Heidelberg sentence example

heidelberg
  • Gaining his freedom at the instance of Hungarian magnates, he visited Melanchthon at Wittenberg, and in 152 4 became professor of Greek at the university of Heidelberg, being in addition professor of Latin from 1526.
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  • He then entered the Dutch service, took part in the campaigns of 1815, and, after studying another year at Heidelberg, was member for Luxemburg of the military commission of the German federal diet (1824, 1825).
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  • Leaving the service after the war, he studied jurisprudence at Heidelberg, Göttingen and Jena, and in 1819 went for a while to Geneva to complete his studies.
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  • of Heidelberg and 55 m.
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  • Albrecht Ritschl studied at Bonn, Halle, Heidelberg and Tubingen.
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  • After the war he retired into private life at Heidelberg.
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  • Arnold Schlick, Heidelberg.
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  • Wallace, Geographical Distribution of Animals (New York, 1876); Theodor Wolf, Ein Besuch der Galapagos Inseln (Heidelberg, 1879); and paper in Geographical Journal, vi.
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  • passim; C. Torr, Rhodes in Ancient Times (Cambridge, 1885), Rhodes in Modern Times (Cambridge, 1887); C. Schumacher, De republica Rhodiorum commentatio (Heidelberg, 1886); H.
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  • Hertz himself gave an admirable account of the significance of his discoveries in a lecture on the relations between light and electricity, delivered before the German Society for the Advancement of Natural Science and Medicine at Heidelberg in September 1889.
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  • Cartellieri, Peter von Aragon and die Sizilianische Vesper (Heidelberg, 1904).
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  • In 1656 he became honorary professor at Heidelberg, and died on the 31st of August 1660.
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  • Educated at the universities of Bonn and Heidelberg, he obtained a position in Florence through the influence of an Englishman, William Craufurd, but soon he entered the Prussian diplomatic service and was employed in Florence, in Constantinople and in Rome.
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  • Tiedemann, 2 the Heidelberg anatomist, who has been generally ignored, although he surpassed many a recent zoogeographer by the wide view he took of the problem; in fact he was the first to connect distribution with environmental or bionomic factors; e.g.
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  • §§ 127-255 (Heidelberg, 1814).
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  • HANS DELBRUCK (1848-), German historian, was born at Bergen on the island of Riigen on the 11th of November 1848, and studied at the universities of Heidelberg and Bonn.
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  • Having studied at Marburg and Jena, he for some time lived at Leipzig as a private tutor; but in 1802 he was appointed professor at Marburg, and two years later professor of philology and ancient history at Heidelberg.
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  • He was one of the principal founders of the Philological Seminary established at Heidelberg in 1807.
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  • Weber, De Gytheo et Lacedaemoniorum rebus navalibus (Heidelberg, 1833); W.
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  • After working under Leopold Gmelin at Heidelberg, and Liebig at Giessen, he spent three years in Paris studying the higher mathematics under Comte.
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  • He endorsed the claims of Maximilian of Bavaria to the electoral dignity, and was rewarded with the gift of the Heidelberg library, which was carried off to Rome.
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  • As St Dominic's character and work do not receive the same general recognition as do St Francis of Assisi's, it will be worth while to quote from the appreciation by Prof. Griitzmacher of Heidelberg: "It is certain that Dominic was a noble personality of genuine and true piety..
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  • Studying philology at Heidelberg in 1835, he was led by F.
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  • After a short period of study in Paris on the French Revolution, he spent some time working in the archives of Baden and Bavaria, and published in 1845 Die Geschichte der rheinischen Pfalz, which won for him a professorship extraordinarius at Heidelberg.
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  • Musser also interested himself in politics while at Heidelberg, publishing in 1846 Schleswig-Holstein, Dlinemark and Deutschland, and editing with Gervinus the Deutsche Zeitung.
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  • Hdusser, ein Vortrag (Heidelberg, 1867).
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  • The best MS. is the Heidelberg MS., written in Germany, probably in the 8th century; but this perished in the fire at Mommsen's house.
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  • After this he filled various posts in south Germany - school director at Bamberg (1807), Nuremberg (1808), Ansbach (181o) - until he became professor of exegesis and church history at Heidelberg (1811-1844).
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  • He then went to Europe, studying in Paris in 1866-1867, in Berlin in 1867 and in Heidelberg in 1868.
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  • He matriculated at Heidelberg with the intention of pursuing an ecclesiastical career.
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  • During the period of the diet of Frankfort he had given public lectures on religion at Heidelberg.
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  • In 1553 he became physician to the count of Henneberg, Saxe-Meiningen, and in 1558 held the same post with the elector-palatine, Otto Heinrich, being at the same time professor of medicine at Heidelberg.
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  • In theology he followed Zwingli, and at the sacramentarian conferences of Heidelberg (1560) and Maulbronn (1564) he advocated by voice and pen the Zwinglian doctrine of the Lord's Supper, replying (1565) to the counter arguments of the Lutheran Johann Marbach, of Strassburg.
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  • He ineffectually resisted the efforts of the Calvinists, led by Caspar Olevianus, to introduce the Presbyterian polity and discipline, which were established at Heidelberg in 1570, on the Genevan model.
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  • Its immediate occasion was the disputation at Heidelberg (1568) for the doctorate of theology by George Wither or Withers, an English Puritan (subsequently archdeacon of Colchester), silenced (1565) at Bury St Edmunds by Archbishop Parker.
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  • In 1810 appeared at Heidelberg the first volume of F.
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  • After an interval of about eighteen months, however, he definitively betook himself to an academic career, "habilitating" in Heidelberg, where two vacancies had occurred in the theological faculty of the university.
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  • The fresh insight into the history of the church evinced by this work at once drew attention to its author, and even before he had terminated the first year of his academical labours at Heidelberg, he was called to Berlin, where he was appointed professor of theology.
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  • He was educated at the Carolinum, an endowed school at Osnabruck, and studied at the universities of Gottingen and Heidelberg.
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  • Zelpfl, Deutsche Rechtsgeschichte (4th ed., Heidelberg, 1871-1876); J.
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  • Ludwig, under whom he studied at Zurich, decided him to devote his attention to physiological chemistry, and therefore he went, after his graduation (18J4), to Heidelberg, where R.
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  • He was educated at the Gymnasium of Frankfort-on-Main and at the universities of Heidelberg and Berlin.
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  • His tractate (1542) against the permission of bigamy in the case of Philip of Hesse was not allowed to be printed (the manuscript is in the Heidelberg university library).
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  • (Heidelberg, 1906); and cf.
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  • Promptuarium sive bibliotheca orientalis, published at Heidelberg in 1658, and another in the 18th, in M.
