grey on the Policy of Great Britain and the Allies towards Norway (1814).

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  • In 1860 Mr Hussey reported (Zool., p. 7144) the average annual captures near Worthing to exceed 11,000 dozens - nearly all being cockbirds; and a witness before a committee of the House of Commons in 1873 stated that, when a boy, he could take forty 1 The more common German name, however, is Distelfink (ThistleFinch) or Stieglitz.

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  • In 1907 he became recorder of Sunderland and in 191() a K.C. In 1910 he entered the House of Commons as Liberal member for Newcastle.

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  • In 1784 the vicar of Tintagel, as mayor and only qualified elector, enjoyed the probably unique privilege of returning two members to the House of Commons.

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  • In 1851 Greeley visited Europe for the first time, serving as a juryman at the Crystal Palace Exhibition, appearing before a committee of the House of Commons on newspaper taxes, and urging the repeal of the stamp duty on advertisements.

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  • On the 10th of May she wrote curtly that the course proposed by Sir Robert Peel was contrary to usage and repugnant to her feelings; the Tory leader then had to inform the House of Commons that, having failed to obtain the proof which he desired of her majesty's confidence, it was impossible for him to accept office.

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  • On the r4th of June Mr Attwood, M.P. for Birmingham, presented to the House of Commons a Chartist petition alleged to have been signed by 1,280,000 people.

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  • The queen trusts, therefore, that the archbishop will himself consider, and, as far as he can, endeavour to induce the others to consider, any concessions that may be offered by the House of Commons in the most conciliatory spirit."

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  • In 1847, and again in 1853, Palmer was returned as member of Parliament for Plymouth, as a Peelite, and in the House of Commons he took an active and independent part.

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  • On the 7th of May he received the thanks of the House of Commons.

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  • Having made ' The Financial Secretary to the Admiralty answered in the affirmative a question asked in the House of Commons on May 4 1921 by Visct.

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  • He then visited various European capitals, and remained for some time in London, where he carefully studied the procedure in the House of Commons.

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  • During the session of the Short Parliament in the spring of 1640, the queen urged the king to oppose himself to the House of Commons in defence of the Catholics.

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  • It provided for a president-general appointed by the crown, who should have supreme executive authority over all the colonies, and for a grand council, elected triennially by the several provincial assemblies, and to have such "rights, liberties and privileges as are held and exercised by and in the House of Commons of Great Britain"; the president-general and grand council were to be "an inferior distinct branch of the British legislature, united and incorporated with it."

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  • In the House of Commons he soon made his mark as a radical, and as a denouncer of naval abuses.

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  • But the main features of the budget were adhered to, and eventually passed the House of Commons on the 4th of November, in spite of the persistent opposition of the scanty Unionist minority.

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  • The discussions on the budget entirely monopolized public attention for the year, and while the measure was defended by Mr Lloyd George in parliament with much suavity, and by Mr Asquith, Sir Edward Grey and Mr Haldane outside the House of Commons with tact and moderation, the feelings of its opponents were exasperated by a series of inflammatory public speeches at Limehouse and elsewhere from the chancellor of the exchequer, who took these opportunities to rouse the passions of the working-classes against the landed classes and the peers.

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  • The government passed a solemn resolution of protest in the House of Commons and appealed to the country; and the general election of January 1910 took place amid unexampled excitement.

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  • He represented Lincolnshire in the parliament of 1559, and Northamptonshire in that of 1563, and he took an active part in the proceedings of the House of Commons until his elevation to the peerage; but there seems no good evidence for the story that he was proposed as speaker in 1563.

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  • A "troy pound " and a new standard yard, as well as secondary standards, were constructed by direction of parliament in 1758-1760, and were deposited with the Clerk of the House of Commons.

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  • The House of Lords contains tapestry dating from 1733, and remains in its original condition, but the octagonal House of Commons was demolished by the bank directors, and replaced with a cash-office.

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  • In 1783 a convention of delegates from all the volunteer corps in Ireland assembled in Dublin for the purpose of procuring a reform in parliament; but the House of Commons refused to entertain the proposition, and the convention separated without coming to any practical result.

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  • In 1885 he was elected for West Bristol, and the Conservative party having returned to power, became chancellor of the exchequer and leader of the House of Commons.

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  • The organization of the house is entirely different from that of the British House of Commons or of most assemblies on the European continent.

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  • The first general election for the Dominion House of Commons was held during the month of August, and except in the province of Nova Scotia was favourable to the administration, which entered upon its parliamentary work with a majority of thirty-two.

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  • It was not till 1873 that an act was passed making members of the local legislatures ineligible for seats in the House of Commons.

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  • Each province has a lieutenant-governor and a single legislative chamber, with a representation of four members in the Senate and five in the House of Commons of the Dominion parliament.

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  • The House of Commons consists of representatives elected directly by the people.

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  • Members of the Senate and of the House of Commons receive an annual indemnity of $250o, with a travelling allowance.

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  • About the same time the House of Commons directed the trustees to remove the prohibition on the sale of rum.

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  • He wrote pamphlets in support of the opposition to Sir Robert Walpole, and was secretary of a committee appointed by the House of Commons to inquire into the conduct of that minister.

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  • The repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts having been carried in the House of Commons in the session of 1828, Wellington, to the great disappointment of Tories like Lord Eldon, recommended the House of Lords not to offer further resistance, and the measure was accordingly carried through.

