Henry sentence example

henry
  • He refused to use his full influence in favour of the candidacy of Charles of Valois, brother of Philip IV., lest France became too powerful; and recognized Henry of Luxemburg, whom his representatives crowned emperor at the Lateran in 1312.
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  • I am so glad that Lester and Henry are good little infants.
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  • You're as stubborn as my uncle Henry and his Studebaker!
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  • The last thing she wanted to do was get Henry into trouble with his boss.
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  • The first recorded appearance of Henry Chicheley himself is at New College, Oxford, as Checheley, eighth among the undergraduate fellows, in July 1387, in the earliest extant hall-book, which contains weekly lists of those dining in Hall.
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  • In November 1408 Chicheley was back at Westminster, when Henry IV.
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  • But during the regency, after Henry VI's accession, Beaufort was successful, and in 1426 became cardinal and legate.
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  • Having detached Henry I.
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  • A further step was taken by Henry II.
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  • As Mr Henry James puts it, she interviews herself.
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  • He obtained 150,000 ducats towards the expenses of the expedition from Henry VIII.
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  • It was the birthplace of Catherine Parr, Henry VIII.'s last queen.
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  • His father, dying in the following year, commended him to the care and favour of his brother and successor, Henry III., who faithfully fulfilled the charge.
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  • His mother married Francois de Balzac, marquis d'Entragues, and one of her daughters, Henriette, marchioness of Verneuil, afterwards became the mistress of Henry IV.
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  • Uncle Henry says 'Eureka' means 'I have found it.'
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  • "How is Uncle Henry?" she enquired, after a pause during which the horse continued to trot with long, regular strides.
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  • "Yes; with Uncle Henry," she answered.
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  • Tomorrow Uncle Henry and I must start back for Kansas.
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  • "But Uncle Henry and Aunt Em need me to help them," she added, "so I can't ever be very long away from the farm in Kansas."
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  • "Henry Longfellow," said the teacher, "why have you not written?"
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  • Henry took his slate and went out.
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  • And in the garden, Henry saw a turnip.
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  • He said, Henry Longfellow, you have done very well.
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  • Some people said that they were what Henry Longfellow wrote on his slate that day at school.
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  • To- day will decide whether Richard or Henry shall be king of England.
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  • His enemy, Henry, who wished to be king, was pressing him hard.
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  • Henry became king of England.
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  • Henry, the Duke of Richmond, made war upon him and defeated him in a great battle.
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  • One day King Henry the Fourth of France was hunting in a large forest.
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  • "They say that King Henry always has a number of men with him," said the boy; "how shall I know which is he?"
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  • "Well, my boy," said King Henry, "which do you think is the king?"
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  • Then Henry Ford came along, followed by a host of others, and cars got better and better while getting less and less expensive.
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  • I knew Mr. Henry Drummond, and the memory of his strong, warm hand-clasp is like a benediction.
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  • Among them are "Henry Esmond," "Bacon's Essays" and extracts from "English Literature."
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  • We are amused at beholding the costume of Henry VIII, or Queen Elizabeth, as much as if it was that of the King and Queen of the Cannibal Islands.
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  • This resignation was possibly due to his dislike of Henry's foreign policy.
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  • In 1591 he obtained a dispensation from the vows of the order of Malta, and married Charlotte, daughter of Henry, Marshal d'Amville, afterwards duke of Montmorency.
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  • The manor of Little Bolton seems to have been, at least from Henry III.'s reign, distinct from that of Great Bolton, and was held till the 17th century by the Botheltons or Boltons.
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  • It is also shown conspicuously in figures given by Henry.
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  • The breach between the queen's party and Albany's had widened, and the queen's advisers had begun an intrigue with England, to the end that the royal widow and her young son should be removed to Henry's court.
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  • The famous political preacher, Henry Sacheverell, held the living early in the 18th century.
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  • Under the influence of Archbishop Chicheley, who had himself founded two colleges in imitation of Wykeham, and Thomas Bekynton, king's secretary and privy seal, and other Wyke - hamists, Henry VI., on the 11th of October 1440, founded, in imitation of Winchester College, "a college in the parish church of Eton by Windsor not far from our birthplace," called the King's College of the Blessed Mary of Eton by Windsor, as "a sort of first-fruits of his taking the government on himself."
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  • With the archbishop of Canterbury he received Henry VI.
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  • William's Son, (HENRY) BROCKHOLST LIVINGSTON (1757-1823), was an officer in the American War of Independence, and was an able lawyer and judge.
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  • The part played by equity in the development of law is admirably illustrated in the well-known work of Sir Henry Maine on Ancient Law.
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  • From 1594 to 1641 the duchy remained vested in the French family of La Tour d'Auvergne, one of whom (Henry, viscount of Turenne and marshal of France) had married in 1591 Charlotte de la Marck, the last of her race.
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  • In the old town of Bridlington the church of St Mary and St Nicholas consists of the fine Decorated and Perpendicular nave, with Early English portions, of the priory church of an Augustinian foundation of the time of Henry I.
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  • Between 1283 and 1290, a Bavarian disciple of Wolfram's 2 adopted the story and developed it into an epic poem of nearly 8000 lines, incorporating episodes of Lohengrin's prowess in tournament, his wars with Henry I.
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  • When Henry the Lion, duke of Saxony and Bavaria, was placed under the imperial ban in 1180, Otto's services were rewarded by the investiture of the dukedom of Bavaria at Altenburg.
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  • Louis appears to have been previously promised this succession, and to strengthen his claim married his son, Otto, to Agnes, the sister of Henry, the count palatine, who died without heirs in 1214.
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  • He supported Frederick in his struggle with the anti-kings, Henry Raspe, landgrave of Thuringia, and William II., count of Holland, and was put under the papal ban by Pope Innocent IV., Bavaria being laid under an interdict.
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  • He left two sons, Louis and Henry, who reigned jointly until 1255, when a division of the lands was made, by which Louis II.
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  • (1228-1294) received upper Bavaria and the Palatinate of the Rhine, and Henry I.
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  • When Conradin was executed in 1268 Louis inherited his lands in Germany, sharing them with his brother Henry.
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  • Lower Bavaria was ruled by the descendants of Henry I.
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  • The first in date is that which was concluded for England with Henry I.
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  • It is the seat of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station and of Hobart College (nonsectarian), which was first planned in 1812, was founded in 1822 (the majority of its incorporators being members of the Protestant Episcopal church) as successor to Geneva Academy, received a full charter as Geneva College in 1825, and was renamed Hobart Free College in 1852 and Hobart College in 1860, in honour of Bishop John Henry Hobart.