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  • VOSSIUS [Voss], Gerhard Johann (1577-1649), German classical scholar and theologian, was the son of Johannes Voss, a Protestant of the Netherlands, who fled from persecution into the Palatinate and became pastor in the village near Heidelberg where Gerhard was born.
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  • His son, GEORGE JELLINEK, was appointed professor of international law at Heidelberg in 1891.
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  • It was taught in Paris by Albert of Saxony (about 1350-1360)13501360) and Marsilius of Inghen (about 1364-1377, afterwards at Heidelberg), as well as by Johannes Buridanus, rector of the university as early as 1327.
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  • After holding appointments at Kiel and Heidelberg, he was in 1874 made professor at Berlin; he had already in 1871 become a member of the Reichstag, and from that time till his death in 1896 he was one of the most prominent figures in the city.
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  • Returning to Germany, he became privy councillor to the elector palatine Philip, whom he assisted in bringing the university of Heidelberg to the height of its fame.
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  • Morneweg, Johann von Dalberg, ein deutscher Humanist and Bischof (Heidelberg, 1887).
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  • Their chief occurrences are in the districts of Witwatersrand, Heidelberg, Klerksdorp and Venterskroon.
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  • The chief method employed for their destruction is spraying the swarms with arsenic. The districts with the greatest area under cultivation are Heidelberg, Witwatersrand, Pretoria, Standerton and Krugersdorp. The chief crops grown for grain are wheat, maize (mealie) and kaffir corn, but the harvest is inadequate to meet local demands.
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  • Formal proclamation of the republic was made on the 16th of December (Dingaan's Day) at Heidelberg.
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  • Conrad took up his residence at the castle of Juttenbuhel, near Heidelberg, which became the capital of the Palatinate.
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  • His troops took Heidelberg and devastated the Palatinate, while Philip William took refuge in Vienna, where he died in 1690.
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  • The next elector, a brother of the last one, was Charles Philip, who removed his capital from Heidelberg to Mannheim in 1720.
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  • Hausser, Geschichte der Rheinischen Pfalz (Heidelberg, 18 45); Nebenius, Geschichte der Pfalz (Heidelberg, 1874); Giimbel, Geschichte der protestantischen Kirche der Pfalz (Kaiserslautern, 1885); the Regesten cer Pfalzgrafen am Rhein,' 1214-1508, edited by Koch and Wille (Innsbruck, 1894); and Wild, Bilderatlas zur badischpfalzischen Geschichte (Heidelberg, 1904).
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  • of Cambridge and Edinburgh, Doctor in utroque jure of Heidelberg; an hon.
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  • In the great 14th century "Manesse" MS. (c) collection of medieval German lyrics, preserved at Heidelberg, there are two songs written by Conradin, and his fate has formed the subject of several dramas.
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  • From 1581 he studied at the universities of Strassburg, Leipzig, Heidelberg and Jena.
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  • His Irenicum vere christianum is directed against David Pareus (1548-1622), professor primarius at Heidelberg, who in Irenicum sive de unione et synodo Evangelicorum (1614) had pleaded for a reconciliation of Lutheranism and Calvinism; his Calvinista aulopoliticus (1610) was written against the "damnable Calvinism" which was becoming prevalent in Holstein and Brandenburg.
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  • It now takes a tortuous westerly course, and the scenery on its banks becomes more romantic. Winding down by Neckarsteinach and Neckargemund between lofty wooded heights, it sweeps beneath the Kanigsstuhl (1900 ft.), washes the walls of Heidelberg, and now quitting the valley enters the plain of the Rhine and falls into that river from the right at Mannheim.
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  • From 1880 to 1882 he studied in Berlin, Heidelberg and Paris.
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  • After attending the gymnasium of his native town, he studied at Marburg and Heidelberg, and then, attracted by the fame of Liebig, went in 1839 to Giessen, where he became a privatdozent in 1841, and professor of chemistry twelve years later.
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  • In 1864 he was called to Heidelberg in the same capacity, and he remained there till his death on the 20th of February 1892.
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  • ZACHARIAS URSINUS (1534-1583), German theologian, and one of the authors of the Heidelberg Catechism, was born at Breslau on the 18th of July 1534, and became a disciple of Melanchthon at Wittenberg.
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  • In 1561 he was appointed professor in the Collegium Sapientiae at Heidelberg, where in 1563 at the instance of the elector-palatine, Frederick III., he drew up the Catechism in co-operation with Kaspar Olevian.
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  • Karl Hillebrand became involved, as a student in Heidelberg, in the Baden revolutionary move ment, and was imprisoned in Rastatt.
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  • There are two universities, the Protestant at Heidelberg and the Roman Catholic at Freiburg-im-Breisgau, and a celebrated technical college at Karlsruhe.
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  • The supreme courts of justice of the duchy are in Karlsruhe, Freiburg, Offenburg, Heidelberg, Mosbach, Waldshut, Constance and Mannheim, whence appeals lie to the Reichsgericht (supreme tribunal of the empire) in Leipzig.
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  • Hausser, Denkwiirdigkeiten zur Geschichte der badischen Revolution (Heidelberg, 1851); L.
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  • By an agreement made in 1907 the school of theology of Ursinus College (Collegeville, Pennsylvania; the theological school since 1898 had been in Philadelphia) and the Heidelberg Theological seminary (Tiffin, Ohio) united to form the Central Theological seminary of the German Reformed Church, which was established in Dayton in 1908.
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  • Thorbecke (Heidelberg, 1867) and A.
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  • After the fall of Napoleon he took part in Wurttemberg politics, was expelled from Stuttgart and Heidelberg, and soon afterwards arrested at Frankfurt, delivered over to the Prussian authorities and condemned to fourteen years' fortress imprisonment for his alleged publication of state secrets in his memoirs.
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  • He read philosophy at Berlin, Halle and Heidelberg, devoting himself mainly to the doctrines of Hegel and Schleiermacher.
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  • This same Elector Frederick invited two young divines, Zacharias Ursinus and Caspar Olevianus,, to prepare the afterwards celebrated Heidelberg catechism, which in 1563 superseded Calvin's catechism in the Palatinate.
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  • " Ans.: " That men may know God by whom they were created," - the Heidelberg catechism has: " What is thy only comfort in life and death ?"
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  • In 1684 he had been offered a professorship at Heidelberg; but his marriage with a lady of his native city led him to decline the invitation.
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  • After a short residence at Heidelberg (1871),(1871), where he began his study of German philosophy, he returned to Edinburgh as assistant first to Henry Calderwood and later to A.
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  • The result of the battle was a complete victory for the French, who followed up their success by driving a portion of Bournonville's army (on which the duke of Lorraine had rallied his forces) from the Neckar (action of Ladenburg near Heidelberg, July 7th).
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  • He was educated at a secondary school at Poltava, and was for a short time at Heidelberg University.