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  • In 1818 a select committee of the House of Commons was appointed to consider the Usury Laws and in 1841 a similar committee of the House of Lords was appointed.

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  • This sudden leap into popularity seems to have been occasioned in connexion with a veiled allusion to Irving's striking eloquence made in the House of Commons by Canning, who had been induced to attend his church from admiration of an expression in one of his prayers, quoted to him by Sir James Mackintosh.

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  • It is, however, the conclusion of Mr Bryce, in his American Commonwealth, that as a rule a seat in Congress costs the candidate less than a seat for a county division in the House of Commons.

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  • But he came to the House of Commons for a much larger sum than he intended to give with his daughter.

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  • Junius wrote of him, "As for Mr Wedderburn, there is something about him which even treachery cannot trust," and Colonel Barre attacked him in the House of Commons.

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  • The debates on the Crimes Bill and the Irish Land Bill quickly undeceived them, and the steady and even remorseless vigour with which the government of Ireland was conducted speedily convinced the House of Commons and the country that Mr. Balfour was in his right place as chief secretary.

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  • His leadership of the House of Commons in the first session of the new parliament was marked by considerable firmness in the suppression of obstruction, but there was a slight revival of the criticisms which had been current in 1896.

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  • The opposition were determined to raise debates in the House of Commons on the fiscal question, and Mr Balfour was no less determined not to be caught in their trap. These tactics of avoidance reached their culminating point when on one occasion Mr Balfour and his supporters left the House and allowed a motion hostile to tariff reform to be passed nem.

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  • Mr Balfour had never spoken more brilliantly, nor shone more as a debater, than in these years when he had to confront a House of Commons three-fourths of which was hostile.

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  • He made himself exceedingly unpopular u1 1810 by bringing about the exclusion of strangers, including reporters for the press, from the House of Commons under the standing order, which led to the imprisonment of Sir Francis Burdett in the Tower and to riots in London.

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  • He sat in the House of Commons for Ayrshire (S.) as a Unionist member from 1895-1906.

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  • In 1593 he was returned as member of parliament for his native county, and also chosen speaker of the House of Commons.

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  • On the day of the unveiling of Lord Beaconsfield's statue all the members of the Conservative party in the House of Commons were decorated with the primrose.

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  • In the City of London there were customary tithes; in other towns and places there were compositions for tithes which were confirmed by local acts of parliament; and according to a return presented to the House of Commons in 1831, there were passed between 1757 and 1830 no less than 2000 local acts containing clauses for the commutation of tithes.

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  • It was, indeed, evident that without reform the Irish House of Commons would not be able to make much use of its newly won independence.

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  • The House of Commons was in no sense representative of the Irish people.

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  • The great majority of the people were excluded as Roman Catholics from the franchise; two-thirds of the members of the House of Commons were returned by small boroughs at the absolute disposal of single patrons, whose support was bought by a lavish distribution of peerages and pensions.

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  • When in 1799 the government brought forward their bill it was defeated in the Irish House of Commons.

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  • In that year the Great Fire of London, following on the Great Plague, roused the superstitious fears of the people, and the House of Commons embodied the general feeling in a bill against atheism and profaneness.

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  • The-military expenditure of Germany, according to a comparative table furnished to the House of Commons by the British war office in 1907, varied between 36,000,000 and 44,000,000 per annum in the period 1899-1902, and between 42,000,000 and 5I,o00,00o per annum in that of 1905-1909.

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  • He was already known in the country as Cobden's chief ally, and was received in the House of Commons with a suspicion and hostility even greater than had met Cobden himself.

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  • He took his seat in the House of Commons as one of the members for Durham on 28th July 1843, and on 7th August delivered his maiden speech in support of a motion by Mr Ewart for reduction of import duties.

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  • In the House of Commons his progress was slower.

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  • The speech established his position in the House of Commons.

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  • Towards the close of the struggle he told the House of Commons that a thousand meetings had been held, that at every one the doors were open for any man to enter, yet that an almost unanimous vote for reform had been taken.

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  • In the debates on the Reform Bills submitted to the House of Commons from 1859 to 1867, Bright's was the most influential voice He rebuked Lowe's "Botany Bay view," and described Horsman as retiring to his "cave of Adullam," and hooking in Lowe.

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  • In March 1865 Cobden died, and Bright told the House of Commons he dared not even attempt to express the feelings which oppressed him, and sat down overwhelmed with grief.

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  • He refused in the House of Commons to apologize for these words, and was supported in his refusal by both sides of the House.

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  • He became known in the House of Commons principally for his candid criticism of the measures introduced by his nominal leaders, and he was rather to be ranked among the Opposition than as a Ministerialist; and when the crisis with the Transvaal came in 1899, Mr Courtney's views, which remained substantially what they were when he supported the settlement after Majuba in 1881, had plainly become incompatible with his position even as a nominal follower of Lord Salisbury and Mr Chamberlain.

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  • The House of Commons declared this latter pamphlet a breach of privilege; its author was arrested on the 14th of December 1819, and in spite of an appeal to the court of king's bench he remained in custody until the end of the following February.

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  • His ambitions lay rather in the direction of the House of Commons.

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  • In Opposition Lord Rosebery was now at a serious disadvantage as head of a parliamentary party; for in any case he could not rally them as a loyally followed leader in the House of Commons might have done.