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  • Of the old castle, called Nenagh Round, dating from the time of King John, there still exists the circular donjon or keep. There are no remains of the hospital founded in 1200 for Austin canons, nor of the Franciscan friary, founded in the reign of Henry III.
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  • It was one of the ancient manors of the Butlers, who received for it the grant of a fair from Henry VIII.
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  • Under Henry II., being involved in the disgrace of all the servants of Francis I., he was sent to Rome (1547), and he obtained eight votes in the conclave which followed the death of Pope Paul III.
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  • But on the descent of the emperor Henry VII., Frederick entered into an alliance with him, and in violation of the pact of Caltabellotta made war on the Angevins again (1313) and captured Reggio.
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  • The rivalry between the French and English factions in Scotland was complicated by private feuds of the Hamiltons and Douglases, the respective heads of which houses, Arran and Angus, were contending for the supreme power in the absence of Albany in France, where at the instance of Henry VIII.
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  • The queen-mother had at this time fallen in love with Henry Stewart, second son of Lord Avondale, whom she married immediately after obtaining her divorce from Angus in 1527.
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  • But when her desire to arrange a meeting between James and Henry VIII.
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  • He was accused of desiring to make himself pope; more probably he thought of serving as a papal condottiere against the emperor Henry IV.
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  • Meanwhile the king had formed an alliance with Henry VII.
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  • It was the birthplace of Henry VIII., Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth, and here Edward VI.
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  • The building was enlarged by Edward IV., by Henry VIII., who made it one of his chief residences, by James I.
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  • The new pope, Gelasius II., and also his successor, Calixtus II., espoused the cause of the stubborn archbishop, and in October 1119, in spite of promises made to Henry I., he was consecrated by Calixtus at Reims. Enraged at this the king refused to allow him to enter England, and he remained for some time in the company of the pope.
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  • At length, however, his friends succeeded in reconciling him with Henry, and, after serving the king in Normandy, he was recalled to England, which he entered early in 1121.
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  • From 1604 to 1612 he studied at the school of La Fleche, which Henry IV.
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  • Two years before he left school he was selected as one of the twenty-four who went forth to receive the heart of Henry IV.
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  • His residence in the Netherlands fell in the most prosperous and brilliant days of the Dutch state, under the stadtholdership of Frederick Henry (1625-1647).
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  • Henry More, who had given it a modified sympathy in the lifetime of the author, became its opponent in later years; and Cudworth differed from it in most essential points.
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  • Accrington (Akerenton, Alkerington, Akerington) was granted by Henry de Lacy to Hugh son of Leofwine in Henry II.'s reign, but came again into the hands of the Lacys, and was given by them about 1200 to the monks of Kirkstall, who converted it into a grange.
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  • The word "bowls" occurs for the first time in the statute of 1511 in which Henry VIII.
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  • But though the same statute absolutely prohibited bowling alleys, Henry VIII.
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  • Burton was evidently a mesne borough under the abbot, who held the court of the manor and received the profits of the borough according to the charter of Henry I.
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  • Later charters were given by Henry II., by John in 1204 (who also granted an annual fair of three days' duration, 29th of October, at the feast of St Modwen, and a weekly market on Thursday), by Henry III.
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  • He ultimately married Isabella, after the death of John, and had by her a number of sons, half-brothers of Henry III.
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  • Civil war was raging in France, and Clement became an ardent partisan of the League; his mind appears to have become unhinged by religious fanaticism, and he talked of exterminating the heretics, and formed a plan to kill Henry III.
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  • Having obtained letters for the king, he left Paris on the 31st of July 1589, and reached St Cloud, the headquarters of Henry, who was besieging Paris.
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  • The attendants then withdrew, and while Henry was reading the letters Clement mortally wounded him with a dagger which had been concealed beneath his cloak.
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  • The assassin was at once killed by the attendants who rushed in, and Henry died early on the following day.
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  • Educated at Reading school and at Winchester college, Henry Vansittart joined the society of the Franciscans, or the "Hellfire club," at Medmenham, his elder brothers, Arthur and Robert, being also members of this fraternity.
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  • It was not till the reign of Henry II.
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  • Outside England the title justiciar was given under Henry II.
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  • Extending the area of his activities, he entered into communication with the emperor Henry III., addressed to Pope Leo IX.
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  • After a period of retirement at Fonte Avellana, he proceeded in 1069 as papal legate to Germany, and persuaded the emperor Henry IV.
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  • The Troy-book, undertaken at the command of Henry V., then prince of Wales, dates from 1412-1420; the Story of Thebes from 1420-1422; and the Falls of Princes towards 1430.
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  • There is a fine park outside the town belonging to the duke of Arenberg, whose ancestor, Charles de Ligne, bought it from Henry IV.
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  • The Canonis Descriptio on its publication in 1614, at once attracted the attention of Edward Wright, whose name is known in connexion with improvements in navigation, and Henry Briggs, then professor of geometry at Gresham College, London.
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  • Tradition indicates Selby as the birth-place of Henry I., and thus accounts for the high privileges conferred upon the abbey.
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  • Instead of yielding to this, he joined with Henry Bristowe Wilson and Rowland Williams, who had been similarly attacked, in the production of the volume known as Essays and Reviews.
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  • Under the leadership of Dr Henry Cooke, a minister of rare ability and eloquence, the evangelical party triumphed in the church courts, and the Unitarians seceded and became a separate denomination.
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  • Shields (1825-1904), who afterwards entered the Protestant Episcopal Church, republished and urged the adoption of the Book of Common Prayer as amended by the Westminster Divines in the royal commission of 1661; and Henry Van Dyke was prominent in the latter stage of the movement for a liturgy.
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  • He was elected member for the city of Dublin in 1761, his colleague in the representation being the recorder, Henry Grattan's father.
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  • Its site is now occupied by an open square, one stone remaining to mark the spot where Henry II.
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  • This great navigator had already won renown in the service of Henry VII.
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  • After his accession to the throne William spent some time at the court of the English king, Henry II.; then, quarrelling with Henry, he arranged in 1168 the first definite treaty of alliance between France and Scotland, and with Louis VII.
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  • In return for this aid the younger Henry granted to William the earldom of Northumberland, a possession which the latter had vainly sought from the English king, and which was possibly the cause of their first estrangement.
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  • By this arrangement the king and his nobles, clerical and lay, undertook to do homage to Henry and his son; this and other provisions placing both the church and state of Scotland thoroughly under the suzerainty of England.
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  • In 1186 at Woodstock William married Ermengarde de Beaumont, a cousin of Henry II., and peace with England being assured three years later, he turned his arms against the turbulent chiefs in the outlying parts of his kingdom.