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  • as a result of which he resigned his professorship. Several universities were eager to obtain his services, and he had accepted a post offered him by the elector palatine at Heidelberg, when he died suddenly on the 12th of September, 1672.
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  • Among other places he went to Heidelberg and Halle, and had his attention directed at Heidelberg to the canons of scripture criticism published by Gerhard von Ma.stricht, and at Halle to C. Vitringa's Anacrisis ad Apocalypsin.
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  • ABRAHAM GEIGER (1810-1874), Jewish theologian and orientalist, was born at Frankfort-on-Main on the 24th of May 1810, and educated at the universities of Heidelberg and Bonn.
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  • Abraham Geiger's nephew Lazarus Geiger (1829-1870), philosopher and philologist, born at Frankfort-on-Main, was destined to commerce, but soon gave himself up to scholarship and studied at Marburg, Bonn and Heidelberg.
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  • Vernunft (Heidelberg, 1884).
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  • Druskowitz, Eugen Diihring (Heidelberg, 1888); E.
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  • 4 Manuscript copies are preserved at Heidelberg, Darmstadt, Frankfort, Giessen, Cassel and other places.
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  • KARL ULLMANN (1796-1865), German Protestant theologian, was born at Epfenbach, near Heidelberg, on the 15th of March 1796.
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  • He studied at Heidelberg and Tubingen, and in 1820 delivered exegetical and historical lectures at Heidelberg.
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  • In 1829 he went to Halle as professor to teach church history, dogmatics and symbolics, but in 1836 he accepted a chair at Heidelberg.
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  • He remained there three years, and then went in 1580 to Neustadt, whither the professors of Heidelberg had been driven by the elector-palatine because they were not Lutherans.
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  • He graduated at Cambridge in 1584, and then went to Heidelberg, where the faculty had been by this time re-established.
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  • In 1594 he was appointed professor of theology at Leiden, and before going thither received from the university of Heidelberg the degree of doctor.
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  • During the interval between the citation and the appearance of the accused, the professorial members of the synod was instructed to prepare themselves to be able to confute the Arminian errors, and the synod occupied itself with deliberations as to a new translation of the Bible, for which a commission was named, made arrangements for teaching the Heidelberg catechism, and granted permission to the missionaries of the East Indies to baptize such children of heathen parents as were admitted into their families.
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  • He studied theology at Heidelberg under H.
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  • Returning to Heidelberg he became Privatdozent in theology in 1829, and in 1831 published his Begriff der Kritik am Allen Testamente praktisch erartert, a study of Old Testament criticism in which he explained the critical principles of the grammatico-historical school, and his Des Propheten Jonas Orakel uber Moab, an exposition of the 1 5th and 16th chapters of the book of Isaiah attributed by him to the prophet Jonah mentioned in 2 Kings xiv.
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  • After the death of Friedrich Umbreit (1795-1860), one of the founders of the well-known Studien and Kritiken, he was called in 1861 to succeed him as professor of theology at Heidelberg.
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  • Hitzig died at Heidelberg on the 22nd of January 1875.
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  • 1840), professor of theology at Heidelberg.
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  • He was educated at a Realgymnasium at Mannheim and after the age of 15 at the technical school of Karlsruhe, proceeding to the university of Heidelberg, where he graduated as doctor of philosophy (1863).
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  • Friedel and Wurtz, and returned to teach at Heidelberg.
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  • ADOLPH HAUSRATH (1837-1909), German theologian, was born at Karlsruhe on the 13th of January 1837 and was educated at Jena, Göttingen, Berlin and Heidelberg, where he became Privatdozent in 1861, professor extraordinary in 1867 and ordinary professor in 1872.
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  • In 1514 he entered the university of Heidelberg, where Oecolampadius was one of his teachers, and where in 1518 he heard Luther discuss.
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  • After teaching in Heidelberg and Berlin, he became professor of philosophy at Jena (1846), a post which he held till his death.
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  • als empirische Wissenschaft (2 vols., Leipzig, 1855); Darstellung and Kritik der Beweise fur das Dasein Gottes (Heidelberg, 1840); Beitrcige zur Psych.
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  • They published, as was the fashion among the Reformed churches, separate creeds for themselves, but almost all accepted the Heidelberg Catechism.
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  • They permitted each congregation to use at pleasure the Augsburg Confession or the Heidelberg Catechism.
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  • After a brilliant university career at the university of Brunswick, at Edinburgh and Heidelberg, he returned to Canada and taught in various local schools, eventually becoming professor of classics and history in the local university.
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  • The Reformed churches of the Palatinate, on the other hand, used the Heidelberg Catechism (1562-1563), "sweetspirited, experiential, clear, moderate and happily-phrased," mainly the work of two of Calvin's younger disciples, Kaspar Olevianus and Zacharias Ursinus.
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  • The Heidelberg Catechism, set forth by order of the elector, is perhaps the most widely accepted symbol of the Calvinistic faith, and is noteworthy for its emphasis on the less controversial aspects of the Genevan theology.
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  • In Scotland both Calvin's Geneva Catechism and then the Heidelberg Catechism were translated by order of the General Assembly and annotated.
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  • The Heidelberg and Westminster Catechisms are of a more logical and independent character.
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  • He went to school at Weinsberg and Heilbronn, and then, intending to study law, he went to Bologna, but soon returned to Heidelberg and betook himself to theology.
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  • Jahrhunderts (Heidelberg, 1905).
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  • die Anfdnge der zweiten Kreuzzuges (Heidelberg, 1882); B.
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  • It was detected by Max Wolf at Heidelberg on plates exposed on Sept.
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  • (Berlin, 1879); Soltau, Entstehung and Zusammensetzung der altromischen Volksversammlungen, and Die Giiltigkeit der Plebiscite (Berlin, 1884); Huschke, Die Verfassung des Konigs Servius Tullius als Grundlage zu einer rOmischen Verfassungsgeschichte (Heidelberg, 1838); Borgeaud, Le Plebiscite dans l'antiquite.
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  • After studying at Giessen, Heidelberg and Gottingen, he entered on the practice of the law.
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  • He was educated at the universities of Bonn, Heidelberg and Giessen, at the last of which he graduated Ph.D.
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  • He studied philosophy, philology and theology at Marburg in 1786, and eventually (1795) became professor ordinarius of theology at Heidelberg, where he died on the 22nd of November 1836.
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  • He studied medicine at Tubingen, Heidelberg and Berlin, and in 1857 began to lecture at Heidelberg.
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  • In 1864 he became assistant professor there, and in 1866 was chosen to represent Heidelberg in the Baden Chamber, but soon resigned.
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  • After studying at Basel and Göttingen he was successively pastor at Schaffhausen (1841), professor of theology at Basel (1849); and at Heidelberg professor of theology (185r), director of the seminary and university preacher.