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  • But his followers were not all loyal, and his rivals in leadership were themselves in the House of Commons.

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  • The war had brought to the front a pro-Boer section, who seemed gradually to be compromising the whole party, and had apparently succeeded in winning the support of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, the leader in the House of Commons.

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  • Lauderdale's Militia Act gave Charles a force of 22,000 men, who would " go anywhere " (that is, would invade England), at the king's command, and in1673-1675Lauderdale was attacked in the English House of Commons.

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  • In 153 2, nevertheless, he excited some displeasure in the king by the part he took in the preparation of the famous "Answer of the Ordinaries" to the complaints brought against them in the House of Commons.

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  • He welcomed both the bill establishing a Ministry of Health and that establishing a Ministry of Transport; but he warned the House of Commons not to expect cheaper passenger fares and freight charges; the railwaymen would not allow themselves to be sweated for the benefit of the travelling public. But, once again, his real activity was outside.

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  • But in December 1688 he was arrested at Sittingbourne and was imprisoned; then, having lost his mastership, he was charged at the bar of the House of Commons with changing his religion and with other offences.

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  • But in 1522 when war was again declared he emphatically refused to bear any part of the responsibility, and in 1523 he opposed in convocation the financial demands which met with a more strenuous resistance in the House of Commons.

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  • Through the rashness of others he got into difficulties, and was attacked in the British House of Commons by Mr Gladstone, whom he compelled to apologize.

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  • Mr. Asquith, then Prime Minister, spoke of him in the House of Commons as having come nearest, of all men of his generation, to that ideal of manhood to which every English father would wish to see his son aspire.

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  • One of the firstfruits of his work was the entrance of John Bright into parliamentary life; and by 1852 forty Dissenters were members of the House of Commons.

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  • In the following year, on the announcement of the contemplated marriage, the House of Commons unanimously voted a dowry of £30,000 and an annuity of £6000 to the princess.

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  • It was to be governed by a specially appointed committee of distinguished personages, the chairman being the Speaker of the House of Commons.

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  • In 18 3 a select committee of the House of Commons went into the whole subject of secondary punishment and reported that, as the difficulties in the way of an effective classification of prisoners were insurmountable, they were strongly in favour of the confinement of prisoners in separate cells, recommending that the whole of the prisons should be altered accordingly and the expense borne by the public exchequer.

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  • They speedily relapsed into crime; their numbers, as the years passed, became so great and their depredations so serious, especially in garrotte robberies, that a cry of indignation was raised against the system, which led to its arraignment before a select committee of the House of Commons in 1863.

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  • Other measures are set forth in the new classification of convicts, prescribed by the secretary of state in the rules submitted by him to the House of Commons in 1904.

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  • Two Parsees have also been the only natives of India elected to the House of Commons.

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  • The first case which brought him prominently into notice and gave him assurance of ultimate success was the government prosecution, in 1752, of a bookseller, William Owen, for a libel on the House of Commons.

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  • The same year he entered the House of Commons as member for the borough of Downton in Wiltshire.

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  • The extension of responsible constitutional government by Great Britain to her chief colonies, under a governor or viceregal representative of the crown, has been followed in British North America by the union of the Canadian, maritime and Pacific provinces under a federal government - with a senate, the members of which are nominated by the crown, and a house of commons elected by the different provinces according to their relative population.

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  • By the 33rd article of the treaty of Paris (1856) this convention, annexed to the final act, was given "the same force and validity as if it formed part thereof," Palmerston declaring in the House of Commons (May 6) that it had "placed a barrier between Russia and the north of Europe."

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  • This virtually removed all restrictions on Catholics, except that it left them incapable of filling the offices of Regent, Lord Chancellor, or Lord Lieutenant of Ireland; and it expressly debarred their priests from sitting in the House of Commons.

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  • The House of Commons voted a public monument to his memory, which was erected in Saint Paul's cathedral, London.

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  • He himself delivered in the House of Commons many speeches unrivalled in parliamentary history for wit and recklessness; and one of them still lives in history as the "champagne speech."

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  • The House of Commons recognized in him its spoilt child, and Burke happily said that "he never thought, did or said anything" without judging its effect on his fellow members.

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  • The metrical psalms also, which are still sung in Scottish churches, were adopted at this time; they are based mainly on the version, which had been approved by the Westminster Assembly, of Francis Rouse (1579-1659), a member of the English House of Commons.

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  • In 18 o Mr Gladstone declared for y 9 disestablishment, and under his government of 1892 a Disestablishment Bill was introduced in the House of Commons by Sir Charles Cameron, in two successive sessions, 1893-1894.

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  • Charles both disbelieved and exposed him, whereupon Oates carried his tale before the House of Commons.

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  • According to a return laid before the House of Commons in the session of 1878, the total length of tramways authorized by parliament up to the 30th of June 1877 was 363 m., and the total length opened for traffic 213 m., comprising 125 m.

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  • In the United Kingdom the chancellor of the exchequer, usually in April, lays before the House of Commons a statement of the actual results of revenue and expenditure in the past finance year (now ending March 31), showing how far his estimates have been realized, and what surplus or deficit there has been in the income as compared with the expenditure.

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  • Rhodes informed the House of Commons Select Committee that the belief that the Boers intended to introduce the influence of another foreign power in the already complicated system of South Africa " greatly influenced " him in promoting the revolt.