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  • His ancestor, Richard Seymour, a Protestant Episcopal ` clergyman, was an early settler at Hartford, Connecticut, and his father, Henry Seymour, who removed from Connecticut to New York, was prominent in the Democratic party in the state, being a member of the "Albany Regency" and serving as state senator in1816-1819and in 1822, and as canal commissioner in 1819-1831.
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  • About the middle of the 12th century the country was subdued by the duke of Saxony, Henry the Lion, who founded a bishopric at Ratzeburg, and after Henry's fall in 1180 it formed part of the smaller duchy of Saxony, which was governed by Duke Bernhard.
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  • Henry II., after landing at Waterford, received in Lismore castle the allegiance of the archbishops and bishops of Ireland.
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  • Here Morton encouraged Buckingham's designs against Richard, and put him into communication with the queen dowager, Elizabeth Woodville, and with Henry Tudor, earl of Richmond.
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  • When Richmond secured the crown as Henry VII.
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  • Morton no doubt impressed Lancastrian traditions upon Henry VII., but he cannot be credited with any great originality as a statesman, and Henry's policy was as much Yorkist as Lancastrian.
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  • The fact that parliament continued to meet fairly often so long as Morton lived, and was only summoned once by Henry VII.
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  • Eu has three buildings of importance - the beautiful Gothic church of St Laurent (12th and 13th centuries) of which the exterior of the choir with its three tiers of ornamented buttressing and the double arches between the pillars of the nave are architecturally notable; the chapel of the Jesuit college (built about 1625), in which are the tombs of Henry, third duke of Guise, and his wife, Katherine of Cleves; and the château.
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  • The latter was begun by Henry of Guise in 1578, in place of an older château burnt by Louis XI.
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  • In 1889 an important step towards federation was taken by Sir Henry Parkes.
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  • The occasion was the report of Major-General Edwards on the defences of Australia, and Sir Henry addressed the other premiers on the desirability of a federal union for purposes of defence.
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  • Sir Henry Parkes was elected president, and he moved a series of resolutions embodying the principles necessary to establish, on an enduring foundation, the structure of a federal government.
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  • When Henry Smith was just two years old his father died, whereupon his mother left Ireland for England.
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  • On the death of his elder brother in September 1843 Henry Smith left Rugby, and at the end of 1844 gained a scholarship at Balliol College, Oxford.
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  • Educated at the Lycee Corot, and the Rcole Normale he was successively professor of philosophy at the Lycee d'Angers 1881-3, at the Lycee de Clermont 1883-8, at the College Rollin 1888-9, at the Lycee Henry IV.
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  • He was educated at the College of Henry IV.
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  • There is evidence that ships were built at Woolwich in the reign of Henry VII., but it was.
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  • Finally in 924 Lorraine passed in the reign of Henry the Fowler under German (East Frankish) overlordship. Henry's son, Otto the Great, owing to the disordered state of the country, placed it in 953 in the hands of his able brother, Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, for pacification.
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  • At the same time negotiations were successfully carried on with John Casimir, with Elizabeth and with Henry of Navarre, and their help secured for the national cause.
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  • After John's death he crowned the infant Henry III.
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  • As representing the pope, the suzerain of Henry, he claimed the regency and actually divided the chief power with William Marshal, earl of Pembroke.
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  • In the early 16th century Tournai was an English possession for a few years and Henry VIII.
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  • In 1177 John de Courci, with the countenance of Henry II., set out to the conquest of Ulster.
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  • In January 1131 Innocent held a personal interview with King Henry I.
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  • In 934 it was passed by the German king Henry I., after which it was extended by King Harold Bluetooth (940-986), but was again stormed by the emperor Otto II.
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  • Subsequently he was transferred, perhaps through Cromwell's influence, to the service of the king, and in January 15 3 2 he was sent to Rome to obstruct the judicial proceedings against Henry in the papal curia.
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  • He seems, however, to have pleased his patron, Cromwell, and perhaps Henry, by his energy in seeing the king's "Great" Bible in English through the press in Paris.
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  • He became a staunch Conservative, and, apart from his embassy to the emperor in 1524-1543, was mainly occupied during the last years of Henry's reign in brandishing the "whip with six strings."
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  • It is a more remarkable fact that, in spite of his prominence, neither Henry VIII.
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  • See Letters and Papers of Henry VIII.
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  • Not long after it had been sacked by Totila Benevento became the seat of a powerful Lombard duchy and continued to be independent until 1053, when the emperor Henry III.
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  • In particular, his acceptance of the crown would have guaranteed his followers, under the act of Henry VII., from liability in the future to the charge of high treason for having given allegiance to himself as a de facto king.
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  • "Your father," wrote Sir Francis Russell to Henry Cromwell, "hath of late made more wise men fools than ever; he laughs and is merry, but they hang down their heads and are pitifully out of countenance."
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  • His body was privately buried in the chapel of Henry VII.
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  • By his wife Elizabeth Bourchier, Cromwell had four sons, Robert (who died in 1639), Oliver (who died in 1644 while serving in his father's regiment), Richard, who succeeded him as Protector, and Henry.
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  • By the female line, through his children Henry, Bridget and Frances, the Protector has had numerous descendants, and is the ancestor of many well-known families.'
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  • Faringdon House, close to the church, was built by Henry James Pye (1745-1813), poet laureate from 1790 to 1813, who also caused to be planted the conspicuous group of fir-trees on the hill east of the town called Faringdon Clump, or locally (like other similar groups) the Folly.
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  • By the marriage of Eleanor of Aquitaine with Henry Plantagenet, the countship passed under the suzerainty of the kings of England, but at the same time it was divided, William VII., called the Young (1145-1168), having been despoiled of a portion of his domain by his uncle William VIII.,called the Old,who was supported by Henry II.
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  • Then Louis, in company with his brothers William and Henry, made his way across the French frontier to the camp of the Huguenot leader, Admiral Coligny.
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  • In the hope of drawing away the Spaniards from the siege of Leiden by a diversion in the south, Louis, with his brothers John and Henry, at the head of a force of mixed nationalities and little discipline, crossed the frontier near Maastricht, and advanced as far as the Mookerheide near Nijmv,-egen.
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  • In the disorderly flight both Louis and his younger brother Henry, refusing to abandon the field, lost their lives.
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  • In 1602 he made his second visit to the French capital, when his transcendent qualities brought him into the closest relations with the court of Henry IV., and made him the spiritual father of that circle of select souls who centred round Madame Acarie.
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  • Henry in the United States in 1842 and 1850 investigated the effect.