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  • HEPPENHEIM, a town of Germany, in the grand-duchy of Hesse-Darmstadt, on the Bergstrasse, between Darmstadt and Heidelberg, 21 m.
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  • Among the points of interest within it are the old chapel of 1318, with Leopold's tomb and the altar of Verdun, dating from the 12th century, the treasury and relic-chamber, the library with 30,000 volumes and many MSS., the picture gallery, the collection of coins, the theological hall, and the winecellar, containing an immense tun like that at Heidelberg.
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  • Cartellieri, Peter von Aragon and die sizilianischen Vesper (Heidelberg, 1904).
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  • Ledderhose, Das Leben Spangenbergs (Heidelberg, 1846); Otto Frick, Beitrage zur Lebensgeschichte A.
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  • In 1598 he went to Heidelberg, where he held various scholastic appointments.
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  • He wrote the biographies of a number of German scholars of the 16th century, mostly theologians, which were published in Heidelberg and Frankfort (5 vols., 1615-1620).
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  • Among Reuchlin's own pupils were Melanchthon, Oecolampadius and Cellarius, while Sebastian Munster in Heidelberg (afterwards professor at Basel), and Buchlein (Fagius) at Isny, Strasburg and Cambridge, were pupils of the liberal Jewish scholar Elias Levita.
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  • von England (Heidelberg, 1905).
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  • - the Heidelberg (Palatine), Florentine, Vatican and Augsburg - by Stephanus (1547), Nevelet (1610), Hudson (1718), Hauptmann (1741), Furia (1810), Coray (1810), Schneider (1812) and others.
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  • He studied law and politics at Heidelberg, and entered the Baden government department of finance in 1829.
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  • One hundred members, many of them foreign divines, composed this great assembly, who after 154 sittings gave their seal to the doctrines of the Netherlands Confession and the Heidelberg Catechism.
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  • He received a military education in Germany and subsequently studied at Heidelberg and London University, returning to the United States in 1861.
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  • In 1820 he entered Marburg University, and next year removed to Heidelberg, where he worked in Leopold Gmelin's laboratory.
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  • On his return he had proposed to settle as a Privatdozent at Heidelberg, but accepted the post of teacher of chemistry in the newly established technical school (Gewerbeschule) in Berlin (1825), where he remained till 1831.
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  • VICTOR MEYER (1848-1897), German chemist, was born at Berlin on the 8th of September 1848, and studied at Heidelberg University under R.
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  • In 1885 he was chosen to succeed Hans Hubner (1837-1884) in the professorship of chemistry at Göttingen, where stereochemical questions especially engaged his attention; and in 1889, on the resignation of his old master, Bunsen, he was appointed to the chair of chemistry in Heidelberg.
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  • Georg Michael Weiss (c. 1700-c. 1762), a graduate of Heidelberg, ordained and sent to America by the Upper Consistory of the Palatinate in 1727, organized a church in Philadelphia; preached at Skippack; worked in Dutchess and Schoharie counties, New York, in 1731-46; and then returned to his old field in Pennsylvania.
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  • founded in 1850 a theological school and Heidelberg University at Tiffin, Ohio.
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  • Colleges connected with the Church, besides the seminary at Lancaster, Franklin and Marshall College and Heidelberg University, are: Catawba College (1851) at Newton, North Carolina; and Ursinus College (1869), founded by the Low Church wing, at Collegeville, Pennsylvania, which had, until 1908, a theological seminary, then removed to Dayton, Ohio, where it united with Heidelberg Theological Seminary (until 1908 at Tiffin) to form the Central Theological Seminary.
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  • The son was educated at Phillips Academy, Exeter, at Harvard University, at Heidelberg, Göttingen and Berlin.
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  • When the author was preparing to return from Berlin, the Royal Academy made him their guest at a public dinner, an unprecedented honour; and the universities of Berlin, Heidelberg and Munich united in a testimonial of regard.
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  • On his return to Germany he started a small chemical laboratory at Heidelberg, where, with a very slender equipment, he carried out several important researches.
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  • After studying law at the universities of Berlin, Gottingen and Heidelberg (1813-1817), he settled as a Privatdocent, in 1821, at the university of Berlin, where he became ordinary professor of law in 1827.
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  • Having taken his doctor's degree, he became privat-docent at Jena; in 1807 professor of theology at Heidelberg, where he came under the influence of J.
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  • The extremes of cold and heat are, as recorded in the ten years 1895-1905, 7 in Konigsberg and 93 ifl Heidelberg (the hottest place in Germany).
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  • Heidelberg - - 1385 177 55 3
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  • The most celebrated public libraries are those of Berlin (i,ooo,ooo volumes and 30,000 MSS.); Munich (1,000,000 volumes, 40,000 MSS.); Heidelberg (563,000 volumes, 8ooo MSS.); Göttingen (503,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Strassburg (760,000 volumes); Dresden (500,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Hamburg (municipal library, 600,000 volumes, 5000 MSS.); Stuttgart (400,000 volumes, 3500 MSS.); Leipzig (universitylibrary, 500,000 volurries, 5000 MSS.); Wurzburg (350,000 volumes); TUbingen (340,000 volumes); Rostock (318,000 volumes); Breslau (university library, 300,000 volumes, 7000 MSS.); Freiburg-im-Breisgau (250,000 volumes); Bonn (265,000 volumes); and Konigsberg (230,000 volumes, I ioo MSS.).
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  • at Bamberg, Berlin (2), Bonn, Bothkamp in Schleswig, Breslau, Dhsseldorf, Gotha, Göttingen, Hamburg, Heidelberg, Jena Kiel, KOnigsberg, Leipzig, Munich, Potsdam, Strassburg and Wilhelmshaven.
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  • A number of deputies, belonging to different legislative assemblies, taking it upon themselves to give voice to the national demands, had met at Heidelberg,.
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  • At his invitation a conference of the finance ministers met in July at Heidelberg; they agreed to a great increase in the indirect taxes, but refused to accept the monopoly on tobacco.
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  • In 1884 a new development took place: u,nder the influence of Miquel a meeting was held at Heidelberg of the South German members of the party, who accepted the commercial and social policy of the government, including the Socialist law; their programme received Bismarcks approval, and was accepted by the rest of the patty, so that they henceforward were taken into favor by the government; but they had wpn the position by sacrificing almost all the characteristics of the older Liberalism the hope of a reunion for all the different sections which had hitherto kept the name of Liberal was at an end.
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  • He studied theology in the universities of Heidelberg and Berlin (1817-20) under Karl Daub (1765-1836), Schleiermacher and Neander, the philosophers and historians Georg Hegel, Friedrich Creuzer (1771-1858) and F.
