Hebrides sentence example

hebrides
  • to assist in subduing the Hebrides Islands.
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  • The New Hebrides are under a mixed British and French commission.
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  • They left Callao on the 21st of December 1605, and in the following year discovered the island now known as Espiritu Santo, one of the New Hebrides group, which De Quiros, under the impression that it was indeed the land of which he was in search, named La Austrialia del Espiritu Santo.
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  • Except for a few species in the New Hebrides, New Caledonia and Fiji, the luminous Elateridae are unknown in the eastern hemisphere.
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  • They sailed from Callao in December 1605, and discovered several islands of the New Hebrides group. They anchored in a bay of a large island which Quiros named " Australia del Espiritu Santo."
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  • He visited the New Hebrides, Santa Cruz, New Caledonia and Solomon Islands, and made careful though rough surveys of the Louisiade Archipelago, islands north of New Britain and part of New Guinea.
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  • During the second voyage Cook visited Easter Island, discovered several islands of the New Hebrides and New Caledonia; and on his way home by Cape Horn, in March 1774, he discovered the Sandwich Island group and described South Georgia.
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  • COLONSAY, an island of the Inner Hebrides, Argyllshire, Scotland, io m.
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  • It is found also in the Isle of Pines, and in the New Hebrides.
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  • New Hebrides >>
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  • The general appearance of the islands is not unlike that of one of the outer Hebrides.
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  • In ancient Ireland a king's mantle was dyed with saffron, and even down to the 17th century the "lein-croich," or saffron-dyed shirt, was worn by persons of rank in the Hebrides.
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  • From this time onward Haakon's reign was marked by more peace and prosperity than Norway had known for many years, Until in 1263 a dispute with the Scottish king concerning the Hebrides, a Norwegian possession, induced Haakon to undertake an expedition to the west of Scotland.
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  • Somewhat similar legends are those of the island of Brazil, of Lyonnesse, the sunken land off the Cornish coast, of the lost Breton city of Is, and of Mayda or Asmaide - the French Isle Verte and Portuguese Ilha Verde or "Green Island" - which appears in many folk-tales from Gibraltar to the Hebrides, and until 1853 was marked on English charts as a rock in 44° 48' N.
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  • In Tonga, in the New Hebrides, and in the long chain of the Solomons and the Bismarck Archipelago there is much activity.
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  • the eastern Solomon Islands and the New Hebrides).
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  • Megapodes are found in the Solomon Islands, the New Hebrides, Samoa, Tonga, the Carolines and the Marianas.
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  • Quiros returned to Europe, and, obtaining command of a fleet, made a voyage in1605-1607during which he observed some of the Paumotu and Society Islands, and later discovered the small Duff group of the Santa Cruz Islands, passing thence to the main island of the New Hebrides, which he hailed as his objective, the southern continent.
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  • The French were now taking a share in the work of discovery, and in 1768 Louis Antoine de Bougainville sailed by way of the central Paumotus, the Society Islands, Samoa, the northern New Hebrides, the south coast of New Guinea and the Louisiade and Bismarck archipelagoes.
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  • Within the limits of the area under notice, his first voyage (1769) included visits to Tahiti and the Society group generally, to New Zealand and to the east coast of Australia, his second (1773-1774) to New Zealand, the Paumotu Archipelago, the Society Islands, Tonga and subsequently Easter Island, the Marquesas and the New Hebrides; and his third (1777-1778) to Tonga, the Cook or Norway group, and the Hawaiian Islands, of which, even if they were previously known to the Spaniards, he may be called the discoverer, and where he was subsequently killed.
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  • The provision for the joint influence of Great Britain and France over the New Hebrides (1906) brought these islands into some prominence owing to the hostile criticism directed against the British government both in Australia and at home.
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  • In 999 he went from Greenland to the court of King Olaf Tryggvason in Norway, stopping in the Hebrides on the way.
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  • Domesticated goats have run wild in many islands, such as the Hebrides, Shetland, Canaries, Azores, Ascension and Juan Fernandez.
