Himalayan sentence example

himalayan
  • Many of the Himalayan forms are Indian fish which appear to go up to the higher streams to deposit their ova, and the Tibetan species as a rule are confined to the rivers on the table-land or to the streams at the greatest elevations, the characteristics of which are Tibetan rather than Himalayan.

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  • The Himalayan or Tibetan sun bear (Ursus torquatus) is found along the north, from the Punjab to Assam.

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  • Many wild species of the sheep and goat tribe are to be found in the Himalayan ranges.

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  • Tours to suit all levels of ability from a gentle ramble to a Himalayan expedition.

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  • Much has been written about the impressive ness of Himalayan scenery.

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  • The years from 1848 to 1858 were alluded to subsequently as "the veiled period " of her life, and she spoke vaguely of a seven years' sojourn in " Little and Great Tibet," or preferably of a " Himalayan retreat."

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  • Its peaks are 4000 to 5000 feet lower than Mount Everest, but its passes average 3000 feet higher than the Himalayan passes."

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  • The highlands which shut off the Turkestan provinces from Southern Afghanistan have afforded the best opportunities for geological investigation, and as might be expected from their geographical position, the general result of the examination of exposed sections leads to the identification of geological affinity with Himalayan, Indian and Persian regions.

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  • The Himalayan varieties of the markhor and ibex are abundant in Kafiristan.

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  • Its form is that of a great triangle, with its base resting upon the Himalayan range and its apex running far into the ocean.

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  • The wide plains watered by the Himalayan rivers form the second of the three regions into which we have divided India.

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  • The greater part of the Himalayan region lay beneath the sea from early Palaeozoic times to the Eocene period, and the deposits are accordingly marine; the Peninsula, on the other hand, has been land since the Permian period at least - there is, indeed, no evidence that it was ever beneath the sea - only on its margins are any marine deposits to be found.

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  • The alluvial deposits prove depression in quite recent geological times; and within the Himalayan region earthquakes are still common, whilst in Peninsular India they are rare.

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  • A notable further instance of the connexion of the western Himalayan flora with that of Europe is the holm oak (Quercus Ilex), which is characteristic of the Mediterranean region.

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  • At another he actually despatched an expedition against China, which perished miserably in the Himalayan passes.

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  • But in 1815 General Ochterlony, who commanded the army operating by way of the Sutlej, stormed one by one the hill forts which still stud the Himalayan states now under the Punjab government, and compelled the Nepal darbar to sue for peace.

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  • The soil of Oudh consists of a rich alluvial deposit, the detritus of the Himalayan system washed down into the Ganges valley.

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  • This chain continues south of the Tsanpo (or Upper Brahmaputra), and becomes part of the Himalayan system.

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  • Neither immediately beyond this great bend, nor within it in the Himalayan regions lying north of Assam and east of Bhutan, have scientific investigations yet been systematically carried out; but it is known that the largest of the Himalayan affluents of the Brahmaputra west of the bend derive their sources from the Tibetan plateau, and break down through the containing bands of hills, carrying deposits of gold from their sources to the plains, as do all the rivers of Tibet.

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  • North of Bhutan, between the Himalayan crest and Lhasa, this formation is approximately maintained; farther east, although the same natural forces first resulted in the same effect of successive folds of the earth's crust, forming extensive curves of ridge and furrow, the abundant rainfall and the totally distinct climatic conditions which govern the processes of denudation subsequently led to the erosion of deeper valleys enclosed between forest-covered ranges which rise steeply from the river banks.

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  • J Y Y explored from Lhasa to the sources of the Brahmaputra and Indus, at the conclusion of the Tibetan mission in 1904, conclusively prove that Mount Everest, which appears from the Tibetan plateau as a single dominating peak, has no rival amongst Himalayan altitudes, whilst the very remarkable investigations made by permission of the Nepal durbar from peaks near Kathmandu in 1903, by Captain Wood, R.E., not only place the Everest group apart from other peaks with which they have been confused by scientists, isolating them in the topographical system of Nepal, but clearly show that there is no one dominating and continuous range indicating a main Himalayan chain which includes both Everest and Kinchinjunga.

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  • So much controversy has been aroused on the subject of Himalayan altitudes that the present position of scientific analysis in relation to them maybe shortly stated.

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  • From the absence of any well-marked unconformity it is evident that in the northern part of the Himalayan belt, at least in the Spiti area, there can have been no post-Archaean folding of any magnitude until after the deposition of the Nummulitic beds, and that the folding was completed before the later Tertiaries of Hundes were laid down.

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  • On the southern or Indian side the routes to Tibet and Ladakh follow the levels of Himalayan valleys with no remarkably steep gradients till they near the approach to the water-divide.