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  • This post he exchanged in 1828 for a professorship in the Wittenberg theological seminary, of which in 1832 he became also second director and ephorus, and hence in 1837 he removed to Heidelberg as professor and director of a new clerical seminary; in 1849 he accepted an invitation to Bonn as professor and university preacher, but in 1854 he returned to Heidelberg as professor of theology, and afterwards became member of the 'Oberkirchenrath, a position he held until his death on the 10th of August 1867.
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  • His removal to Heidelberg and the publication of his first important work, Die Anfange der christlichen Kirche and ihrer Verfassung (1837), coincide with the attainment of the principal theological positions with which his name is associated.
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  • (Heidelberg).
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  • In general the system is well illustrated by the papyri forming the Schott-Reinhardt collection at Heidelberg (edited by C.H.
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  • Dobbert, Ober das Wesen and den Geschiiftskreis der missi dominici (Heidelberg, 1861); N.
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  • 2 So Hitzig (Ostern and Pfcngsten im zweiten Dekalog, Heidelberg, 1838), independently of a previous suggestion of Goethe in 1783, who in turn appears to.
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  • C. Schlosser, when he went to Heidelberg in 1811, devoted himself to philology, giving special attention to the Persian language.
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  • He learnt law at the universities of Heidelberg and Gottingen.
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  • In October 1509 he went to Heidelberg, where he took the B.A.
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  • Educated at the universities of Heidelberg and Gottingen, he showed an interest in art and visited Italy; but returning to Frankfort he turned his attention to the study of history, and became secretary of the Gesellschaft fib' dltere deutsche Geschichtskunde.
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  • After an unhappy childhood, he studied at Heidelberg, and at the age of twenty entered the Benedictine monastery of Sponheim near Kreuznach, of which, in 1485, he became abbot.
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  • In 1870 he went to Bern as professor of New Testament studies, passing thence in 1876 to Heidelberg, where he remained until his death on the 26th of January 1897.
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  • His German name, Kiirsner, was changed to Pellicanus by his mother's brother Jodocus Gallus, an ecclesiastic connected with the university of Heidelberg, who supported his nephew for sixteen months at the university in 1491-1492.
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  • He studied at Marburg and at Heidelberg, where he became the friend of J.
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  • In 1659 he was called to Steinfurt to fill the chair of dogmatics and ecclesiastical history, and in the same year he became doctor of theology of Heidelberg.
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  • Having studied theology in the academy of the Moravian brethren at Niesky, and philosophy at Leipzig and Jena, he travelled for some time, and in 1806 became professor of philosophy and elementary mathematics at Heidelberg.
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  • Navarre, and studied law at Louvain, Cologne and Heidelberg, returning to Paris in 1573.
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  • In 1591 he became professor of Roman law at Strassburg, where he remained until April 1600, when in response to an invitation from Frederick IV., elector palatine, he removed to Heidelberg.
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  • The difficulties of his position led to his return to Strassburg for a short time, but in November 1604 he definitely settled at Heidelberg.
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  • He died at Strassburg on the 7th of September 1622, having left Heidelberg before the city was sacked by the imperial troops in 1621.
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  • In 1805, when several lecturers left in consequence of diminished classes, he had written to Johann Heinrich Voss, suggesting that his philosophy might find more congenial soil in Heidelberg; but the application bore no fruit.
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  • His income amounted at Nuremberg to 1500 gulden (130) and a house; at Heidelberg, as professor, he received about the same sum; at Berlin about 3000 thalers (L300).
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  • Towards the close of his eighth session three professorships were almost simultaneously put within his reach - at Erlangen, Berlin and Heidelberg.
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  • The Prussian offer expressed a doubt that his long absence from university teaching might have made him rusty, so he accepted the post at Heidelberg, whence Fries had just gone to Jena (October 1816).
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  • The strangest of his hearers was an Esthonian baron, Boris d'Yrkull, who after serving in the Russian army came to Heidelberg to hear the wisdom of Hegel.
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  • At Heidelberg Hegel was active in a literary way also.
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  • Besides this work he wrote two reviews for the Heidelberg Jahrbiicher - the first on F.
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  • From 1839 to 1845 Wolfgang studied law at Bonn, Jena, Heidelberg and Berlin, taking his degree of doctor juris at Heidelberg in 1845.
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  • Luther's friends had been provokingly silent about the Theses; but in April 1518, at the annual chapter of the Augustinian Eremites held at Heidelberg, Luther heard his positions temperately discussed, and found somewhat to his astonishment that his views were not acceptable to all his fellow monks.
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  • It was adopted by the Reformed Church not only throughout Switzerland but in Scotland (1566), Hungary (1567), France (1571), Poland (1578), and next to the Heidelberg Catechism is the most generally recognized Confession of the Reformed Church.
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  • of Heidelberg, and 9 m.
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  • He himself was elaborately educated at Caen, at Paris, at Heidelberg and at Basel.
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  • Having studied at Herborn and Heidelberg, and travelled in Holland and England, he became rector of a school at Prerau, and after that pastor and rector of a school at Fulnek.
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  • He became professor of philosophy at Heidelberg in 1862, removed to Berlin in 1872, and retired in 1895.
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  • He studied at Heidelberg (under R.
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  • He was educated at the universities of Edinburgh, St Andrews and Heidelberg.
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  • Meyer (Heidelberg, 1885), who devotes attention to the relation of Hypatia to the chief representatives of Neoplatonism; J.
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  • Before his patron's death (1604) he became (1603) secretary to Henry, duke of Bouillon, with whom he went to Heidelberg and Frankfort.
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  • (Heidelberg, 1890); G.
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  • He studied at Halle, Jena and Heidelberg, and became an adherent of the party which sought to create a free and united Germany.
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  • According to Professor Leskien (Grammatik der altbulgarischen (altkirchenslavischen) Sprache, Heidelberg, 1909, p. xxi.), Cyril had probably made a prolonged and careful study of Slavonic before proceeding on his missionary journey, and probably in the first instance with a view to preaching the Gospel to the Sla y s of Macedonia and Bulgaria, who were much nearer his own home, Thessalonica, than were those of Moravia.
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  • Always inclined to a roving life, he soon proceeded to the university of Paris and afterwards continued his studies at Cologne and Heidelberg, returning to Prague in 1407.
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  • He studied theology at Göttingen, Berlin, Heidelberg and Munich, and was ordained priest in 1844.
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  • Academies in imitation of Italian institutions came into existence, the two most conspicuous, named after the Rhine and the Danube, holding their headquarters respectively at Heidelberg and Vienna.
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  • They spent one year at Paris, and two at Geneva, whence they removed to Heidelberg.
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  • After studying philology, philosophy and theology at Helmstadt, Jena, Giessen, Tubingen and Heidelberg, he travelled through Holland, France and England, where he became acquainted with the leading Reformers.
