This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

hay

hay

hay Sentence Examples

  • Grabbing an armful of the hay they had packed around the supplies in each wagon, she dropped it on the sand and the mules eagerly began devouring it.

  • The bay wandered up and nibbled at the hay.

  • I'll get you some hay.

  • She pulled a handful of hay from under the tarp and fed it to the horse.

  • When the tines get full of hay, you lift it.

  • If you dump them evenly you have rows of hay.

  • I thought maybe that was what you were trying to tell me that day at the hay field.

  • I could see a man and a boy some distance away, pitching hay into a horse drawn wagon.

  • What does Howie have to do with ironing clothes and reaping hay?

  • Look what he dreamt; a woman ironing shirts, a child playing, a cat and a farmer pitching hay.

  • The structure was just under seventy feet long and about twelve feet high; said to be the height designed to accommodate a wagon fully loaded with hay.

  • Next, a head but scattered hay was the only thing in sight.

  • But Ryland's personal knowledge of her was limited to a couple rolls in the hay a dozen years ago.

  • The goats were going to need more hay and alfalfa pellets.

  • She forked some hay into each of the stalls and checked the herd again.

  • She checked the first stall to see if more hay was needed and called instructions without looking in his direction.

  • No hay needed here.

  • She plucked a piece of twine from the hay on the floor.

  • She opened the gate for Alex and he deposited the goat on the hay.

  • In the hay beside their mother, lay two tiny bodies, soft and clean.

  • Falling asleep in the hay.

  • Alex had broken the ice off the top of the water trough by the time she got there and every stall was filled with fresh hay.

  • Carmen worked at the hay with the toe of her boot.

  • Did you put some more hay in her stall?

  • Carmen was scooping hay out of one of the kidding stalls when he found her at the barn.

  • He took a tumble in the hay with the farmers' daughter.

  • Of all the... do you actually think I traveled six hundred miles just for a tumble in the hay with you?

  • Alex paused at the hay pile and sat down, cross-legged, while he examined a chart.

  • "Thanks," she said, and dropped to the hay beside him.

  • The barn smelled of fresh hay, oats and molasses.

  • She dropped back on the hay and wrinkled her nose at him.

  • If she were willing to take that tumble in the hay, he'd hang around a while longer?

  • She cut the strings and pulled a few leaves from a new bale of alfalfa hay.

  • As she lifted the hay and turned, a figure moved in the hay on the floor.

  • He pushed up from the floor and brushed hay from his clothes.

  • She handed Ed a clump of hay and he delicately plucked it from her fingers.

  • She was surprised to see him with Lori, rolling in the hay - and there was no question about what was going on this time.

  • The smell of alfalfa came from a stack of hay in the corner.

  • She darted for the door and tripped over a piece of twine, plunging to the hay.

  • Josh remained sitting in the hay, staring at her as if confused by her response.

  • Her knees were suddenly weak and she grabbed a pole, sliding down to sit in the hay.

  • At first she didn't see the white form in the hay.

  • A grown woman playing in the hay with a lamb – all dressed up.

  • She stood and brushed the hay from her clothes.

  • A long wobbly form was standing in the fresh hay.

  • She pealed off a couple of leaves of hay and threw them into Ed's stall.

  • She grabbed more hay and stepped around the buggy Alex was restoring for her - a surrey with a fringe on top? exactly like she had always wanted.

  • At the barn, Carmen fed and watered Brutus and threw some hay to the cow.

  • His temper was free and running and she tried to do the same, but he caught her and threw her on the hay.

  • He dived into the hay after her and she twisted away.

  • He tossed in some fresh alfalfa hay and glanced around the barn.

  • Then she threw a leaf of alfalfa hay into her stall.

  • She left the tack room door open while she stacked the newest delivery of hay.

  • He watched her lift a bale of hay and step up on the pile.

  • Lifting it, he stepped up on the pile of hay and tossed the bale on top, straightening it before stepping down.

  • Finally he brushed the hay from his shirt and jeans, his gaze downcast as he spoke.

  • He glanced at the hay.

  • He nodded, reaching for another bale of hay.

  • Aaron and Rob helped her unsaddle the horses and get them into stalls with hay and water.

  • They were alone so she announced her plans for the hay ride and barbeque.

  • Is this about the hay ride and barbeque?

  • He pretended not to be listening when Carmen announced a barbeque and hay ride for Sunday evening.

  • He bought some battery powered lights to hang on the wagon and Gerald helped him pile hay on the wagon.

  • The hay ride across the field with bison grazing was exciting.

  • She forked some hay to Princes and leaned the pitchfork against the wall near the door.

