How to use Himalayas in a sentence

himalayas
  • On the south it is bounded by the Himalayas, on the north by a mountain-system still more vast.

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  • Failing to reach India through Upper Assam he returned to the neighbourhood of Lhasa, and crossed the Himalayas by a more westerly route.

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  • During its passage through the southern spurs of the Himalayas it receives the Jahnavi from the north-west, and subsequently the Alaknanda, after which the united stream takes the name of the Ganges.

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  • The aspect of the country is generally a level plain, but the northern part of it rises towards the Himalayas, the greatest elevation being 1342 ft.

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  • It crosses the Himalayas by the Tang Pass (15,200 ft.), and thence proceeds via Gyantse (13,200 ft.) and the Kharo Pass (16,500 ft.), Yamdok Lake (15,000) to the Tsang-po (12,100 ft.), and crossing the river winds up along the Kyi Chu, on which Lhasa stands, 33 m.

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  • The genus Cedrus contains two other species closely allied to C. Libani - Cedrus Deodara, the deodar, or "god tree" of the Himalayas, and Cedrus atlantica, of the Atlas range, North Africa.

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  • He died at Kedarnata in the Himalayas when only 32 years of age.

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  • The extent of Asoka's dominion included all India from the thirteenth degree of latitude up to the Himalayas, Nepal, Kashmir, the Swat valley, Afghanistan as far as the Hindu Kush, Sind and Baluchistan.

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  • Culicidae are by no means confined to lowlying districts, and have even been met with in the Himalayas at an altitude of 13,000 feet.

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  • At Sukhi it pierces through the Himalayas, and turns south-west to Hardwar, also a place of great sanctity.

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  • Farther east the Takpa of Tawang in the eastern Assam Himalayas appears to form a transition between the central and the Sifan group of dialects on the Chinese frontier, which includes the Minyak, Sungpan, Lifan and Tochu dialects.

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  • A very distinct species (P. murina), remarkable for its dull coloration, is peculiar to the Azores, and several others are found in Asia from the Himalayas to Japan.

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  • The first variety inhabit the Himalayas and are beautifully covered with a deep soft fur quite long compared to the flat harsh hair of the Bengal sort.

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  • Bimbisara was murdered by his son Ajatasatru, who succeeded him, and whose bloodthirsty policy reduced the whole country between the Himalayas and the Ganges under the suzerainty of Magadha.

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  • It is not uncommon on many parts of the Himalayas, where it breeds; and on the mountains of Kumaon and the Punjab, and is the "golden eagle" of most AngloIndians.

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  • The dwellers in a malarious region like the Terai (at the foot of the Himalayas) are miserable,.

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  • It is found chiefly where the Buddhist religion prevailed in ancient times, in Bihar and along the foot of the Himalayas and in western India, where it particularly flourishes in the neighbourhood of the Buddhist caves at Ajanta.

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  • But although the crests of its component ranges reach altitudes of 21,500 to 22,000 ft., they are not as a rule overtopped by individual peaks of commanding and towering elevation, as the Himalayas are, but run on the whole tolerably uniform and relatively at little greater altitude than the lofty valleys which separate them one from another.

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  • Blyth long ago proposed the name Caprolagus for the remarkable spiny rabbit of the western Himalayas, while the generic name Oryctolagus was suggested later for the rabbit, and Sylvilagus for the American "cotton-tails"; but none of these was accorded general acceptation.

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  • The mountains of the Hindu Kush running from east to west form the northern boundary of the province, and are met at the north-east corner of the Chitral agency by the continuation of an outer chain of the Himalayas after it crosses the Indus above the Kagan valley.

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  • He fled north of the Himalayas into the Bod country, where he was elected king by the twelve chiefs of the tribes of southern and central Tibet.

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  • His empire rivalled that of Asoka, extending from the Hugli on the east to the Jumna and Chambal on the west, and from the foot of the Himalayas on the north to the Nerbudda on the south.

