Highlands sentence example

highlands
  • The tribal organization in northern Albania is an interesting survival of the earliest form of social combination; it may be compared in many respects with that which existed in the Scottish highlands in the time of the Stuart kings.
    6
    2
  • The source of the river is in the highlands of the Vindhyas, upwards of 2000 ft.
    2
    0
  • North-eastern Albania forms part of the Turkish vilayet of Kossovo; the northern highlands are included in the vilayet of Shkodra (Scutari), the eastern portion of central Albania belongs to the vilayet of Monastir, and the southern districts are comprised in the vilayet of Iannina.
    1
    0
  • The highlands of Central America and the West Indies have preserved a number of Chino-Japanese typesBocconia, Deutzia, A belie, &c.not met with elsewhere in the New Woild.
    1
    0
  • This flora extends from Ireland to the Canaries and reappears on the highlands of Angola.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Father Francisco Paez acquired great influence in Abyssinia, and explored its highlands from 1600 to 1622.
    1
    0
  • In the Sumerian texts of Babylonia it was called Numma, "the Highlands," of which Elamtu or Elamu, "Elam," was the Semitic translation.
    1
    0
  • He died at Bad Kreuth in the Bavarian Highlands on the 14th of June 1893.
    1
    0
  • This man, then, having been a guest in many homes and having come down gradually from the highlands to the sea-coast, was Hellenic not only in speech but also in soul.
    1
    0
  • At Highlands, Macon county, during 1898 it was 105.24 in., and during 1901 it was 106.17 in., 30.74 in.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • There are considerable spaces where the strike, or axis, of the main ranges is transverse to the water-parting, which is then represented by intermediate highlands forming lacustrine regions with an indefinite watershed.
    1
    0
  • The Pamir highlands between the base of the Tian-shan mountains and the eastern buttresses of the Hindu Kush unite these two great divides, enclosing the Gobi depression on the west; and they would again be united on the east but for the transverse valley of the Amur, which parts the Khingan mountains from the Yablonoi system to the east of Lake Baikal.
    1
    0
  • Although the establishment of a lucrative trade between India and central Asia had been the dream of many successive Indian viceroys, and much had been done towards improving the approaches to Simla from the north, very little was in really known of the highlands of the Pamirs, or of the regions of the great central depression, before the mission of central Asia.
    1
    0
  • Eastwards of this the great Kashgar depression, which includes the Tarim desert, separates Russia from the vast sterile highlands of Tibet; and a continuous series of desert spaces of low elevation, marking the limits of a primeval inland sea from the Sarikol meridional watershed to the Khingan mountains on the western borders of Manchuria, divide her from the northern provinces of China.
    2
    1
  • The name of Aryan has been given to the races speaking languages derived from, or akin to, the ancient form of Sanskrit, who now occupy the temperate zone extending from the Mediterranean, across the highlands of Asia Minor, Persia and Afghanistan, to India.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • By the western gates of Makran prehistoric irruptions from Mesopotamia broke into the plains of Lower Sind, and either passed on towards the central provinces of India or were absorbed in the highlands south of Kalat.
    1
    0
  • Spurs from the Caucasus and from the Armenian highlands fill up the broad latitudinal depression between them.
    1
    0
  • The snow-clad peaks of the main Caucasus, descending by short, steep slopes, fringe the valley on the north, while an abrupt escarpment, having the characteristics of a border ridge of the Armenian highlands, fronts it on the south.
    1
    0
  • The slopes of the Armenian highlands are clothed with fine forests, and the vine is grown at their base, while on the wide-stretching steppes the Turko-Tatars pasture cattle, horses and sheep. The lower part of the Kura valley assumes the character of a dry steppe, the rainfall not reaching 54 in.
    1
    0
  • These highlands exhibit very considerable evidences of volcanic activity both in remote geological periods and also since the Tertiary epoch.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • In the extreme north (Commagene) the highlands are almost entirely held by Kurds who entered from beyond Euphrates in comparatively recent times.
    1
    0
  • Disguised as a groom, he started on the 18th of August with only two gentlemen to make his way to the Highlands.
    1
    0
  • The three great rivers that form the La Plata system - the Paraguay, Parana and Uruguay - have their sources in the highlands of Brazil and flow southward through a great continental depression, two of them forming eastern boundary lines, and one of them, the Parana, flowing across the eastern part of the republic. The northern part of Argentina, therefore, drains eastward from the mountains to these rivers, except where some great inland depression gives rise to a drainage having no outlet to the sea, and except, also, in the " mesopotamia " region, where small streams flow westward into the Parana and eastward into the Uruguay.
    0
    0
  • In the " mesopotamia " region the flora is similar to that of the southern Chaco, but in the Misiones it approximates more to that of the neighbouring Brazilian highlands.
    0
    0
  • The guanaco (Auchenia), which ranges from Tierra del Fuego to the Bolivian highlands, finds comparative safety in these uninhabitable solitudes, and is still numerous.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • North of the Murchison, Mount Augustus and Mount Bruce, with their connecting highlands, cut off the coastal drainage from the interior; but no point on the north-west coast reaches a greater altitude than 4000 feet.
    0
    0
  • A narrow Cambrian sea must have extended across central Australia from the Kimberley Goldfield in the north-west, through Tempe Downs and the Macdonnell chain in central Australia, to the South Australian highlands, central Victoria at Mansfield, and northern Tasmania.
    0
    0
  • This period was marked by intense earth movements, which affected the whole of the east Australian highlands.
    0
    0
  • Similar granitic intrusions occurred in New South Wales and Queensland, and built up a mountain chain, which ran north and south across the continent; its worn-down stumps now form the east Australian highlands.
    0
    0
  • These movements in the south-east formed the Great Valley of Victoria, which traverses nearly the whole of the state between the Victorian highlands to the north, and the Jurassic sandstones of the Otway Ranges and the hills of south Gippsland.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • These rocks were followed by the outpouring of the extensive older basalts in the Great Valley of Victoria and on the highlands of eastern Victoria, and also in New South Wales and Queensland.
    0
    0
  • The great monoclinal fold which formed the eastern face of the east Australian highlands, west of Sydney, is of later age.
    0
    0
  • Tasmania and Victoria were separated by the foundering of Bass Strait, and at the same time the formation of the rift valley of Spencer Gulf, and Lake Torrens, isolated the South Australian highlands from the Eyre Peninsula and the Westralian plateau.
    0
    0
  • Upper Lough Erne is a typical meandering lake of the limestone lowland, with outliers of higher Carboniferous strata forming highlands northeast and south-west of it.
    0
    0
  • The ancient Sacae, or Scyths, are recognized in the Aryan population, who may be found in great numbers and in their purest form in the more inaccessible mountains and glens of the central highlands.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • To such fields may be added the yet more complicated problems of those reflex waves which flowed backwards from India into the border highlands.
    0
    0
  • The Armenian highlands, which run generally parallel to the Caucasus, though at much lower elevations (5000-6000 ft.), are a plateau region, sometimes quite flat, sometimes gently undulating, clothed with luxuriant meadows and mostly cultivable.
    0
    0
  • Generally speaking, it may be characterized as a climate of extremes on the Armenian highlands, in the Kura valley and in northern Caucasia, and as maritime and genial in Lenkoran, on the Black Sea coastlands, and in the valley of the Rion.
    0
    0
  • About 50,000 tons of coal of very poor quality are, however, extracted annually, and the same quantity of salt in the Armenian highlands and in Kuban.
    0
    0
  • Schists, as a rule, are found in regions composed mainly of metamorphic rocks, such as the Central Alps, Himalayas, and other mountain ranges, Saxony, Scandinavia, the Highlands of Scotland and north-west of Ireland.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 1902 the surrounding highlands were found to be suitable for European settlement, and Nairobi speedily grew in importance; in 1907 the headquarters of the administration were transferred to it from Mombasa.
    0
    0
  • The highlands of Daghestan were for many years the stronghold of the Circassians in their struggle against Russia, especially under the leadership of Shamyl, whose last stand was made on the steep mountain fastness of Gunib, 74 m.