  • The surface is to be afterwards covered with hay or litter.

  • In 1909 the acreage of hay alone was 675,000 acres, and the crop was 844,000 tons, valued at $11,225,000.

  • A fire without light, compared to the heat which gathers in a haystack when the hay has been stored before it was properly dry - heat, in short, as an agitation of the particles - is the motive cause of the contraction and dilatations of the heart.

  • A Buke of the Conqueror Alexander the Great by Sir Gilbert Hay (fl.

  • Hay is made of the native prairie grasses, which grow luxuriantly.

  • As the tableland runs northward it decreases both in height and width, until it narrows to a few miles only, with an elevation of scarcely 1500 ft.; under the name of the Blue Mountains the plateau widens again and increases in altitude, the chief peaks being Mount Clarence(4000 ft.), Mount Victoria (3525 ft.), and Mount Hay (3270 ft.).

  • Other important crops grown are - maize, 324,000 acres; oats, 493,000 acres; other grains, 160,000 acres; hay, 1,367,000 acres; potatoes, 119,000 acres; sugar-cane, 141,000 acres; vines, 65,000 acres; and other crops, 422,000 acres.

  • Hay and forage are the most important crops, and Vermont grasses for grazing have been favourably known since the close of the 18th century.

  • In 1909 on 879,000 acres a crop of hay (excluding forage) was raised valued at $16,155,000.

  • The natural grass meadows are extensive, and hay is grown all over the country, but especially in the P0 valley.

  • These enenlies are as a rule so conspicuous that we do not look on their depredations as diseases, though the gradual deterioration of hay under the exhausting effects of root-parasites like Rhinanthus, and the onslaught of Cuscuta when unduly abundant, should teach us how unimportant to the definition the question of size may be.

  • In 1900, 88.9% of its farm acreage was devoted to hay and forage crops, being more than doubled in the decade.

  • 2 The value of the different kinds of agricultural products for 1899 was as follows: live stock, $4,373,973; hay and grain, $1,535,914; dairy produce, $385,220; vegetables, $216,600; fruits, $20,900.

  • After unsuccessful attempts to rid themselves of the mice, the farmers appealed to the United States Biological Survey, and alfalfa hay poisoned with strychnia sulphate was used successfully in the Humboldt Valley in January 1908 and in the Carson Valley, where a similar plague threatened, in April 1908.5 Minerals.

  • The principal crops are cotton, Indian corn, tobacco, hay, wheat, sweet potatoes, apples and peanuts.

  • The hay and forage crop increased from 80,528 tons in 1879 to 246,820 tons in 1899; and in 1909 the hay crop was 242,000 tons.

  • Various kinds of fodder crops are grown in Transcaucasia, such as hay, rye-grass and lucerne.

  • They were fed with hay during the annual inundation, and at other times tethered in meadows of green clover.

  • Lupine, beans, peas and vetches were grown for fodder, and meadows, often artificially watered, supplied hay.

  • It is best to mow stubble and hay at night when they are moist."

  • The meadow-land was also divided into strips from which the various holders drew their supply of hay.

  • In the absence of artificial grasses and roots, hay was very valuable; it constituted almost the only winter food for live stock, which were consequently in poor condition in spring.

  • And vndoubted, that hay and strawe that will find one beest in the house wyll finde two beestes in the close, and better they shall lyke.

  • " Clouer grasse, or the grasse honey suckle " (white clover), is directed to be sown with other hay seeds.

  • The great losses arising from spoilt hay crops served to stimulate experimental inquiry into the method of preserving green fodder known as ensilage, with the result that the system eventually became successfully incorporated in the ordinary routine of agricultural practice.

  • A contemporaneous effort in the direction of drying hay by artificial means led to nothing of practical importance.

  • The hay crop was very inferior, and in some cases it was practically ruined.

  • This gave a stimulus to the trade in imported hay, which rose from 61,237 tons in 1892 to 263,050 tons in 1893, and despite some large home-grown crops in certain subsequent years (1897 and 1898) this expansion has never since been wholly lost.

  • The hot drought of 1893 extended over the spring and summer months, but there was an abundant rainfall in the autumn; correspondingly there was an unprecedentedly bad yield of corn and hay crops, but a moderately fair yield of the main root crops (turnips and swedes).

  • The drought of 1898 was interrupted by copious rains in June, and these falling on a warm soil led to a rapid growth of grass and, as measured by yield per acre, an exceedingly heavy crop of hay.

  • Similar details for potatoes, roots and hay, brought together in Table VIII., show that the TABLE VIII.-Estimated Annual Total Produce of Potatoes, Roots and Hay in the United Kingdom, 1890-1905-Thousands of Tons.

