How to use Horns in a sentence

horns
  • Screams and blaring horns came from the streets.

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  • But she didn't have horns or a tail or anything.

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  • The black horns, which are ringed in their basal portion, are comparatively short and not unlike those of the Asiatic serows in general characters, being subcylindrical, and curving slightly backwards.

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  • At the time, we felt so infallible in our rightness we grabbed the proverbial bull by the horns exposing ourselves to a wealth of trouble.

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  • In common with the okapi, giraffes have skin-covered horns on the head, but in these animals, which form the genus Giraffa, these appendages are present in both sexes; and there is often an unpaired one in advance of the pair on the forehead.

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  • The convex side rests upon the duchy of Coburg and is in part bounded by Bavaria, while the concave side, turned towards the north, contains portions of four other Thuringian states and Prussia between its horns, which are 46 m.

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  • The horns, usually present in both sexes, are small and straight, situated far back on the forehead; and between them rises the crest-like tuft of hair from which the genus takes its scientific name.

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  • A subject so vast and so incapable of classification cannot be discussed here, but its aesthetic principles may be illustrated by the extreme case of the trumpets and horns, which in classical times had no scale except that of the natural harmonic series.

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  • The modern Wagnerian conductor is apt to complain that Beethoven, in his four-bar phrase, drowns a melody which lies in the weakest register of the clarinet by a crowd of superfluous notes in oboes, horns and flutes.

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  • The alternatives are called the "horns" of the dilemma.

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  • Built on the horns of a sheltered bay, Hartlepool (Hertepull, Hertipol), grew up round the monastery founded there in 640, but was destroyed by the Danes in Soo and rebuilt by Ecgred, bishop of Lindisfarne.

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  • The breed of cattle most widely distributed is that known as the Podolian, usually with white or grey coat and enormous horns.

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  • As the most developed pair in birds they are com monly, although wrongly, called the hyoid horns.

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  • Thus a nation which has to choose between bankruptcy and the repudiation of its debts is on the horns of a dilemma.

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  • Large doses also depress the nervous system, weakening the anterior horns of grey matter in the spinal cord so as ultimately to cause complete paralysis, and also causing a partial insensibility of the cutaneous nerves of touch and pain.

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  • The journal of the axle A, is carried in a bearing or axle-box B, which is free to move vertically in the wide vertical slot G, formed in the frame and called generally " the horns," under the control of the spring.

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  • Important features of Greek sacrifice, though not necessarily found in every rite, were the putting of wreaths and pieces of wool on the victim, the gilding of its horns, the lustration of the officiant and the sprinkling of those present with holy water.

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  • These sides are stiffened, and when the mitre is worn, they rise in front and behind like two horns pointed at the tips (cornua mitrae).

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  • Such a mitre appears on a seal of Archbisho p Thomas Becket (Father Thurston, The ?P allium, London, 1892, p. 17), The custom was, however, .already growing up of setting the horns over the front and back of the head instead of the sides (the mitre said to have belonged to St Thomas Becket, now at Westminster Cathedral, is of this type), 1 and with this the essential character of the mitre, as it persisted through the middle ages, was established.

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  • When the horns came to be set before and behind, the vertical orphrey retained its position.

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  • Architectural motives even were introduced, as frames to the embroidered figures of saints, while sometimes the upper edges of the mitre were ornamented with crockets, and the horns with architectural finials.

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  • When a spinner is required to quote prices of yarn for delivery in the future he is fixed on the horns of a dilemma.

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  • There are carriage roads radiating from Aleppo to the sea at Alexandretta, and to Aintab; and Antioch is also connected with Alexandretta; Beirut and Horns with Tripoli; Damascus with Beirut; and Nazareth with Haifa.

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  • As the female counterpart of the Phoenician Baal (viewed as a sun-god), and on the testimony of late writers (Lucian, Herodian) that she was represented with horns, the place-name AshterothKarnaim in Gilead ("Ashteroth of the horns") has been considered ample proof in favour of the theory.

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  • But it is probable that the horns were primarily ram's horns, 4 and that Astarte the moon-goddess is due to the influence of the Egyptian Isis 1 The vocalization suggests the Heb.

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  • Haydn uses a true Straussian discord in The Seasons, in order to imitate the chirping of a cricket; but the harshest realism in Gatterdammerung (the discord produced by the horns of Hagen and his churls in the mustering-scene in the second act) has a harmonic logic which would have convinced Corelli.

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  • Scoresby describes them as "extremely playful, frequently elevating their horns and crossing them with each other as in fencing."

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  • The horns in old males have extremely broad bases, meeting in the middle line, and covering the brow and crown of the head.

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  • In females and young males the horns are smaller, and their bases separated by a space in the middle of the forehead, The ears are small, erect, pointed, and nearly concealed in the hair.

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  • It is represented by a nearly complete skeleton, and has doublycurved horns and sheep-like teeth.

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  • The native cattle, also diminutive in size, with small horns and short legs, furnish beef of remarkable tenderness and flavour; while the cows, when well fed, yield a plentiful supply of rich milk.

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  • Ewes as well as rams generally have short horns, and the wool is long and very fine.

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  • The skull is elongated, with the orbit not separated from the temporal fossa and the nasals, which may or may not carry horns, reaching at least as far forwards as the union of the premaxillae.

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  • A large number of representatives of the group are known from both the Old and the New World; specialization displaying itself in the later ones in the development of dermal horns over the nasal bones, either in laterally placed pairs as in some of the early forms, or in the median line, either single or double.

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  • Next we have the living African species, representing the subgenus Diceros, in which there are two horns but no front teeth.

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  • The gaur, which extends into Burma and the Malay Peninsula, where it is known as seladang, is the typical representative of an Indo-Malay group of wild cattle characterized by the presence of a ridge on the withers, the compressed horns, and the white legs.

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  • Having recognized their mother, the sons avenged her by tying Dirce to the horns of a wild bull, which dragged her about till she died.

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  • The horns are long, ringed, and form spirals with from three to five turns.

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  • The hero seized it by the horns and was borne headlong in the flight of the animal, which he finally subdued and dragged into a cavern.

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  • Next in value came wool (£226,000), horses and mules (£110,000), skins, hides and horns (£106,000), tobacco (£89,000), tin, coal, copper and lead.

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  • The Pharaoh's characteristic crown (or crowns) symbolized his royal domains, the sacred uraeus marked his divine ancestry, and he sometimes appeared in the costume of the gods with their fillets adorned with double feathers and horns.