    0
    0
  • In the lower river lands Egyptian cotton has been the most successful, whilst Upland cotton is more suited to the highlands.
    0
    0
  • Though planters who confined their efforts to the lower lying grounds - of which there is a fairly large tract - succeeded, all the cotton planted on the highlands proved more or less a failure.
    0
    0
  • Palestine, being less shut in and enjoying a comparatively large general rainfall, would be still a land " flowing with milk and honey " had its forests not been destroyed, and the terracing, which used to hold up soil on the highlands, been maintained.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The first, to be seen on the coast and the western slopes of the highlands, is characterized by a number of evergreen shrubs with small leathery leaves, and by quickly-flowering spring plants.
    0
    0
  • The, 6th century saw the establishment of a powerful Gond kingdom by Sangram Sah, who succeeded in 1480 as the 47th of the petty Gond rajas of Garha-Mandla, and extended his dominions so as to include Saugor and Damoh on the Vindhyan plateau, Jubbulpore and Narsinghpur in the Nerbudda valley, and Seoni on the Satpura highlands.
    0
    0
  • Burton (Highlands of Brazil, London, 1869) says that its shape "is that of a huge serpent, whose biggest end is about the Praga....
    0
    0
  • The whole region is characterized by a remarkable degree of physical uniformity, and may be broadly described as a vast plateau of an average elevation of 3000 ft., bounded westwards by the Ethiopian and Galla highlands and northwards by an inner and an outer coast range, skirting the south side of the Gulf of Aden in its entire length from the Harrar uplands to Cape Guardafui.
    0
    0
  • The highlands, which in an almost continuous line traverse East Africa, have to a great extent isolated the flora of Somaliland in spite of the general resemblance of its climate and soil to the country on the western side of the band of high ground.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Subsequently in the Abyssinian highlands the expedition was.
    0
    0
  • By correspondence he stimulated some friends in Edinburgh to establish charity schools in the Highlands, and the Gaelic School Society (1811) was his idea.
    0
    0
  • The zone of highlands throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina reaches a mean altitude of 1500 ft., while summits of more than 4000 ft.
    0
    0
  • Its mountains, which belong to the Adriatic watershed, and form a continuation of the Montenegrin highlands, are less rounded and more dolomitic in character.
    0
    0
  • In Bosnia the weather resembles that of the south Austrian highlands, generally mild, though apt to be bitterly cold in winter.
    0
    0
  • They comprise the geographically distinct regions of the Anatolian plateau (Asia Minor), the Armenian and Kurdish highlands, the Mesopotamian lowlands, the hilly and partly mountainous territory of Syria and Palestine and the coast lands of west and north-east Arabia.
    0
    0
  • Turkey's Arabian possessions comprise, besides El-Hasa on the Persian Gulf, the low-lying, hot and insalubrious Tehama and the south-western highlands (vilayets of Hejaz and Yemen) stretching continuously along the east side of the Red Sea, and including the two holy cities of Mecca and Medina.
    0
    0
  • Montrose cut his way through to the Highlands; but he failed to organize an army.
    0
    0
  • From Chieng Khan the river again turns eastwards along the 18th parallel, forcing its way through its most serious rapid-barrier, and receiving some important tributaries from the highlands of Tung Chieng Kum and Chieng Kwang, the finest country in Indo-China.
    0
    0
  • The town was once famous for its pistols and sporrans (as the purses worn with the kilt are called), which were in great request by the clansmen of the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • Of the great inland region, which includes the arid campos of the north, the partially-wooded plateaus of Minas Geraes, Goyaz and Matto Grosso, the temperate highlands of the south, and the tropical lowlands of the Paraguay basin, no adequate description can be given without taking each section in detail, which can be done to better advantage in describing the individual states.
    0
    0
  • Shortly after the battle of Killiecrankie (1689), the Cameronian regiment, enrolled in the same year (afterwards the 26th Foot), was despatched to hold Dunkeld prior to another invasion of the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • The acropolis of Geronthrae, a hero-shrine at Angelona in the south-eastern highlands, and the sanctuary of Ino-Pasiphae at Thalamae have also been investigated.
    0
    0
  • This wattle thrives well in most localities, but especially in the highlands of central Natal.
    0
    0
  • But by far the greater portion of the Hungarian highlands belongs to the Carpathian mountains, which begin, to the north, on the left bank of the Danube at Deveny near Pressburg (Pozsony), run in a north-easterly and easterly direction, sway round south-eastward and then westward in a vast irregular semicircle, and end near Orsova at the Iron Gates of the Danube, where they meet the Balkan mountains.
    0
    0
  • These groups are the Leitha mountains, the Styrian highlands, the Lower Hungarian highlands, which are a continuation of the former, and the Bakony Forest.
    0
    0
  • When the Orinoco is reached its lower basin is contracted between the Guiana highlands and the northern sierras, and its tributaries begin to come in more nearly at right angles, showing that the margins of the actual valley are nearer and higher.
    0
    0
  • The Orinoco is supposed to have 436 tributaries, of which, among the largest, the Caroni-Paragua, Aro, Caura, Cuchivero, Suapure, Sipapo and Ventuari have their sources in the Guiana highlands; the Suata, Manapere and Guaritico in the northern sierras; and the Apure, Uricana, Arauca, Capanaparo, Meta, Vichada and Guaviare (the last three being Colombian rivers) in the llanos and Andes.
    0
    0
  • They are extensive grassy plains, the lowest being the bed of an ancient inland lake about which is a broad terrace (mesa), the talus perhaps of the ancient encircling highlands.
    0
    0
  • The climatic conditions are not so favourable as in Argentina, but these are counterbalanced to some extent by the great river system of the Orinoco, whose large navigable tributaries cross the plains from end to end, and whose smaller streams from the surrounding highlands provide superior opportunities for water storage and irrigation.
    0
    0
  • The rubber forests are on the Orinoco and its tributaries of the Guiana highlands.
    0
    0
  • The climate of the coast belt is semi-tropical and malaria is prevalent; that of the highlands temperate.
    0
    0
  • Jacobite traditions also lingered among the great families of the Scottish Highlands; the last person to suffer death as a Jacobite was Archibald Cameron, a son of Cameron of Lochiel, who was executed in 1 753.
    0
    0
  • It commands the direct approaches to the Baluch highlands by Sakki Sarwar and Fort Monro.
    0
    0
  • In the highlands of the Shan hills there are the Inle lakes near Yawnghwe, and in the Katha district also there is another Indaw which covers some 60 sq.
    0
    0
  • The original meaning of Urra was perhaps " clayey soil," but it came to signify " the upper country " or " highlands," kengi being " the lowlands."
    0
    0
  • After this we trace the friar in northern Persia, in Millestorte, once famous as the Land of the Assassins in the Elburz highlands.
    0
    0
  • Sandstone, and clays suitable for brick-making, are found in the district of Scotland, so called from a fancied resemblance to the Highlands of North Britain.
    0
    0
  • Its mountains are insufficient in elevation and extent to attract their full share of the monsoon rains, which fall so abundantly on the Abyssinian highlands on the other side of the Red Sea; for this reason Arabia has neither lakes nor forests to control the water-supply and prevent its too rapid dissipation, and the rivers are mere torrent beds sweeping down occasionally in heavy floods, but otherwise dry.
    0
    0
  • Akhdar, is perhaps the most fertile district in the peninsula; Hadramut, too, contains many large and prosperous villages, and the torrents from the Yemen highlands fertilize several oases in the Tehama (or Tihama) or lowlands of the western and southern coast.
    0
    0
  • Continuing eastward they crossed the mountainous region and reached the highlands of Yemen at Uden, a small town and the centre of a district celebrated for its coffee.
    0
    0
  • In the interior of northern and central Arabia, however, where the average level of the country exceeds 3000 ft., the fiery heat of the summer days is followed by cool nights, and the winter climate is fresh and invigorating; while in the highlands of Asir and Yemen in the south-west, and of Oman in the east, the summer heat is never excessive, and the winters are, comparatively speaking, cold.