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  • After representing Horsham in the House of Commons for over four years Goulburn was successively member for St Germans, for West Looe, and for the city of Armagh.

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  • Notwithstanding this, the House of Commons declared in the teeth of the facts that paper had undergone no depreciation.

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  • He was elected to the House of Commons for the St.

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  • The House of Commons was composed of 148 members, representing the 26 electoral divisions of Portugal, the Azores and Madeira, which returned 113 elected members and 35 representatives of minorities, and of 7 members representing the colonies.

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  • The proposal of the South Sea Company to pay off the national debt was strenuously supported by Aislabie, and finally accepted in an amended form by the House of Commons.

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  • The Repeal Act, indeed, was only passed pari passe with another censuring the American assemblies, and declaring the authority of the British parliament over the colonies "in all cases whatsoever"; so that the House of Commons repudiated in the most formal manner the principle Pitt laid down.

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  • From 1295 to 1832 Liskeard sent two members to the House of Commons.

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  • A few months later he delivered his maiden speech in the House of Commons in defence of the expedition against Copenhagen, which he conceived to be justified by the known designs of Napoleon on the Danish court.

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  • Canning became foreign minister and leader of the House of Commons.

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  • Lord Palmerston was no orator; his language was unstudied, and his delivery somewhat embarrassed; but he generally found words to say the right thing at the right time, and to address the House of Commons in the language best adapted to the capacity and the temper of his audience.

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  • The House of Commons was moved by Roebuck to reverse the sentence, which it did (June 29) by a majority of 46, after having heard from Palmerston the most eloquent and powerful speech ever delivered by him, in which he sought to vindicate, not only his claims on the Greek government for Don Pacifico, but his entire administration of foreign affairs.

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  • Upon the resignation of Lord Aberdeen and the duke of Newcastle, the general sentiment of the House of Commons and the country called Palmerston to the head of affairs, and he entered, on the 5th of February 1855, upon the high office, which he retained, with one short interval, to the day of his death.

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  • Defeated by a hostile combination of parties in the House of Commons on the question of the Chinese war in 1857 and the alleged insult to the British flag in the seizure of the lorcha " Arrow," he dissolved parliament and appealed to the nation.

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  • The unprotected condition of the principal British fortresses and arsenals had long attracted his attention, and he succeeded in inducing the House of Commons to vote nine millions for the fortification of those important points.

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  • In the House of Commons he was a prominent supporter of Charles Bradlaugh; he was the first to advocate old age pensions, and in 1890 carried a proposal to free elementary education in Scotland.

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  • They were conveyed in a passage in the king's speech at the opening of parliament on the 29th of January, and in a statement by Sir Edward Grey in the House of Commons on the 26th of February.

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  • Called by John Evelyn "a youth of extraordinary hopes," he completed his education at Utrecht, and in 1695 entered the House of Commons as member for Tiverton.

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  • He made many friends, and his reputation was already so high that Sheridan referred to him in the House of Commons as a rising hope of the Whigs.

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  • Canning, who delivered the eulogy of Pitt in the House of Commons on the 3rd of February, refused to take office in Fox's ministry of "all the talents."

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  • Public opinion was strong against Canning, and in the House of Commons he was looked upon with distrust.

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  • He had accepted the governorgeneralship of India, which would have implied his retirement from public life at home, and refused to remain unless he was promised "the whole inheritance" of Castlereagh, - the foreign office and the leadership of the House of Commons.

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  • St Margaret's is officially the church of the House of Commons.

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  • The Irish party used every opportunity in and oul of parliament for resenting this act, and Forster was kept constantly on the move between Dublin and London, conducting his campaign against crime and anarchy and defending it in the House of Commons.

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  • But when circumstances had overcome Mr. Asquith's antipathy to compulsion, Mr. Law took charge of the first military service bill in the House of Commons in Jan.

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  • At first the House of Commons was disposed to resent the apparent neglect with which it was treated by being asked to accept a deputy as its leader in place of a Prime Minister who washimself an M.P.; and cries for "Lloyd George " were raised when Mr. Law rose to play the leader's part in the debate on the Address in 1917.

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  • It must have been with peculiar gratification that he announced to the House of Commons in April 1917 that the Imperial War Cabinet had accepted the principle of Imperial Preference; and that it was hoped that each part of the Empire, having due regard to the interests of the Allies, would give specially favourable treatment and facilities to the produce and manufactures of other parts of the Empire - a hope which, as regards the mother country, was translated into action in the budgets introduced under Mr. Law's leadership after the war.

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  • In May 1918 he told the House of Commons that the French Government had denounced all commercial conventions containing " mostfavourable-nation " clauses; and that, in view of the probable scarcity of raw material after the war, the British Government would take a similar course.

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  • The result of the general election greatly strengthened his position, as the Unionists had a considerable predominance in the new House of Commons.

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  • He strongly upheld in the House of Commons the measures taken, first by Mr. Macpherson and then by Sir Hamar Greenwood, to restore law and order in that country; and definitely refused to interfere in the case of the Lord Mayor of Cork who, sentenced to imprisonment for conducting a rebel organization, went on hunger-strike and eventually succumbed in gaol.

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  • He was elected for Lambton to the first Dominion house of commons in 1867, and soon became the leader of the liberal opposition; from 1871 to 1872 he also sat in the Ontario provincial assembly, and held the position of provincial treasurer.