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  • Independently of the enormous variety of topographical conformation contained in the Himalayan system, the vast altitude of the mountains alone is sufficient to cause modifications of climate in ascending over their slopes such as are not surpassed by those observed in moving from the equator to the poles.

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  • The level to which the Himalayan glaciers extend is greatly dependent on local conditions, principally the extent and elevation of the snow basins which feed them, and the slope and position of the mountain on which they are formed.

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  • Measurements of the movement of Himalayan glaciers give results according closely with those obtained under analogous conditions in the Alps, viz.

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  • In connexion with almost all the Himalayan glaciers of which precise accounts are forthcoming are ancient moraines indicating some previous condition in which their extent was much larger than now.

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  • They have been observed on the summit of the table-land as well as on the Himalayan slope.

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  • Though one species of coffee is indigenous in the hotter Himalayan forests, the climate does not appear suitable for the growth of the plant which supplies the coffee of commerce.

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  • The fishes from the headwaters of the Indus also belong, for the most part, to Central-Asiatic types, with a small admixture of purely Himalayan forms. Amongst the former are several peculiar small-scaled carps, belonging to the genus Schizothorax and its allies.

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  • Moles, which are unknown in the Indian peninsula, abound in the forest regions of the eastern Himalayas at a moderate altitude, and shrews of several species are found almost everywhere; amongst them are two very remarkable forms of water shrew, one of which, however, Nectogale, is probably Tibetan rather than Himalayan.

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  • Lizards are numerous, and as well as frogs are found at all elevations from the plains to the upper Himalayan valleys, and even extend to Tibet.

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  • The Himalayan butterflies are very numerous and brilliant, for the most part belonging to groups that extend both into the Malayan and European regions, while African forms also appear.

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  • In the Himalayan and Indian hunia sheep, the rams of which are specially trained for fighting, and have highly convex foreheads, the tail is short at birth.

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  • From the Palaeoarctic region it is distinguished by the presence of Himalayan species.

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  • The Himalayan bear (Ursus isabellinus) has its home on the Pamir, and the smaller Leuconyx up to the highest levels on the Tianshan.

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  • Antelopes, Lepus lehmanni, Lagomys rutilus, various species of Arvicolae, and the Himalayan long-tailed marmot (Arctomys caudatus), the most characteristic inhabitant of the alpine meadows, are the only mammals of the Pamir proper.

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  • Among the Lepidoptera of the Pamir there is an interesting mixture of Tian-shan with Himalayan species.

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  • During July and early August it is also awash with a multitude of Himalayan flowers, including the rare blue poppy.

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  • Examples include mink, signal crayfish, common carp and plants such a Himalayan balsam, New Zealand pigmy weed and parrots feather.

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  • Himalayan balsam, a garden escapee has been found at a number of sites along the river.

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  • They include lime, flowering crab and Himalayan Birch and a 5.5 meter high Christmas tree.

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  • Himalayan balsam, New Zealand pigmy weed and parrots feather.

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  • It is also the habitat of the endangered snow leopard, the serow and rare Himalayan musk deer.

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  • You may well spot Himalayan Blue Sheep, Ibex and, if you are lucky, the rare snow leopard.

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  • Help protect the snow leopards in Nepal's Sacred Himalayan Landscape by taking part in the WWF Walk for Wildlife!

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  • General characteristics There are four other species of crested porcupine, the Cape porcupine, Himalayan porcupine, Indian porcupine and Malayan porcupine.

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  • The area protects an abundant wildlife including the endangered red panda, musk deer, Himalayan tahr and leopard.

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  • During 2003 local people were involved in a project at Forfar Loch to help reduce another invasive species, the Himalayan balsam.

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  • From the delta of the Ganges and Brahmaputra on the east to that of the Indus on the west, and intervening between the tableland of the peninsula and the foot of the Himalayan slope of the Tibetan plateau, lies the great plain of northern India, which rises at its highest point to about moo ft., and includes altogether, with its prolongation up the valley of Assam, an area of about 500,000 sq.

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  • It is not a uniform speech, but comprises several dialects which have been classed by Jaeschke into three groups, namely (i) the central or the dialects of Lhasa and the central provinces of U and Tsang (including Spiti) which is the lingua franca of the whole country, (2) the western dialects of Ladak, Lahul, Baltistan and Purig, and (3) the eastern dialects of the province of Khams. In addition to these, however, are many sub-dialects of Tibetan spoken in the frontier Himalayan districts and states outside Tibet, namely, in Kunawar and Bashahr, Garhwal, Kumaon, Nepal including especially the Serpa and Murmi of eastern Nepal, Sikkim (where the dialect is called Danjong-ka), Bhutan (Lho-ka or Duk-ka.), all of which are affiliated to a central group of dialects.