    0
    0
  • Doughty adds that the Nejd highlands between Kasim and Mecca are watered yearly by seasonable rains, which at Taif are expected about the end of August and last commonly from four to six weeks.
    0
    0
  • This appears to be about the northern limit reached by the south-west monsoon, which from June to September brings a fairly abundant rainfall to the Yemen highlands, though the Tehama remains almost entirely rainless.
    0
    0
  • Among fruit trees the vine, apricot, peach, apple, quince, fig and banana are cultivated in the highlands, and in the lower country the date palm flourishes, particularly throughout the central zone of Arabia, in Hejaz, Nejd and El Hasa, where it is the prime article of food.
    0
    0
  • Of cereals the common millets, dhura and dukhn, are grown in all parts of the country as the summer crop, and in the hot irrigated Tehama districts three crops are reaped in the year; in the highlands maize, wheat and barley are grown to a limited extent as the winter crop, ripening at the end of March or in April.
    0
    0
  • In the north, its boundary skirts the river Wawa; in the west, it corresponds with the eastern limit of the Nicaraguan highlands; in the south, it is drawn along the river Rama.
    0
    0
  • In fact, the country between the Matmata highlands and the strait separating Jerba from the mainland is singularly African in the character and aspect of its flora.
    0
    0
  • The table-land consists of a series of fertile plains, of varying size and elevation separated from each other by upland tracts or mountains, and it is drained almost entirely by the river Iris (Yeshil Irmak) and its numerous tributaries, the largest of which are the Scylax (Tchekerek Irmak) with many affluents and the Lycus (Kalkid Irmak), all three rising in the highlands near, or on, the frontier of Armenia Minor and flowing first in a westerly and then in a north-westerly direction to merge their waters in a joint stream, which (under the name of the Iris) pierces the mountain-wall and emerges on the east of Amisus (Samsun).
    0
    0
  • The greater part of Baden belongs to the basin of the Rhine, which receives upwards of twenty tributaries from the highlands; the north-eastern portion of the territory is also watered by the Main and the Neckar.
    0
    0
  • In the southern portion of the district the scenery in parts of the hill-ranges and the highlands which connect them is very beautiful.
    0
    0
  • Though deserted by the Khazars, with whom he had made an alliance upon entering into Pontus, he gained a decisive advantage by a brilliant march across the Armenian highlands into the Tigris plain, and a hard-fought victory over Chosroes' general, Shahrbaraz, in which Heraclius distinguished himself by his personal bravery.
    0
    0
  • Then follow the low, dense, prone, pillow-like dwarf bushes, thorny and grey, common to the Oriental highlands - A stragalus and the peculiar Acantholimon.
    0
    0
  • This process of Hellenization, or at least its final stage, was further regarded as intimately connected with a movement of peoples which had brought the " Dorians " from the northern highlands into those parts of Greece which they occupied in historic times.
    0
    0
  • Arcadia, on the other hand, in the heart of Peloponnese, retained till a late date a quite different dialect, akin to the ancient dialect of Cyprus, and more remotely to Aeolic. This distribution makes it clear (r) that the Doric dialects of Peloponnese represent a superstratum, more recent than the speech of Arcadia; (2) that Laconia and its colonies preserve features alike, -n and -w which are common to southern Doric and Aeolic; (3) that those parts of " Dorian " Greece in which tradition makes the pre-Dorian population " Ionic," and in which the political structure shows that the conquered were less completely subjugated, exhibit the Ionic -a and -ov; (4) that as we go north, similar though more barbaric dialects extend far up the western side of central-northern Greece, and survive also locally in the highlands of south Thessaly; (5) that east of the watershed Aeolic has prevailed over the area which has legends of a Boeotian and Thessalian migration, and replaces Doric in the northern Doris.
    0
    0
  • But more work had to be done in the Balkan highlands.
    0
    0
  • From Miranda it winds south-eastward through the wide basin enclosed on the right by the highlands of Old Castile and western Aragon, and on the left by the Pyrenees.
    0
    0
  • The lake is fed by a number of rivers and small streams which descend from the surrounding highlands.
    0
    0
  • Just above Holyoke the Connecticut leaves the rugged highlands through a rift between Mt Tom (1214 ft.; ascended by a mountain-railway from Holyoke) and Mt Holyoke (954 ft.), and begins a meandering valley course, falling (in the Hadley Falls) in great volume some 60 ft.
    0
    0
  • The maple, walnut, oak, ash, beech, elm, gum, sycamore, hickory and poplar, found on the southern slope of the Osage highlands, on the uplands about the source of the highlands and in the central portions of the Red river valley, are valuable for cabinet woods.
    0
    0
  • South-east of Mount Kilimanjaro are the Pare Mountains and Usambara highlands, separated from the coast by a comparatively narrow strip of plain.
    0
    0
  • Other well-known tribes are the Wasambara, who have given their name to the highlands between Kilimanjaro and the coast, and the Warundi, inhabiting the district between Tanganyika and the Kagera.
    0
    0
  • At that time the only railway in the country was a line from Tanga to the Usambara highlands.
    0
    0
  • Mallary, Lenox and the Berkshire Highlands (New York-London, 1902); also Inland Massachusetts, Illustrated...
    0
    0
  • There are, however, extensive oak, pine and beech forests in the highlands, and many beautiful oases in the deeply sunk valleys, and along the rivers, especially beside the Ebro, which is, therefore, often called the "Nile of Aragon."
    0
    0
  • South of the Highlands, in New Jersey, but extending to the very banks of the Hudson,.
    0
    0
  • It is noted for its remarkable scenery, especially where it crosses the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • This brought on the battle of White Plains late in October, in which Howe gained no advantage; and from here both armies withdrew into New Jersey, the British capturing Fort Washington on the way, the Americans leaving behind garrisons to guard the Highlands of the Hudson.
    0
    0
  • Clinton met with little difficulty from the principal American defences of the Highlands, consisting of Forts Montgomery and Clinton on the western bank, together with a huge chain and boom stretched across the river to a precipitous mountain (Anthony's Nose) on the opposite bank, and ascended as far as Esopus (now Kingston) which he burned, but he was too late to aid Burgoyne.
    0
    0
  • All these streams are interrupted by rapids as they descend from the highlands to the plain and are unnavigable by steamers save for a few miles from their mouths.
    0
    0
  • East of the Cascade Mountains the Columbia and Spokane rivers mark the boundary between the Okanogan Highlands to the northward and the Columbia plateau to the southward; The Okanogan Highlands, an outlier of the Rocky Mountains extending westward from the Coeur d'Alene Mountains in Idaho, reach heights of 5000 to 6000 ft.
    0
    0
  • In the eastern part of the Okanogan Highlands there is some western white pine, and here, too, larch is most abundant.
    0
    0
  • The larger valleys of the Black Hills district contain fertile alluvial deposits washed from the neighbouring highlands, but in the plains adjoining these mountains the soils consist of a stiff gumbo suitable only for pasture land.
    0
    0
  • The northern section includes the Shickshock Mountains and Notre Dame Range in Quebec, scattered elevations in Maine, the White Mountains and the Green Mountains; the central comprises, besides various minor groups, the Valley Ridges between the Front of the Allegheny Plateau and the Great Appalachian Valley, the New York-New Jersey Highlands and a large portion of the Blue Ridge; and the southern consists of the prolongation of the Blue Ridge, the Unaka Range, and the Valley Ridges adjoining the Cumberland Plateau, with some lesser ranges.
    0
    0
  • In eastern Pennsylvania the Great Valley was accessible by reason of a broad gateway between the end of South Mountain and the Highlands, and here in the Lebanon Valley settled German Moravians, whose descendants even now retain the peculiar patois known as "Pennsylvania Dutch."
    0
    0
  • The city covers the low, level bottom-land at the junction of the two rivers, and spreads over the surrounding highlands to the W., the principal residential district.