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  • In Babylonia Naram-Sin in the guise of a god wears the pointed helmet and two great horns distinctive of the deities.3 This relationship between the gods and their human representatives is variously expressed.

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  • Whereas at 2.30 absolute destruction seemed the only possible fate of the defeated army, by 6 p.m., thanks to the devoted heroism of the artillery and the initiative of a few junior commanders of cavalry, it had escaped from the enclosing horns of the Prussian attack.

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  • In stature they range from the size of a hare to that of a rhinoceros; and their horns vary in size and shape from the small and simple spikes of the oribi and duiker antlers to the enormous and variously shaped structures borne respectively by buffaloes, wild sheep and kudu and other large antelopes.

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  • The majority of these are large and heavilybuilt ruminants, with horns present in both sexes, the muzzle broad, moist and naked, the nostrils lateral, no face-glands, and a large dewlap often developed in the males; while the tail is long and generally tufted, although in one instance longhaired throughout.

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  • The [ox's] horns are of nearly equal size in both sexes, are placed on or near the vertex of the skull, and may be either rounded or angulated, while their direction is more or less outwards, with an upward direction near the tips, and conspicuous knobs or ridges are never developed on their surface.

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  • The second group, or Caprinae, includes the sheep and goats, which are smaller animals than most of the Bovidae, generally with horns in both sexes, but those of the females small.

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  • In the males the horns are usually compressed and triangular, with transverse ridges or knobs, and either curving backwards or spiral.

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  • Sheep and goats are very nearly related, but the former never have a beard on the chin of the males, which are devoid of a strong odour; and their horns are typically of a different type.

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  • The twist of the horns varies to a great extent locally, the spiral being most open and corkscrew-like in the typical Astor animal, and closest and most screw-like in the race (C. falconeri jerdoni) inhabiting the Suleiman and adjacent ranges.

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  • The larger antelopes, so common on the African side of the Gulf of Aden, are not found, except one variety, the Oryx beatrix (called by the Arabs, wild cow), which is an inhabitant of the Nafud between Tema and Hail; it is about the size of a donkey, white, and with long straight horns.

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  • In the Yemen mountains the wal, a wild goat with massive horns, similar to the Kashmir ibex, is found; monkeys also abound.

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  • In the absence of face-glands and in the structure of the horns the species approximates to the goats.

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  • The African species use the nasal horns as weapons, with which they strike and toss their assailant, but the Asiatic rhinoceroses employ their sharp lower tusks much as does a boar.

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  • To the third group or genus (Diceros) belong the two African rhinoceroses, which have two horns, the skin without definite folds, and no lower tusks.

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  • Both sexes carry horns, which are ringed and form an open spiral.

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  • The principal products are rice, oil-seeds, lac, tussur silk, horns, hides, wax and a little iron.

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  • These strange plants usually grow in rocky places with little or no earth to support them; and it is said that in times of drought the cattle resort to them to allay their thirst, first ripping them up with their horns and tearing off the outer skin, and then devouring the moist succulent parts.

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  • Uintatheres were huge creatures, with long narrow skulls, of which the elongated facial portion carried three pairs of bony horn-cores, probably covered with short horns in life, the hind-pair being much the largest.

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  • In the next chapter (v.) the seer has a vision of a roll in the hand of Him that sat on the throne which none could open or look upon, till the Lion of the tribe of Judah, the mighty one with seven horns.

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  • For flat ropes the drum or bobbin consists of a solid disk, of the width of the rope fixed upon the shaft, with numerous parallel pairs of arms or horns, arranged radially on both sides, the space between being just sufficient to allow the rope to enter and coil regularly upon the preceding lap. This method has the advantage of equalizing the work of the engine throughout the journey, for when the load is greatest, with the full cage at the bottom and the whole length of rope out, the duty required in the first revolution of the engine is measured by the length of the smallest circumference; while the assistance derived from gravitating action of the descending cage in the same period is equal to the weight of the falling mass through a height corresponding to the length of the largest lap, and so on, the speed being increased as the weight diminishes, and vice versa.

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  • Leaving this it expands into the Lake of Horns, having been dammed back in antiquity.

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  • In the shape and curvature of the horns, which at first incline outwards and forwards, and then bend somewhat upwards and inwards, this breed of cattle resembles the aurochs and the (by comparison) dwarfed park-breeds.

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  • Moreover, in both the Pembroke and the park-breeds the horns are lightcoloured with black tips.

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  • Their horns are white, tipped with black, and extended and turned upwards in the manner distinctive of the park-breed.

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  • Except in the bongo and elands, horns are present only in the males, and these are angulated and generally spirally twisted, and without rings.

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  • The harnessed antelopes, or bushbucks, are closely allied to the kudus, from which they chiefly differ by the spiral formed by the horns generally having fewer turns.

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  • The last-named species spends most of its time in water, where it may be observed not infrequently among the reeds with all but its head and horns submerged.

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  • The large and brightly coloured bongo (Boocercus euryceros) of the equatorial forest-districts serves in some respects to connect the bushbucks with the elands, having horns in both sexes, and a tufted tail, but a brilliant orange coat with vertical white stripes.

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  • The small horns and bluish-grey colour of the adult bulls serve to distinguish the Indian nilgai, Boselaphus tragocamelus, from the other members of the subfamily.

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  • These are for the most part large antelopes, with long cylindrical horns, which are present in both sexes, hairy muzzles, no face-glands, long tufted tails and tall thick molars of the ox-type.

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  • In Hippotragus the stout and thickly ringed horns rise vertically from a ridge above the eyes at an obtuse angle to the plane of the lower part of the face, and then sweep backwards in a bold curve; while there are tufts of long white hairs near the eyes.

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  • In the addax (Addax nasomaculatus), which is a distinct species common to North Africa and Syria, the ringed horns form an open spiral ascending in the plane of the face, and there is long, shaggy, dark hair on the fore-quarters in winter.

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  • The various species of oryx differ from Hippotragus by the absence of the white eye-tufts, and by the horns sloping backwards in the plane of the face.

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  • Pits are present in the forehead of the skull, and the horns are ringed for part of their length, with a compressed base; their form being often lyrate,.

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  • The horns are more or less lyrate,and generally developed in both sexes; there are frequently brushes of hair on the knees.

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  • The face has the ordinary gazelle-markings; but the rather short horns - which are wanting in the female - have a peculiar upward and forward curvature, unlike that obtaining in the gazelles FIG.

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  • The East African gerenuk, or Waller's gazelle (Lithocranius walleri), of which two races have been named, is a very remarkable ruminant, distinguished not only by its exceedingly elongated neck and limbs, but also by the peculiar hooked form of the very massive horns of the bucks, the dense structure and straight profile of the skull, and the extreme slenderness of the lower jaw.

