Hecate sentence example

hecate
  • It is to be noted that Hecate plays little or no part in mythological legend.
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  • It is also given to Hecate (Tibullus 3.4.
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  • In older times Hecate is represented as single-formed, clad in 1 J.
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  • According to other versions of the legend, when saved from sacrifice Iphigeneia was transported to the island of Leuke, where she was wedded to Achilles under the name of Orsilochia (Antoninus Liberalis 27); or she was transformed by Artemis into the goddess Hecate (Pausanias _i.
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  • 5 She was sometimes identified with Hecate.
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  • In the case of Jason and the Argonauts, she plays the part of a kindly, good-natured fairy; Euripides, however, makes her a barbarous priestess of Hecate, while the Alexandrian writers depicted her in still darker colours.
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  • As a memorial of the miraculous interference, the Byzantines erected an altar to Torch-bearing Hecate, and stamped a crescent on their coins, a device which is retained by the Turks to this day.
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  • Hecate >>
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  • ' A considerable fragment of his epic Hecate has been discovered in the Rainer papyrus.
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  • Garlic was placed by the ancient Greeks on the piles of stones at cross-roads, as a supper for Hecate (Theophrastus, Characters, AECUISacµovias); and according to Pliny garlic and onions were invocated as deities by the Egyptians at the taking of oaths.
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  • A companion sanctuary of Hecate was constructed underground by Diocletian.
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  • The wonderfully productive halibut fisheries of Hecate Strait, which separates these islands from the mainland and its adjacent islands, have attracted the attention of fishing companies, and great quantities of this fish are taken regularly and shipped across the continent in cold storage.
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  • of Macedon, who dedicated it about zoo B.C. This avenue must have formed the usual approach for sacred embassies and processions; but it is probable that the space to the south was not convenient for marshalling them, since Nicias, on the occasion of his famous embassy, built a bridge from the island of Hecate (the Greater Rhevmatiari) to Delos, in order that the imposing Athenian procession might not miss its full effect.
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  • HECATE (Gr.
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  • According to the generally accepted view, she is of Hellenic origin, but Farnell regards her as a foreign importation from Thrace, the home of Bendis, with whom Hecate has many points in common.
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  • Hecate is frequently identified with Artemis, an identification usually justified by the assumption that both were moon-goddesses.
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  • Hecate is the chief goddess who presides over magic arts and spells, and in this connexion she is the mother of the sorceresses Circe and Medea.
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  • Like Artemis, Hecate is also a goddess of fertility, presiding especially over the birth and the youth of wild animals, and over human birth and marriage.
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  • 390, takes the Hesiodic Hecate to be a moon-goddess, daughter of the sun-god Perseus.
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  • Steuding in Roscher's Lexikon, where the functions of Hecate are systematically derived from the conception of her as a moon-goddess; L.
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  • It is suggested that this is due to the fact that, at the time of the adoption of the oriental goddess, the Greeks already possessed lunar divinities in Hecate, Selene, Artemis.
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  • The grateful Byzantines erected a statue to "torch-bearing" Hecate, and adopted the lunar crescent as the badge of the city.
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  • The idea dates from the 5th century, and was due to her connexion with Hecate and Apollo.
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  • In addition to the epitaph already mentioned, Proclus was the author of hymns, seven of which have been preserved (to Helios, Aphrodite, the Muses, the Gods, the Lycian Aphrodite, Hecate and Janus, and Athena), and of an epigram in the Greek Anthology (Anthol.
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  • the threefold Hecate) including h-w-t (cf.
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  • Farnell, who regards Artemis as originally an earth-goddess, while recognizing a "genuine lunar element" in Hecate from the 5th century, considers her a chthonian rather than a lunar divinity (see also Warr in Classical Review, ix.
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