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  • In 1886 he was elected mayor of New York City, his nomination having been forced upon the Democratic Party by the strength of the other nominees, Henry George and Theodore Roosevelt; his administration (1887-1888) was thoroughly efficient and creditable, but he broke with Tammany, was not renominated, ran independently for re-election, and was defeated.
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  • The Lombards chose Ardoin, marquis of Ivrea, for king, and Pavia supported his claims against those of Henry of Bavaria, who had been elected in Germany.
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  • Henry nearly destroyed Pavia, was crowned in Rome and died in 1024.
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  • Their appointment, according to notions which defined themselves within the church at this epoch, was simoniacal; and during the long minority of Henry IV., who succeeded his father in 1056, the terrible Tuscan monk, Hildebrand of Soana, forged weapons which he used with deadly effect against the presumption of the empire.
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  • Henry IV., king o Germany, but not crowned emperor, convened a diet in th~
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  • War was thus declared between the two chiefs of western Christendom, that war of investitures which out-lasted the lives of both Gregory and Henry, and was not terminated till the year 1122.
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  • It was in her castle of Canossa that Henry IV.
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  • When William II., the last monarch of the Norman race, died, Henry VI.
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  • Henry established imperial vicars in the Lombard towns, confirming the tyrants, but gaining nothing for the empire in exchange for the titles he conferred.
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  • Equally contemptible in its political results and void of historical interest was the brief visit of John of Bohemia, son of Henry VII., whom the Ghibellines next invited to assume their leadership. He sold a few privileges, conferred a few titles, and recrossed the Alps in 1333.
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  • The king (Henry VIII.) happened at the time to be visiting in the immediate neighbourhood, and two of his chief counsellors, Gardiner, secretary of state, afterwards bishop of Winchester, and Edward Fox, the lord high almoner, afterwards bishop of Hereford, were lodged at Cressy's house.
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  • Cranmer suggested that if the canonists and the universities should decide that marriage with a deceased brother's widow was illegal, and if it were proved that Catherine had been married to Prince Arthur, her marriage to Henry could be declared null and void by the ordinary ecclesiastical courts.
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  • During the first week of April Convocation sat almost from day to day to determine questions of fact and law in relation to Catherine's marriage with Henry as affected by her previous marriage with his brother Arthur.
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  • Five days later he pronounced the marriage between Henry and Anne - which had been secretly celebrated about the 25th of January 1533 - to be valid.
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  • The breach with Rome and the subjection of the church in England to the royal supremacy had been practically achieved before Cranmer's appointment as archbishop: and he had little to do with the other constitutional changes of Henry's reign.
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  • But his position as chief minister of Henry's ecclesiastical jurisdiction forced him into unpleasant prominence in connexion with the king's matrimonial experiences.
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  • Anne's sister, Mary Boleyn, had been Henry VIII.'s mistress; this by canon law was a bar to his marriage with Anne - a bar which had been removed by papal dispensation in 1527, but now the papal power to dispense in such cases had been repudiated, and the original objection revived.
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  • Cranmer was present with Henry VIII.
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  • The last great undertaking in which he was employed was the revision of his codification of the canon law, which had been all but completed before the death of Henry.
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  • He had pledged himself to respect the testamentary disposition of Henry VIII.
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  • After his release in May 1819, having broken away from Henry Hunt and the more moderate reformers, he prepared a new and comprehensive plot.
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  • Addressing the gathering, Langton referred to the laws of Edward the Confessor as "good laws," which the king ought to observe, and then mentioned the charter granted by Henry I.
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  • This follows the precedent set in the accession charter of Henry I.
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  • This custom, which owes its origin to Henry II., meant a loss of revenue to the lords, whose victory in this matter, however, was a step backwards.
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  • He will restore lands and castles to those who have been deprived of them without the judgment of their peers; he will do the same concerning property unlawfully seized by Henry II.
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  • Magna Carta is an elaboration of the accession charter of Henry I., and is based upon the Articles of the Barons.
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  • On the 12th of November 12 t 6 the regent William Marshal, earl of Pembroke, reissued the charter in the name of the young king Henry III.
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  • It declares that henceforward scutages shall be taken according to the precedents of Henry II.'s reign.
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  • Subsequently the charters were confirmed several times by Henry III.
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  • The second epithet designates its position on a hill, but the first is given it from the market granted to the abbots of St Albans to be kept there, by Henry II.
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  • For some time sickness and mortality were excessively large, but the reclamation of swamp and clearance of jungle on an extensive scale by Colonel Henry Man when in charge (1868-1870), had a most beneficial effect, and the health of the settlement has since been notable.
    0
    0
  • This prince, a brother of the emperor Henry VII., ruled from 1307 to 1354, and was the real founder of the power of Trier.
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    0
  • Baldwin raised them to great prosperity by his energy and foresight, and chiefly as a result of the active political and military support he rendered to the emperors Henry VII., Louis the Bavarian and Charles IV.
    0
    0
  • Early in 984 the king was seized by Henry II., the Quarrelsome, the deposed duke of Bavaria, who claimed the regency as a member of the reigning house, and probably entertained the idea of obtaining the kingly dignity himself.
    0
    0
  • A strong opposition was quickly aroused, and when Theophano and Adelaide, widow of the emperor Otto the Great, appeared in Germany, Henry was compelled to hand over the young king to his mother.
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  • After long struggles this was hindered, in France by the bull Romana (Fournier, p. 218), in England by the Bill of Citations, 23 Henry VIII.
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    0
  • In England the Constitutions of Clarendon (by chap. viii.) prohibited appeals to the pope; but after the murder of St Thomas of Canterbury Henry II.
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    0
  • The foreseen adverse termination of this long-drawn cause led to Henry's legislation.
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  • Early in Henry II.'s time it had become the custom of England for the court Christian: to "signify" its sentence of excommunication to the king and to demand from him a writ of significavit to the sheriff, to imprison the person excommunicated.
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  • At any rate the " original " jurisdiction claimed for the monarch personally and his delegates, under Henry VIII.
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    0
  • But Wratyslaus of Bohemia speedily appealed to the emperor for help, and a war between Poland and the Empire was only prevented by the sudden rupture of Henry IV.
    0
    0
  • The establishment of The Atlantic Monthly in 1857 gave her a constant vehicle for her writings, as did also The Independent of New York, and later The Christian Union, of each of which papers successively her brother, Henry Ward Beecher, was one of the editors.
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  • The river is crossed at Stratford by a stone bridge of 14 arches, built by Sir Hugh Clopton in the reign of Henry VII.
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    0
  • The present beautiful choir was built by Dean Balshall (1465-1491), and in the reign of Henry VII.