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  • In 1858 he became professor of physiology in Heidelberg, and in 1871 he was called to occupy the chair of physics in Berlin.
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  • After some stay at Dresden, hesitating between fixing himself as university teacher at Göttingen, Heidelberg or Berlin, he finally chose the last-mentioned.
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  • In 1828 he made inquiries about a chair at Heidelberg; and in 1830 he got a shortened Latin version of his physiological theory of colours inserted in the third volume of the Scriptores ophthalmologici minores (edited by Radius).
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  • Three years later he received a visit from his old college friend Bunsen, who was then staying in Heidelberg.
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  • In 1673 Spinoza received an invitation from the elector palatine to quit his retirement and become professor of philosophy in the university of Heidelberg.
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  • Hausrath in Neue Heidelberg.
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  • The boy's education was undertaken by his uncle Martin Maier, parish priest at Rothenburg on the Neckar, who sent him at the age of twelve to the university of Heidelberg, and subsequently to those of Tubingen, Cologne and Freiburg in the Breisgau.
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  • From 1875 till his death he was professor of theology of Heidelberg.
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  • He died at Heidelberg on the 6th of August 1909.
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  • Schaff's broad views strongly influenced the German Reformed Church, through his teaching at Mercersburg, through his championship of English in German Reformed churches and schools in America, through his hymnal (18J9), through his labours as chairman of the committee which prepared a new liturgy, and by his edition (1863) of the Heidelberg Catechism.
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  • He gained such a reputation as an Oriental scholar that the elector palatine in 1655 appointed him professor of Oriental languages and biblical criticism at Heidelberg.
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  • His SOD, JOHANN JAKOB HOTTINGER (1652-1735), who became professor of theology at Zurich in 1698, was the author of a work against Roman Catholicism, Helvetische Kirchengeschichte (4 vols., 1698-1729); and his grandson, JOHANN HEINRICH HOTTINGER (1681-1750), who in 1721 was appointed professor of theology at Heidelberg, wrote a work on dogmatics, Typus doctrinae christianae (1714).
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  • HEIDELBERG, a town of Germany, on the south bank of the Neckar, 12 m.
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  • Of these, the old bridge on the east, built in 1788, has a fine gateway and is adorned with statues of Minerva and the elector Charles Theodore of the Palatinate; the other, the lower bridge, on the west, built in 1877, connects Heidelberg with the important suburbs of Neuenheim and Handschuchsheim.
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  • Heidelberg is an important railway centre, and is connected by trunk lines with Frankfort, Mannheim, Karlsruhe, Spires and Wurzburg.
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  • The chief attraction of Heidelberg is the castle, which overhangs the east part of the town.
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  • In 1648, at the peace of Westphalia, Heidelberg was given back to Frederick V.'s son, Charles Louis, who restored the castle to its former splendour.
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  • In a cellar entered from the courtyard is the famous Great Tun of Heidelberg.
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  • On the terrace of the beautiful grounds is a statue of Victor von Scheffel, the poet of Heidelberg.
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  • The university of Heidelberg was founded by the elector Rupert I., in 1385, the bull of foundation being issued by Pope Urban VI.
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  • At the Reformation it became a stronghold of Protestant learning, the Heidelberg catechism being drawn up by its theologians.
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  • It was afterwards taken to Paris, and in 1815 was restored to Heidelberg.
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  • The manufactures of Heidelberg include cigars, leather, cement, surgical instruments and beer, but the inhabitants chiefly support themselves by supplying the wants of a large and increasing body of foreign permanent residents, of the considerable number of tourists who during the summer pass through the town, and of the university students.
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  • At an early period Heidelberg was a fief of the bishop of Worms, who entrusted it about 1225 to the count palatine of the Rhine, Louis I.
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  • Heidelberg was one of the great centres of the reformed teaching and was the headquarters of the Calvinists.
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  • In 1688 and again in 1693 Heidelberg was sacked by the French.
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  • On the 5th of March 1848 the Heidelberg assembly was held here, and at this meeting the steps were taken which led to the revolution in Germany in that year.
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  • 45f,4 Lorentzen, Heidelberg and Umgebung (Stuttgart, 1902); Durm, Das Heidelberger Schloss, eine Studie (Berlin, 1884); Koch and Seitz, Das Heidelberger Schloss (Darmstadt, 1887-1891); J.
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  • Hautz, Geschichte der Universiteit Heidelberg (1863-1864); A.
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  • Thorbecke, Geschichte der Universited Heidelberg (Stuttgart, 1886); the Urkundenbuch der Universiteit Heidelberg, edited by Winkelmann (Heidelberg, 1886); Bah:, Die Entfiihrung der Heidelberger Bibliothek nach Rom (Leipzig, 1845); and G.
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  • Heidelberg, Transvaal >>
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  • The number of matriculated students is usually greater in winter than in summer; the reason of the disproportion being that in the summer university towns having pleasant surroundings, such as Bonn, Heidelberg, Kiel and Jena, are more frequented.
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  • Having studied jurisprudence and political economy at the universities of Bonn, Heidelberg, Munich and Berlin, he entered the legal career at Cologne, and immediately devoted his attention to financial and commercial questions.
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  • Streitberg, Gotisches Elementarbuch (Heidelberg, 1897); Th.
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  • In 1855 he was appointed archivist at Breslau; in 1862 he became professor of history at Heidelberg, and ten years later professor at Berlin, where he was a member of the directing body of the Monumenta and a member of the Academy.
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  • Amongst others may be noted honorary degrees by the universities of Oxford, Dublin, Edinburgh, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Leiden and Bologna.
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  • He was educated at the university of Heidelberg, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and began to practise at Cincinnati.
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  • After studying at Erlangen, Berlin and Heidelberg from 1862 to 1866, he became in 1873 professor extraordinarius at Leipzig and eventually (1895) professor ordinarius at Göttingen.
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  • Four years later he was appointed professor of physics at Heidelberg, and in 1875 he was transferred to Berlin, where he died on the 17th of October 1887.
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  • In 1869 she went to Heidelberg, where she studied under H.
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  • He studied theology and philology at Heidelberg and later at Halle under Hermann Hupfeld, who persuaded him to include Arabic, Syriac and Egyptian.
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  • Entering the ministry in 1853, he was made vicar at Durlach soon afterwards, and became a licentiate in the theological faculty at Heidelberg.
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  • In 1854 he was appointed garrison-preacher at Mannheim; and in 1858 he was licensed to lecture at Heidelberg, where in 1861 he was made professor extraordinarius.
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  • He had no party views; the Heidelberg catechism, authoritative in Holland, he criticized.
