Heraldry sentence example

heraldry
  • He made a special hobby of heraldry and genealogy.
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  • The use of the fleur-de-lis in heraldry dates from the 12th century, soon after which period it became a very common charge in France, England and Germany, where every gentleman of coat-armour desired to adorn his shield Middle Ages.
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  • Probably there was as much foundation for this legend as for the more rationalistic explanation of William Newton (Display of Heraldry, p. 145), that the fleur-de-lis was the figure of a reed or flag in blossom, used instead of a sceptre at the proclamation of the Frankish kings.
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  • In heraldry, a bevel is an angular break in a line.
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  • Genealogy, heraldry and chronology run parallel with the wider subject.
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  • He frequently assisted Philip in conducting negotiations with foreign powers, and he was an arbiter in tournaments and on all questions of chivalry, where his wide knowledge of heraldry was highly useful.
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  • The crescent is employed as a charge in heraldry, with its horns vertical; when they are turned to the dexter side of the shield, it is called increscent, when to the sinister, decrescent.
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  • Its use in royal heraldry goes back to the time of Edward Prince of Wales (the Black Prince) in the 14th century.
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  • The dark mark of fate and doom was on the threshold the tall old threshold surmounted by coronets and caned heraldry.
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  • Finally, as might be expected, heraldry was recorded very fully at the heralds ' visitations.
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  • Joint projects with our friends from Krakow have included heraldry, the weather, water, the environment and school life.
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  • But clansmen who do not possess their own arms are not barred from using heraldry.
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  • An appendix reconstructs Knight's library, principally consisting of books concerning heraldry, topography and history.
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  • Over its long run, it has had many useful articles on Scots heraldry or heraldry of individual Scots families.
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  • Sources for medieval heraldry The main contemporary source for medieval heraldry is the rolls of arms.
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  • The name probably comes from the importance of the lion in Scottish heraldry.
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  • I have also tried to include web sites containing significant source material on medieval English heraldry, although at present little is available online.
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  • The subject matter of these ends is substantially heraldic with Arms on waisted shields with rolled top corners typical of 16th century heraldry.
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  • Some armigers are reluctant to use their heraldry as they feel that to do so may seem somewhat pretentious.
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  • These latter crowns form charges in English heraldry (see Heraldry).
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  • A book-lover and antiquary, he made a special hobby of heraldry and genealogy.
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  • Medieval heralds made no distinction in shape between a lion and a leopard, but marked the difference by drawing the leopard showing the full face (see Heraldry: § Beasts and Birds).
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  • In heraldry "mantling," also known as "panache," "lambrequin" or "contoise," is an ornamental appendage to an escutcheon, of flowing drapery, forming a background (see Heraldry).
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  • Marivi's Heraldry teaches origamic architecture enthusiasts how to create a coat of arms.
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  • Griffons have been powerful symbols for centuries and have been part of many heraldry crests because of their mystical protective, powerful properties.
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  • The Tree Maker also offers customized genealogy charts and other heraldry products for a fee.
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  • The reference to "tail" is either to the expression "turn tail" in flight, or to the habit of animals dropping the tail between the legs when frightened; in heraldry, a lion in this position is a "lion coward."
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  • From 1659 to 1662 he visited the universities of Basel, Tubingen and Geneva, and commenced the study of heraldry, which he pursued throughout his life.
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  • In 1663 he published Le Palais de l'honneur, which besides giving the genealogy of the houses of Lorraine and Savoy, is a complete treatise on heraldry, and in 1664 Le Palais de la gloire, dealing with the genealogy of various illustrious French and European families.
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  • On the Continent the distinction which is commonly but incorrectly made between the nobility and the gentry has never arisen, and it was unknown here while chivalry existed and heraldry was understood.
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  • In its own age, chivalry rested practically, like the highest civilization of ancient Greece and Rome, on slave labour; 9 and if many of its 8 Dallaway's Heraldry, p. 303.
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  • In heraldry a "pale" is a band placed vertically in the centre of a shield, hence "in pale" or "to impale" is used of the marshalling of two coats side by side on a shield divided vertically.
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  • Thus the mitre over an English bishop's coat-of-arms is a survival which indicates him as the successor of bishops who actually wore mitres, while armorial bearings themselves, and the whole craft of heraldry, are survivals bearing record of a state of warfare and social order whence our present state was by vast modification evolved.
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  • Heraldry, abbey Strand Within little more than a decade the monastery had been elevated to an Augustinian abbey.
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  • This comes from the usage in heraldry (first in French) for the colour equivalent to black, represented conventionally by a crosshatching of vertical and horizontal lines.
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