  • Under hay are included the produce of clover, sainfoin and rotation grasses, and also that of permanent meadow.

  • The effects of a prolonged [[Table Ix]].-Estimated Annual Average Yield per Acre of Crops in spring and summer drought, like that of 1893, are exemplified in the circumstance that four corn crops and the two hay crops all registered very low average yields that year, viz.

  • wheat 26�08 bushels, barley 2 9.3 o bushels, oats 38.14 bushels, beans 19.61 bushels, rotation hay 23.55 cwt., permanent hay 20.41 cwt.

  • On the other hand, the season of 1898 was exceptionally favourable to cereals and to hay.

  • The hay made from clover, sainfoin and grasses under rotation generally gives a bigger average yield than that from permanent grass land.

  • of hay from temporary grass, and 29 cwt.

  • of hay from permanent grass.

  • Again, although from the richest old permanent meadow-lands very heavy crops of hay are taken season after season, the general average yield of permanent grass is about 3 cwt.

  • of hay per acre less than that from clover, sainfoin and grasses under rotation.

  • In 1882, at Reading, a gold medal was given for a cream separator for horse power, whilst a prize of roo guineas offered for the most efficient and most economical method of drying hay or corn crops artificially, either before or after being stacked, was not awarded.

  • In 1888, at Nottingham, hay and straw presses for steam-power, horse-power and handpower were the subjects of competition.

  • There is a great variety of produce, but the principal crops are Indian corn, wheat, oats, hay, potatoes, apples and tobacco.

  • quarter ranks highest in the production of hay.

  • It was not long, however, before the stock-feeder in the South found that cotton seed hulls were an excellent substitute for hay.

  • In 1907-8, according to the state Department of Agriculture, the total value of all field crops (cotton, cereals, sugar-cane, hay and forage, sweet potatoes, &c.) was $11,856,340, and the total value of all farm products (including live stock, $20,817,804, poultry and products, $1,688,433, and dairy products, $1,728,642) was $46,371,320.

  • Before his time there were no reports of admiralty cases, except Hay and Marriott's prize decisions.

  • The principal products are corn, oats, barley, potatoes, rye, beetroot, hemp, flax, hay and other fodder.

  • In this festival Pales was invoked to grant protection and increase to flocks and herds; the shepherds entreated forgiveness for any unintentional profanation of holy places of which their flocks might have been guilty, and leaped three times across bonfires of hay and straw (Ovid, Fasti, iv.

  • Robert Hay Drummond, 1761-1776.

  • From 1741 to 1747 he lived with Lord Blantyre and Mr Hay of Drummelzier at Utrecht, and made excursions in Flanders, France and Germany.

  • Besides Garfield, John Hay and Marcus A.

  • Other important crops in the order of their value are oats, hay and forage, Indian corn, barley, flax-seed, potatoes, rye, grass seeds, wild grass, clover, beans, peas, and miscellaneous vegetables and orchard products.

  • It lives entirely away from houses, commonly taking up its abode in wheat or hay fields, where it builds a round grass nest about the size of a cricket-ball, in which it brings up its young.

  • A truss of straw contains 36 lb, of old hay 56 lb, of new hay 60 lb.

  • The crops raised in the country districts are principally vegetables and fruit, potatoes, hay, oats, rye and wheat.

  • This is known as cake saffron to distinguish it from hay saffron, which consists merely of the dried stigmas.

  • The survival of names of obliterated physical features or characteristics is illustrated in Section I.; but additional instances are found in the Strand, which originally ran close to the sloping bank of the Thames, and in Smithfield, now the central meat market, but for long the " smooth field " where a cattle and hay market was held, and the scene of tournaments and games, and also of executions.

  • Smithfield Hay Market.

  • Of other markets, the Whitechapel Hay Market and Borough Market, Southwark, are under the control of trustees; and Woolwich Market is under the council of that borough.

  • He planted his ordnance on Hay Hill, and then marched by St James's Palace to Charing Cross.

  • There are large copper-smelting establishments in the city, which exports a very large amount of copper, some gold and silver, and cattle and hay to the more northern provinces.

  • In the same year the chief crops were oats, barley, rye, wheat, potatoes and hay.

  • The principal exports are wines, especially champagne, spirits, hay, straw, wool, potatoes, woven goods, fruit, glass-ware, lace and metal-ware.

  • Sir John Hay Athole Macdonald >>

  • (valued at $7,717,000); the acreage under hay was 618,000, the crop being 587,000 tons and its value $6,985,000.