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  • Of species common to the two, Maximowicz finds that Manchuria possesses 40% and scarcely 9% that are endemic. Of a collection of about 500 species made in that country by Sir Henry James nearly a third are British.
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  • He then followed the fortunes of his friend Maurice, the new elector of Saxony, deserted Charles, and joined the league which proposed to overthrow the emperor by an alliance with Henry II.
    0
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  • Henry II., duke of Brunswick, then took command of the troops of the league, and after Albert had been placed under the imperial ban in December 1553 he was defeated by Duke Henry, and compelled to fly to France.
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  • The second voyage was commanded by Sir Henry Middleton; but it was in the third voyage, under Keelinge and Hawkins, that the mainland of India was first reached in 1607.
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  • Sir Robert's grandson, Henry, the 3rd baron, was created earl of Sunderland in June 1643, and was killed at the battle of Newbury when fighting for the king a little later in the same year.
    0
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  • It should be mentioned that while Sunderland was thus serving James II., he was receiving a pension from France, and through his wife's lover, Henry Sidney, afterwards earl of Romney, he was furnishing William of Orange with particulars about affairs in England.
    0
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  • Isabella succeeded to the throne (1474) on the death of Henry IV.
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  • He corresponded frequently with Mary, but there being no hopes whatever of his restoration, and a new suitor being found in the duke of Norfolk, Mary demanded a divorce, on pleas which recall those of Henry VIII.
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  • He was probably dead and buried in his chapel at East Winch before November 27, 1308, the date of the patent by which Henry Scrope succeeded him as a commissioner of trailbaston.
    0
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  • Offices and lands came to John Howard by reason of that fellowship. Henry VI., when restored, summoned him to parliament in 1470 as Lord Howard, a summons which may have been meant to lure him to London into Warwick's power, but he proclaimed the Yorkist sovereign on his return and fought at Barnet and Tewkesbury.
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  • He himself was attainted and was lying a prisoner in the Tower, doomed to die in the morning, on the night of the death of Henry VIII.
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  • The bride was Mary, sole heir in her issue of her father Henry, the last of the Fitzalan earls of Arundel.
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  • The young duchess died in her seventeenth year after giving birth to a son, and the duke took a second wife from a humble stock, newly enriched and honoured, the daughter of Henry VIII.'s subservient chancellor, the Lord Audley of Walden.
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  • He survived the reign of Henry VIII., that perilous age for the Howards, with no worse misadventure than the conviction of himself and his wife of misprision of treason in concealing the offences of his niece, Queen Catherine.
    0
    0
  • A patent of 1604 created Henry Howard (1540-1614), younger son of Surrey the poet, earl of Northampton, a peerage which ended with the death of this, the most unprincipled of his house.
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    0
  • In 1688 his widow was created countess of Stafford for life, and his eldest son, Henry, had the earldom of Stafford, with special remainder to his brothers.
    0
    0
  • William the Conqueror in 1084 celebrated Easter at Abingdon, and left his son, afterwards Henry I., to be educated at the abbey.
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  • This office he held until 1547, when he was sent by Henry II.
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  • The ruined castle served as the place of imprisonment of Frederick II.'s son Henry.
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    0
  • When Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's cabinet was formed in December 1905 he became foreign minister, and he retained this office when in April 1908 Mr Asquith became prime minister.
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    0
  • The grammar school was founded by Dr Roger Lupton, provost of Eton College, in 1528, but as it was connected with a chantry it was suppressed by Henry VIII., to be refounded in 1551 by Edward VI.; it now takes rank among the important public schools.
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  • In the 16th century the city was the strongest Spanish fortress in the New World, excepting Cartagena, and gold and silver were brought hither by ship from Peru and were carried across the Isthmus to Chagres, but as Spain's fleets even in the Pacific were more and more often attacked in the 17th century, Panama became less important, though it was still the chief Spanish port on the Pacific. In 1671 the city was destroyed by Henry Morgan, the buccaneer; it was rebuilt in 1673 by Alfonzo Mercado de Villacorta about five miles west of the old site and nearer the roadstead.
    0
    0
  • The king's encouragement seemed at first to point to a successful revival of flagellation; but the practice disappeared along with the other forms of devotion that had sprung up at the time of the league, and Henry III.'s successor suppressed the Paris brotherhood.
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  • "GEORGE HENRY ROBERTS (1869-), English Labour politician, was born at Chedgrave, Norfolk, July 27 1869.
    0
    0
  • (1367-1413), king of England, son of John of Gaunt, by Blanche, daughter of Henry, duke of Lancaster, was born on the 3rd of April 1367, at Bolingbroke in Lincolnshire.
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    0
  • Henry then felt himself free, and made friends with the exiled Arundels.
    0
    0
  • Henry then made his claim as coming by right line of blood from King Henry III., and through his right to recover the realm which was in point to be undone for default of governance and good law.
    0
    0
  • Parliament formally accepted him, and thus Henry became king, "not so much by title of blood as by popular election" (Capgrave).
    0
    0
  • With this Henry's own political sympathies well accorded.
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    0
  • From the start Henry was embarrassed by the power and pretensions of the Percies.
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    0
  • During the summer of 1400 Henry made a not over-successful expedition to Scotland.
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    0
  • In 1400 and again in each of the two following autumns Henry invaded Wales in vain.
    0
    0
  • Henry Percy (Hotspur) and his father, the earl of Northumberland, thought their services ill-requited, and finally made common cause with the partisans of Mortimer and the Welsh.
    0
    0
  • Henry had, however, no one on whom he could rely outside his own family, except Archbishop Arundel.
    0
    0
  • For the execution of the archbishop Henry was personally responsible, and he could never free himself from its odium.
    0
    0
  • Henry, stricken with sore disease, was unable to reap the advantage.
    0
    0
  • However, with Archbishop Arundel as his chancellor, Henry still controlled the government.
    0
    0
  • Beaufort and his brother Henry, bishop of Winchester, were opposed to Arundel and supported by the prince of Wales.
    0
    0
  • However, in November 1411 Henry showed that he was still capable of vigorous action by discharging the prince and his supporters.
    0
    0
  • But Henry's health was failing steadily.
    0
    0
  • As a young man Henry had been chivalrous and adventurous, and in politics anxious for good government and justice.
    0
    0
  • The persecution of the Lollards, which began with the burning statute of 1401, may be accounted for by Henry's own orthodoxy, or by the influence of Archbishop Arundel, his one faithful friend.
    0
    0
  • Henry's faults may be excused by his difficulties.