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  • A still more aberrant gazelle is a small North-East African species known as the beira (Dorcatragus melanotis), with very short horns, large hoofs and a general appearance recalling that of some of the members of the subfamily Neotraginae, although in other respects gazelle-like.

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  • With the palla, or impala(A epyceros melampus), we reach an exclusively African genus, characterized by the lyrate horns of the bucks, the absence of lateral hoofs, and the presence of a pair of glands with black tufts of hair on the hind-feet.

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  • More or less nearly related to the saiga is the chiru, Pantholops hodgsoni, of Tibet, characterized by the long upright black horns of the bucks, and the less convex nose, in which the nostrils open anteriorly instead of downwards.

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  • Almost the only characters they possess in common are the short and spike-like horns of the bucks, which are ringed at the base, with smooth tips, and the large size of the face-gland, which opens by a circular aperture.

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  • In some respects connecting the last group with the Cervicaprinae is the rhebok, or vaal-rhebok (Pelea capreolus), a grey antelope of the size of a roebuck, with small upright horns in the bucks recalling those of the last group, and small lateral hoofs, but no face-glands.

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  • Reedbuck, or rietbok (Cervicapra), are foxy-red antelopes ranging in size from a fallow-deer to a roe, with thick bushy tails, forwardly curving black horns, and a bare patch of glandular skin behind each ear.

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  • The duikers, or duikerboks (Cephalophus), of Africa, which range in size from a large hare to a fallow-deer, typify the subfamily Cephalophinae, characterized by the spike-like horns of the bucks, the elongated aperture of the face-glands, the naked muzzle, the relatively short tail, and the square-crowned upper molars; lateral hoofs being present.

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  • In the duikers themselves the single pair of horns is set in the midst of a tuft of long hairs, and the face-gland opens in a long naked line on the side of the face above the muzzle.

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  • All these are large and generally more or less uniformly coloured antelopes with horns in both sexes, long and more or less hairy tails, high withers, small face-glands, naked muzzles, tall, narrow upper molars, and the absence of pits in the frontal bones.

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  • The long face, high crest for the horns, which are ringed, lyrate and more or less strongly angulated, and the moderately long tail, are the distinctive features of the hartebeests.

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  • They are heavily built ruminants, with horns of nearly equal size in both sexes, short tapering tails, large hoofs, narrow goat-like upper molars, and usually small face-glands.

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  • The horns are generally rather small, upright, ringed at the base,.

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  • In the structure of its horns the North American white Rocky Mountain goat (Oreamnus) is very like a serow, from which it differs by its extremely short cannon-bones.

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  • In the latter respect this ruminant resembles the takin (Budorcas) of Tibet, which, as already mentioned, has horns recalling those of the white-tailed gnu.

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  • Elands and kudus appear to have been represented in India during the Pliocene; the European Palaeoreas of the same age seems to be intermediate between the two, while Protragelaphus is evidently another European representative of the group. Helicophora is another spiral-horned European Pliocene antelope, but of somewhat doubtful affinity; the same being the case with the large Criotherium of the Samos Pliocene, in which the short horns are curiously twisted.

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  • He wrestles with Achelous for Deianeira (" destructive to husband "), daughter of Oeneus, king of Calydon, vanquishes the river god, and breaks off one of his horns, which as a horn of plenty is found as an attribute of Hercules in art.

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  • In art, Oceanus was represented as an old man of noble presence and benevolent expression, with the horns of an ox and sometimes crab's claws on his head.

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  • The island is visited periodically by a few Samoyedes; they formerly considered it sacred, and some of their sacrificial piles, consisting of drift-wood, deer's horns and the skulls of bears and deer, have been observed by travellers.

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  • N., were discovered, in 1639 and 1734 respectively, two golden horns of the Scandinavian period; these were stolen in 1802 from the Museum of Northern Antiquities in Copenhagen, where they had been treasured, and have never been recovered.

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  • Hearing, however, that Solomon, with the help of Nathan the prophet and Bathsheba, and apparently with the consent of David, had ascended the throne, he fled for safety to the horns of the altar.

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  • On entering his province he induced Drusilla, wife of Azizus of Horns (Emesa), to leave her husband and live with him as his wife.

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  • The title " branching horns " alludes to the second antennae, which are two-branched except in the females of Holopedium, with each branch setiferous, composed of only two to four joints.

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  • This appendage is merely a fold of the skin, ornamental and sexual; it has no cavity in its interior, and has no communication with the mouth or with the respiratory organs; it is supported by the posterior horns of the hyoid bone, and can be erected and spread at the will of the animal.

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  • Beecher (1856-1905) has pointed out (1898), many animals possessing hard parts tend toward the close of their racial history to produce a superfluity of dead matter, which accumulates in the form of spines among invertebrates, and of horns among the land vertebrates, reaching a maximum when the animals are really on the down-grade of development.

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  • Among still other causes are great bulk, which proves fatal under certain new conditions; relatively slow breeding; extreme specialization and development of dominant organs, such as horns and tusks, on which for a time selection centres to the detriment of more useful characters.

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  • The of tencited poems attributed to Nezahualcoyotl may not be quite genuine, but at any rate poetry had risen above the barbaric level, while the mention of ballads among the people, court odes, and the chants of temple choirs would indicate a vocal cultivation above that of the instrumental music of drums and horns, pipes and whistles, the latter often of pottery.

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  • Standing as high as a large donkey, the argali is the finest of all the wild sheep, the horns of the rams, although of inferior length, being more massive than those of Ovis poli of the Pamirs.

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  • In northern Europe the wood spirit, Ljesche, is believed to have a goat's horns, ears and legs.

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  • The horns of the bucks are heavy, and have a peculiar forward curvature at the tips; the colour of the coat is red-fawn, with a broad brown band down the back.

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  • The horns of the old bucks are of great length and beauty, and characterized by their bold scimitar-like backward sweep and sharp front edge, interrupted at irregular intervals by knots or bosses.

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  • Some of these reverted breeds have developed horns of considerable size, although not showing that regularity of curve distinctive of the wild race.

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  • In the Azores the horns are remarkably upright and straight, whence the name of "antelopegoat" which has been given to these animals.

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  • It is true that many tame goats show spirally twisted horns recalling those of the under-mentioned Asiatic markhor; but in nearly all such instances it will be found that the spiral twists in the opposite direction.

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  • Firstly, we have the common or European goats, of which there are several more or less well-marked breeds, differing from each other in length of hair, in colour and slightly in the configuration of the horns.

