Hemophilia sentence example

hemophilia
  • About 20 percent of all individuals with hemophilia A begin to produce antibodies in their blood against the specific factor protein; the presence of antibodies may then rapidly destroy infused factor VIII.

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  • The most commonly known coagulation disorder is hemophilia, a condition in which a critical component of blood coagulation is missing, causing individuals to bleed for long periods of time before clotting occurs.

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  • Hemophilia B symptoms are similar to those of hemophilia A, including numerous, large, and deep bruises and prolonged bleeding.

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  • Hemophilia most often occurs in families with a known history of the disease, but occasionally, new cases occur in families with no apparent history.

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  • Factor XI deficiency, or hemophilia C, is a bleeding disorder that occurs among certain ethnic groups.

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  • Hemophilia A is diagnosed with laboratory tests that can detect the presence of clotting factor VIII, factor IX, and others, as well as the presence or absence of clotting factor inhibitors.

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  • Gene carriers for both forms of hemophilia can be detected through DNA studies in conjunction with results from factor VIII assays.

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  • Comprehensive care addresses children's needs by providing various types of counseling to help deal with the psychosocial aspects of diseases such as von Willebrand's and hemophilia.

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  • With mild bleeding episodes in persons afflicted with hemophilia A, infusions of a drug called desmopressin (DDAVP) may be administered.

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  • Christmas disease is treated similarly to hemophilia A, with a mix of synthetic products and human blood products to provide coagulation factors as needed.

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  • Factor XI (hemophilia C) deficiency is most often treated with plasma, since there are no commercially available concentrates of factor XI in the United States.

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  • People who have hemophilia A or B and other bleeding disorders are advised to avoid activities and contact sports that can cause severe injury.

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  • Berntorp, Erik, et al. Textbook on Hemophilia.

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  • By 1997, approximately 800 different diagnostic tests were available, most of them for hereditary genetic disorders such as Tay-Sachs disease, sickle cell anemia, hemophilia, muscular dystrophy, and cystic fibrosis.

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  • Examples of genetic conditions include Down syndrome, Tay-Sach's disease, sickle cell disease, and hemophilia.

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  • Hemophilia is a coagulation disorder arising from a genetic defect of the X chromosome; the defect can either be inherited or result from spontaneous gene mutation.

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  • In each type of hemophilia (hemophilias A, B, and C), a critical coagulation protein is missing, causing individuals to bleed for long periods of time before clotting occurs.

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  • In hemophilia, certain clotting factors are either decreased in quantity, absent altogether, or improperly formed, preventing the formation of a clot and resulting in uncontrolled bleeding.

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  • Hemophilia A is the most common type of coagulation disorder and involves decreased activity of factor VIII.

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  • Individuals with less than 1 percent of normal factor VIII activity level have severe hemophilia.

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  • Individuals with 1-5 percent of normal factor VIII activity level have moderate hemophilia and are at risk for heavy bleeding after seemingly minor traumatic injuries.

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  • Individuals with 5-40 percent of normal factor VIII activity level have mild hemophilia and must prepare carefully for any surgery or dental procedures.

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  • Hemophilia A affects between one in 5,000 to one in 10,000 males in most populations.

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  • Hemophilia B occurs in one in 40,000 to 50,000.

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  • The prevalence of hemophilia is estimated to be 13.4 cases per 100,000 U.S. males (10.5 hemophilia A and 2.9 hemophilia B).

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  • Hemophilia C occurs primarily among individuals of Jewish descent.

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  • Hemophilia A and B are both caused by a genetic defect present on the X chromosome.

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  • About 70 percent of all people with hemophilia A or B inherited the disease.

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  • Both factors VIII and IX are produced by a genetic defect of the X chromosome, so hemophilia A and B are both sex-linked diseases passed on from a female to male offspring.

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  • Therefore, even if she receives one flawed X chromosome, she will still be capable of producing a sufficient quantity of factors VIII and IX to avoid the symptoms of hemophilia.

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  • Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by prolonged or spontaneous bleeding, especially into the muscles, joints, or internal organs.

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  • There are also a number of related bleeding disorders where there are other factor deficiencies that are much rarer than hemophilia.

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  • We trying to get know more... Your Dana has mild hemophilia?

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  • Please note that some medical conditions preclude certain drivers from taking part, e.g. hemophilia or epilepsy.

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  • She carries the flaw that causes hemophilia and can pass it on to her offspring.

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  • If, however, she has a son who receives her flawed X chromosome, he will be unable to produce the right quantity of factors VIII or IX, and he will suffer some degree of hemophilia.