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  • The coats of the Bengal kind are short and of a dark orange brown with black stripes, those from east or further India are similar in colour, but longer in the hair, while those from north of the Himalayas and the mountains of China are not only huge in size, but have a very long soft hair of delicate orange brown with very white flanks, and marked generally with the blackest of stripes.

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  • The deodar forms forests on the mountains of Afghanistan, North Beluchistan and the north-west Himalayas, flourishing in all the higher mountains from Nepal up to Kashmir, at an elevation of from 5500 to 12,000 ft.; on the peaks to the northern side of the Boorung Pass it grows to a height of 60 to 70 ft.

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  • The Kusi rises in the Himalayas and falls into the Ganges near Colgong within Bhagalpur.

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  • The Himalayas in the north of the district attain a height between 7000 and 8000 ft., one peak reaching an elevation of 8565 ft.; the highest point of the Siwalik range is 3041 ft.

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  • The Alps, however, do not present so continuous a barrier as the Himalayas, the Andes or even the Pyrenees.

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  • A precisely similar structure is seen in the Himalayas.

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  • The base of the Himalayas is occupied by a narrow belt forming an extreme north-western extension of the Malayan type described below.

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  • Magnolia, Aucuba, Abelia and Skimmia may be mentioned as examples of Chinese genera found in the eastern Himalayas, and the tea-tree grows wild in Assam.

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  • Distances in the Himalayas, we found, can be extremely deceptive.

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  • It bears, indeed, very much the same relation to the Alps that the Siwalik beds of India bear to the Himalayas.

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  • The end of the Cretaceous period saw the beginning of a series of great earth movements ushered in by volcanic eruptions on a scale such as the earth has never since witnessed, which resulted in the upheaval of the Himalayas by a process of crushing and folding of the sedimentary rocks till marine fossils were forced to an altitude of 20,000 ft.

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  • At Robat-i-Pai near Herat, for example, there is a dark Froductus limestone which seems to be identical with the Productus limestone of the Central Himalayas.

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  • Dinajpur forms part of the rich arable tract lying between the Ganges and the southern slopes of the Himalayas.

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  • India is shut off from the rest of Asia on the north by a vast mountainous region, known in the aggregate as the Himalayas, amid which lie the independent states of Nepal and Bhutan, - with the great table-land of Tibet behind.

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  • At the opposite or northwestern angle, the Indus in like manner pierces the Himalayas, and turns southwards on its course through the Punjab.

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  • The Himalayas not only form a double wall along the north of India, but at both their eastern and western extremities send out ranges to the south, which protect its north-eastern and northwestern frontiers.

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  • On the opposite or north-western frontier of India, the mountainous offshoots run down the entire length of the British boundaries from the Himalayas to the sea.

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  • But the mountain wall is pierced at the corner where it strikes southwards from the Himalayas by an opening through which the Kabul river flows into India.

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  • Indeed, the special feature of the Himalayas is that they send down the rainfall from their northern as well as from their southern slopes to the Indian plains.

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  • In this way the rainfall, alike from the northern and southern slopes of the Himalayas, pours down into the river plains of Bengal.

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  • Of the three regions of India thus briefly surveyed, the first, or the Himalayas, lies for the most part beyond the British frontier, but a knowledge of it supplies the key to the ethnology and history of India.

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  • Broadly speaking, the Himalayas are peopled by Mongoloid tribes; the great river plains of Hindustan are still the home of the Aryan race; the triangular table-land has formed an arena for a long struggle between that gifted race from the north and what is known as the Dravidian stock in the south.

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  • Geologically, as well as physically, India consists of three distinct regions, the Himalayas, the Peninsula, and - between these two - the Indo-Gangetic plain with its covering of alluvium and windblown sands.

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  • The contrast between the Himalayas and the Peninsula is one of fundamental importance.

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  • It should, however, be mentioned that in the eastern part of the Himalayas some of the beds resemble those of the Peninsula, and it appears that a part of the old Indian continent has here been involved in the folds of the mountain chain.

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  • The geology of the Himalayas being described elsewhere (see Himalayas), the following account deals only with the IndoGangetic plain and the Peninsula.