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  • The horns are rather flat at the base and not unfrequently corrugated; they rise vertically from the head, curving to the rear, and are more or less laterally inclined.

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  • The horns are large in the male, and of moderate size in the female, flat at the base and inclining outwards.

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  • The head is long, heavy and ugly, the nose coarse and prominent, with the horns situated close together, often continuing parallel almost to the extremities, being also large, corrugated and pointed.

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  • The goats of France are similar to those of Britain, varying in length of hair, colour and character of horns.

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  • The Norway breed is frequently white with long hair; it is rather small in size, with small bones, a short rounded body, head small with a prominent forehead, and short, straight, corrugated horns.

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  • The horns of the males are very large, and curve round after the manner of the wild goat, with a tuft of hair between and in front.

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  • The horns are somewhat erect and spiral, with an outward bend.

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  • The horns of the male differ from those of the female, being directed vertically and in shape spiral, whilst in the female they have a horizontal tendency, somewhat like those of a ram.

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  • The horns are very erect, and sometimes slightly spiral, inclining inwards and to such an extent in some cases as to cross.

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  • The horns are black, slightly twisted and very short, flat at the base, pointed at the tips, and recumbent on the head.

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  • The horns, however, are more spiral.

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  • The ibex are connected with the wild goat by means of Capra nubiana, in which the front edge of the horns is thinner than in either the European C. ibex or the Asiatic C. sibirica; while the Spanish C. pyrenaica shows how the ibex-type of horn may pass into the spirally twisted one distinctive of the markhor, C. falconeri.

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  • In this ruminant, which is of a dark-brown colour, the relatively smooth black horns diverge outwards in a manner resembling those of the bharal among the sheep rather than in goat-fashion; and, in fact, this tur, which has only a very short beard, is so bharal-like that it is commonly called by sportsmen the Caucasian bharal.

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  • Both sexes carry lyrate horns; the shoulder-height of an adult male is about 30 in., and an average pair of horns measures 14 in.

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  • The general colour is bluegrey with black "points" and white markings and belly; and the horns of the rams are olive-brown and nearly smooth, with a characteristic backward curvature.

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  • The knights wore a collar of golden hunting horns, whence the order was also known as the Order of the Horn.

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  • Varius, though still only a boy, was appointed high priest of the Syrian sun-god Elagabalus, one of the chief seats of whose worship was Emesa (Horns).

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  • The Sumatran rhinoceros differs from the Javanese in having two horns, like the African variety.

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  • A second antelope inhabiting the same country as the chiru is the goa (Gazella picticaudata), a member of the gazelle group characterized by the peculiar form of the horns of the bucks and certain features of coloration, whereby it is markedly distinguished from all its kindred save one or two other central Asian species.

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  • To have made the attack from the northern end would in Nelson's words have been "to take the bull by the horns."

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  • About equal in height to a roebuck, and with a short black tail, the chamois is readily distinguishable from all other ruminants by its vertical, backwardly-hooked, black horns, which are common to males and females, although smaller in the latter.

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  • Males have a pair of dagger-shaped horns on the forehead, the tips of which, in some cases at any rate, perforate the hairy skin with which the rest of the horns are covered.

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  • Specimens in the museum at Tervueren near Brussels show that in fully adult males the horns are subtriangular and inclined somewhat backwards; each being capped with a small polished epiphysis, which projects through the skin investing the rest of the horn.

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  • Again, in Palaeotragus the horns (present only in the male) are situated immediately over the eye-sockets, in Ocapia they are placed just behind the latter, while in Giraffa they are partly on the parietals.

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  • The small size of the horns of the males is probably also an adaptation to life in thick underwood.

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  • Those of the upper jaw are directed upwards from their bases, so that they never enter the mouth, but pierce the skin of the face, thus resembling horns rather than teeth; they curve backwards, downwards, and finally often forwards again, almost or quite touching the forehead.

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  • The Egyptian Pharaohs of the XVIIIth dynasty had likewise been proclaimed mystically sons of this god, who, it was asserted, had impregnated the queenmother; and on occasion wore the ram's horns of Ammon, even as Alexander is represented with them on coins.

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  • The Egyptian goose (chenalopex) is figured in the XVIIIth dynasty as sacred to Ammon; but his most frequent and celebrated incarnation was the woolly sheep with curved (" Ammon") horns (as opposed to the oldest native breed with long horizontal twisted horns and hairy coat, sacred to Khnum or Chnumis).

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  • Khnum was likewise identified with Zeus probably through his similarity to Ammon; his proper animal having early become extinct, Ammon horns in course of time were attributed to this god also.

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  • According to this, God caused horns to grow on Alexander's head to enable him to overthrow all things.

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  • This detail of the legend is ultimately traceable, as Hottinger long ago supposed, to the numerous coins on which Alexander is represented with the ram's horns of Ammon.'

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  • Sheep of a peculiar breed with horizontal twisted horns and hairy coat are figured on.

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  • The bow was always of wood, in one piece in the prehistoric and early times, also of two horns in the 1st Dynasty; but the compound bow of horn is rarely found, only as an importation, in the XVIIIth Dynasty.

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  • The Ilamdnid Saif addaula shortly after this assumed the governorship of Aleppo, and became involved in a struggle with the Ikshid, whose general, Kgfur, he defeated in an engagement between Horns and Hamab (Hamath).

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  • Another general, although not universal, characteristic of the Pecora is the presence of simple or complex appendages on the forehead commonly known as horns.

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  • In the giraffes the separation of the horns from the skull may be a degenerate character.

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  • In the Asiatic muntjac deer we find a pair of skin-covered horns, or " pedicles," corresponding to the paired horns of the giraffe, although welded to the skull.

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  • The sheaths are akin to hair in structure, thus suggesting affinity with the hairs surmounting the giraffe's horns.

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  • Female prongbuck may or may not have horns.

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  • In many cases these horns are present in both sexes.

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  • From the fact that the bony horn-core of the hollow-horned ruminants first develops as a separate ossification, as do the horns of the giraffe, while the pedicle of the antlers of the deer grow direct from the frontal bone, it has been proposed to place the hollow-horned ruminants (inclusive of the prongbuck) and the giraffes in one group and the deer in another.

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  • One very important fact recorded by Dr Gadow is that calves and lambs shed their horns at an early age.

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  • The giraffes (Giraffa) are now an exclusively African genus, and have long legs and neck, and three horns - a single one in front and a pair behind - supplemented in some instances with a rudimentary pair on the occiput.