    0
    0
  • After two expeditions across the borders, a truce was made in July 1457, and the king employed the period of peace in strengthening his authority in the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • On the east the Pamir highlands are fenced off from the East Turkestan lowlands by the double border-ridge of Sarik-kol (the Sarik-kol range and the Murtagh or Kashgar range), which has its eastern foot down in the Tarim basin (4000-4500 ft.) and its western up on the Pamirs at 10,500 to 13,000 ft.
    0
    0
  • Generally speaking, the Nan-shan highlands are a region raised 12,000 to 14,000 ft.
    0
    0
  • Shortly afterwards (1892) he succeeded in finally beating down the resistance of the Hazara tribe, who vainly attempted to defend their immemorial independence, within their highlands, of the central authority at Kabul.
    0
    0
  • South of the Jurjura and separated from it by the valley of the Sahel, is the Biban range with a famous double pass of the same name, through which alone access is gained to the highlands beyond.
    0
    0
  • In the highlands this hot and dry summer is followed by four months of winter; and, finally, in the regions above 8000 ft.
    0
    0
  • On the irrigated lowlands rice, wheat and other cereals are cultivated, and exported to the highlands.
    0
    0
  • Cattle-breeding is vigorously prosecuted in Hissar and the highlands generally.
    0
    0
  • The highest points of the department are found in the wooded highlands of the Ardennes which, with an altitude varying between 980 and 1640 ft., cover the north and north-east.
    0
    0
  • In 1779 he attempted to draw Washington out of the Highlands,' with the result that in the manoeuvres he lost the garrison at Stony Point, 700 strong, the position being stormed by Wayne with the American light infantry on the 16th of July.
    0
    0
  • Deep gorges, through which tributaries of the Chorokh force their passage to the main river, intersect these highlands, forming most picturesque gorges.
    0
    0
  • In Ireland and the west Highlands neolithic arrow-heads and flint chips are still fairy weapons.
    0
    0
  • In the Highlands, however, there is much more interest in second sight than in fairies, while in Ireland the reverse is the case.
    0
    0
  • Manresa is the chief town of the highlands watered by the Cardoner and upper Llobregat, which meet below the town, and are also connected by a canal 18 m.
    0
    0
  • A better idea of this region is conveyed by the native name Altos, or highlands, although that term includes the northern declivity of the Sierra Madre.
    0
    0
  • The area of the United States, as here considered, exclusive of Alaska and outlying possessions, occupies a belt nearly twenty degrees of middle latitude in width, and crosses Boundaries sad Area, North America from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The southern boundary is naturally defined on the east by the Gulf of Mexico; its western extension crosses obliquely over the western highlands, along an irregular line determined by aggressive Americans of Anglo-Saxon stock against Americans of Spanish stock.
    0
    0
  • In a north-eastern section, practically all of New England is occupied by the older crystalline belt; the corresponding northern part of the stratified belt in the St Lawrence and Champlain-Hudson valleys on the inland side of New England is comparatively free from the ridge-making rocks which abound farther south; and here the plateau member is wanting, being replaced, as it were, by the Adirondacks, an outlier of the Laurentian highlands of Canada which immediately succeeds the deformed stratified belt west of Lake Champlain.
    0
    0
  • For the most part the rivers follow open valleys along belts of weak strata; but they frequently pass through sharp-cut notches in the na1row ridges of the stratified beltthe Delaware water-gap is one of the deepest of these notches; and in the harder rocks of the crystalline belt they have eroded steep-walled gorges, of which the finest is that of the Hudson, because of the greater height and breadth of the crystalline highlands there than at points where the other rivers cross it.
    0
    0
  • The Superior Oldland.An outlying upland of the Laurentian highlands of Canada projects into the United States west and south of Lake Superior.
    0
    0
  • The Adirondack Mountains .T his rugged district of northern New York may be treated as an outlier in the United States of the Laurentian highlands of Canada, from which it is separated by the St Lawrence Valley.
    0
    0
  • The strata are the deposits of an ancient sea, which in the earlier stage of geological investigation was thought to be part of the primeval ocean, while the Laurentian highlands were taken to be the first land that rose from the primeval waters.
    0
    0
  • This peculiar feature is explained as the result of displacement of the river from a better graded preglacial valley by the Pleistocene ice-sheet, which here overspread the plains from the moderately elevated Canadian highlands far on the north-east, instead of from the much higher mountains near by on the west.
    0
    0
  • The Cascade Range is in essence a maturely dissected highland, composed in part of upwarped Colombian lavas, in part of older rocks, and crowned with several dissected volcanoes, of which the chief are (beginning in the north) Mts Baker (Io,827 ft.), Rainier (14,363 ft.), Adams (12,470 ft.) and Hood (11,225 ft.); the first three in \Vashington, the last in northern Oregon- These bear snowfields and glaciers; while the dissected highlands, with ridges of very irregular arrangement, are everywhere sculptured in a fashion that strongly suggests the work of numerous local Pleistocene glaciers as an important supplement to preglacial erosion.
    0
    0
  • The highlands and uplands between the chief valleys are but moderately dissected; many small side streams still flow on the highland, and descend by steeply incised gorges to the valleys of the larger rivers.
    0
    0
  • Its deposition seems to have followed a time of deformation which resulted in an increase of altitude in the Appalachian Mountains, and in an accentuation of the contrast between the highlands and the adjacent plains.
    0
    0
  • The crofters' houses have been rebuilt of stone and lime, and are superior to those in most parts of the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • South of these highlands, occupying a narrow strip on each side of the Tennessee river, is a delightful country of gentle rolling lowlands varying in elevation from 500 to 800 ft.
    0
    0
  • The thinnings of the larch woods in the Highlands are in demand for railway sleepers, scaffold poles, and mining timber, and are applied to a variety of agricultural purposes.
    0
    0
  • From the Julian Alps, which traverse the province in the north, the country descends in successive terraces towards the sea, and may roughly be divided into the upper highlands, the lower highlands, the hilly district and the lowlands.
    0
    0
  • Plenty of springs issue on the highlands, and wide expanses of grassy country dotted with trees like an English park are met with.
    0
    0
  • The southern highlands, however, are devoted to stock-raising, which was once an important industry.
    0
    0
  • The healthiest portions are the highlands, where most exposed to the south-east trades.
    0
    0
  • Even at the time when they were first known to Europeans, they had stone and lava hatchets, shark's-tooth knives, hardwood spades, kapa cloth or paper, mats, fans, fish-hooks and nets, woven baskets, &c., and they had introduced a rough sort of irrigation of the inland country with long canals from highlands to plains.
    0
    0
  • Aram-Damascus, which means, the Damascus portion of the Aramaic domain; and har-Ephraim, which means, the Ephraim portion of the (Israelitish) highlands - EV "Mount Ephraim."
    0
    0
  • It would thus include the country lying between Babylonia on the south and the Armenian Taurus highlands on the north, the maritime Syrian district on the west, and Assyria proper on the east.
    0
    0
  • The most natural explanation is that Aryans had made their way into the highlands east of Assyria, and thence bands had penetrated into Mesopotamia, peacefully or otherwise, and then, like the Turks in the days of the Caliphate, founded dynasties.
    0
    0
  • Antiochus skirted the northern highlands by way of Nasibin.
    0
    0
  • The general structure of the trans-Himalayan chains appears to indicate that the main axis of upheaval of the whole vast mass of the Tibetan highlands is to be found on two approximately parallel lines, represented the one by the Kuen-lun and the other by a line which is more or less coincident with the watershed between India and the central lake region, extending from Lake Pangong to Tengri Nor, the plateau enclosed between the two being wrinkled by minor folds, of which the relative elevation is comparatively low, averaging from woo to 1500 ft.
    0
    0
  • There are still enormous glaciers about the head of the Brahmaputra, but the glacial epoch of the Chang-t'ang highlands has passed away, though comparatively recently.
    0
    0
  • Campbell, who also discusses the subject in Popular Tales of the Western Highlands, iv.
    0
    0
  • The first pioneers who went forth to engage in this difficult enterprise came from the secluded Celtic Churches of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands.