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  • The deposits of the Indc-Gangetic plain are of modern date and the formation of the depression which they fill is almost certainly connected with the elevation of the Himalayas.

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  • From the gorge of the Indus to that of the Brahmaputra, a distance of 1400 m., the Himalayas form an unbroken watershed, the northern flank of which is drained by the upper valleys of these two rivers; while the Sutlej, starting from the southern foot of the Kailas Peak, breaks through the watershed, dividing it into two very unequal portions, that to the north-west being the smaller.

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  • There is no reason to believe that any transfer of air takes place across the Himalayas in a southerly direction, unless indeed in those most elevated regions of the atmosphere which lie beyond the range of observation; but a nocturnal flow of cooled air, from the southern slopes, is felt as a strong wind where the rivers debouch on the plains, more especially in the early morning hours; and this probably contributes in some degree to lower the mean temperature of that belt of the plains which fringes the mountain zone.

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  • Up or down this plain, at opposite seasons, sweep the monsoon winds, in a direction at right angles to that of their nominal course; and thus vapour which has been brought by winds from the Bay of Bengal is discharged as snow and rain on the peaks and hillsides of the Western Himalayas.

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  • The first, or the valley of Assam and the Brahmaputra, is long and narrow, bordered on the north by the Himalayas, on the south by the lower plateau of the Garo, Khasi and Naga hills.

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  • But it would appear that throughout the year there is, with but slight interruption, a steady upper current from the south-west, such as has been already noticed over the Himalayas.

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  • The upper levels of the Himalayas slope northwards gradually to the Tibetan uplands, over which the Siberian temperate vegetation ranges.

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  • In the western Himalayas this upland flora is marked by a strong admixture of European species, such as the columbine (Aquilegia) and hawthorn (Crataegus Oxyacantha).

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  • The malarious tarsi fringing the Himalayas, the uninhabitable swamps of the Gangetic delta, and the wide jungles of the central plateau are at present the chief home of the tiger.

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  • In Assam they are sometimes speared from boats, and in the Himalayas they are said to be ensnared by bird-lime.

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  • Three distinct varieties, the white, the red and the black wolf, are found in the Tibetan Himalayas.

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  • It still exists in places along the tarsi or submontane fringe of the Himalayas.

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  • The sarau (Nemorhaedus bubalinus), allied to the chamois, has a wide range in the mountains of the north, from the Himalayas to Assam and Burma.

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  • They are swept north by the wind till they strike upon the outer ranges of the Himalayas.

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  • The greater part of the remainder are found in Bengal on the borders of Burma, on the borders of Nepal, Tibet and Bhutan, and in the Spiti, Lahul and Kanawar districts of the Punjab Himalayas, where many of the inhabitants are of Tibetan origin.

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  • Potatoes thrive best on the higher elevations, such as the Khasi hills, the Nilgiris, the Mysore uplands, the Shan States, and the slopes of the Himalayas; but they are also grown even in lowland districts.

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  • Cardamoms are a valuable crop in the same locality, and also in the Nepalese Himalayas.

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  • Early travellers reported that the tea-plant was indigenous to the southern valleys of the Himalayas; but they were mistaken in the identity of the shrub, which was the Osyris nepalensis.

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  • At about the same time tea-planting was introduced into the neighbourhood of the sanatorium of Darjeeling, among the Sikkim Himalayas.

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  • In the Himalayas themselves the deodar and other conifers form the bulk of the timber, while in the lower ranges, such as the Khasi hills in Assam, and those of Burma, various pines are prominent.

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  • The list of the sixteen states ignores everything north of the Himalayas, south of the Vindhyas, and east of the Ganges where it turns south.

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  • Towards the end of his reign Harsha's empire embraced the whole basin of the Ganges from the Himalayas to the Nerbudda, including Nepa1, 2 besides Malwa, Gujarat and Surashtra (Kathiawar); while even Assam (Kamarupa) was tributary to him.