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  • The okapi (Ocapia), which is also African but restricted to the tropical forest-region, in place of being an inhabitant of more or less open country, represents a second genus, characterized by the shorter neck and limbs, the totally different type of colouring, and the restriction of the horns to the male sex, in which they form a pair on the forehead; these horns being more compressed than FIG.

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  • From deposits of the same age in Greece, Samos and elsewhere have been obtained skulls and other remains of Palaeotragus or Samotherium, a ruminant closely allied to Ocapia, the males of which were armed with a very similar pair of dagger-shaped horns.

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  • In the equally large Bramatherium and Hydaspitherium of India the horns of the males were complex, those of the former including an occipital pair, while those of the latter arise from a common base.

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  • Largest of all is Sivatherium, typically from the Lower Pliocene of Northern India, but also recorded from Adrianople, in which the skull of the male is short and wide, with a pair of simple conical horns above the eye, and a huge branching pair at the vertex.

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  • Either we must regard Merycodus as a deer which parallels the antelopes and the prongbuck in every detail of skeletal structure, or else, like the prongbuck, an antelope separated from the main stock at a date sufficiently early to have permitted the development of a distinct type of cranial appendages, namely, antlers in place of true horns.

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  • The characteristic of this family - as represented by the prongbuck - is that the sheath of the horns is forked, and shed annually, or every few years.

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  • Lastly, we have the great family of hollow-horned ruminants or Bovidae, in which the horns (present in the males at least of all the existing species) take the form of simple non-deciduous hollow sheaths growing upon bony cores.

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  • The lowest part of the province, the north-west end, is occupied by the Birket el Kerun, or Lake of the Horns, whose surface level is 140 ft.

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  • The breeds include the Ayrshire, noted milkers and specially adapted for dairy farms (which prevail in the south-west), which in this respect have largely supplanted the Galloway in their native district; the polled Angus or Aberdeen, fair milkers, but valuable for their beef-making qualities, and on this account, as well as their hardihood, in great favour in the north-east, where cattlefeeding has been carried to perfection; and the West Highland or Kyloe breed, a picturesque breed with long horns, shaggy coats and decided colours-black, red, dun, cream and brindle-that thrives well on wild and healthy pasture.

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  • This conversion, represented as having been brought about while he was hunting on Good Friday by a miraculous appearance of a stag bearing between his horns a cross or crucifix surrounded with rays of light, has frequently been made the subject of artistic treatment.

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  • The blood is converted into clarifying material, the entrails are used for sausage coverings, the hoofs and small bones furnish the raw material for the manufacture of glue, the large bones are carved into knife handles, and the horns into combs, the fats are made to yield butterine, lard and soap, and the hides and hair are used in the manufacture of mattresses and felts.

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  • There are no horns or antlers.

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  • The attempt, however, proved unsuccessful, and after suffering considerable losses the Palmyrenes retired in the direction of Emesa (now Horns), whence the road lay open to their native city.

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  • It has two horns and a bristly coat.

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  • The doe is of a light fawn colour and has no horns.

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  • His spiral horns, twisted for three or four turns like a corkscrew, often reach the length of 30 in.

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  • Its short curved horns and skull are enormously massive.

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  • The horns of the bull are thicker than those of the cow, but the horns of the cow are larger.

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  • Newton's first telescope so far realized his expectations that he could see with its aid the satellites of Jupiter and the horns of Venus.

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  • In all these antelopes long cylindrical horns are present in both sexes; the muzzle is hairy; there is no gland below the eye; the tail is long and tufted; and in the breadth of their tall crowns the upper molar-teeth resemble those of the oxen.

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  • The sable and roan antelopes are distinguished from Oryx by the stout and thickly ringed horns rising vertically from a ridge over the eyes at an obtuse angle to the plane of the lower part of the face, and then sweeping backwards in a bold curve.

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  • The roan antelope is a larger animal, with shorter horns, whose general colour in both sexes is strawberry-roan.

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  • He was born with horns, a goat's beard and feet and a tail, his person being completely covered with hair.

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  • Sometimes he has goat's feet and horns, curly hair and a long beard, half animal, half man; sometimes he is a handsome youth, with long flowing hair, only characterized by horns just beginning to grow, the shepherd's crook and pipe.

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  • They are killed for their flesh, hides and horns, and little attention is paid to their milkgiving properties.

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  • The neat cattle, which are of Australian and Indian origin, are raised chiefly for beef, their hides and their horns; about nine-tenths of them were destroyed by the rinderpest and the war at the close of the 19th century.

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  • It is remarkable withal that this rumour circulated, not in Horns (Emesa), where Abdarrahman died, but in Medina.

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  • On the news of the murder of the caliph, the citizens of Horns (Emesa) put at their head Abu Mahommed as-Sofiani, a grandson of Yazid I., and marched against Damascus.

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  • No`aim revolted in Palestine, Emesa (Horns) and Tadmor were turbulent, Damascus was besieged by Yazid b.

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  • Suleiman fled to Horns and thence to Tadmor and on to Kufa, leaving his brother Said in Horns.

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  • Hippopotamus, otter and the wild boar are numerous; a species of wild ox of small size with black horns and very agile is also found.

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  • There is, as yet, no evidence as to whether the females of the true bongo bear horns, though it is probable they do; but as the horns are present in both sexes of the East African form, Mr Oldfield Thomas has made that the type of the genus.'

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  • He defeated the Ottoman advance-guard at Horns on the 9th of July and at Hamah on the 11th, entered Aleppo on the 17th, and on the 29th inflicted a crushing defeat on the main Turkish army under Hussein Pasha at the pass of Beilan.

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  • He is pictured as having seven mouths, a hundred wings and horns and is armed with bow and arrows and an axe.

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  • This goat having broken off one of its horns, Amaltheia filled it with flowers and fruits and presented it to Zeus, who placed it together with the goat amongst the stars.

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  • The horns are peculiar for their upright direction and comparative straightness, although they.have the same triangular section as in other buffaloes.

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  • The horns of the cows are very small.

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  • Oxen are employed for all field-work; those of the commonest breed are tawny, of great muscular power, very docile, and with horns measuring 5 or 6 ft.

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  • Thus the " Celtic " ox (Bos longifrons), from remote ages the common type in the Alpine regions, is characterized by the height of its forehead above the orbits, by its highly-developed occipital region, and its small horns.

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  • At the north end was the famous altar, built out of the horns of the victims, which was sometimes reckoned among the seven wonders of the world.

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  • On the other hand, the recorded discovery of iron armour, Roman and British pottery and coins, together with the bones and horns of deer and other animals, is of little evidential value without a precise record of the circumstances in which they were found.