    0
    0
  • By Mary Bohun Henry had four sons: his successor Henry V., Thomas, duke of Clarence, John, duke of Bedford, and Humphrey, duke of Gloucester; and two daughters, Blanche, who married Louis III., elector palatine of the Rhine, and Philippa, who married Eric XIII., king of Sweden.
    0
    0
  • Henry's second wife was Joan, or Joanna, (c. 1370-1437), daughter of Charles the Bad, king of Navarre, and widow of John IV.
    0
    0
  • Some personal matter is contained in Wardrobe Accounts of Henry, Earl of Derby (Camden Soc.).
    0
    0
  • In 1109 she was betrothed to the emperorelect, Henry V., and was sent to Germany, but the marriage was delayed till 1114.
    0
    0
  • But the arrogance which she displayed in her prosperity alienated the Londoners and the papal legate, Bishop Henry of Winchester.
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    0
  • Henceforward she remained in the background, leaving her eldest son Henry to pursue the struggle with Stephen.
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    0
  • She outlived Henry's coronation by ten years; her husband had died in 1151.
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  • His grandfather, William Henry Harrison (1773-1841), was ninth president of the United States.
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    0
  • Count Henry of Schwerin, and conveyed with his son and many other valuable hostages to the inaccessible castle of Dannenberg.
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    0
  • In Edward II.'s time, the king's forest of the Peak, in Derbyshire, is especially mentioned as infested with wolves, and it was not until the reign of Henry VII.
    0
    0
  • It was founded in 1004 by the emperor Henry II., finished in 1012, afterwards partially burnt, and rebuilt in the 13th century.
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    0
  • On their extinction it passed to the Saxon house, and in 1007 the emperor Henry II.
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    0
  • A prose version of Locher's Stultifera Navis, by Henry Watson, was printed by Wynkyn de Worde in 1518.
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    0
  • Anne Boleyn, however, remained unmarried, and a series of grants and favours bestowed by Henry on her father between 1522 and 1525 have been taken, though very doubtfully, as a symptom of the king's affections.
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    0
  • Unlike her sister Mary, who had fallen a victim to Henry's solicitations,' Anne had no intention of being the king's mistress; she meant to be his queen, and her conduct seems to have been governed entirely by motives of ambition.
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  • The exact period of the beginning of Anne's relations with Henry is not known.
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  • They have been surmised as originating as early as 1523; but there is nothing to prove that Henry's passion was anterior to the proceedings taken for the divorce in May 1527, the celebrated love letters being undated.
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  • Henry meanwhile, however, had sent William Knight, his secretary, on a separate mission to Rome to obtain facilities for his marriage with Anne; and on the cardinal's return in August he found her installed as the king's companion and proposed successor to Catherine of Aragon.
    0
    0
  • After the king's final separation from his wife in July 1531, Anne's position was still more marked, and in 1532 she accompanied Henry on the visit to Francis I., while Catherine was left at home neglected and practically a prisoner.
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    0
  • Soon after their return Anne was found to be pregnant, and in consequence Henry married her about the 25th of January 15333 (the exact date is unknown), their union not being made public till the following Easter.
    0
    0
  • There were soon signs that Henry's affection, which had before been a genuine passion, had cooled or ceased.
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    0
  • In September 1533 the birth of a daughter, afterwards Queen Elizabeth, instead of the long-hoped-for son, was a heavy disappointment; next year Of this there is no direct proof, but the statement rests upon contemporary belief and chiefly upon the extraordinary terms of the dispensation granted to Henry to marry Anne Boleyn, which included the suspension of all canons relating to impediments created by "affinity rising ex illicito coitu in any degree even in the first."
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  • 3 According to Cranmer, Letters and Papers of Henry VIII.
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    0
  • On the 12th Sir Francis Weston, Henry Norris, William Brereton and Mark Smeaton were declared guilty of high treason, while Anne herself and Lord Rochford were condemned unanimously by an assembly of twenty-six peers on the 15th.
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    0
  • On the following day Henry was betrothed to Jane Seymour.
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    0
  • The discovery of Anne's misdeeds coincided in an extraordinary manner with Henry's disappointment in not obtaining by her a male heir, while the king's despotic power and the universal unpopularity of Anne both tended to hinder the administration of pure justice.
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    0
  • It is almost incredible that two grand Letters and Papers of Henry VIII.
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  • Every year since her marriage Anne had given birth to a child, and Henry had no reason to despair of more; while, if Henry's state of health was such as was reported, the desire for children, which Anne shared with him, may be urged as an argument for her guilt.
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    0
  • She appealed to the king's less refined instincts, and Henry's deterioration of character may be dated from his connexion with her.
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    0
  • Biography and authorities cited; Henry VIII.
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    0
  • 141, 18 9, 3 1 3, 350; Il Successo de la Morte de la Regina de Inghilterra (1536); The Maner of the Tryumphe of Caleys and Bullen, and the Noble Tryumphaunt Coronacyon of Queen Anne (1533, rep. 1884); State Papers Henry VIII.; Letters and Papers of Henry VIII., by Brewer and Gardiner, esp. the prefaces; Cal.
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  • See also articles on CATHERINE OF ARAGON and HENRY VIII.
    0
    0
  • It is interesting, however, to know, that in the first volume is a review by Gibbon of Lord Lyttelton's History of Henry II., and that the second volume contains a contribution by Hume on Walpole's Historic Doubts.
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    0
  • Before the 13th century the burgesses held a weekly market on Sunday and a yearly fair on St James's day, but in 1218 Henry III.
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    0
  • He was the son of John Henry, a welleducated Scotsman, among whose relatives was the historian William Robertson, and who served in Virginia as county surveyor, colonel and judge of a county court.
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    0
  • This speech, which, according to reports, was extremely radical and denied the right of the king to disallow acts of the colonial legislature, made Henry the idol of the common people of Virginia and procured for him an enormous practice.
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    0
  • The more conservative members strongly opposed them as premature, whereupon Henry supported them in a speech familiar to the American school-boy for several generations following, closing with the words, "Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery ?
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    0
  • Henry was twice married, first to Sarah Skelton, and second to Dorothea Spotswood Dandridge, a grand-daughter of Governor Alexander Spotswood.
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    0
  • See Moses Coit Tyler, Patrick Henry (Boston, 1887; new ed., 1899), and William Wirt Henry (Patrick Henry's grandson), Patrick Henry: Life, Correspondence and Speeches (New York, 1890-1891); these supersede the very unsatisfactory biography by William Wirt, Sketches of the Life and Character of Patrick Henry (Philadelphia, 1817).
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  • The silver shilling was first struck in 1504, in the reign of Henry VII.