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  • In 1714 the question of finding the longitude at sea, which had been looked upon as an important one for several years, was brought into prominence by a petition presented to the House of Commons by a number of captains of Her Majesty's ships and merchant ships and of London merchants.

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  • In 1809, in command of the naval force on shore, he contributed greatly to the reduction of Martinique, and signed the capitulation by which that island was handed over to the English; for his services on this occasion he received the thanks of the House of Commons.

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  • He was returned to the House of Commons in that year for the Irish borough of Carlow, and became a devoted admirer and adherent of Mr Gladstone; but he was practically a silent member, and his parliamentary career came to an end after the general election of 1865, when, having headed the poll for Bridgnorth, he was unseated on a scrutiny; he contested Bridgnorth again in 1868, but without success.

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  • The greater part of the House of Commons was on their side, and on the whole they may be regarded as the party of constitutional protest against maladministration.

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  • The strong Protestantism of Elizabeths reign had assumed a distinctly Calvinistic form, and the country gentlemen who formed the majority of the House of Commons were resolutely determined that no other theology than that of Calvin should be taught in England.

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  • The judges who had given obnoxious decisions were called to answer for their fault and were taught that they were responsible to the House of Commons as well as the king.

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  • The question of expenditure was constantly telling on the relations between the king and the House of Commons.

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  • In Danby (see LEEDS, 1ST DUKE oF) he found a minister whose views answered precisely to the views of the existing House of Commons.

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  • But so thoroughly was the spirit of the country roused, that many even of the new corporations were set against Jamess declaration, and he had therefore to abandon for a time the hope of seeing it accepted even by a packed House of Commons.

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  • That House of Commons was far from resting on a wide basis of popular suffrage.

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  • The supremacy of the House of Commons would have been an evil of no common magnitude, if it had made government Beginning impossible.

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  • He selected as his ministers the leading members of the two Houses who had the confidence of the majority of the House of Commons.

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  • But the House of Commons did not see it, even when the Dutch garrisons were driven by French troops out of the posts in the Spanish Netherlands which they had occupied for many years (1701).

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  • The system was not new, as Danby is credited with the discovery that a vote in the House of Commons might be purchased.

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  • Such a system was possible because the House of Commons was not really accountable to its constituents.

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  • The House of Commons expelled him.

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  • Fyshe Palmer for circulating an address from a society of the friends of liberty to their fellow-citizens in favor of a reform of the House of Commons.

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  • The committee of the House of Commons it once reported that there was evidence of a conspiracy to supersede the House of Commons by a national convention, and Pitt proposed and carried a bill suspending the Habeas Corpus Act.

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  • The Liberals could see no more than that he appeared to be committed to international engagements, the logical outcome of which might beas an orator of the Opposition put itthat Cossacks would be encamped in Hyde Park for the purpose of overawing the House of Commons.

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  • A bill modifying the Corn Laws, introduced by Canning and Huskisson, passed the House of Commons on the 12th of April 1827, but was rejected by the Lords.

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  • The election, indeed, which followed her accession did not materially alter the composition of the House of Commons.

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  • Before abandoning the struggle, the Whigs decided on appealing from the House of Commons to the country.

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  • The Chartists were induced to abandon the procession which had caused so much alarm, and the monster petition was carried in a cab to the House of Commons.

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  • But the bulk of the Conservative party rallied under the lead of Lord Stanley (afterwards Derby) in the House of Lords, and gradually subthitted to, rather than accepted, the lead of Disraeli in the House of Commons.

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  • Cobden, however, brought forward a motion in the House of Commons condemning these high-handed proceedings.

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  • For a second time Lord Derby undertook the difficult task of carrying on the work of government without the support of Lord a majority of the House of Commons.

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  • The Liberal party generally in the House of Commons was in favor of such a modification of the oaths as would enable the Jews so elected to take their seats.

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  • It was plain that the House of Commons had withdrawn its support from Lord Derby, but it was not clear that any other leading politician would be able to form a government.

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  • For the third time in his career Lord Derby undertook the formidable task of conducting the government of the country Lord with only a minority of the House of Commons to nerbys support him.

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  • But it was soon apparent that the House of Commons required a definite scheme, and that it would not seriously consider a set of abstract resolutions which committed no one to any distinct plan.

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  • It was also interesting to reflect that Gladstone had begun life as a Conservative, and had only gradually moved to the ranks of the Liberal party; while Disraeli had fought his first election under the auspices of OConnell and Hume, had won his spurs by his attacks on Sir Robert Peel, and had been only reluctantly adopted by the Conservatives as their leader in the House of Commons.

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  • In March 1868 John Francis Maguire, an Irish Catholic, asked the House of Commons to resolve itself into a committee to take intO immediate consideration the affairs of Ireland.

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  • For, while hitherto the debate had turn.ed on the technical points whether an affirmation could be substituted for an oath, or whether a person who had declared that an oath had no meaning for him could properly be sworn, the end at which Bradlaughs opponents were thenceforward aiming was the imposition of a new religious testthe belief in a Godon members of the House of Commons.

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  • Parliament subsequently, by a new act, permitted affirmations to be used, and thenceforward religion, or the absence of religion, was no disqualification for a seat in the House of Commons.

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  • It was his evident belief that by pursuing such tactics he could force the House of Commons to concede the legislation which he desired.