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  • By the treaty of Segauli, which defines the English relations with Nepal to the present day, the Gurkhas withdrew on the one hand from Sikkim, and on the other from those lower ranges of the western Himalayas which have supplied the health-giving stations of Naini Tal, Mussoorie and Simla.

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  • A large semi-circular tract, comprising the valleys of the Gogra and the Gumti, has long been separated from the remainder of the great plain as the kingdom of Oudh; and though since 1877 it has been under the administrative charge of a lieutenantgovernor, it retains certain features of its former status as a chief-commissionership. The province includes the whole upper portion of the wide Gangetic basin, from the Himalayas and the Punjab plain to the Vindhyan plateau, and the lowlying ricefields of Behar.

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  • The course of the great rivers marks the prevailing slope of the land, which falls away from the Himalayas, the Rajputana uplands, and the Vindhyan plateau south-eastwards towards the Bay of Bengal.

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  • South of the Himalayas, from which it is separated by valleys or duns, is the Siwalik range, which slopes down to the fruitful plain of the Doab (two rivers), a large irregular horn-shaped tongue of land enclosed between the Ganges and Jumna.

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  • North of the Ganges, and enclosed between that river and the Himalayas and Oudh, lies the triangular plain of Rohilkhand.

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  • Below the junction of the Ganges and the Jumna at Allahabad the country begins to assume the appearance of the Bengal plains, and once more expands northwards to the foot of the Nepal Himalayas.

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  • Oudh forms the central portion of the great Gangetic plain, sloping downwards from the Nepal Himalayas in the north-east to the Ganges on the south-west.

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  • In 1823 (though not officially known till later) an epidemic broke out at Kedarnath in Gurwhal, a sub-district of Kumaon on the south-west of the Himalayas, on a high situation.

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  • The plant has a wide distribution, growing in wet situations in the Himalayas, North America, Siberia and various parts of Europe, including England, and has been naturalized in Scotland and Ireland., Though regarded as a native in most counties of England at the present day, where it is now found thoroughly wild on sides of ditches, ponds and rivers, and very abundantly in some districts, it is probably not indigenous.

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  • Semnopithecus schistaceus was found by Captain Hutton at an elevation of 11,000 feet in the Himalayas, leaping actively among fir-trees whose branches were laden with snow-wreaths.

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  • Hooker ascertained the average vertical range of flowering plants in the Himalayas to be 4000 ft., while in some cases it extended to 8000 ft.

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  • To the north is the main chain of the Himalayas, the lower ranges of which rise abruptly from the plain; to the south is the great elevated plateau or succession of plateaus known as the Assam range.

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  • Rising in the Tibetan plateau, far to the north of the Himalayas, and skirting round their eastern passes not far from the Yang-tsze-kiang and the great river of Cambodia, it enters Assam by a series of waterfalls and rapids, amid vast boulders and accumulations of rocks.

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  • In the upper part of the valley, towards the gorge where the Brahmaputra enters, the country is varied and picturesque, walled in on the north and east by the Himalayas, and thickly wooded from the base to the snow-line.

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  • It is found in Kumaon and Bhotan and on some of the Nepal ranges, but does not grow in the moist climate of the Sikkim Himalayas; it is found at a height of 7000 to 12,000 ft., and attains large dimensions; the wood is highly resinous, and is said to be durable; great quantities of a white clear turpentine exude from the branches when injured.

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  • On the north-west Persia is united by the highlands of Armenia to the mountains of Asia Minor; on the north-west the Paropamisus and Hindu Kush connect it with the Himalayas.

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  • The genus includes about sixty species, natives of Europe, North America and Asia, especially the Himalayas, China and Japan.

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  • Moles, which are unknown in the Indian peninsula, abound in the forest regions of the eastern Himalayas at a moderate altitude, and shrews of several species are found almost everywhere; amongst them are two very remarkable forms of water shrew, one of which, however, Nectogale, is probably Tibetan rather than Himalayan.

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  • The poppy grown in India is usually the white-flowered variety, but in the Himalayas a red-flowered poppy with dark seeds is cultivated.