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  • The chief islands of the Outer Hebrides are Lewis-with-Harris (or Long Island), North Uist, Benbecula, South Uist, Barra, the Shiants, St Kilda and the Flannan Isles, or Seven Hunters, an uninhabited group, about 20 M.
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  • The Inner Hebrides are much more scattered and principally include Skye, Small Isles (Canna, Sanday, Rum, Eigg and Muck), Coll, Tyree, Lismore, Mull, Ulva, Staffa, Iona, Kerrera, the Slate Islands (Seil, Easdale, Luing, Shuna, Torsay), Colonsay, Oronsay, Scarba, Jura, Islay and Gigha.
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  • C. Mackenzie, History of the Outer Hebrides (1903).
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  • In 1873 the "foreignlabour" traffic in plantation hands for Queensland and Fiji extended its baneful influence from the New Hebrides to these islands.
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  • The Hebrides >>
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  • In 1841 work was begun in New Caledonia, in 1842 in the Loyalty Isles and in the New Hebrides, associated from 1857 with the memorable name of John G.
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  • The latter fell in with an English man-of-war, the "Lion," and had to return to France; Charles escaped during the engagement, and at length arrived on the 2nd of August off Erisca, a little island of the Hebrides.
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  • During 6th and 7th centuries, Irish anchorites, in their "passion fc_ solitude," found their way to the Hebrides, Orkneys, Shetlands, Faroes and Iceland, but they were not interested in colonization or geographical knowledge.
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  • land"), the largest of a small group of about sixteen islets of the Outer Hebrides, Inverness-shire, Scotland.
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  • He had early read an account of the Hebrides, and had been much interested by learning that there was so near him a land peopled by a race which was still as rude and simple as in the Middle Ages.
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  • About the beginning of 1775 his Journey to the Hebrides was published, and was, during some weeks, the chief subject of conversation in all circles in which any attention was paid to literature.
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  • The improvement may be discerned by a skilful critic in the Journey to the Hebrides, and in the Lives of the Poets is so obvious that it cannot escape the notice of the most careless reader.
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  • It thus comprises all the insular groups which extend almost continuously from the south-eastern extremity of Asia to more than half-way across the Pacific. Its chief divisions are Malaysia with the Philippines; Australia with Tasmania and New Zealand; Melanesia, that is, New Guinea, New Britain, New Ireland, Admiralty, the Solomons, New Hebrides, Santa Cruz, Fiji, Loyalties and New Caledonia; Micronesia, that is, the Ladrones, Pelew and Carolines, with the Marshal] and Gilbert groups; lastly, Polynesia, that is, Samoa, Tonga, Cook, Tahiti, the Marquesas, Ellice, Hawaii and all intervening clusters.
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  • COLL, an island of the Inner Hebrides, Argyllshire, Scotland.
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  • SCOTLAND, the name given in modern times to that portion of Great Britain which lies north of the English boundary; it also comprises the Outer and Inner Hebrides and other islands off the west coast, and the Orkney and Shetland islands off the north coast.
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  • Where lava has been piled up in successive nearly horizontal sheets, with occasional layers of tuff or other softer rock between them, it offers conditions peculiarly favourable for the formation of escarpments, as in the wide basalt plateaus of the Inner Hebrides.
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  • Dispersed over all parts of the western Highlands, they are most numerous in the north-west, especially in the Outer Hebrides and in the west of the shires of Ross and Cromarty and Sutherland, where the surface of the Archean gneiss is so thickly sprinkled with them that many tracts consist nearly as much of water as of land.
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  • In this view the Outer and Inner Hebrides were formerly one with themselves and the mainland, and the western isles therefore are truly grouped with the Highland province of Scotland.
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  • Looked at in the broadest way, these numerous islands may be regarded as belonging to two groups or series, the Outer and the Inner Hebrides.
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  • In the Outer Hebrides most of the ground is low, rocky and plentifully dotted over with lakes; but it rises into mountainous heights in Harris, some of the summits attaining elevations of 2600 ft.
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  • The Inner Hebrides form a much less definite group. They may be regarded as beginning with the Shiant Isles in the Minch and stretching to the southern headlands of Islay, and their irregularity has no doubt been chiefly brought about by the remarkable diversity of geological structure.