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  • But counties and boroughs were broken up into a number of small constituencies, for the most part returning only one member each; while the necessity of increasing the relative weight of Great Britain, and the reluctance to inflict disfranchisement on Ireland, led to an increase in the numbers of the House of Commons from 658 to 670 members.

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  • The country showed no more disposition than the House of Commons to approve the course which the minister was taking.

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  • The most picturesque appointment was that of Lord Randolph Churchill, who was made chancellor of the exchequer and leader of the House of Commons.

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  • Attention was drawn in the House of Commons to the insufficient supply of cordite provided by the war office, and the Housenotwithstanding the assurance of the war minister (Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman) that the supply was adequateplaced the government in a minority.

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  • The Liberals had long arrears to make up in their political programme, and their supremacy in the House of Commons was an encouragement to assert their views in legislation.

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  • Apart from the parliamentary crisis, really hingeing on the difficulty of discovering a means by which the real will of the people should be carried out without actually making the House of Commons autocratically omnipotent, but also without allowing the House of Lords to obstruct a Liberal government merely as the organ of the Tory party, the new king succeeded to a noble heritage.

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  • The Rot nh parliament orum end with Henry VII., but in 1509 begin the journals of the House of Lords, and in 1547 the journals of the House of Commons.

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  • He had been returned to the House of Commons for the pocket borough of Wendover, and his first speech (January 27, 1766) was felt to be the rising of a new light.

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  • Before leaving office the Rockingham government repealed the Stamp Act; confirmed the personal liberty of the subject by forcing on the House of Commons one resolution against general warrants, and another against the seizure of papers; and relieved private houses from the intrusion of officers of excise, by repealing the cider tax.

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  • In the House of Commons his industry was lmost excessive.

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  • It arose partly from the fact of William Burke's residence there, partly from his friendship with Philip Francis, but most of all, we suspect, from the effect which he observed Indian influence to have in demoralizing the House of Commons.

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  • Sheridan's speech in the House of Commons upon the charge relative to the begums of Oude probably excelled anything that Burke achieved, as a dazzling performance abounding in the most surprising literary and rhetorical effects.

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  • Burke's first decisive step against Hastings was a motion for papers in the spring of 1786; the thanks of the House of Commons to the managers of the impeachment were voted in the summer of 1794.

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  • Between Sheridan and Burke there was an open breach in the House of Commons upon the Revolution so early as February 1790, and Sheridan's influence with Fox was strong.

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  • In May 1791 the thundercloud burst, and a public rupture between Burke and Fox took place in the House of Commons.

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  • The Speeches of Edmund Burke, in the House of Commons and Westminster Hall, were published in 4 vols., 1816.

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  • When the struggle with France was renewed in May 1803, it became evident that as a war minister Addington was not a success; and when Pitt became openly hostile, the continued confidence of the king and of a majority in the House of Commons was not a sufficient counterpoise to the ministry's waning prestige.

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  • To gain a footing in the House of Commons was all that his confident spirit ever asked, and Froude vouches for it that he succeeded only just in time to avert financial ruin.

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  • Therefore when, three weeks after the session began, a debate on Irish election+petitions gave him opportunity, Disraeli attempted that first House of Commons speech which imagination still dwells upon as something wondrous strange.

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  • That he should not have known better, even by hearsay, than to address the House of Commons in fantastic phrase from the mouth of a fantastic figure is indeed remarkable, but not that he retained self-confidence enough to tell the unwitting crew who laughed him down that a time would come when they would hear him.

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  • Within three years, on the death of Lord George Bentinck, there was none to dispute with him the leadership of the Conservative party in the House of Commons.

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  • Earl Russell succeeded him as prime minister, Mr Gladstone as leader of the House of Commons.

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  • There was a great deal too (though little to his blame) in Lord Malmesbury's observation that he was not only disliked in the House of Commons for his mysterious manner, but prejudiced by a pronounced foreign air and aspect.

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  • In 1882 he entered the local legislature as Liberal member for Halifax, and from 1884 to 1896 was premier and provincial secretary of the province, but in the latter year became finance minister in the Dominion administration of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, and was elected to the House of Commons for Shelburne and Queen's county.

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  • In 1871 another bill for compulsory adoption was rejected by the House of Commons on the second reading by a majority of five.

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  • In 1780 he was elected to the House of Commons for his native town, his success being due to his personal popularity and his lavish expenditure.

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  • In the autumn of 1783 he set out with Pitt on a tour in France; and after his return his eloquence proved of great assistance to Pitt in his struggle against the majority of the House of Commons.

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  • While Clarkson conducted the agitation throughout the country, Wilberforce took every opportunity in the House of Commons of exposing the evils and horrors of the trade.

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  • In February 1792 an allusion in debate by Toler (afterwards earl of Norbury), the attorney-general, to Tandy's personal ugliness, provoked him into sending a challenge; this was treated by the House of Commons as a breach of privilege, and a Speaker's warrant was issued for his arrest, which however he managed to elude till its validity expired on the prorogation of parliament.

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  • He was summoned in April 1675 before a committee of the House of Commons to give evidence against Lauderdale, and disclosed, without reluctance according to his enemies, confidences which had passed between him and the minister.

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  • According to evidence laid before the House of Commons in 1822 one-third of the woollen cloth used in Ireland was imported from England.

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  • Government, &c.-The executive government of Ireland is vested in a lord-lieutenant, assisted by a privy council and by a chief secretary, who is always a member of the House of Commons and generally of the cabinet.