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    0
  • Henry Cavendish, from which it appeared that Cavendish, already famous by many other researches (such as the mean density of the earth, the composition of water, &c.), must be looked on as, in his day, a man of Maxwell's own stamp as a theorist and an experimenter of the very first rank.
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    0
  • Henry's son Murkertagh the Strongminded, and his great-grandson Hugh, described as "the most renowned, hospitable and valorous of the princes of Ireland in his time," greatly consolidated the power of the O'Neills.
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    0
  • Conn O'Neill (c. 1480-1559), 1st earl of Tyrone, surnamed Bacach (the Lame), grandson of Henry O'Neill mentioned above, was the first of the O'Neills whom the attempts of the English in the 16th century to subjugate Ireland brought to the front as leaders of the native Irish.
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    0
  • When Kildare became viceroy in 1524, O'Neill consented to act as his swordbearer in ceremonies of state; but his allegiance was not to be reckoned upon, and while ready enough to give verbal assurances of loyalty, he could not be persuaded to give hostages as security for his conduct; but Tyrone having been invaded in 1541 by Sir Anthony St Leger, the lord deputy, Conn delivered up his son as a hostage, attended a parliament held at Trim, and, crossing to England, made his submission at Greenwich to Henry VIII., who created him earl of Tyrone for life, and made him a present of money and a valuable gold chain.
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    0
  • The rest of the earl's life was mainly occupied by endeavours to maintain his influence, and by an undying feud with his son Shane (John), arising out of his transaction with Henry VIII.
    0
    0
  • This victory greatly strengthened Shane O'Neill's position, and Sir Henry Sidney, who became lord deputy in 1566, declared to the earl of Leicester that Lucifer himself was not more puffed up with pride and ambition than O'Neill.
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    0
  • He was brought up in London, but returned to Ireland in 1567 after the death of Shane, under the protection of Sir Henry Sidney.
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    0
  • Having roused the ire of Sir Henry Bagnal (or Bagenal) by eloping with his sister in 1591, he afterwards assisted him in defeating Hugh Maguire at Belleek in 1593 and then again went into opposition and sought aid from Spain and Scotland.
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    0
  • In May of the same year Sir Henry Docwra, at the head of a considerable army, took up a position at Derry, while Mountjoy marched from Westmeath to Newry to support him, compelling O'Neill to retire to Armagh, a large reward having been offered for his capture alive or dead.
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    0
  • Neill Mor's great-greatgrandson, Henry O'Neill, was created baronet of Killeleagh in 1666.
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    0
  • In defending the town of Antrim against the rebels in 1798 O'Neill received wounds from which he died on the 18th of June, being succeeded as Viscount O'Neill by his son Charles Henry St John (1779-1841), who in 1800 was created Earl O'Neill.
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    0
  • In 1841 Edward Moxon was found guilty of the publication of a blasphemous libel (Shelley's Queen Mab), the prosecution having been instituted by Henry Hetherington, who had previously been condemned to four months' imprisonment for a similar offence, and wished to test the law under which he was punished.
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    0
  • When Henry broke with the papacy, Pope Paul III.
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    0
  • Bishop Roger of Caen (1107-1139) built the castle, described by Henry of Huntingdon as scarcely inferior to that of Devizes, "than which there was none greater within the confines of England."
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    0
  • Becket is an irregular structure, dating from the reign of Henry VI., but frequently restored.
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    0
  • Lymington dates its importance from the grant of the town to Richard de Redvers, earl of Devon, in the reign of Henry I.
    0
    0
  • Before departing for the Orient, he married Miss Lou Henry, a fellow student at college, daughter of a banker at Monterey, Cal.
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    0
  • The borough was founded before 1217 by William de Vernon, earl of Devon, whose ancestor Richard de Redvers had received the manor from Henry I.
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    0
  • The wool manufacture flourished at Honiton in the reign of Henry VII., and it is said to have been the first town at which serges were made, but the industry entirely declined during the 19th century.
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    0
  • Soon after 1509 he was appointed a member of 'the royal council and chaplain to Henry VIII.
    0
    0
  • He was a man of learning, writing in favour of Henry's divorce, and with Cuthbert Tunstall, bishop of Durham, a treatise against Cardinal Pole.
    0
    0
  • There was a brief reaction: Henry Stuart Foote (1800-1880), Unionist, was elected governor in 1851 over Davis, the States' Rights candidate, and in the same year a Constitutional Convention had declared almost unanimously that "the asserted right of secession".
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    0
  • Other buildings of interest are: - the small chapel which is all that remains since 1820 of the old and famous cathedral of St Simon and St Jude founded by Henry III.
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    0
  • Goslar is believed to have been founded by Henry the Fowler about 920, and when in the time of Otto the Great the mineral treasures in the neighbourhood were discovered it increased rapidly in prosperity.
    0
    0
  • In the 17th century mysticism is represented in the philosophical field by the so-called Cambridge Platonists, and especially by Henry More (1614-1687), in whom the influence of the Kabbalah is combined with a species of christianized Neoplatonism.
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    0
  • Shaw subsequently accompanied Forsyth's mission in 1870, when Henry Trotter made the first maps of Chinese Turkestan.
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    0
  • Ashland was laid out as a town in 1847, and was named in honour of Henry Clay's home at Lexington, Ky.; in 1857 it was incorporated.
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    0
  • Ranulf married Constance, widow of Henry II.
    0
    0
  • (1398), which created Chester into a principality to be held by the king's eldest son, was revoked by Henry IV.
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    0
  • Henry Seymour Conway's elder brother, Francis, 2nd Baron Conway, was created marquess of Hertford in 1793; his mother was a sister of Sir Robert Walpole's wife, and he was therefore first cousin to Horace Walpole, with whom he was on terms of intimate friendship throughout his life.
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    0
  • Born in Edinburgh on the 28th of January 1784, he lost his father in 1791 and his mother in 1795; and as his grandfather regarded him with indifference, he went to reside with Henry Dundas, afterwards Viscount Melville.
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    0
  • The present parish church of St Giles in the Fields, between Shaftesbury Avenue and New Oxford Street, dates from 1734, but here was situated a leper's hospital founded by Matilda, wife of Henry I., in i ioi.
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    0
  • Henry Clay, the speaker, appointed him a member of the Committee on Foreign Relations, of which John C. Calhoun was chairman, and for some forty years these three constituted a great triumvirate in American politics.
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    0
  • Four years later his party passed him by for William Henry Harrison, the hero of Tippecanoe, and Webster refused the proffered nomination for vice-president.
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    0
  • The same element in the Brethren opposed a census, but according to Howard Miller's census of 1880 (Record of the Faithful) the number of Dunkers was 59,749 in that year; by the United States census of 1890 it was then 73,795; the figures for 1904 are given by Henry King Carroll in his.