    0
    0
  • The Kubus, a savage forest people of the highlands, were believed by some to be Negrito owing to the frizzled character of their hair, but it appears certain that they are Malayan.
    0
    0
  • Bukit Tinggi, or, as it is commonly called, Fort de Kock, is the capital of the residency of the Padang highlands.
    0
    0
  • Copper has been worked in the Padang highlands (most largely in the district of Lake Singkara) and at Muki in Achin.
    0
    0
  • Certain inscriptions discovered in the Padang highlands seem to certify the existence in the 7th century of a powerful Hindu kingdomin Tanah Datar, not far from the site of the later capital of Menangkabo.
    0
    0
  • Paraguay proper, or the country between the Paraguay and the Parana, is traversed from north to south by a broad irregular belt of highlands, which are known as the Cordillera Ambaya, Cordillera Urucury, &c., but partake rather of the character of plateaus, and form a continuation and outwork of the great interior plateau of Brazil.
    0
    0
  • On the western side these highlands terminate with a more or less sharply defined edge, the country sloping gradually up to their bases in gentle undulations with open, ill-defined valleys; on the eastern side they send out broad spurs enclosing deep-cut valleys, and the whole country retains more of an upland character.
    0
    0
  • Tirana is beautifully situated on the border of the richly wooded highlands inhabited by the Mirdite Albanians.
    0
    0
  • The soil is fertile, and whereas rice is mainly grown on the lowlands the highlands are especially suitable for the cultivation of coffee, tea, tobacco, cinchona and vanilla.
    0
    0
  • The principal products are rubber shoes (at the village of Fells), skirts (at the village of Wyoming), and leather and silverware (at Melrose Highlands).
    0
    0
  • Piercing the desert, and at its annual overflow depositing rich sediment brought from the Abyssinian highlands, the river has created the Delta and the fertile strip in Upper Egypt.
    0
    0
  • Sir Walter Scott mentions a belief in the banshee as existing in the highlands of Scotland (Demonology and Witchcraft, p. 351).
    0
    0
  • At the latter place he heard of Argyll's total rout in the western Highlands.
    0
    0
  • Physically, Scotland is divided into three geographical regions - the " Highlands " (subdivided by Glen More into the NorthWestern and South-Eastern Highlands); the Central Plain or " Lowlands " (a tract of south-westerly to north-easterly trend, between a line drawn roughly from Girvan to Dunbar and a line drawn from Dumbarton to Stonehaven); and the Southern Uplands.
    0
    0
  • Along both sides of the Moray Firth a strip of level land lies between the foot of the hills and the sea, while the county of Caithness, occupying a wide plain, does not, strictly speaking, belong to the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • Seen from Strathmore or the Firth of Clyde the Highlands present well-defined masses of hills abruptly rising from the Lowland plains, and from any of the western islands their sea front resembles a vast rampart indented by lochs and rising to a uniform level, which sinking here and there allows glimpses of still higher summits in the interior.
    0
    0
  • The surface of the Highlands is rugged.
    0
    0
  • The Highlands are separated into two completely disconnected and in some respects contrasted regions by the depression of the Great Glen, extending from Loch Linnhe to Inverness, by which the ancient plateau was severed.
    0
    0
  • The south-eastern region of the Highlands, having a more diversified geological structure, offers greater variety of scenery.
    0
    0
  • It first strikes eastwards round the head of Loch Laggan and then swings southwards, pursuing a sinuous course till it leaves the Highlands on the east side of Loch Lomond.
    0
    0
  • Besides the principal tracts of low-lying ground in the Highlands already alluded to, there occur long narrow strips of flat land in the more important valleys.
    0
    0
  • In Galloway, also, the highest portions of the Uplands have acquired a ruggedness and wildness more like those of the Highlands than an y other district in the south of Scotland.
    0
    0
  • Although the rocks throughout the Southern Uplands have a persistent northeasterly and south-westerly strike, and though this trend is apparent in the bands of more rugged hills that mark the outcrop of hard grits and greywackes, nevertheless geological structure has been much less effective in determining the lines of ridge and valley than in the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • The crumpling of the earth's crust which folded the rocks of the Highlands and Southern Uplands probably upraised above the sea a series of longitudinal ridges having a general north-easterly direction.
    0
    0
  • This name, however, has also been applied to wide tracts of lowland which embrace portions of several valleys, but are defined by lines of heights on each side; the best example is afforded by Strathmore - the " Great Strath " - between the southern margin of the Highlands and the line of the Sidlaw Hills.
    0
    0
  • In the Old Red Sandstone they are particularly prominent where River- that formation has lain in the pathway of the streams. sweeping down from the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • Towards the south margin of the Highlands notable instances of true canyons in the Old Red Sandstone are to be seen where the Isla and North Esk enter that formation.
    0
    0
  • Relics of these platforms occur both in the Highlands and among the Southern Uplands.
    0
    0
  • Where a number of small torrents converge in a steep mountain recess, they cut out a crescent-shaped hollow or halfcauldron, which in the Scottish Highlands is known as a corrie.
    0
    0
  • Glen lakes are almost wholly confined to the western half of the Highlands, where they form the largest sheets of fresh water.
    0
    0
  • Lochs Lomond, Katrine and Lubnaig in the southern Highlands, and Lochs Maree and More in the north, are conspicuous examples.
    0
    0
  • Dispersed over all parts of the western Highlands, they are most numerous in the north-west, especially in the Outer Hebrides and in the west of the shires of Ross and Cromarty and Sutherland, where the surface of the Archean gneiss is so thickly sprinkled with them that many tracts consist nearly as much of water as of land.
    0
    0
  • In the Highlands they may be counted by hundreds, nestling in the bottoms of the corries.
    0
    0
  • In the Highlands no mineral wealth has been discovered to stimulate the industry of the natives or to attract labour and capital.
    0
    0
  • The central, southern and eastern Highlands are occupied by metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous rocks, to which has been provisionally assigned the name of Dalradian, from the old Celtic kingdom of Dalriada.
    0
    0
  • They constitute the lowest group of the most interesting series of strata in the Highlands, and yield a large number of fossils.
    0
    0
  • Rocks of Cambrian age have not been identified elsewhere in Scotland, though it may ultimately be shown that the quartzites and limestones of the Central Highlands are equivalents of those of the north-west coast.
    0
    0
  • The plications of the Highlands and the chief dislocations of the country have followed the same general direction, and hence the parallelism and north-easterly trend of the main topographical features.
    0
    0
  • The Lower, with its abundant intercalated lavas and tuffs, extends continuously as a broad belt along the northern margin of the Central Plain, reappears in detached tracts along the southern border, is found again on the south side of the Uplands in Berwickshire and the Cheviot Hills, occupies a tract of Lorne (Oban and the vicinity) in Argyllshire, and on the north side of the Highlands underlies most of the low ground on both sides of the Moray Firth, stretches across Caithness and through nearly the whole of the Orkney Islands, and is prolonged into Shetland.
    0
    0
  • The Jurassic system - comprising, in descending order, the subdivisions of Upper Oolites (Portlandian Kimmeridge Clay), Middle Oolites (coal limestones; Oxford clay), Lower Oolites (Great Oolite series; Inferior Oolite series), Lias (Upper, Middle, Lower) - is well represented on both sides of the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • On the west side of the Highlands Jurassic rocks are found in many detached areas from the Shiant Isles to the southern shores of Mull.
    0
    0
  • Rocks belonging to the Cretaceous system at one time covered considerable areas on both sides of the Highlands, but they have been entirely stripped off the eastern side, while on the western they have been reduced to a few fragmentary patches, which have survived because of the overlying sheets of basalt that have protected them.
    0
    0
  • Moraines of the last of the glaciers are numerous throughout the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • The crofters of the Highlands and islands had their grievances also.
    0
    0
  • The red deer is peculiar to the Highlands, but the fallow deer is not uncommon in the hill country of the south-western Lowlands.