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  • In 1639 the House of Commons had 274 members, a number which was further increased to 300 at the Revolution, and so it remained until the Union.

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  • In 1715 the Irish House of Commons resolved that any one who should prosecute a Presbyterian for accepting a commission in the army without taking the test was an enemy to the king and to the Protestant interest.

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  • His procedure was essentially lawyer-like, for he respected the House of Commons and dreaded revolutionary violence.

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  • Parnell cared nothing for the dignity of the House of Commons.

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  • The shortening of the time was perhaps accounted for by the fact that the new House of Commons consisted of 331 Liberals, 249 Conservatives, 86 Home Rulers and Independents, Parnell thus holding the balance of parties.

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  • The Unionist party had adopted a policy of local government for Ireland while opposing legislative independence, and a bill was introduced into the House of Commons by Mr Balfour in February 1892.

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  • On the 8th of April 1886 he had told the House of Commons that it " passed the wit of man " to draw a practical distinction between imperial and non-imperial affairs.

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  • A great part of the bill was closured by what was known as the device of the " gag " without discussion, although it occupied the House of Commons altogether eighty-two nights.

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  • In 1880 he again entered the House of Commons as Radical member for Northampton with Mr. Bradlaugh as his colleague, and this seat he retained until his retirement in 1905.

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  • Soon after his arrival in London he became minister of St Bartholomew's church, near the Exchange; and in 1643 he was appointed to preach the sermon before the House of Commons on occasion of the public fast of the 29th of March.

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  • On the 26th of August 1645 he again preached before the House of Commons on the day of their monthly fast.

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  • He made his maiden speech in the House of Commons on the 4th of August 1876, on Lord Sandon's Education Bill.

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  • Unlike Lord Hartington (afterwards duke of Devonshire) and other Liberals, who declined to join Mr Gladstone in view of the altered attitude he was adopting towards Ireland, Mr Chamberlain entered the cabinet as president of the Local Government Board (with Mr Jesse Collings as parliamentary secretary), but on the 15th of March 1886 he resigned, explaining in the House of Commons (8th April) that, while he had always been in favour of the largest possible extension of local government to Ireland consistently with the integrity of the empire and the supremacy of parliament, and had therefore joined Mr Gladstone when he believed that this was what was intended, he was unable to consider that the scheme communicated by Mr Gladstone to his colleagues maintained those limitations.

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  • During the eighty-two days' discussion in the House of Commons Mr Chamberlain was the life and soul of the opposition, and his criticisms had a vital influence upon the attitude of the country when the House of Lords summarily threw out the bill.

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  • On May 28th in tile House of Commons he spoke on the same subject, and declared "if you are to give a preference to the colonies, you must put a tax on food."

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  • Ashmead-Bartlett, the Conservative member of parliament; and he then took his wife's name, entering the House of Commons as member for Westminster, 1885.

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  • In 1758 he was appointed admiral of the blue and commander-in-chief of the expedition to Cape Breton, when, in conjunction with General Amherst, he took the fortress of Louisburg, and the island of Cape Breton - services for which he again received the thanks of the House of Commons.

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  • Pitt accepted, despite his failing health, possible alcoholism and limited support in the House of Commons.

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  • Dermot seems to be taking a breather in his virtual House of Commons.

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  • It happened to also be budget day so there was a definite buzz around the house of commons.

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  • Sheets soaked with chloride of lime were hung at the windows of the House of Commons to prevent MPs getting cholera.

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  • Soon, however, thoroughly disillusioned with the Party system, he left the House of Commons for ever.

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  • They have rendered fruitless the most serious work of the present House of Commons.

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  • On 19th December 2000 the House of Commons became the first legislature in the world to vote explicitly to legalize human cloning.

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  • A Select Committee of the House of Commons had recommended the erection of a national asylum for criminal lunatics in 1807.

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  • We do not agree that direct elections to the second chamber would threaten the primacy of the House of Commons.

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  • In 1643 the House of Commons promised money and religious and political influence throughout the realm to religious progressives in Scotland.

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  • Both were well known before they joined David Cameron's front bench team of enjoying highly remunerative non-political employment outside the House of Commons.

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  • To consolidate our work in the area of flooding, POST convened a seminar in the House of Commons on 29 April 2002.

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  • This pleasant man led a distinctly unpleasant party to its highest ever representation in the House of Commons.

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  • In the House of Commons the Tories imposed a three-line whip to refuse the Bill of Rights a first reading.

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  • In the House of Commons his light but pointed humour gradually led to the coining of a new word, "birrelling," and his literary and oratorical reputation grew apace.

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  • As chancellor he issued writs for the election of thirty-six new members to fill vacancies caused during the long recess; this, though grounded upon precedent, was open to suspicion as an attempt to fortify Charles, and was attacked by an angry House of Commons which met on the 4th of February 1673.

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  • With a view to becoming a parliamentary candidate for the city of Dublin he issued in 1748-1749 a series of political addresses in which he advocated the principles of Molyneux and Swift; and he made himself so obnoxious to the government that the House of Commons voted him an enemy to the country, and issued a proclamation for his arrest, thus compelling him to retire for some years to the continent.

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  • In the House of Commons his acute reasoning made a considerable impression, and under successive Liberal ministries (1853-1858) he obtained official experience as secretary of the Board of Control and vice-president of the Board of Trade.