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  • However, the vast majority of people with either hemophilia A or B are male.

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  • About 30 percent of all people with hemophilia A or B are the first member of their family to ever have the disease.

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  • In the case of severe hemophilia, the first bleeding event usually occurs prior to 18 months of age.

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  • In some babies, hemophilia is suspected immediately when a routine circumcision (removal of the foreskin of the penis) results in unusually heavy bleeding.

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  • Hemophilia B symptoms are similar to those of hemophilia A, including numerous large and deep bruises and prolonged bleeding.

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  • People with hemophilia are at very high risk of severe, heavy, uncontrollable bleeding (hemorrhage) from injuries such as motor vehicle accidents and also from surgery.

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  • Some other rare clotting disorders such as von Willebrand's disease present similar symptoms but are not usually called hemophilia.

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  • Hemophilia is usually discovered when an injury initiates bleeding and the bleeding will not stop.

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  • In very young children, spontaneous musculoskeletal bleeding may occur around the time the child begins to walk; these episodes may be the first sign of hemophilia.

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  • This information helps to confirm a diagnosis of hemophilia and identifies the type and severity of hemophilia present.

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  • Families with a history of hemophilia can also have tests done during a pregnancy to determine whether the fetus will have hemophilia.

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  • Chorionic villous sampling is a test that examines proteins for deficiencies or defects that are characteristic of hemophilia.

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  • The treatment of hemophilia involves replacing or supplementing the deficient coagulation factors.

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  • Appropriate treatment of hemophilia can decrease suffering and be lifesaving in the presence of hemorrhage.

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  • Molecular biological techniques have introduced gene therapies as new treatment possibilities for hemophilia.

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  • Variations in the type and severity of hemophilia makes it difficult to generalize a prognosis, however, for individuals with mild hemophilia, the prognosis is quite good.

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  • Those with more severe hemophilia can also live relatively normal lives with careful management and avoidance of injury.

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  • Because of its genetic origins, hemophilia cannot be prevented in those born with the inherited defects or factor deficiencies.

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  • However, individuals who have a family history of hemophilia may benefit from genetic testing and counseling before deciding to have a baby.

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  • The most important way for individuals with hemophilia to prevent complications of the disease is to avoid activities that may lead to injury.

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  • When a child has an inherited coagulation disorder such as hemophilia, parents will be concerned about the possibility of trauma or injury that may lead to potentially dangerous bleeding episodes.

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  • The watchfulness of parents along with effective management of hemophilia by physicians can help the child to lead a relatively normal life.

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  • Counseling is available to help children handle the psychosocial aspects of living with hemophilia.

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  • Children seem to stay in balance unless a bleeding disorder of some kind exists, either hereditary (hemophilia or von Willebrand's) or related to hookworm infection or another illness.

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  • These include the coagulation disorders hemophilia A and hemophilia B, and von Willebrand's disease, a bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in von Willebrand factor, an essential component of the coagulation system.

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  • Certain blood disorders, such as hemophilia, can cause the nose to bleed.

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  • Unlike hemophilia, where bleeding is caused by an ineffective clotting mechanism in the blood, bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is caused by fragile blood vessels.

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  • However, like hemophilia, bleeding may be extensive and can occur without warning.

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  • Hemophilia or hemophilia A (factor VIII deficiency) is an inherited coagulation disorder, affecting about 20,000 Americans.

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  • Christmas disease or hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency) is less common than hemophilia A with similar symptoms.

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  • Other coagulation disorders include factor XI deficiency (hemophilia C), and factor VII deficiency.

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  • Hemophilia C afflicts one in 100,000 people and is the second most common bleeding disorder among women.

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  • Because of its hereditary nature, hemophilia A may be suspected before symptoms occur.

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  • Some signs of hemophilia A are numerous large, deep bruises and painful, swollen joints caused by internal bleeding.

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  • Individuals with hemophilia do not bleed faster, just longer.

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  • A person with mild hemophilia may first discover the disorder with prolonged bleeding following a surgical procedure or injury.

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  • Mild and severe hemophilia A are inherited through a complex genetic system that passes a recessive gene on the female chromosome.

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  • Women usually do not show signs of hemophilia but are carriers of the disease.

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  • Each male child of the carrier has a 50 percent chance of having hemophilia, and each female child has a 50 percent chance of passing the gene on.

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  • What differentiated this bleeding disorder from classical hemophilia was that it appeared not to be associated with muscle and joint bleeding and affected women and men rather than just men.

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