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  • After being educated at Dusseldorf and at the universities of Bonn, Heidelberg and Berlin he went in 1823 to Paris, where he came under the influence of the great school of French geometers, whose founder, Gaspard Monge, was only recently dead.
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  • Having visited Heidelberg, Frankfort and other German cities, the embassy returned to England at the opening of 1620.
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  • After studying at Heidelberg, Bonn and Berlin, he graduated at Kiel in 1847, and in the following year went to France, where he was teacher of German at Laval and at Reims. His leisure was given to Oriental studies, in which he had made great progress in Germany, and in 1852 he joined Fresnel's archaeological expedition to Mesopotamia.
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  • But, if we are to judge from his own statement in a letter from Heidelberg in 1846, the doubts which now actively assailed him had long been latent in his mind.
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  • Having studied at the universities of Heidelberg and Leipzig, he went for a tour in Italy, on his return from which he lectured as Privatdozent in Heidelberg.
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  • Puwariu, Etymologisches W&terbuch der rumdnischen Sprache (Heidelberg, 1905, &c.) I.
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  • It was held in 1642 under the presidency of Peter of Mogila, and a formulary of the Orthodox creed was drawn up. An answer to the Lutheran Catechism of Heidelberg (translated into Rumanian and printed at Fogaras in 1648) was also prepared by Bishop Varlaam.
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  • Two years later biographical studies of Theodore Beza and Peter Martyr Vermili (Leben des Theodor de Beza and des Peter Martyr Vermili, Heidelberg, 1809) revealed more genuine scholarship. In 1812 appeared his History of the Iconoclastic Emperors of the East (Geschichte der bilderstiirmenden Kaiser des ostromischen Reichs), in which he controverted some points in Gibbon and sought to avoid painting the past in present-day colours.
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  • He left Frankfort in 1819 to become professor of history at Heidelberg, where he resided until his death on the 23rd of September 1861.
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  • See Fecht, Geschichte der Stadt Durlach (Heidelberg, 1869).
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  • Festung Frankenthal wdhrend des dreissigjahrigen Krieges (Heidelberg, 1877); Hildenbrand, Gesch.
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  • For the Greek Church: Pitra, Juris ecclesiae graecorum historia et monuments (Rome, 1864); the later history of the Greek law: Zachariae, Historiae juris graecorum delineatio (Heidelberg, 1839) Mortreuil, Histoire du droit byzantin (Paris, 1843-1846); the recent texts in the Conciliorum Collectio lacensis, vol.
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  • In 1817 he went to Germany, and met Hegel at Heidelberg.
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  • of Heidelberg, on the railway Frankfort-on-Main-Basel, and 39 m.
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  • neueren Geschichte (Heidelberg, 1905); Sievert, "Das Vorleben Papst Urbans IV."
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  • Before its close the Boers seized Heidelberg and established a republic; they destroyed a detachment of British troops at Bronkhorst Spruit; and they surrounded and attacked the British garrisons in the Transvaal.
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  • After studying theology at Leipzig, Göttingen and Tubingen, he became in 1885 professor ordinarius of systematic theology at Heidelberg, and in 1893 was called to Jena.
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  • 1848) was educated at Harvard and at Heidelberg, was a member of the editorial staff of the New York Tribune in 1871-1872 and of the American Cyclopaedia in 1872-1876, and in 1886 became the editor of Scribner's Magazine.
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  • 'HERMANN FRIEDRICH WILHELM HINRICHS (1794-1861), German philosopher, studied theology at Strassburg, and philosophy at Heidelberg under Hegel, who wrote a preface to his' Religion im innern Verhaltniss zur Wissenschaft (Heidelberg, 1722).
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  • - (I) Philosophical: Grundlinien der Philosophie der Logik (Halle, 1826); Genesis des Wissens (Heidelberg, 1835).
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  • The work was dedicated to Charles Louis, elector palatine, who created for Pufendorf at Heidelberg a new chair, that of the law of nature and nations, the first of the kind in the world.
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  • the Westminster Assembly's Shorter Catechism); but sometimes they have the glow of religious tenderness, like Luther's Lesser Catechism, or the Heidelberg Catechism.
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  • when Dr Max Wolf of Heidelberg photographically captured No.
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  • He went first to University College, London; at Heidelberg he worked at German; at Berlin he studied psychology, metaphysics and also physiology under du Bois-Reymond, and heard lectures on Hegel, Kant and the history of philosophy, ancient and modern.
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  • He graduated at Dickinson College in 1854, and in 1856 went to Germany and studied at Halle and Heidelberg.
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  • After being educated at Berlin, Heidelberg and Budapest, he entered the ministry of the interior for the purpose of studying technical and economical questions at the fountain-head, and soon became a specialist in agrarian matters.
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  • The "Heidelberg Catechism," however, emphatically declares that images are not to be tolerated at all in churches.
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  • LOUIS AUGUSTE SABATIER (1839-1901), French Protestant theologian, was born at Vallon (Ardeche), in the Cevennes, on the 22nd of October 1839, and was educated at the Protestant theological faculty of Montauban and the universities of Tubingen and Heidelberg.
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  • Kortiim, Geschichtliche Forschungen (Leipzig, 1863), and Zur Geschichte hellenischen Staatsverfassungen (Heidelberg, 1821); F.
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  • After studying law at Louvain, Bourges and Heidelberg, and travelling in France and Italy, Oldenbarneveldt settled down to practise in the law courts at the Hague.
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  • At eighteen he became a pupil of Heinrich Pestalozzi, and afterwards studied at Heidelberg.
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  • Thence he went to Berlin, earning a livelihood there, as in Heidelberg, by giving private lessons.
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  • He early ran away from home to avoid being set to his father's trade, and at Heidelberg was lucky enough to find a generous patron in Johann von Dalberg and a teacher in Agricola.
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  • jawbone found at Mauer, near Heidelberg, Germany.
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  • Astronomia nova (Heidelberg, 1609 ), 113 - 114; KGW 3, 177 - 178.
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  • Contact details are provided for the main laboratory in Heidelberg and the other outstations.
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  • JOHN JACOB ASTOR (1763-1848), American merchant, was born at the village of Walldorf, near Heidelberg, Germany, on the 7th of July 1763.
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  • Meanwhile he had also studied for short periods at Heidelberg and Berlin, and in 1847 he entered Manchester New College with the idea of becoming a minister like his father, and studied there under James Martineau.
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  • (Heidelberg and Leipzig, 1856-1857), was written by his brother Heinrich von Gagern.
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  • Leaving the service after the war, he studied jurisprudence at Heidelberg, Göttingen and Jena, and in 1819 went for a while to Geneva to complete his studies.
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  • At the Heidelberg meeting and the preliminary convention (Vorparlament) of Frankfort he deeply impressed the assemblies with the breadth and moderation of his views; with the result that when the German national parliament met (May 18), he was elected its first president.