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  • His successor, Lord Elgin, only lived till November 1863, when he too fell a victim to the excessive work of the governor-generalship, dying at the Himalayan station of Dharmsala, where he lies buried.

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  • Spread across 520 square kms of Himalayan foothills, the park is covered by deciduous woodland and giant sal forest.

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  • I have an adopted two-year-old Himalayan female cat.

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  • The crossbreeding of Siamese cats led to many breeds including Tonkinese, Himalayan, Burmese and Balinese.

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  • If you're considering a flame point Himalayan kitten for your next pet, you may have a hard time finding this fairly rare coloring, but the hunt can be worth the effort.

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  • A Himalayan is part of the Persian cat family.

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  • The flame point Himalayan kitten has cream colored fur with red points and is much rarer than some of the other colorations.

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  • Flame points have the same personality as other Himalayan and Persian cats.

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  • Have you ever wondered wondered, "What does a Himalayan cat look like?"

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  • The Himalayan is a popular cat because of its unique personality and appearance.

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  • The Himalayan has both Persian and Siamese ancestors.

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  • Many breeders' associations, including Cat Fanciers Association, consider the Himalayan to be a type of Persian called the color point Persian.

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  • A classic Himalayan cat has a large, round head and a thick neck.

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  • Probably the most popular type is the long, soft, flowing fur that gives the Himalayan a luxurious look.

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  • If you're still thinking to yourself, "What does a Himalayan cat look like?", consider the variety of colors available in this color point cat.

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  • In a chocolate point Himalayan, the body should be an ivory color and the points a creamy milk chocolate.

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  • Flame points are red and quite popular among fanciers of the Himalayan breed.

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  • The seal point Himalayan has a cream-colored body with a deep, seal brown color to the points.

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  • Now you should have a better understanding of what a Himalayan cat looks like.

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  • An ancient meditative technique originally from the foothills of the Himalayan Mountains, Turiya was lost for many years.

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  • In D. speciosum, a Himalayan species, the small deep purple flowers are nearly smothered by the large green bracts.

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  • E. Roylei, a Himalayan plant, is another good alpine, of very dwarf, tufted growth, having large blossoms of a bluish-purple with yellow eye.

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  • Trollius Acaulis - A native of the Himalayan Mountains, and one of the most charming dwarf bog plants, 4 to 6 inches in height, its bright yellow flowers, 2 inches across, suffused with purple-brown on the outside.

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  • Himalayan Heather (Cassiope) - Tiny alpine bushes, thriving in peaty soil well drained, as they are all impatient of stagnant moisture about their roots, while absolute shade from the midday sun is also necessary.

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  • Himalayan Laurel (Aucuba) - A noble evergreen which came into this country in a curious way.

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  • The Himalayan kind is thought by Mr Bean not to differ very much from the Japanese kind.

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  • Meconopsis Paniculata - A beautiful Himalayan plant with much-cut foliage and panicles of bright yellow flowers, which come true from the seed ripened sparingly in fine seasons.

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  • We may hope, too, from the latitude and elevation at which many of them grow, that they will prove hardier than the Himalayan species.

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  • R. Delavayi, with dark red flowers, comes very near the Himalayan R. arboreum.

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  • B. Colvillei is a tender Himalayan kind, with bunches of pale rose-colored flowers.

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  • The Himalayan Beam Tree, P. vestita is extremely fine, but is not hardy everywhere.

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  • The greatest successes with Himalayan Rhododendrons in the British Isles have been obtained near the sea in the south and south-western counties, where the temperature is equable and moist.

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  • Rhododendron Campanulatum - Among the hardiest of the Himalayan species, flowering in April and forming a widely spreading bush.

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  • T. barbata is a beautiful Himalayan species with purple flowers.

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  • Post college, Grylls took some time out and hiked the Himalayan Mountains while he weighed up his options.

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  • In 1873 Elwes pointed out that the Himalayan avifauna extended into north-west China and established the Himalo-Chinese sub-region.

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  • South and west the bounding territories are well fixed in geographical position by the Indian survey determinations of the value of Himalayan peaks.

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  • Of all the Asiatic ranges the Himalayan is, geologically, the best known; and the evidence which it affords shows clearly that the folds to which it owes its elevation were produced by an overthrust from the north.

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  • Such tides as set towards the Himalaya broke against their farther buttresses, leaving an interesting ethnographical flotsam in the northern valleys; but they never overflowed the Himalayan barrier.

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  • Like the Yue-Chi they have probably contributed to form some of the physical types of the Indian population, and it is noticeable that polyandry is a recognized institution among many Himalayan tribes, and is also said to be practised secretly by the Jats and other races of the plains.

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  • Amongst the breeds which are valued for the distribution of colour on the fur are the Himalayan and the Dutch.