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  • Above the highest Secondary rocks on the west coast come terraced plateaus of basalt, which spread out over wide areas in Skye, Eigg, 1VIull and Morven, and form most of the smaller islets of the chain of the Inner Hebrides.
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  • STAFFA (Norse for staff, column, or pillar island), an island of the Inner Hebrides, Argyllshire, Scotland, S4 m.
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  • 4 It is the "Fasgadair" of the Hebrides, the "Shooi" of the Shetlands, and the "Scouti-allen" of the fishermen on the east coast of Scotland.
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  • Baraey, isle of the ocean), an island of the outer Hebrides, Inverness-shire, Scotland.
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  • On Barra Head, the highest point of Berneray, and also the most southerly point of the outer Hebrides chain, is a lighthouse 680 ft.
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  • JURA (” deer island "), an island of the inner Hebrides, the fourth largest of the group, on the west coast of Argyllshire, Scotland.
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  • The surface is mountainous and the island is the most rugged of the Hebrides.
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  • of New Guinea, the Louisiade, Solomon, Santa Cruz, New Hebrides and Loyalty islands, New Caledonia, Fiji and intervening small groups.
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  • Four-horned sheep are common in Iceland and the Hebrides; the small half-wild breed of Soa often showing this reduplication.
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  • It breeds in no small numbers in the Hebrides, and parts of the Scottish Highlands from Argyllshire to Sutherland, as well as in the more elevated or more northern districts of Norway, Sweden and Finland, and probably also thence to Kamchatka.
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  • He proceeded across the Pacific Ocean by way of the Samoan group, which he named the Navigators Islands, the New Hebrides and the Solomon Islands.
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  • It is also applied to the strait between Mallicollo and Espiritu Santo Islands of the New Hebrides group, and the South American climbing plant Bougainvillea, often cultivated in greenhouses, is named after him.
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  • In other places they wave green branches, and on the south coast, pour water over their heads, a custom noticed by Cook at Mallicolo (New Hebrides).
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  • His realm was, however, threatened by dangers from without, as large numbers of his opponents had taken refuge, not only in Iceland, then recently discovered, but also in the Orkneys, Shetlands, Hebrides and Faeroes, and in Scotland itself; and from these winter quarters sallied forth to harry Norway as well as the rest of northern Europe.
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  • The flora has also some Australian and New Zealand affinities (resembling in this respect the New Caledonia and New Hebrides groups), shown especially in these western districts by the Pandanus, by certain acacias and others.
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  • In this contest the Firbolgs were overthrown with great slaughter, and the remnants of the race according to Keating and other writers took refuge in Arran, Islay, Rathlin and the Hebrides, where they dwelt until driven out by Picts.
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  • At any rate it is with her that the sacred fire at Kildare which burnt almost uninterruptedly until the time of the Reformation was associated; and she was commonly invoked in the Hebrides, and until quite recently in Donegal, to secure good crops.
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  • Sandals and shoes of bronze are mentioned in Irish literature, and quite a number are to be seen in museums. A loose flowing garment, intermediate between the brat and lend, usually of linen dyed saffron, was commonly worn in outdoor life, and was still used in the Hebrides about 1700.
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  • In the New Hebrides, Tagar takes the role of Qat, and Suqe of the bad principle, Loki, Ahriman, Tangaro Loloqong, the Australian Crow and so forth.
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  • The Ahts, however, differ but little in their mythological beliefs from the races of the Banks Islands or of the New Hebrides.
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  • In 1784 he accompanied Faujas St Fond in his journey to the Western Isles, and in the English translation of the Travels in England, Scotland and the Hebrides (1799) Smithson is spoken of as "M.
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  • archipelago of islands at the southern tip of the Outer Hebrides of Scotland.
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  • distilleryde for the whiskey enthusiast covers the distilleries of the Hebrides and the west coast of Scotland.
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  • islands in the inner Hebrides, 2006 A variety of cruises on Weaver, Alcuin, and other boats.
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  • John Paton was a great pioneer missionary who devoted himself to sharing the gospel with the cannibals of the New Hebrides in the Pacific.