    0
    0
  • The wild cat may yet be found in the Highlands, and the polecat, ermine and pine marten still exist, the golden eagle and the white-tailed eagle haunt the wilder and more remote mountainous districts, while the other large birds of prey, like the osprey and kite, are becoming scarce.
    0
    0
  • The Highlands had good military roads earlier than the rest of the country.
    0
    0
  • In May 1540 James visited the highlands, and later reduced the Macdonalds and annexed the lordship of the Isles to the crown.
    0
    0
  • How the Catholics of the west highlands took the change of creed we do not know, but they were not fanatically devout and attempted no Pilgrimage of Grace.
    0
    0
  • The conquest of Scotland was soon completed; at last she lay at an English victor's feet; the General Assembly was turned out into the street by " some rats of Musketeers and a troup of horse," and the risings of Glencairn, Lorne (eldest son of Argyll) and others in the highlands were easily crushed.
    0
    0
  • Wade drove his military roads through the highlands, and, poor as the country still was, the city of Glasgow throve on the tobacco and sugar trade with America and the West Indies.
    0
    0
  • The " planting " of ministers in the highlands, which had since the Reformation been almost destitute of religious instruction, bred a populace singularly strict in the matter of " Sabbath observance," and, except in districts still Catholic or Episcopalian, eager supporters of the Free churches.
    0
    0
  • David Stewart of Garth's Sketches of the Highlanders (Edinburgh, 1822) is interesting, though the author leans too much on tradition; and Dr Gregory's History of the Highlands (1881) is excellent, but closes with the Union of the crowns.
    0
    0
  • The Kolab and the Surkhab (or Waksh) flow into it in broad muddy streams from the highlands of Karateghin, and the river at once commences to adopt an uncertain channel wherever the outstretched arms of the hills fail to confine it within definite limits.
    0
    0
  • The administration of the whole of the states on the right bank of the Oxus, down to the Russian boundary line at Ichka Yar, is now in the hands of Bokhara, including Karateghin - which the Russians have transferred to it from Khokand - and Darwaz at the entrance to the Pamir highlands.
    0
    0
  • In the interval it had been a prey to armed bands from the highlands of Chota Nagpur, with whom the raja was unable to cope, and who practically brought the trade of the Company in the district to a standstill.
    0
    0
  • Only in a few districts is the climate suitable for Europeans, most of whom live in the Shire Highlands.
    0
    0
  • Early in 1915, while the situation in the protectorate was still perilous, a revolt of natives occurred in the Shire Highlands.
    0
    0
  • In the Scottish Highlands the flowers may be seen as late as the middle of June.
    0
    0
  • The Argeia, or territory of Argos proper, consisted of a shelving plain at the head of the Gulf of Argolis, enclosed between the eastern wall of the Arcadian plateau and the central highlands of Argolis.
    0
    0
  • Within the limits of this boundary Afghanistan comprises four main provinces, Northern Afghanistan or Kabul, Southern Afghanistan or Kandahar, Herat and Afghan Turkes Ghilzai and Hazara Highlands, Ghazni, Jalalabad and Kafiristan.
    0
    0
  • So rapid has been the land elevation of Central Afghanistan that the erosive action of rivers has not been able to keep pace with that of upheaval; and the result all through Afghanistan (but specially marked in the great central highlands between Kabul and Herat) is the formation of those immensely deep gorges and defiles which are locally known as darns.
    0
    0
  • The highlands which shut off the Turkestan provinces from Southern Afghanistan have afforded the best opportunities for geological investigation, and as might be expected from their geographical position, the general result of the examination of exposed sections leads to the identification of geological affinity with Himalayan, Indian and Persian regions.
    0
    0
  • The general configuration of the Turkestan highlands has been already indicated.
    0
    0
  • Taking the highlands of the country as a whole, there is no Climate.
    0
    0
  • In the highlands of Kabul edible rhubarb is an important local luxury.
    0
    0
  • In the time of Darius Hystaspes (zoo B.C.) we find the region now called Afghanistan embraced in the Achaemenian satrapies, and various parts of it occupied by Sarangians (in Seistan), Arians (in Herat), Sattagydians (supposed in highlands of upper Helmund and the plateau of Ghazni), Dadicae (suggested to be Tajiks), Aparytae (mountaineers, perhaps of Safed Koh, where lay the Paryetae of Ptolemy), Gandarii (in Lower Kabul basin) and Paktyes, on or near the Indus.
    0
    0
  • After 1849, when the annexation of the Punjab had carried the Indian northwestern frontier up to the skirts of the Afghan highlands, the corresponding advance of the Russians south-eastward along the Oxus river became of closer interest to the British, particularly when, in 1856, the Persians again attempted to take possession of Herat.
    0
    0
  • At the foot of the great mountain barrier, and separating it from the more ancient land which now forms the highlands of the peninsula, a broad plain, for the most part alluvial, stretches from sea to sea.
    0
    0
  • The highlands of the peninsula, which are cut off from the encircling ranges by the broad Indo-Gangetic plain, are divided into two unequal parts by an almost continuous chain of hills running across the country from west by south to east by north, just south of the Tropic of Cancer.
    0
    0
  • The betel-nut or areca palm is chiefly grown in certain favoured localities, such as the deltaic districts of Bengal and the highlands of southern India.
    0
    0
  • The principal cotton-growing tracts are the plains of Gujarat and Kathiawar, whence Indian cotton has received in the Liverpool market the historic name of " Surat "; the highlands of the Deccan, and the valleys of the Central Provinces and Berar.
    0
    0
  • Forest-clad highlands are their favourite resorts.
    0
    0
  • The northern division is part of the Abyssinian highlands.
    0
    0
  • The Pampanga rises in the highlands on the north-east border, flows south by west, and discharges through several channels into Manila Bay.
    0
    0
  • In the British army the first battalion of the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) is directly descended from the "Cameronian guard," which, composed of Cameronians, was embodied by the convention parliament in 1689, and was afterwards employed to restore order in the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • Prominent both as an administrator and as a lawgiver, the king by his vigorous rule did much to destroy the tendencies to independence which existed in the Highlands and Islands; but, on the other hand, his rash conduct at Flodden brought much misery upon his kingdom.
    0
    0
  • Along the upper course of the White river in the Bostons and in the country about Hot Springs in the Ouachitas is found the most beautiful scenery of the highlands; few regions are more beautiful.
    0
    0
  • That of the highlands is mostly but a thin covering, and their larger portion is relatively poorly fitted for agriculture.
    0
    0
  • There is much rain in the Futa Jallon highlands, but the Niger basin is somewhat drier.
    0
    0
  • In that region and in the highlands the climate is fairly healthy for Europeans and the heat somewhat less than on the coast.
    0
    0
  • Expeditions reduced the Highlands to order; earldom after earldom was forfeited; but this vigour aroused the desire for revenge, and at length cost James his life.
    0
    0
  • The oldest rocks, consisting of slate, mica-schists and grits, which have been correlated with the metamorphic series of the eastern Highlands, form an incomplete ring round the granite in the north of the island and occupy the whole of the west coast from Loch Ranza south to Dougrie.
    0
    0
  • The greater portion is exceedingly hilly and in parts mountainous, and the interior consists almost entirely of highlands with here and there open valleys and plateaus of 50 to 60 sq.
    0
    0
  • At the head-waters of the Tornea, Finland penetrates as a narrow strip into the heart of the highlands of Kjolen (the Keel), where the Haldefjall (Lappish, Halditjokko) reaches 4115 ft.
    0
    0
  • It has the same general characteristics as the latter river, being a mountain stream near its source, and after leaving the highlands becoming sluggish and losing much of its water.
    0
    0
  • In the plains where drainage is poor, especially in the S., the soils contain too much alkali; but in the highlands most of this has been dissolved and carried away by the rains, and the soils are well adapted for grazing grounds.
    0
    0
  • The Protesters, who were in favour with the common people, are chargeable with having brought into Scottish church life the observance of fastdays, and of the long and excited Communion services which were kept up for two and a half centuries and may still be witnessed in the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • The religious state of the Highlands, to which at the period of the Union the Reformation had only very partially penetrated, occupied the attention of the church during the whole of the 18th century.