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  • Bruce threw his infantry reserve into the battle, the arrows of the English archers wounded the men-at-arms of their own side, and the remnants of the leading line were tired and disheartened when the final impetus to their rout was given by the historic charge of the "gillies," some thousands of Scottish campfollowers who suddenly emerged from the woods, blowing horns, waving such weapons as they possessed, and holding aloft improvised banners.

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  • The males alone have rather small, spirally twisted horns.

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  • They have heavily fringed necks and tufted tails; the bucks carry long sublyrate and heavily ringed horns, but the does are horn- - - less.

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  • The Abyssinian rhinoceros has two horns and its skin has no folds.

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  • The horns of the zebu variety are sometimes four feet long.

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  • The horns of the large goats are of ten thirty inches in length and stand up straight from the head.

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  • C. Hovey as a prehistoric quarry, proved to be such by the stag horns and boulder pounders found in its vicinity.

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  • The large bronzes are almost the only ones which have survived from classical times, the most famous of them being the seated Mercury and the dancing Faun; the marbles reckon among their vast number the Psyche, the Capuan Venus, the portraits of Homer and Julius Caesar, as well as the huge group called the Toro Farnese (Amphion and Zethus tying Dirce to its horns), the Farnese Hercules, the excellent though late statues of the Balbi on horseback and a very fine collection of ancient portrait busts.

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  • There are three breeds of Rumanian oxen, besides the peculiar black buffaloes, with horns lying almost flat along their necks.

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  • The takin, which may be compared in size to a Kerry cow, is a clumsily built brute with yellowish-brown hair and curiously curved horns, which recall those of the South African white-tailed gnu.

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  • Both sexes usually possess horns, but those of the females are small.

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  • In the males the horns are generally angulated, and marked by fine transverse wrinkles; their colour being greenish or brownish.

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  • It is remarkable for the great size of the horns of the old rams and the wide open sweep of their curve, so that the points stand boldly out on each side, far away from the animal's head, instead of curling round nearly in the same plane, as in most of the allied species.

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  • Although its horns are less extended laterally than those of 0.

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  • They are chiefly manifested in the form and number of the horns, which may be increased from the normal two to four or even eight, or may be altogether absent in the female alone or in both sexes; in the shape and length of the ears, which often hang pendent by the side of the head; in the peculiar elevation or arching of the nasal bones in some eastern races; in the length of the tail, and the development of great masses of fat at each side of its root or in the tail itself; and in the colour and quality of the fleece.

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  • Both breeds, which have short tails and small horns (present only in the rams), were regarded by the German naturalist Fitzinger as specifically distinct from the domesticated Ovis cries of Europe; and for the first type he proposed the name 0.

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  • The ewes are hornless, but in Africa the rams have very short, thick and somewhat goatlike horns.

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  • Indian breed, which has probably been introduced from Africa, both sexes are devoid of horns.

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  • The feeble development of the horns is probably also a feature due to domestication.

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  • Fat-rumped sheep, Ovis steatopyga, are common to Africa and Asia, and are piebald with rudimentary horns, and a short hairy coat, being bred entirely for their milk and flesh.

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  • In the unicorn sheep of Nepal or Tibet the two horns of the rams are completely welded together.

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  • Europe, in which the long upright horns are spirally twisted like those of the mazkhor wild goat.

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  • Of Derbyshire Gritstone neither sex has horns.

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  • In the other horned breeds, the Dorset and Somerset, Limestone, Exmoor, Old Norfolk, and Western or Old Wiltshire, both sexes have horns.

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  • The characteristics of the latter are retained in the black face and legs of the Suffolk, but the horns have been bred out.

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  • The spiral horns are low at the crown, with a clear space between the roots, and sweep in a wide curve, sloping slightly backwards, and clear of the cheek.

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  • Its face and legs are mottled black and white, and its horns are strong.

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  • The rams sometimes have small, curved, wide horns like those of the Cheviot ram.

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  • Both sexes have horns, very much coiled in the ram.

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  • The rains possess large coiling horns - the ewes may or may not have them.

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  • Eusebius accepted the small bishopric of Emesa (the modern Horns) in Phoenicia, but his powers as mathematician and astronomer led his flock to accuse him of practising sorcery, and he had to flee to Laodicea.

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  • When sculptured decorations were added they frequently took the form of imitations of the actual festoons with which it was usual to ornament altars, or of symbols, such as crania and horns of oxen, referring to the victims sacrificed.

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  • The crescent is employed as a charge in heraldry, with its horns vertical; when they are turned to the dexter side of the shield, it is called increscent, when to the sinister, decrescent.

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  • Other epidermic appendages are the horns of ruminants and rhinoceroses - the former being elongated, tapering, hollow caps of hardened epidermis of fibrous structure, fitting on and growing from conical projections of the frontal bones and always arranged in pairs, while the latter are of similar structure, but without any internal bony support, and situated in the middle line.

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  • In the alpine tracts of the Tian-shan, on the borders of the Pamir, their horns and skulls are frequently met with, but there the place of the species is now taken by Ovis karelini.

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  • Otherwise the chief articles of Constantinople's export trade consist of refuse and waste materials, sheep's wool (called Kassab bashi) and skins from the slaughter-houses (in 1903 about 3,coo,000 skins were exported, mostly to America), horns, hoofs, goat and horse hair, guts, bones, rags, bran, old iron, &c., and finally dogs' excrements, called in trade ` pure,' a Constantinople speciality, which is used in preparing leather for ladies' gloves.

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  • The aurochs was a black animal, with a lighter dorsal streak, and horns directed upwards in the shape of a pitchfork, black at their tips, but otherwise whitish.

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  • Among other British breeds may be mentioned the Devons and Herefords, both characterized by their red colour; the long-horned and Sussex breeds, both with very large horns, showing a tendency to grow downwards; and the Ayrshire.

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  • Polled, or hornless, breeds, such as the polled Angus and polled Suffolk, are of interest, as showing how easily the horns can be eliminated, and thus indicating a hornless ancestry.

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  • The great white or cream coloured cattle of Italy, Austria, Hungary and Poland, which have very long black-tipped horns, are also probably not far removed from the aurochs stock.

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  • On the other hand, the great tawny draught cattle of Spain seem to indicate mixture with a different stock, the horns having a double curvature, quite different from the simple one of the aurochs type.