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  • He had been living there since childhood and we had a long natter about life in general and existence in the Hebrides.
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  • pioneer missionary who devoted himself to sharing the gospel with the cannibals of the New Hebrides in the Pacific.
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  • There, like the waves about the Hebrides, the low underwood is agitated continually.
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  • Somewhat similar legends are those of the island of Brazil, of Lyonnesse, the sunken land off the Cornish coast, of the lost Breton city of Is, and of Mayda or Asmaide - the French Isle Verte and Portuguese Ilha Verde or "Green Island" - which appears in many folk-tales from Gibraltar to the Hebrides, and until 1853 was marked on English charts as a rock in 44° 48' N.
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  • The population of the Hebrides in 1901 numbered 78,947 (or 28 to the sq.
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  • Unhappily, a few months after the appearance of the Journey to the Hebrides, Johnson did what none of his envious assailants could have done, and to a certain extent succeeded in writing himself down.
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  • c.celticus) of Iceland, the Hebrides, &c., and the wild pony of Mongolia (E.
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  • Passing through the New Hebrides group he touched at Batavia, and arrived at St Malo after an absence of two years and four months.
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  • of Tonga and nearly midway between the New Hebrides and Tahiti, 1600 m.
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  • In 1154 the diocese of Sodor was formed to include the Hebrides and other islands west of Scotland.
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  • It is caught on all parts of the British and Irish coasts, but the Dogger Bank, and Rockall, off the Outer Hebrides, have been specially noted for their codfisheries.
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  • There were occasional native risings, as in Samoa (where, however, the fighting was rather in the nature of civil warfare), the French possessions in eastern Polynesia, and the New Hebrides, apart from attacks on individual settlers or visitors, which have occurred here and there from the earliest period of exploration.
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  • They have been broadly classified into the Outer Hebrides and the Inner Hebrides, the Minch and Little Minch dividing the one group from the other.
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  • The Outer Hebrides being almost entirely composed of gneiss the epithet suitably serves them, but, strictly speaking, only the more northerly of the Inner Hebrides may be distinguished as Trap Islands.
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  • The annual rainfall, particularly in the Inner Hebrides, is heavy (42.6 in.
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  • The Hebrides are mentioned by Ptolemy under the name of "E330uSat and by Pliny under that of Hebudes, the modern spelling having, it is said, originated in a misprint.
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  • By arrangement with the Presbyterians the area of the mission includes the Northern New Hebrides, Banks, Torres, Santa Cruz and Solomon Islands.
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  • SMALL ISLES, a parish of islands of the Inner Hebrides, Inverness-shire, Scotland.
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  • THE HEBRIDES, or Western Isles, a group of islands off the west coast of Scotland.
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  • During the remarkable voyage he then made to Timor, Bligh passed amongst the northern islands of the New Hebrides, which he named the Banks Group, and made several running surveys.
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  • (1898); John Macculloch's Geological Account of the Hebrides (1819); Hugh Miller's Cruise of the " Betsy" (1858); W.
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  • Smith's Lewisiana, or Life in the Outer Hebrides (1874); Alexander Smith, A Summer in Skye (1865); Robert Buchanan, The IJebrid Isles (1883); C. F.
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  • Magnus, son of Haakon, concluded in 1266 a peace with the Scots, renouncing all claim to the Hebrides and other islands except Orkney and Shetland, and Alexander III.
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  • Pennant's Tour in Scotland and Voyage to the Hebrides (1774); James Boswell's Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, LL.D.
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  • Mention is made of incursions of the vikings as early as 793, but the principal immigration took place towards the end of the 9th century in the early part of the reign of Harald Fairhair, king of Norway, and consisted of persons driven to the Hebrides, as well as to Orkney and Shetland, to escape from his tyrannous rule.
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  • Gordon-Cumming, In the Hebrides (1883); Report of the Crofters' Commission (1884); A.
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  • About the year 1095 Godred Crovan, king of Dublin, Man and the Hebrides, died in Islay.
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  • Soon afterwards they began to make incursions against their mother-country, and on this account Harald fitted out an expedition against them, and placed Orkney, Shetland, the Hebrides and the Isle of Man under Norwegian government.
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