Hepatitis-b sentence example

hepatitis-b
  • The vaccine is designed to prevent diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and polio.

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  • As with Kawasaki disease, various infectious organisms have been proposed as the cause of IPAN, including hepatitis B virus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), various retroviruses, streptococci, and even a virus usually found in cats.

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  • Testing the blood of a person who has been bitten for immunity to hepatitis B and other diseases is always necessary after a human bite.

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  • A person who has been bitten may also require immunization against hepatitis B and other diseases.

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  • Children who have had a severe allergic reaction to baker's yeast should not take the hepatitis B vaccine.

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  • Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV).

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  • It is estimated that hepatitis B accounts for 20 to 25 percent of all acute viral hepatitis in children.

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  • The test detects one of the viral antigens called hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in the blood.

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  • Later on, HBsAg may no longer be present, in which case a test for antibodies to a different antigen, called hepatitis B core antigen, is used.

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  • If HBsAg can be detected in the blood for longer than six months, chronic hepatitis B is diagnosed.

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  • There is no cure for hepatitis B and no specific treatment is available.

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  • Chronic, or relapsing, infection occurs with hepatitis B in about 5-10 percent of cases.

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  • A vaccine for hepatitis B is as of 2004 widely used in the United States for routine childhood immunization.

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  • If mothers have HBV in their blood, they can give hepatitis B to their baby during childbirth.

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  • If the blood test is positive, the baby should receive vaccine along with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) at birth.

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  • Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-Also called Hepadna virus, the pathogen responsible for hepatitis B infection.

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  • See also Hepatitis A; Hepatitis B vaccine; Vaccination.

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  • Tattoos can lead to the transmission of infectious diseases, such as hepatitis B and C and theoretically HIV, when proper sterilization and safety procedures are not followed.

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  • Body piercing also presents the risk of chronic infection, scarring, hepatitis B and C, tetanus, and skin allergies to the jewelry that is used.

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  • If hepatitis B or C is confirmed, a series of diet and lifestyle changes, such as the elimination of alcohol, is recommended to control the disease.

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  • Minor infections respond well to antibiotic therapy, while blood-borne diseases such as hepatitis B and C cause life-altering results.

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  • Finally, if the hepatitis B vaccine was not given in the hospital, the first shot may be given at this visit.

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  • It the mother of a newborn carries the hepatitis B virus (HBV) in her blood, the baby needs to receive the first shot within 12 hours of birth.

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  • If the hepatitis B injection was not completed at the six month visit, it will be given at this exam.

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  • Approximately 20,000 infants are born each year to mothers who test positive for the hepatitis B virus.

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  • These infants are at high risk for developing hepatitis B infection through exposure to their mothers blood during delivery.

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  • Hepatitis B can be identified through a blood test for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in pregnant women.

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  • All infants should also receive a series of three hepatitis B vaccine injections as part of their routine immunizations.

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  • Infants infected with hepatitis B develop a chronic, mild form of hepatitis and are at increased risk for developing liver disease.

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  • The hepatitis B vaccine (HBV or HepB) is an injection that protects children from contracting hepatitis B, a serious disease caused by the hepatitis B virus.

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  • The hepatitis B vaccine consists of a small protein from the surface of the hepatitis B virus called the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg).

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  • An HBV derived from the blood serum of people with hepatitis B was as of 2004 no longer produced in the United States.

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  • D virus, which occurs as a co-infection with hepatitis B and usually results in more severe disease symptoms.

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  • The duration of hepatitis B immunity following infant vaccination is not known.

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  • A 2004 study found that most low-risk children vaccinated at birth did not have antibodies against hepatitis B in their blood by the time they reached the age of five.

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  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that, prior to the launch of the infant HBV immunization program, about 33,000 American children of non-infected mothers acquired hepatitis B by the age of ten.

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  • Hepatitis B is a potentially serious disease caused by the hepatitis B virus.

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  • The hepatitis B virus is eventually cleared from the bodies of most infected adolescents and adults.

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  • Only about 2-6 percent of infected older children and adults develop chronic hepatitis B and can continue to transmit the virus to other people.

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  • There is no cure for hepatitis B and approximately one-fourth of chronic hepatitis B victims die of cirrhosis or liver cancer, including children who do not survive to young adulthood.

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  • Children under the age of five who become infected with hepatitis B are at high risk for chronic infection and severe liver damage and disease later in life, even though initially they may have no symptoms.

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  • These infected children have a 90 percent risk of chronic hepatitis B infection and as many as 25 percent of them will die of chronic liver disease as adults.

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  • Mothers who have emigrated from countries with high rates of endemic hepatitis B are more likely to be infected.

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  • Mothers with acute or chronic infectious hepatitis B can be identified by a blood test for HBsAg.

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  • Children born to mothers who have hepatitis B or whose hepatitis B status is unknown should receive their first HBV dose within 12 hours of birth.

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  • In many parts of the world, vaccine intervention before birth is required to prevent hepatitis B infection and its consequences in newborns.

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  • It is recommended that newborns whose mothers are HBsAg-positive receive hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG)-a preparation of serum containing high levels of antibodies to hepatitis B-as well as HBV within 12 hours of birth.

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  • A child's immune response to either hepatitis B infection or to HBV can be measured by a blood test for antibodies to HBsAg (anti-HBs).

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  • Between 1979 and 1989, the incidence of acute hepatitis B increased in the United States by 37 percent.

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  • In 1991 the CDC developed a strategy for eliminating the transmission of hepatitis B via universal childhood vaccination.

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  • Nearly all states enacted laws requiring hepatitis B vaccination for enrollment in daycare, schools, and colleges.

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  • Infant death from hepatitis B and the incidence of liver disease in children also decreased significantly.

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  • The CDC expects the overall incidence of hepatitis B in the American population to fall throughout the early 2000s as a result of mass childhood vaccination.

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  • However, as of 2004, infants receiving HBV since 1991 had not yet reached the age when high-risk behaviors increase the likelihood of hepatitis B infection.

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  • In Pacific Island nations-where rates of hepatitis B infection are among the highest in the world-a regionally coordinated immunization program has significantly reduced the incidence of chronic infection.

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  • In the United States the Vaccines for Children program covers the cost of hepatitis B vaccination for those without health insurance and for other specific groups of children, including Native Americans.

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  • The CDC estimates that infant hepatitis B vaccination saves fifty cents in direct medical costs for every dollar spent on HBV.

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  • Comvax-Hib-HepB, a combination vaccine that protects against the Haemophilus influenzae type B bacterium and the hepatitis B virus.

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  • Pregnant women are usually checked for Hepatitis B and syphilis.

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  • The Hepatitis B vaccine once contained mercury, but it is now thimerosal-free.

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