    0
    0
  • Deane, however, died in 1503, and Wolsey became chaplain to Sir Richard Nanfan, deputy of Calais, who apparently recommended him to Henry VII.
    0
    0
  • His ecclesiastical preferments, of which he received several in 1506-1509, culminated in his appointment by Henry to the deanery of Lincoln on February 2, 1509.
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    0
  • He had, moreover, received assurances from the emperor that he would further Wolsey's candidature for the papacy; and although he protested to Henry VIII.
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    0
  • This ambition distinguishes his foreign policy from that of Henry VII., to which it has been likened.
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    0
  • But Henry VII.'s accumulations had disappeared; parliament resisted in 1523 the imposition of new taxation; and the attempts to raise forced loans and benevolences in1526-1528created a storm of opposition.
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    0
  • A bill of attainder, passed by the Lords, was rejected at Cromwell's instigation and probably with Henry's goodwill by the Commons.
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    0
  • Giustiniani explains that he had to make proposals to the cardinal before he broached them to Henry, lest Wolsey "should resent the precedence conceded to the king."
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    0
  • His morals were of the laxest description, and he had as many illegitimate children as Henry VIII.
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    0
  • Brewer, in his elaborate prefaces to the Letters and Papers (reissued as his History of the Reign of Henry VIII.), originated modern admiration for Wolsey; and his views are reflected in Creighton's Wolsey in the "Twelve English Statesmen" series, and in Dr Gairdner's careful articles in the Dict.
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    0
  • Among his informants were Earl Richard of Cornwall and Henry III.
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    0
  • In 1257, in the course of a week's visit to St Albans, Henry kept the chronicler beside him night and day,.
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    0
  • None the less, he gives a more vivid impression of his, age than any other English chronicler; and it is a matter for regret that his great history breaks off in 1259, on the eve of the crowning struggle between Henry III and the baronage.
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    0
  • There is still less ground for the supposition that Henry of Anjou, whom she married immediately after the divorce, had been her lover before it.
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    0
  • Louis, who had hoped that Aquitaine would descend to his daughters, was mortified and alarmed by the Angevin marriage; all the more so when Henry of Anjou succeeded to the English crown in 1154.
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    0
  • But her relations with Henry passed gradually through indifference to hatred.
    0
    0
  • Henry was an unfaithful husband, and Eleanor supported her sons in their great rebellion of 1173.
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    0
  • It was during her captivity that Henry formed his connexion with Rosamond Clifford, the Fair Rosamond of romance.
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    0
  • See the chronicles cited for the reigns of Henry II., Richard I.
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    0
  • But the duchy was re-established after the death of the German king Henry I., and became hereditary in the Hohenstaufen family, and then in the house of Austria, which succeeded in 1273 to the imperial dignity.
    0
    0
  • Since the days of Adolf of Holstein and Henry the Lion, a movement of German colonization, in which farmers from the Low Countries, merchants from Lubeck, and monks of the Cistercian Order all played their parts, had been spreading German influence from the Oder to the Vistula, from the Vistula to the Dwina - to Prague, to Gnesen, and even to Novgorod the Great.
    0
    0
  • John of Bohemia had fought by the Vistula: Henry of Bolingbroke was of the goodly company; Chaucer's perfect knight had travelled in "Pruce and Lettowe."
    0
    0
  • It was in vain that the heroic grand master, Henry of Plauen (1410-1413) sought to stem the tide of disaster; he was deposed by the chapter of the Order for his pains.
    0
    0
  • In 1799 he was induced by his fellow-student, Henry Brougham, to study the diffraction of light.
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    0
  • For the history of institutions which, thanks largely to the writings of Sir Henry Maine, has become a new and interesting branch of science, Bentham cared nothing.
    0
    0
  • On this subject Henry is far from clear; but he defends Plato against the current Aristotelian criticism, and endeavours to show that the two views are in harmony.
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    0
  • The assizes for Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire were held at Nottingham until the reign of Henry III., when they were held alternately at Nottingham and Derby until 1569, after which the Derbyshire assizes were held at Derby.
    0
    0
  • The greatest landholder in Derbyshire at the time of the Domesday Survey was Henry de Ferrers, who owned almost the whole of the modern hundred of Appletree.
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    0
  • The Ferrers estates were forfeited by Robert, earl of Derby, in the reign of Henry III.
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  • Few Englishmen retained estates of any importance after the Conquest, but one, Elfin, an under-tenant of Henry de Ferrers, not only held a considerable property but was the ancestor of the Derbyshire family of Brailsford, The families of Shirley and Gresley can also boast an unbroken descent.
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  • St John's Episcopal church, built in 1740 (and sub sequently much enlarged), is noted especially as the meetingplace of the Virginia Convention of March 1775, before which Patrick Henry made a famous speech, ending, " I know not what course others may take, but as for me, Give me liberty, or give me death !"
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  • In 1850 the commission accepted the model submitted by Thomas Crawford (1814-1857), an American sculptor, the corner-stone of the monument was laid in that year, and the equestrian statue of Washington, with sub-statues of Patrick Henry and Thomas Jefferson, was unveiled on the 22nd of February 1858.
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  • Henry, " Richmond on the James " in Historic Towns of the Southern States (New York, 1900), edited by Lyman P. Powell; and Samuel Mordecai, Richmond in By-Gone Days (Richmond, 1856; 2nd ed., 1860).
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  • The creator of the present edifice was Francis I., under whom the architect Gilles le Breton erected most of the buildings of the Cour Ovale, including the Porte Doree, its southern entrance, and the Salle des Fetes, which, in the reign of Henry II., was decorated by the Italians, Francesco Primaticcio and Nicolo dell' Abbate, and is perhaps the finest Renaissance chamber in France.
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  • After Francis I., Fontainebleau owes most to Henry IV., to whom are due the Cour d'Henri IV., the Cour des Princes, with the adjoining Galerie de Diane, and Galerie des Cerfs, used as a library.
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  • A space of over 200 acres to the east of the palace is covered by the park, which is traversed by a canal dating from the reign of Henry IV.
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  • Where in some towns," says the statute 4th Henry VII.
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  • When trouble arose between Conrad and Henry, duke of Saxony, afterwards King Henry the Fowler, the attitude of Conrad was ascribed by the Saxons to the influence of Hatto, who wished to prevent Henry from securing authority in Thuringia, where the see of Mainz had extensive possessions.
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  • He was accused of complicity in a plot to murder Duke Henry, who in return ravaged the archiepiscopal lands in Saxony and Thuringia.
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