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  • It has recently been shown, however, that opium grown in the hilly districts of the Himalayas yields 50% more morphia than that of the plains, and that the deficiency of morphia in the Indian drug is due, in some measure, to the long exposure to the air in a semi-liquid state which it undergoes.

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  • The dazzling white effect of their peaks is produced, not by snow, as among the Himalayas, but by enormous masses of vitreous rose-coloured quartz.

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  • The presidency of Bengal, in contradistinction to those of Madras and Bombay, eventually included all the British territories north of the Central Provinces, from the mouths of the Ganges and Brahmaputra to the Himalayas and the Punjab.

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  • Proceeding west, the sub-province of Bengal proper stretches to the banks of the Ganges and inland from the seaboard to the Himalayas.

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  • The climate varies from the snowy regions of the Himalayas to the tropical vapour-bath of the delta and the burning winds of Behar.

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  • Thousands of square miles in Lower Bengal annually receive a top-dressing of virgin soil from the Himalayas, - a system of natural manuring which renders elaborate tillage a waste of labour, and defies the utmost power of over-cropping to exhaust its fertility.

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  • From their well-watered rice-fields, the main source of their wealth, they could see the giant Himalayas looming up against the clear blue of the Indian sky.

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  • Under the terms of this treaty the In.diangovernment undertook to pay the new amir a subsidy of 60,000 a year; and Yakub Khan consented to receive a British mission at Kabul, and to cede some territory in the Himalayas which the military advisers of Lord Beaconsfield considered necessary to make the frontier more scientific. This apparent success was soon followed by disastrous news.

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  • It also grows in Asia Minor, Persia, and at great elevations on the Himalayas.

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  • The tarai, or the forest and marshy tracts along the southern slopes of the Himalayas, gradually merge within the district into drier land, the beds of the streams become deeper and more marked, the marshes disappear, and the country assumes the ordinary appearance of the plain of the Ganges.

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  • It is most probable that, when allowance has been made for the obliteration of glacial markings, and the region has been better explored, it will appear that the glaciation of Turkestan was on a scale at least as vast as that of the Himalayas.

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  • A large number were formerly known only in the Himalayas, or in Persia, while others have their origin in East Asia.

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  • Grum-Grshimailo found on the Pamir the butterfly Colias nastes, a species characteristic of Labrador and Lapland; like the alpine plants which bear witness to a Glacial period flora in the Himalayas, this butterfly is a survival of the Glacial period fauna of the Pamir.

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  • It has its own habitus, notwithstanding the number of species it has in common with Siberia and south-east Russia on the one hand and with the Himalayas on the other, and this habitus is due to the dryness of the climate and the consequent changes undergone by the soil.

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  • Along with the desert of Gobi East Turkestan occupies the lower terrace of the great central Asian plateau, which projects from the Himalayas north-east towards the Bering Straits.

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  • The peak possesses no distinctive native name and has been called Everest after Sir George Everest, who completed the trigonometrical survey of the Himalayas in 1841 and first fixed its position and altitude.

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  • As the period advanced, along the very line that had been occupied by the nummulitic sea (Tethys) the crust began to be folded up, giving rise to the Alps, Carpathians, Caucasus, Himalayas and other mountains, some of the early Tertiary marine formations being now found raised more than 16,000 ft.

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  • Tea plantations, with seeds and plants from Assam, Ceylon and the Himalayas, were started in the early part of 1900 on the slopes of the hills south of Resht at an altitude of about 1000 ft.

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  • The Kachins, who probably came from the sub-regions of the Himalayas, occupy the hills throughout the district.

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  • Along with the Himalayas only the Andes offers the scale of landscape and sheer mountain grandeur.

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  • If you are considering a visit to the Himalayas post monsoon, please get in contact soon to book your place.

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  • These hills are the remains of an ancient mountain chain, once larger and higher than the Himalayas are today.

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  • At an altitude of 3,500 meters, it's a verdant oasis curving down from the stark peaks of the Himalayas.

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  • You can also see the red panda, another resident of the Eastern Himalayas!