    0
    0
  • In 1725 the gift called the " royal bounty " was first granted - a subsidy amounting at first to £1000 per annum, increased in George IV.'s reign to £2000, and continued to the present day; its original object was to assist the reclamation of the Highlands from Roman Catholicism by means of catechists and teachers.
    0
    0
  • The government built forty-two churches in the Highlands, providing them with a slender endowment; and these are still known as parliamentary churches.
    0
    0
  • At that date the Church of Scotland had 300 schools, mostly in the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • The membership of the larger churches is that of communicants only; in the Highlands especially the adherents of these churches who do not communicate form a large proportion of those connected with the church.
    0
    0
  • The permanent residents are generally limited to the major-domo and his family; and in the dry season labourers are hired, of any colour that can be obtained - some from the low country, others from the highlands - for three, four, or five months, who gather in and grind the cane, and plant for the harvest of the following year; but the staff of resident Indian labourers, such as exists in the farms of the sierra, cannot be kept up in the Yungas, as these half-warm valleys are called.
    0
    0
  • The Indians of the highlands are the descendants of others who have inhabited that region exclusively for untold ages; and a similar affirmation may be made of the Indians of the plain.
    0
    0
  • At its foot passes the great road which leads from Babylonia (Bagdad) to the highlands of Media (Ecbatana, Hamadan).
    0
    0
  • Apart from Segura, which flows from the highlands of Albacete through Murcia and Orihuela to the sea, there is no considerable river, but a few rivulets flow east into the Mediterranean.
    0
    0
  • As the river water was insufficient to maintain the local industry an artificial reservoir was constructed at La Gileppe on the Hautes Fagnes, and an imposing aqueduct conveys the water stored on these highlands into Verviers.
    0
    0
  • Sweden itself may be considered in four main physical divisions - the mountains and highland district, covering all Norrland and the western part of Svealand; the lowlands of central Sweden; the so-called Sma.land highlands, in the south and southeast; and the plains of Ska.ne, occupying the extreme southward projection of the peninsula.
    0
    0
  • The neighbourhood of Areskutan and the Dalarne highlands, owing to the railway and the development of communications by steamer on the numerous lakes, are visited by considerable numbers of travellers, both Swedish and foreign, in summer; but the northern heights, crossed only by a few unfrequented tracks, are known to few, and to a considerable extent, indeed, have not been closely explored.
    0
    0
  • South of the central lowlands the so-called Smaland highlands extend over the old province of Smaland in the south-east, and lie roughly south of Lake Vetter and of Gothenburg, S m aland where.
    0
    0
  • The Smaland highlands abut southward upon the plains of Skane, the last of the main orographical divisions, which coincides, roughly with the old province of Skane (Scania).
    0
    0
  • The Smaland highlands are drained to the Baltic and Cattegat by numerous rivers of less importance.
    0
    0
  • A local increase of the ice period naturally takes place in the upper parts of the Smaland highlands; and in the case of the great lakes of Norrland, the western have a rather shorter ice period than the eastern.
    0
    0
  • The elk, carefully preserved, haunts the lonely forests from the Arctic Circle even to the Smaland highlands.
    0
    0
  • The Gota canal route, however, is used by many; the uplands of Dalecarlia (Dalarne) are frequented; and the railway through the Jemtland highlands to Trondhjem gives access to a beautiful region, where numerous sanatoria are in favour with the Swedes themselves.
    0
    0
  • Land which is neither cultivable nor under forest (marsh land or, in the northern mountainous districts, land above the upper limit of the forests) amounts to 61% in the far north and 36% in the Smaland highlands, but only to 15% in the central plains and in Skane.
    0
    0
  • In Britain natural forests of Scotch fir of any extent are only now found in the Highlands, chiefly on the declivities of the Grampians.
    0
    0
  • Its surface is a succession of great terraces, facing north and north-east, formed by the denudation of the ancient sandstone plateau which once covered this part of the continent; the terraces are seamed by watercourses, and their valleys are broken by hills and ranges of highlands.
    0
    0
  • Taking the Kuren Dagh or Kopet Dagh to form the northern scarp of this plateau east of the Caspian, we find a prolongation of it in the highlands north of the political frontier on the Aras, and even in the Caucasus itself.
    0
    0
  • On the north-west Persia is united by the highlands of Armenia to the mountains of Asia Minor; on the north-west the Paropamisus and Hindu Kush connect it with the Himalayas.
    0
    0
  • Some of the ranges west of the Central Range, which form the highlands of Kurdistan, Luristan, Bakhtiari and Fars, and are parallel to it, end near the Persian Gulf; others follow the Central Range, and take a direction to the east at some point between Kermgn and the sea on the western frontier of Baluchistan.
    0
    0
  • Lochiel, who died in February 1719, is called by Macaulay the "Ulysses of the Highlands."
    0
    0
  • Sugar has been obtained from the sap of this as from other species, the most being one ounce from a quart of sap. The latter has also been made into wine in the Highlands of Scotland.
    0
    0
  • North of the railway line, hedged in between Afghanistan and the plains of the Indus, stretch the long ridges of rough but picturesque highlands, which embrace the central ranges of the Suliman system (the prehistoric home of the Pathan highlander), where vegetation is often alpine, and the climate clear and bracing and subject to no great extremes of temperature.
    0
    0
  • Here, throughout the elevated highlands of the Kalat plateau which are called Jalawan, the drainage gathers into channels which cut deep gorges in the hills, and passes eastwards into the plains of Sind.
    0
    0
  • Beyond and south of the hydrographical area of the Jalawan highlands the rivers and streams of the hills either run in long straight lines to the Arabian Sea, north of Karachi, or, curving gradually westwards, they disappear in the inland swamps which form so prominent a feature in this part of south-west Asia.
    0
    0
  • Kach Gandava, whilst its agricultural development has in no way receded, is now rivalled by many of the valleys of the highlands.
    0
    0
  • An exception to the general rule is found in the Mulla, which carries the floods of the Kalat highlands into the Gandava basin and forms one of the most important of the ancient highways from the Indus plains to Kandahar.
    0
    0
  • Secondly, to the west of this mountain wilderness, stretching upwards from the sea in a wedge form between the Brahui highlands and the group of towering peaks which enclose the Hingol river and abut on the sea at Malan, are the alluvial flats and delta of the Purali, forming the little province of Las Bela, the home of the Las Rajput.
    0
    0
  • Possibly the ordinary processes of denudation and erosion, acting on those recent deposits which overlie the harder beds of the older series, may have much to say to these climatic changes, and the wanton destruction of forests may have assisted the efforts of nature; but it is difficult to understand the widespread desiccation of large areas of the Baluch highlands, where evidences of Arab irrigation works and of cultivation still attest to a once flourishing agricultural condition, without appealing to more rapidly destructive principles for the change.
    0
    0
  • But it is characteristic of his strong nature that, where he does betray any sign of human sympathy or tenderness, it is for those who by their weakness and position are dependent on others for their protection - as for " the peasant boy with the little dog, his playfellow," 1 or for " the home-sick lad from the Sabine highlands, who sighs for his mother whom he has not seen for a long time, and for the little hut and the familiar kids."2 If Juvenal is to be ranked as a great moralist, it is not for his greatness and consistency as a thinker on moral questions.
    0
    0
  • From Kailas on the far west to the extreme north-eastern sources of the Brahmaputra, the great northern water-parting of the Indo-Tibetan highlands has only been occasionally touched.
    0
    0
  • It also affords material evidence of that wrinkling or folding action which accompanied the process of upheaval, when the Central Asian highlands were raised, which is more or less marked throughout the whole of the north-west Indian borderland.
    0
    0
  • Highlands of Scotland, and the reversed faults which appear at the surface with the " minor thrusts."
