How to use Horse-chestnut in a sentence

horse-chestnut
  • In Saxifraga umbrosa (London-pride) and in the horse-chestnut we meet with a raceme of scorpioid cymes; in sea-pink, a capitulum of contracted scorpioid cymes (often called a glomerulus); in laurustinus, a compound umbel of dichasial cymes; a scorpioid cyme of capitula in Vernonia scorpioides.

    0
    0
  • Thus in the horse-chestnut there is an interposition of two stamens, and thus seven stamens are formed in the flower, which is asymmetrical.

    0
    0
  • In the last-mentioned case they are called declinate, as in amaryllis, horse-chestnut and fraxinella.

    0
    0
  • A shaft of brilliant sunlight fell through the dusty layers of a horse chestnut tree, landing on the velvet vows of her shoes.

    0
    0
  • A grove of horse chestnut trees may become an asset too valuable for small boys to plunder!

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • During the fall, wherever you find horse chestnut trees you'll find children playing conkers.

    0
    0
  • Other trees including the horse chestnut and sycamore already have well-developed leaves.

    0
    0
  • It grows into a smaller tree than our common horse chestnut and has darker foliage.

    0
    0
  • New species continue to arrive and spread rapidly, for example the horse chestnut leaf miner, which probably first appeared in 2002.

    0
    0
  • Planted tree species included sycamore, Norway maple, beech, ash, lime, elm, Scots pine and horse chestnut.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Still, as in the laburnum just mentioned, in the variegated jasmine and in Abutilon Darwinii, in the copper beech and in the horse-chestnut, the influence of a variegated scion has occasionally shown itself in the production from the stock of variegated shoots.

    0
    0
  • Of deciduous trees the sycamore, wych-elm, horse-chestnut, beech, lime, plane and poplar may be used, - the abele or white poplar, Populus alba, being one of the most rapidgrowing of all trees, and, like other poplars, well suited for nursing other choicer subjects; while of evergreens, the holm oak, holly, laurel (both common and Portugal), and such conifers as the Scotch, Weymouth and Austrian pines, with spruce and (South.) silver firs and yews, are suitable.

    0
    0
  • Leading up to the present church with its slate roof is a row of horse chestnut trees.

    0
    0
  • It grows on many trees, both evergreen and summer-leafing-orchard trees, Limes, Poplars, Elms, Willows, Hornbeam, Beech, Acacia, Horse-chestnut, Firs-rarely on the Oak in Britain.

    0
    0
  • The peach, horse-chestnut, lilac, morello cherry, black currant, rhododendron and many other trees and shrubs develop flower-buds for the next season speedily after blossoming, and these may be stimulated into premature growth.

    1
    1
    Advertisement
  • Leaves which are articulated with the stem, as in the walnut and horse-chestnut, fall and leave a scar, while those which are continuous with it remain attached for some time after they have lost their vitality.

    1
    1
  • Matthiolus, who attributes the origin of the name of the tree to the use of the nuts by the inhabitants of Constantinople for the relief of short-windedness and cough in horses, remarks that no ancient writer appears to have made mention of the horse-chestnut.

    1
    1
  • From the early date of its leafing year by year, a horse-chestnut in the Tuileries is known as the "Marronnier du 20 mars."

    1
    1
  • The wood of the horse-chestnut is soft, and serves only for the making of water-pipes, for turner's work and common carpentry, as a source of charcoal for gunpowder, and as fuel.

    1
    1
  • Infusion of horse-chestnut's is found to expel worms from soil, and soon to kill them if they are left in it.

    1
    1
    Advertisement
  • One variety of the horse-chestnut has variegated leaves, and another double flowers.

    1
    1