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  • Spotted Laughingthrush is perhaps one of the best songsters in the Himalayas.

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  • Messner also brought some yaks over from the Himalayas which now live on a small farm at the castle.

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  • Alpine pastures on the high ranges of the snow-capped Great Himalayas are used for grazing yaks in the summer months.

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  • The Rohillas were a race of Afghan origin, who had established themselves for some generations in a fertile tract west of Oudh, between the Himalayas and the Ganges, which still bears the name of Rohilkhand.

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  • In the western hemisphere they range along the Mexican highlands and the Andes far into the tropics, while in the Old World the genus, well represented in the Himalayas and the hills of China, exists likewise in the peninsula of Malacca, in the Indian Archipelago and Malaya to the Philippine Islands and Borneo.

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  • It is known in India as the " cheer pine "; the wood is good, resinous, and moderately durable; the tree is common on the foot-hills of the Himalayas.

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  • You can also see the red panda, another resident of the Eastern Himalayas !

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  • The program includes trekking through the Himalayas, going through the National Parks and Wildlife reserves.

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  • Biking to work and then jetting off to trek in the Himalayas seriously cancel each other out.

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  • In the early 2000s, people living in small-scale tribal societies all around the world, including Africa, the Pacific Islands, North and South America, and the Himalayas, still used penis sheaths.

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  • In the Himalayas it sometimes grows 100 feet high.

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  • It flowers in May and June, and is a native of the temperate Himalayas.

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  • Viburnum Cotinifolium - A spreading shrub or low tree of 20 feet, found high on the Himalayas, yet so tender as to need shelter or a place on a warm wall during our winters.

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  • Holboellia - H. latifolia is a beautiful evergreen climbing shrub from the Himalayas, hardy against walls in the southern and the warm districts.

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  • Indian Poppy (Meconopsis) - Handsome Poppyworts, the most familiar of which is the common Welsh Poppy (M. cambrica); the other kinds are natives of the Himalayas, hardy, but only of biennial duration.

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  • Meconopsis Horridula - A little plant found at a great height in the Himalayas, growing as almost stemless tufts of lanceolate leaves, covered densely with prickles; the short stems bear bluish-purple flowers about an inch and a half wide.

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  • Emodi, from the Himalayas, a plant 6 to 12 inches high, with large leaves cut into wedge-shaped lobes, their whole surface a fine bronzy red in early spring.

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  • Chelidonii, of doubtful hardiness, from the Himalayas, with charming pale lilac flowers and greyish-green foliage.

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  • Germany. In a wild state it occurs from the Himalayas to China and Japan.

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  • A second kind, P. begonifolia, is from the Himalayas, and is larger in all its parts, with downy leaves and purple berries.

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  • Roscoea - A small though interesting genus of tuberous rooted plants from China and the Himalayas, of easy cultivation if planted 4 to 5 inches deep in sandy loam.

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  • This is S. crataegoides, a compact hardy shrub of 10 or 12 feet, found in Asia from the Himalayas to Japan-whence all our plants have come.

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  • P. acinosa, the Indian Poke, comes from the Himalayas, and, while much resembling P. decandra, is a little less tall, with its berries in drooping clusters instead of held erect.

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  • W. Amherstiana, from the Himalayas, similar but more showy, is rare.

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  • You play as Bruce Wayne and, on a personal mission to find yourself, you wind up somewhere in the Himalayas.

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  • You play a mountain climber who must climb the Himalayas to seek out his lost brother.

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  • Goji Berries, also known as wolf berries, grow wild in China and the Himalayas.

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  • This work boot claims to keep you comfortable through the Himalayas.

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  • They're tough enough to be used for a winter backpacking in the Himalayas.

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  • Though the museum emphasizes local rocks and minerals, the collection also includes specimens from the Himalayas, the Rocky Mountains, and Namibia.

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  • There are Tantra temples throughout India, but the Himalayas are perhaps the best experience for Hindu tradition.

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  • The Indian location is in the foothills of the Himalayas, and offers a unique experience for future yoga teachers.