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  • Humped cattle are widely spread over Africa, Madagascar and India, and form a distinct species, Bos indicus, characterized by the presence of a fleshy hump on the shoulders, the convexity (instead of concavity) of the first part of the curve of the horns, the very large size of the dewlap, and the general presence of white rings round the fetlocks, and light circles surrounding the eyes.

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  • The largest horns are found in the Galla cattle, in which they attain enormous dimensions.

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  • The cattle of Ankole, on the Uganda frontier, which have immense horns, conform to this type.

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  • From all other Bovinae they differ by the triangular section of their horns.

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  • The structure of their molar teeth affiliates them to the antelopes of the Oryx and Hippotragus groups; but the early bovines lack horns in the female, whereas both sexes of these antelopes are horned.

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  • Perhaps, however, the most interesting are the remains of certain oxen from the Lower Pliocene of Europe and India, which have been described under the sub-generic (or generic) title of Leptobos, and are characterized by the absence of horns in the females.

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  • Many of these are of curious form, with remarkable developments of the plates of the head and projecting horns and spines.

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  • Here she was discovered by Dirce, who ordered the two young men to tie her to the horns of a wild bull.

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  • The horns of the male rise from the crest of the skull, and after bending gradually backwards terminate in smooth tips; the front surface of the remainder carrying bold transverse ridges or knots.

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  • These ibex, especially the race from the Thian Shan, are incomparably finer than the European species, their bold knotted horns sometimes attaining a length of close on 60 in.

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  • The Arabian, or Nubian, ibex (C. nubiana) is characterized by the more slender type of horn, in which the front edge is much narrower; while the Simien ibex (C. vali) of Central Abyssinia is a very large and dark-coloured animal, with the horns black instead of brownish, and bearing only slightly marked front ridges.

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  • The Caucasian ibex (C. caucasica), or tur, is a wholly fox-coloured animal, in which the horns are still flatter in front, and thus depart yet further from the ibex type.

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  • In the Spanish ibex (C. pyrenaica) the horns fare flattened, with ill-defined knobs, and a spiral twist.

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  • Yet the fact that the long, soft Conchoderma auritum stands exposed on the Coronula, sometimes ten on one, indicates that the whale can have little chance of evicting its tenants, even at the expense of rubbing off the eighteen flattened horns of its own skin embedded in cavities round the domed base of the Coronula shell.

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  • Later she commonly wore the horns of a cow, and the cow was sacred to her; it is doubtful, however, whether she had any animal representation in early times, nor had she possession of any considerable locality until a late period, when Philae, Behbet and other large temples were dedicated to her worship. Yet she was of great importance in mythology, religion and magic, appearing constantly in the very ancient Pyramid texts as the devoted sister-wife of Osiris and mother of Horus.

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  • He had thought her younger than forty when they first locked horns over the speeding ticket, but he was admittedly inept at guessing women's ages—or guessing practically anything about the fairer sex.

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  • In spite of his love of music, no pocket recorder filled Dean's head with voices, strings or horns through tiny toy earphones— he'd leave that to the bikers who pedaled unaware of the sounds of birds and springtime around them.

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  • There was no sign of any fins, horns or other appurtenances.

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  • The original Bradford shield featured a red and blue per pale field bearing an engrailed gold chevron between three hunting horns.

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  • Mozart composed this divertimento, or sextet for strings and two horns, eight days after his pet starling dies.

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  • Usually they've got horns or a shark fin on their hoods.

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  • The ranch has a large corral with a dozen or so hapless cattle for the tourists ' sport - some with large horns.

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  • The road was very busy with traffic, with much hooting of horns, obviously a very popular weekend route for locals.

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  • Ignoring traffic, blaring horns and fingered salutes, we kissed on cheeks, then lips and hips gridlocked.

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  • But when Laurie Anderson composed a drive-in concert of motorists beeping car horns, she was being creative.

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  • The dorsal horns are where sensory neurons enter the spinal cord.

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  • There's fog horns, there's a piece of the Mozart Requiem, you name it.

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  • Medallions of the king ever after showed him crowned with the ram's horns of kingship and divinity.

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  • Lindsay, AAA champion at U15 level last year locked horns with the 1999 ESAA junior boys javelin champion Andy Robinson.

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  • The act was accompanied by so much mirth that neighbors were awakened and saw the men and the horns which led to much jeering.

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  • Some carried greenery including mistletoe, others bells and/or ceremonial staves of antlers ' horns.

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  • The accompaniment also includes two oboes, two clarinets, two bass bassoons, two horns, tuba and tympani.

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  • The game opens with you, a little guy or girl with horns, arriving penniless in a town populated with anthropomorphic animals.

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  • Hunting horns are heard in the forests, before the river flows past a rustic wedding celebration where the guests are dancing a polka.

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  • They had shaggy, thick wool and two horns.

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  • I have tried things for pulling up socks or tights without much success; shoe horns, long and short, and elastic shoelaces.

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  • The ventral horns are where motor neurons leave the spinal cord.

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  • A being with horns and a forked tail is a myth.

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  • On most horns the crook has a tenon that simply fits into a corresponding socket on the body.

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  • We much tooting of horns, raising of flags and waving, the two ship passed by.

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  • On the left of the stage are the French horns, and on the right trumpets, trombones and finally tubas.

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  • If a tin whistle is made of tin, what are fog horns made of?

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  • Car flags, woofer cheer horns, Afro wigs, .. .

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  • Lydgate certainly possessed extraordinary versatility, which enabled him to turn from elaborate epics to quite popular poems like the Mumming at Hertford, A Ditty of Women's Horns and London Lickpenny.

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  • In addition to certain details in the conformation of the skull, the horns are much more slender than in the ordinary white goat, and instead of bending regularly backwards till near their tips, curve widely outwards from their bases.

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  • It is only after the service of consecration and the mass are finished that the consecrating prelate asperses and blesses the mitre and places on the head of the newly consecrated bishop, according to the prayer which accompanies the act, " the helmet of protection and salvation," the two horns of which represent " the horns of the Old and New Testaments," a terror to " the enemies of truth," and also the horns of " divine brightness and truth " which God set on the brow of Moses on Mount Sinai.

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  • About iroo the conical mitre begins to give place to a round one; a band of embroidery is next set over the top from back to front, which tends to bulge up the soft material on either side; and these bulges develop into points or horns.

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  • To this was added later a vertical orphrey (titulus), usually from the centre of the front of the circulus to that of the back, partly in order to hide the seam, partly to emphasize the horns when those were to left and right.

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  • But there were dissensions within, both between Baldwin and his mother, Melisinda, who sought to protract her regency unduly, and between contending parties in Antioch, where the hand of Constance, Raymund's widow, was a desirable prize 4; while from without the horns of the crescent were slowly closing in on the kingdom.