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  • For its subsequent importance it was indebted to the elector Charles Philip, who, owing to ecclesiastical disputes, transferred his residence from Heidelberg to Mannheim in 1720.
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  • The first to attempt to define pitch would seem to have been Arnold Schlick (Musica ausgeteutscht and ausgezogen, Heidelberg, 1 511), who gives a measure, a line of 4s Rhenish inches, which, he says, multiplied sixteen times, should be the lowest F of a small organ.
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  • After studying at Marburg under Hermann Kolbe and at Heidelberg under Robert Bunsen, he came to England in 1862 and obtained a position in a chemical works at Widnes, where he elaborated the practical application of a method he had devised for recovering the sulphur lost as calcium sulphide in the black ash waste of the Leblanc alkali process.
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  • This theory has been supported by the investigations of Dr Klaatsch, of the university of Heidelberg, who would, however, date Australian ancestry still farther back, for his studies on the spot have convinced him that the Australians are " a generalized, not a specialized, type of humanity - that is to say, they are a very primitive people, with more of the common undeveloped characteristics of man, and less of the qualities of the specialized races of civilization."
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  • He entered the university of Ingoldstadt (March 26, 1515), and proceeded thence to the Dominican College, incorporated with the university, at Heidelberg.
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  • B, now in the Vatican, containing all the twenty plays preceded by the spurious Querolus; C, now at Heidelberg, containing the last twelve plays, i.e.
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  • Seidel, Die Kiiste and das Vorland der Togocolonie (Berlin, 1897), and Die Ewhesprache in Togo (Heidelberg, 1906); Schonhart, Volkstiimliches aus Togo (Dresden, 1909); R.
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  • See the autobiographical Aus dem Leben eines alien Professors (Leipzig and Darmstadt, 1848), to which was added in the year of his death Paralipomena der Lebenskizze eines alien Professors (Frankfort, 1858); also Starck, Friederich Kreuzer, sein Bildungsgang and seine bleibende Bedeutung (Heidelberg, 1875).
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  • The anonymous author of the Gesta (see Hagenmeyer's edition, Heidelberg, 1890) was a Norman of South Italy, who followed Bohemund, and accordingly depicts the progress of the First Crusade from a Norman point of view.
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  • The prince and princess entered Heidelberg on the 17th of June, and Elizabeth, by means of her English annuity, enjoyed five years of pleasure and of extravagant gaiety to which the small German court was totally unaccustomed.
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  • m.; Heidelberg, 2410 sq.
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  • ADOLPH HAUSRATH (1837-1909), German theologian, was born at Karlsruhe on the 13th of January 1837 and was educated at Jena, Göttingen, Berlin and Heidelberg, where he became Privatdozent in 1861, professor extraordinary in 1867 and ordinary professor in 1872.
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  • Dr Karl Stahlin's elaborate and scholarly Sir Francis Walsingham and seine Zeit (Heidelberg, vol.
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  • In 1618-19 the synod of Dort (see Dort, Synod Of), the thirteen Arminian pastors headed by Simon Episcopius being shut out, established the victory of the Calvinist school, drew up ninety-three canonical rules, and confirmed the authority of the Belgic Confession and the Heidelberg Catechism.
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  • In 1860 he went to Heidelberg, where he started a laboratory of his own, but returning to St Petersburg in 1861, he became professor of chemistry in the technological institute there in 1863, and three years later succeeded to the same chair in the university.
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  • After studying at Basel and Göttingen he was successively pastor at Schaffhausen (1841), professor of theology at Basel (1849); and at Heidelberg professor of theology (185r), director of the seminary and university preacher.
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  • Commentatio (Heidelberg, 1811); Finlay, History of Greece (vol.
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  • In 1885 he was chosen to succeed Hans Hubner (1837-1884) in the professorship of chemistry at Göttingen, where stereochemical questions especially engaged his attention; and in 1889, on the resignation of his old master, Bunsen, he was appointed to the chair of chemistry in Heidelberg.
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  • The son was educated at Phillips Academy, Exeter, at Harvard University, at Heidelberg, Göttingen and Berlin.
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  • The most celebrated public libraries are those of Berlin (i,ooo,ooo volumes and 30,000 MSS.); Munich (1,000,000 volumes, 40,000 MSS.); Heidelberg (563,000 volumes, 8ooo MSS.); Göttingen (503,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Strassburg (760,000 volumes); Dresden (500,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Hamburg (municipal library, 600,000 volumes, 5000 MSS.); Stuttgart (400,000 volumes, 3500 MSS.); Leipzig (universitylibrary, 500,000 volurries, 5000 MSS.); Wurzburg (350,000 volumes); TUbingen (340,000 volumes); Rostock (318,000 volumes); Breslau (university library, 300,000 volumes, 7000 MSS.); Freiburg-im-Breisgau (250,000 volumes); Bonn (265,000 volumes); and Konigsberg (230,000 volumes, I ioo MSS.).
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  • at Bamberg, Berlin (2), Bonn, Bothkamp in Schleswig, Breslau, Dhsseldorf, Gotha, Göttingen, Hamburg, Heidelberg, Jena Kiel, KOnigsberg, Leipzig, Munich, Potsdam, Strassburg and Wilhelmshaven.
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  • He studied theology at Göttingen, Berlin, Heidelberg and Munich, and was ordained priest in 1844.
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  • After some stay at Dresden, hesitating between fixing himself as university teacher at Göttingen, Heidelberg or Berlin, he finally chose the last-mentioned.
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  • See Oncken, Stadt, Schloss and Hochschule Heidelberg; Bilder aus ihrer Vergangenheit (Heidelberg, 1885); Ochelhauser, Das Heidelberger Schloss, bauand kunstgeschichtlicher Fi hrer (Heidelberg, 1902); Pfaff, Heidelberg and Umgebung (Heidelberg, 1902); ?.??'.??_??
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  • Amongst others may be noted honorary degrees by the universities of Oxford, Dublin, Edinburgh, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Leiden and Bologna.
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  • After studying at Erlangen, Berlin and Heidelberg from 1862 to 1866, he became in 1873 professor extraordinarius at Leipzig and eventually (1895) professor ordinarius at Göttingen.
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  • After studying theology at Leipzig, Göttingen and Tubingen, he became in 1885 professor ordinarius of systematic theology at Heidelberg, and in 1893 was called to Jena.
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  • Through the generosity of Pepsi, Heidelberg College students have access to up to $5,000 each year to fund undergraduate research and professional development.
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  • Lamb chops, veal shank, schweinebraten, spanferkel (roast suckling pig with dumpling), and leberkäse (veal loaf topped with egg, sauerkraut, and mashed potatoes) are just a few of the uncommon dishes on the menu at the Old Heidelberg restaurant.
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