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  • He contributed £600 to the proposed Irish campaign and £500 for raising forces in England - large sums from his small estate - and on his own initiative in July 1642 sent arms of the value of £ioo down to Cambridge, seized the magazine there in August, and prevented the king's commission of array from being executed in the county, taking these important steps on his own authority and receiving subsequently indemnity by vote of the House of Commons.

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  • The parliament, however, continued to negotiate, and accordingly Charles was removed by the army to Hurst Castle on the 1st of December, the troops occupied London on the 2nd; while on the 6th and 7th Colonel Pride "purged" the House of Commons of the Presbyterians.

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  • Moreover, since 1881 the wages and salaries of the telegraph employees have been increased on several occasions in consequence of political pressure brought to bear on members of parliament; and notwithstanding the protest of the government of the day, the House of Commons in 1883 carried a resolution that the minimum rate for inland telegrams should be reduced to 6d.

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  • A select committee of the House of Commons (with Mr Arnold Morley, Postmaster-General, as chairman) was appointed " to consider and report whether the provision now made for the telephone service in local areas is adequate, and whether it is expedient to supplement or improve this provision either by the granting of licences to local authorities or otherwise."

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  • In March 1906 a motion censuring Lord Milner for an infraction of the Chinese labour ordinance, in not forbidding light corporal punishment of coolies for minor offences in lieu of imprisonment, was moved by a Radical member of the House of Commons.

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  • He then paid a generous tribute to the virtues, the abilities and services of Cobden, and he was followed by Disraeli, who with great force and felicity of language delineated the character of the deceased statesman, who, he said, "was an ornament to the House of Commons and an honour to England."

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  • Within a week of his arrival he denounced in the House of Commons a government proclamation, which Grattan had approved, in language so violent that he was ordered into custody and required to apologize at the bar of the House.

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  • On the 15th of July 1908, Mr Asquith said that Sir Edward Grey had announced in the House of Commons on the 6th of June 1907 that the British government intended to negotiate with the powers for the renewal of the convention, on condition that they would relinquish the penal clause, and that none of the obligations in the convention as renewed were penal or required statutory authority.

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  • Lord Russell, backed by Gladstone, persuaded his colleagues to consent to a moderate Reform Bill, and the task of piloting this measure through the House of Commons fell to Gladstone.

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  • During the violent conflict over the Middlesex election (see Wilkes, John) he took the unpopular side, and vehemently asserted the right of the House of Commons to exclude Wilkes.

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  • He also took a prominent part in the proceedings which followed the Kentish petition, and was the author, some say the presenter, of the Legion Memorial, which asserted in the strongest terms the supremacy of the electors over the elected, and of which even an irate House of Commons did not dare to take much notice.

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  • He immediately gained a prominent position in the party hostile to the Court, and before he had been six months in the House of Commons he proposed a resolution that all "popish recusants" should be removed from military commands; the motion, enlarged so as to include civil employment, was carried without a division on the 28th of February 1672-1673.

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  • Through her secretary, General Grey, the queen pointed out that she had not concealed from Gladstone" how deeply she deplored "his having felt himself under the necessity of raising the question, and how apprehensive she was of the possible consequences of the measure; but, when a general election had pronounced on the principle, when the bill had been carried through the House of Commons by unvarying majorities, she did not see what good could be gained by rejecting it in the Lords.

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  • In the House of Commons he was one of the most prominent guerrilla fighters, conspicuous for his audacity and pungency of utterance, and his capacity for obstruction while the Conservatives were in office.

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  • Under his courtesy title of Viscount Goderich he was returned to the House of Commons for Hull in 1852 as an advanced Liberal.

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  • At this celebration he spoke strongly of "the Irish rebel party," and accused the Conservatives of "alliance" with them, but withdrew the imputation when Sir Stafford Northcote moved that such language was a breach of the privileges of the House of Commons.

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  • On returning to South Africa after the Raid inquiry at Westminster in 1897, ' In his evidence before the House of Commons Select Committee which inquired into the Raid, Rhodes did not object to the continued existence of the republic " for local matters," but desired a federal South Africa under the British flag; see Blue Book (165) 1897 p. 21; also Sir Lewis Michell's Life of Rhodes, vol.

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  • Since the incorporation of the British consular service in the civil service there have been several proposals to " reform " the system with the view of increasing its usefulness, more particularly from the point of view of providing assistance to British trade abroad (see Reports of Special Committees of the House of Commons on the Consular Service, 1858, 1872, 1903).

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  • He led a strong fight against the ministerial bills introduced to take advantage of the Parliament Act, and protested vehemently against the relentless closure by which they were driven through the House of Commons.

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  • He cordially concurred in the cooperative and protective resolutions then adopted (see English History) and joined Mr. Asquith in recommending them to the House of Commons.

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  • In May 1789 - that memorable month of May in which the states-general marched in impressive array to hear a sermon at the church of Notre Dame at Versailles - a vote of censure had actually been passed on him in the House of Commons for a too severe expression used against Hastings.

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  • Both were well known before they joined David Cameron 's front bench team of enjoying highly remunerative non-political employment outside the House of Commons.

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  • Peter Hain predicted a " ricin attack ", whatever that is, on the House of Commons.

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  • Did men in the House of Commons suddenly convert to the cause of the suffragist movement?

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  • They are also contests between political parties vying for supremacy in the House of Commons.

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  • The voters in each constituency will elect a single person to represent them in the House of Commons.

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