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  • The horns are of nearly equal size in both sexes, are placed on or near the vertex of the skull, and may be either rounded or angulated, while their direction is more or less outwards, with an upward direction near the tips, and conspicuous knobs or ridges are never developed on their surface.

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  • No importance can be attached to the presence of horns as an indication of affinity between Arsinoitherium and the Amblypoda; and there are important differences in the structure of the skulls of the two, notably in the external auditory meatus, the occiput, the premaxill.ae, the palatal foramina and the lower jaw.

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  • It represents a man in the act of turning a somersault over the horns of a charging bull, a unique rendering of a familiar theme in Minoan art.

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  • This view, however, has not met with general acceptance, on the ground that, in Semitic mythology, the moon is always a male divinity; and that the full moon and crescent, found as attributes of Astarte, are due to a misinterpretation of the sun's disk and cow's horns of Isis, the result of the dependence of Syrian religious art upon Egypt.

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  • In the typical oxen, as represented by the existing domesticated breeds (see Cattle) and the extinct aurochs, the horns are cylindrical and placed on an elevated crest at the very vertex of the skull, which has the frontal region of great length.

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  • A second group of the genus Bos is represented by the IndoMalay cattle included in the sub-genus Bibos (see Bantin, Gaur and Gayal); they are characterized by the more or less marked flattening of the horns, the presence of a well-marked ridge on the anterior half of the back, and the white legs.

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  • More distinct are the bisons, forming the sub-genus Bison, represented by the European and the American species (see Bison), the forehead of the skull being much shorter and wider, and the horns not arising from a crest on the extreme vertex, while the number of ribs is different (14 pairs in bisons, only 13 in oxen), and the hair on the head and neck is long and shaggy.

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  • He behaved with extraordinary skill, displaying in the heat of the conflict all the abilities of an experienced conspirator, knowing, "like the snail, how to draw in his horns as soon as he met with an obstacle" (Thiers), but supple, resourceful and unscrupulous as to the choice of men and means in his obstinate struggle for power.

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  • One man still preserves the horns of the last deer that was killed in this vicinity, and another has told me the particulars of the hunt in which his uncle was engaged.

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  • In the second act there was scenery representing tombstones, there was a round hole in the canvas to represent the moon, shades were raised over the footlights, and from horns and contrabass came deep notes while many people appeared from right and left wearing black cloaks and holding things like daggers in their hands.

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  • The cymbals and horns in the orchestra struck up more loudly, and this man with bare legs jumped very high and waved his feet about very rapidly.

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  • Blue; a stirrup white interlaced by two hunting horns in saltire gold.

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  • The sheaves of barley refer to malting and the post horns to the town 's coaching inns.

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  • Well Urban Art Forms in Austria have taken the bull by the horns and created a fully audiovisual smorgasbord of delight.

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  • I remember leaving a GCR trespass notice near one of the abutments of Horns Bridge viaduct as it was too common to bother with !

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  • The orchestration includes off-stage trumpets, horns and timpani.

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  • Many cathedrals across Europe had whole ' unicorn horns ' on public display.

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  • Most of the advice listed above can be used for purchasing many types of instruments like horns or pianos.

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  • Brass instruments include trumpets, trombones, French horns, and similar instruments.

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  • It cannot have feathers, hooves, horns, teeth or hair.

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  • Following in the South Seas tradition of all Pacific Islanders, Conch and Triton seashell horns are always blown to herald the new wedding.

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  • A pair of first men blow the horns in concert as the new couple is pronounced man and wife.

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  • The blowing of shell horns to celebrate the new wedding is a very romantic moment!

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  • These tropical island wedding horns were used at the wedding of Nicholas Cage to Lisa Marie Presley and many others!

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  • Many celebrity weddings have celebrated their island weddings with the blowing of these shell horns.

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  • Shell horns will turn your own celebrity wedding into an occasion of jubilation and high spirits!

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  • Engraved shell horns are wonderful lifetime keepsakes, and they make perfect groomsmen gifts.

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  • Shell horns are easy to blow and make a thunderous sound.

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  • Shell horns are now being used all over the world to celebrate weddings in true island fashion!

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  • Legendary horns have a brass mouthpiece and a unique yacht line lanyard with an engravable nameplate.

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  • Legendary Shells are the worlds only makers of shell trophy wedding horns, with over 30 years experience!

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  • Their horns are now used and sought after by numerous foreign as well domestic symphony orchestras!

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  • And by all sailors and fishermen as signal horns since the dawn of sailing ships.

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  • Seafarers, whether whalers, explorers or traders. would encounter conch horns being used in all of the southern waters of the world from China to southeast Asia to South America and the Caribbean.

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  • They were used extensively by the British Navy for hundreds of years, and now today as sailing trophies, wedding horns or special award trophy gifts!

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  • These shell horns are very much part of the soul of the islands and seafaring history.

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  • The cruise features horns, hats and other party décor.

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  • While the stores carry everything from drums to horns to pianos to recording equipment, the focus of this article will be on what this music superstore can offer guitarists and bass players.

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  • Choices include cut crystal and beadwork, elk horns and handmade glass ornaments.

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  • The firm was based in Providence, Rhode Island and made small sterling silver, silver plate and gold items for the home and personal use, such as hair brushes, compacts, hat brushes, hand mirrors, dresser jars, shoe horns and button hooks.

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  • When a deer was hunted, its meat fed the people, its pelt warmed them and its horns and hooves were carved into beautiful beads to adorn them.

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  • In the past ten or so years, the contact lens wearers have taken the bull by the horns, so to speak, when it came down to saving money on contact lenses.

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  • Chun-Li wears a blue qipao--a traditional Chinese dress--and has her hair done up in "Ox horns" adorned with brocades and ribbons.

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  • It's that oddball stuffed animal mounted over the bar of a jackrabbit with antelope horns.

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  • Take advantage of the lack of car horns, noisy neighbors, loud radios, and all the other day-to-day disturbances we live with in town.

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  • Goth Punk offers tips for "fans" and "spikes" or "horns"-how to grow it, how to style it, and how to keep it healthy.

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  • The first is just a hooded towel with a cheerful monster face - plus ears and horns - on the head and paw pads in the covered corners.

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  • Incidentally, the "Lazy S" design is said to be designed that way as an interpretation of the horns on longhorn cattle.

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  • Antiphonal Chant - A two minute section, this one is louder than the first, with trombones, trumpets, horns and cornets being joined by woodwinds for a spectacularly loud finish.

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