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  • In the latter years of his reign Harsha's sway over the whole basin of the Ganges from the Himalayas to the Nerbudda was undisputed.

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  • In 1715 Fathers Desideri and Freyre made their way from Agra, across the Himalayas, to Lhasa, and the Capuchin Friar Orazio della Penna resided in that city from 1735 until 1747.

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  • A larger and more brightly coloured species, C. spinoides, inhabits the Himalayas, but the siskin has many other relatives belonging to the New World, and in them serious modifications of structure, especially in the form of the bill, occur.

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  • The Eocene covers wide tracts from Lithuania to Tsaritsyn, and is represented in the Crimea and Caucasus by thick deposits belonging to the same ocean which left its deposits on the Alps and the Himalayas.

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  • Marine Tertiary beds occur in Burma; in the Himalayas and in south Tibet there is a nearly complete series of marine deposits from the Carboniferous to the Eocene; in Afghanistan the Mesozoic beds are in part marine and in part fluviatile.

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  • It was after the Eocene period that the main part of the elevation of the Himalayas took place, as is shown by the occurrence of nummulitic limestone at a height of 20,000 ft.

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  • Schists, as a rule, are found in regions composed mainly of metamorphic rocks, such as the Central Alps, Himalayas, and other mountain ranges, Saxony, Scandinavia, the Highlands of Scotland and north-west of Ireland.

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  • His exploits, as the ally of Rama (incarnation of Vishnu) in the latter's recovery of his wife Sita from the clutches of the demon Ravana, include the bridging of the straits between India and Ceylon with huge boulders carried away from the Himalayas.

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  • At Allahabad, however, it receives the Jumna, a mighty sister stream, which takes its rise also in the Himalayas to the west of the sources of the Ganges.

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  • See Report on Explorations in Sikkim, Bhutan and Tibet (Deva Dun, 1889); Tanner, "Our present Knowledge of the Himalayas," R.G.S.

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  • The flora of the Asiatic islands (thus distinguished) "is a special development of that prevailing from the Himalayas to the Malay Peninsula and south China.

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  • The short-horned Asiatic goats of the genus Hemitragus receive mention in the article Tahr; but it may be added that fossil species of the same genus are known from the Lower Pliocene formations of India, which have also yielded remains of a goat allied to the markhor of the Himalayas.

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  • Nearly all are natives of Europe, or the northern plains and mountain ranges of Asia and North America, though one (Larix Grifthii) occurs only on the Himalayas.

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  • He found the system to form the chief physiographical feature of southern Tibet, and stated it to be " on the whole the most massive range on the crust of the earth, its average height above the sealevel being greater than that of the Himalayas.

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  • As a conqueror he extended his sway from the still unsubdued Kiang tribes of the north to Ladak in the west, and in the south he carried his power through Nepal to the Indian side of the Himalayas.

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  • The missionaries were sent to Kashmir, to the Himalayas, to the border lands on the Indus, to the coast of Burma, to south India and to Ceylon.

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  • The vast level tract which thus covers northern India is watered by three distinct river systems. One of these systems takes its rise in the hollow trough beyond the Himalayas, and issues River, through their western ranges upon the Punjab as the systems Sutlej and Indus.

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  • The second of the three river systems also takes its rise beyond the double wall of the Himalayas, not very far from the sources of the Indus and the Sutlej.

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  • It turns, however, almost due east instead of west, enters India at the eastern extremity of the Himalayas, and becomes the Brahmaputra of Eastern Bengal and Assam.

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  • These rivers collect the drainage of the northern slopes of the Himalayas, and convey it, by long and tortuous although opposite routes, into India.

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  • There is a thin close-woven cloth made and used as garments among the females of the aboriginal tribes near the foot of the Himalayas, and in various localities a cloth of pure jute or of jute mixed with cotton is used as a sheet to sleep on, as well as for wearing purposes.

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  • The Far West of Nepal is one of the least explored regions of the Himalayas.

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  • Indo-China is especially rich in Eurylaemidae, China proper and the Himalayas in pheasants.

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