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  • Other breeds include the Japanese, with an orange coat, broadly banded on the hind-quarters with black; the pink-eyed and short and thick-furred albino Polish; the Siberian, probably produced by crossing the Himalayan with the Angora; and the black-and-tan and blue-and-tan.

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  • There are few passes across the southern section of the Hindu Kush (and this section is, from the politico-geographical point of view, more important to India than the whole Himalayan system) which have not to surmount a succession of crests or ridges as they cross from Afghan Turkestan to Afghanistan.

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  • The alpine flora, beginning at 6000 ft., is specially characterized by its rhododendrons, pines (Araucaria and Libocedrus), and palms, by numerous superb species of Agapetes (Ericaceae), and on the summits by an extraordinary association of species characteristically European (Rubus, Ranunculus, Leontodon, Aspidium), Himalayan, New Zealandian (Veronica), Antarctic and South American (Drymus, Libocedrus).

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  • In the temperate uplands of the interior, as about Luang Prabang, Himalayan and Japanese species occur - oaks, pines, chestnuts, peach and great apple trees, raspberries, honeysuckle, vines, saxifrages, Cichoraceae, anemones and Violaceae; there are many valuable timber trees - teak, sappan, eagle-wood, wood-oil (Hopea), and other Dlpterocarpaceae, Cedrelaceae, Pterocarpaceae, Xylia, ironwood and other dye-woods and resinous trees, these last forming in many districts a large proportion of the more open forests, with an undergrowth of bamboo.

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  • The district of Hazara extends northeastwards into the outer Himalayan Range, tapering to a narrow point at the head of the Kagan valley.

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  • In south-eastern Tibet, where Himalayan conditions of climate prevail, we have a completely different class of flora.

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  • In some cases, as in all the varying hares, in addition to the eyes retaining their normal pigmentation, areas similar in extent and situation to those on the Himalayan rabbits also retain their pigmentation; and in the ptarmigan there is a black band on each side of the head stretching forwards and backwards from the eyeball, and the outer tail feathers are black.

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  • The Himalayan rabbits reacted like complete albinoes, and 12% of them failed to clot when injected with nucleo-proteid extracted from pigmented animals.

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  • In the meantime a committee had been formed by Lord William Bentinck, the governor-general, for the introduction of tea culture into India, and an official had already been sent to the tea districts of China to procure seed and skilled Chinese workmen to conduct operations in the Himalayan regions.

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  • In early and middle Tertiary times, when the Indian peninsula was an island, and the sea which stretched into Europe washed the base of the Himalayan hills, Sokotra was in great part submerged and the great mass of limestone was deposited; but its higher peaks were still above water, and formed an island, peopled mainly by African species - the plants being the fragmentary remains of the old African flora - but with an admixture of eastern and other Asian forms. Thereafter it gradually rose, undergoing violent volcanic disturbance."

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  • Eastward from the Bengal delta, two alluvial plains stretch up between the hills which connect the Himalayan system with that of the Burmese peninsula.

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  • The extreme or north-western Himalayan region comprises the native state of Garhwal, with the British districts of Dehra Dun, Naini Tal, Almora and Garhwal.

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  • The Himalayan districts of course are cool, and have a much greater rainfall than the plains.

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  • This was proved by Hooker to be the case with Himalayan conifers and rhododendrons, raised in Britain from seed gathered at different altitudes.

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  • The range as a whole is joined at its eastern extremity by the Patkai to the Himalayan system, and by the mountains of Manipur to the Arakan Yoma.

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  • The older rocks are like those of Bengal, and the newer beds show no sign of either the Himalayan or the Burmese folding - on the top of the plateau they are nearly horizontal, but along the southern margin they are bent sharply downwards in a simple monoclinal fold.

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  • A large proportion of them derive their origin from tribes who came from the Himalayan ranges, from Burma or from the Chinese frontier.

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  • P. Gerardiana, a north-west Himalayan species, is a medium-sized tree with a conical head, growing on the more elevated parts of the mountain range; it furnishes edible seeds.

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  • It rises in the snowy Himalayan ranges of Kashmir, enters British territory in the Sialkot district, and flows through the plains of the Punjab, forming the boundary between the Rechna and the Jech Doabs.

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  • They are mostly natives of China and Japan and belong to the genera Arundinaria, Bambusa and Phyllostachys; but include a few Himalayan species of Arundinaria.

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  • We may therefore regard the Himalayan flora as a westward extension of the Chinese rather than the latter as a development of the former.

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  • Familiar instances of this partial albinism is seen in the domestic breed of Himalayan rabbits.

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  • P. longifolia, a Himalayan species, is remarkable for the great length of its lax slender leaves, of a grass-green tint; the cones have the points of the scales recurved.

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