    0
    0
  • The orography of Portugal cannot be scientifically studied except in relation to that of Spain, for there is no dividing line between the principal Portuguese ranges and the highlands of Galicia, Leon and Spanish Estremadura.
    0
    0
  • It rises in the highlands of Galicia, and, after forming for some distance the boundary between that province and Entre-Minho-e-Douro, falls into the sea below the port of Caminha.
    0
    0
  • A Portuguese force under Major Serpa Pinto had invaded the II., - Shire highlands in order to forestall their annexation by the British, and the British government demanded satisfaction.
    0
    0
  • The river Jumna, which washes the walls of its fort, was the natural highway for the traffic of the rich delta of Bengal to the heart of India, and it formed, moreover, from very ancient times, the frontier defence of the Aryan stock settled in the plain between the Ganges and the Jumna against their western neighbours, hereditary freebooters who occupied the highlands of Central India.
    0
    0
  • Roughly calculated, two-fifths of the total area of Bolivia is comprised within the Andean cordilleras which cross its south-west corner and project east toward the Brazilian highlands in the form of a great obtuse angle.
    0
    0
  • The eastern rampart of the Bolivian highlands comprises two distinct chains - the Sierra de Cochabamba on the north-east and the Sierra de Misiones on the east.
    0
    0
  • The rearing of llamas and alpacas is a recognized industry in the Bolivian highlands and is wholly in the hands of the Indians, who alone seem to understand the habits and peculiarities of these interesting animals.
    0
    0
  • This is the history of the mesas, which are the most characteristic scenic feature of the highlands.
    0
    0
  • The BorealCanadian, Transition and Upper Sonoran embrace the highlands.
    0
    0
  • The ethical and metaphysical ideas most conspicuous in the doctrines of Lamaism are not confined to the highlands of central Asia, they are accepted in great measure also in Japan and China.
    0
    0
  • His early interest in the history and antiquities of the Scottish Highlands bore its first fruit in 1837, when he published The Highlanders of Scotland, their Origin, History and Antiquities.
    0
    0
  • Farther north the Altai highlands are continued in the Kuznetsk district, which has a slightly different geological aspect, but still belongs to the Altai system.
    0
    0
  • The true character of the kavir, which forms the distinctive feature of east Persia, has scarcely been determined, some regarding it as the bed of a dried-up sea, others as developed by the saline streams draining to it from the surrounding highlands.
    0
    0
  • The surface of Khorasan thus consists mainly of highlands, saline, swampy deserts and upland valleys, some fertile and wellwatered.
    0
    0
  • There are within the state four distinct topographic belts - the Appalachian, the Highlands, the Triassic Lowland and the Coastal Plain.
    0
    0
  • South-east of the Kittatinny Valley, and parallel with it, lies the second topographic belt, the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • The average elevation of the Highlands is about moo ft.; the highest point, between Canisteer and Vernon, in Sussex county, being 1496 ft.
    0
    0
  • It is free from mountainous ridges, but there are a number of isolated hills, such as the Navesink Highlands (259 ft.) in Monmouth county.
    0
    0
  • The' four topographic belts of the state correspond very closely to the outcrops of its geological formations; the rocks of the Appalachian belt being of Palaeozoic age; the formation of the Highlands, Archaean; that of the Triassic Lowland, Triassic; that of the irregular hills of the Coastal Plain, Cretaceous and Tertiary.
    0
    0
  • Of the streams of the Highlands and the Triassic Lowland, the Passaic river is the most important.
    0
    0
  • Near Cape May fruit trees bloom two or three weeks earlier than in the Highlands.
    0
    0
  • Other minerals, which are not found in commercial quantities, are lead in the form of galena, in Sussex county; graphite, in the crystalline schistose rocks of the Highlands; molybdenum, in the form of a sulphide, in Sussex county; and barytes in Mercer and Sussex counties.
    0
    0
  • The highlands of eastern Australia form the middle belt of the state, to the east of which are the low coastal districts and to the west the wide western plains.
    0
    0
  • The highlands of New South Wales consist, geographically, of a series of tablelands, now in the condition of dissected peneplains; geologically, they are built of a foundation of Archean and folded Lower Palaeozoic rocks, covered in places by sheets of more horizontal Upper Palaeozoic and Mesozoic rocks; these deposits occur along the edge of the highlands, and are widely distributed on the floor of the coastal districts.
    0
    0
  • The stratified rocks in the highlands strike north and south, as if they had been crumpled into folds, in Upper Palaeozoic times, by pressure from east to west.
    0
    0
  • The highland rocks no doubt once extended along the whole length of the state from north to south; but they are now crossed by a band of Upper Palaeozoic sediments, which extend up to the valley of the Hunter river and separate the Blue Mountains and the Southern Highlands of New South Wales from the New England tableland to the north.
    0
    0
  • They are also developed in the New South Wales highlands, to the south-east of Goulburn.
    0
    0
  • The highlands are the worn down stumps of this mountain line.
    0
    0
  • Gold is widely distributed through the highlands.
    0
    0
  • Podgoritsa receives from the eastern plains and the north-eastern highlands a great quantity of tobacco, fruit, cereals, honey, silk, livestock and other commodities, which it distributes through Plavnitsa, its port on Lake Scutari, and through Riyeka to Cettigne and Cattaro.
    0
    0
  • The mainland of Wales rises into three main highlands, the mountain groups of North, Mid and South Wales, connected together by land over moo ft.
    0
    0
  • The unity and ruggedness of the highlands of Wales have proved sufficient to isolate the people from those of the rest of South Britain, and to preserve a purely Celtic race, still very largely of Celtic speech.
    0
    0
  • The treaty of 1783 (Article II.) had defined the north-east boundary of the United States as extending along the middle of the river St Croix " from its mouth in the bay of Fundy to its source " and " due north from the source of St Croix river to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St Lawrence from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean, to the north-westernmost head of Connecticut river; thence down along the middle of that river to the forty-fifth degree of north latitude."
    0
    0
  • It is in this section that the entire mountain system is narrowest, and here it is that (apart from the " gate " at Derbent close beside the Caspian) the principal means of communication exist between north and south, between the steppes of southern Russia and the highlands of Armenia and Asia Minor.
    0
    0
  • The other large river of this region, the Aras, has its sources, not in the Caucasus range, but on the Armenian highlands a long way south-west of Ararat.
    0
    0
  • All along the northern foot of the system hot mineral springs gush out at various places, such as Pyatigorsk, Zhelesnovodsk, Essentuki and Kislovodsk; and the series is continued along the northeastern foot of the highlands of Daghestan, e.g.
    0
    0
  • In this connexion it may also be mentioned that similar evidences of volcanic activity characterize the northern border of the Armenian highlands on the southern side of the Rion-Kura depression, in the mountains of Ararat, Alagoz, Akmangan, Samsar, Godoreby, Great and Little Abull, and in the mineral springs of Borzhom, Abbas-tuman, Sleptzov, Mikhailovsk and Tiflis.
    0
    0
  • Within the limits of these partially explored highlands, lying between the Pamirs and the Tibetan table-land, exact geographical definition is impossible.
    0
    0
  • The Abyssinian highlands are thus a clearly marked orographic division.
    0
    0
  • This lake receives at its northern end the waters of the Omo, which rises in the Shoa highlands and is a perennial river with many affluents.
    0
    0
  • But over the greater part of Abyssinia as well as the Galla highlands the climate is very healthy and temperate.
    0
    0
  • Coffee is one of the most important products of the country, and its original home is believed to be the Kaffa highlands.
    0
    0
  • The "Abyssinian" coffee is grown very extensively throughout the southern highlands.
    0
    0
  • It is grown in the highlands of Harrar, and cultivated with extreme care.
    0
    0
  • The caves of the highlands are often used as dwellings.
    0
    0
  • From 1864 to 1866 he taught geography at the military school at Warsaw, and in 1867 he was admitted to the general staff and sent to Irkutsk, where he started to explore the highlands on the banks of the Usuri, the great southern tributary of the Amur.
    0
    0
  • In winter the flocks are driven from the highlands to the plains.
    0
    0