  • The superior qualities of the soil, together with the usually warm and moist months of spring and summer, make Iowa one of the foremost states of the Union in agriculture and stock-raising, especially in the production of Indian corn, oats, hay and eggs, and in the raising of hogs, horses, dairy cows and poultry.

  • In total acreage of cereals (16,920,095 in 1899) it ranked first (Twelfth Census of the United States), and in product of cereals was exceeded by Illinois only; in acreage of hay and forage (4,649,378 in 1899) as well as in the annual supply of milk (535,872,240 gallons in 1899) it was exceeded by New York only.

  • and N.W., spring wheat most largely in the N.W., barley mostly in the N., flax-seed and prairie hay in the N.E.

  • The leading crops and their percentages of the total crop value were hay and forage (39.1%), vegetables (23.9%), fruits and nuts (11.7%), forest products (8.4%), and flowers and plants (7.1%).

  • The value of farms on which dairying was the chief source of income in 1900 was 46% of the total farm value of the state; the corresponding percentages for livestock, vegetables, hay and grain, flowers and plants, fruit and tobacco, being respectively 14.6, 10 2, 8 o, 4.2, 3.2, and 1 8%.

  • The principal granite quarries are in Milford, ' The yield of cereals and of such other crops in 1907 as are recorded in the Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture was as follows: Indian corn, 1,584,000 bushels; oats, 245,000 bushels; barley, 64,000 bushels; buckwheat, 42,000 bushels; potatoes, 3,600,000 bushels; hay, 760,000 tons; tobacco, 7,167,500 lb.

  • He was appointed, by President McKinley, ambassador to Great Britain to succeed John Hay in 1899, and remained in this position until the spring of 1905.

  • Although New York has lost in the competition with the Western States in the production of most of the grains, especially wheat and barley, and in the production of wool, mutton and pork, it has made steady progress in the dairy business and continues to produce great crops of hay.

  • Of the total acreage of all crops, 5,154,965 acres (54.1%) were of hay and 3,125,077 acres (32.8%) were of cereals.

  • In 1909 the amount of the hay crop (5,002,000 tons) was greater than that of any other state except Iowa, and its value ($71,028,000) was greater than in any other state.

  • The dairy business and the production of hay are especially prominent in the rugged region W.

  • The valley and delta of the Vistula are very fertile, and produce good crops of wheat and pasturage for horses, cattle and sheep. Besides cereals, the chief crops are potatoes, hay, tobacco, garden produce, fruit and sugar-beet.

  • Western Washington has large hay crops; in the E.

  • Great quantities of hay are harvested.

  • Of the total acreage of all crops in 18 99, 8 75,7 12 acres, or 76%, were hay and forage, and 254,231 acres, or 22.1%, were cereals; of the cereal acreage 52.7% was oats, 36.

  • Shortly after this, More Work for Cooper, a sequel to Hay any Worke, was begun at Manchester, but while it was in progress the press was seized.

  • The hay acreage was 536,000 and the production, 804,000 tons.

  • Hay and grain formed the principal source of income of 88.4% of the farms, live-stock of 6.7% and dairy produce of 2.6%.

  • Other important crops are oats ($16,368,000 in 1906) barley ($8,913,000), hay, potatoes, rye and Indian corn.

  • It is in the Illinois coal region, and coal-mining is the most important industry; the city is also a shipping point for hay and grain grown in the vicinity.

  • The hay and forage crop of 1899 (exclusive of corn-stalks) grew on 374,848 acres.

  • A seven years' war followed, in which an English legion under Sir George de Lacy Evans and a naval force under Lord John Hay took part.

  • Hay and forage, the fourth in value of the state's crops in 1899, were grown on 683,139 acres and amounted to 776,534 tons, valued at $6,100,647; in 1909 the acreage of hay was 480,000 and the crop of 653,000 tons was valued at $7,771,000.

  • P. Hay, Proc. U.S. Nat.

  • Hay is the principal crop; in 1909 the acreage was 640,000 acres and the yield was 621,000 tons.

  • The value of the poultry and egg product of 1899 was $1,824,399, which was more than twice that of the cereals and nearly one-third of that of the hay and forage.

  • The valley of the Merrimac is the leading section for the production of hay, small fruits and dairy products.

  • Of the best hay and pasture grasses, Agropyrum Elymus, Stipa, Bromus, Agrostis, Calamagrostes and Poa, there are 59 species.

  • In 1907 the area under oats in Ontario was 2,932,509 acres and yielded 83,524,301 bushels, the area being almost as large as that of the acreage under hay and larger than the combined total of the other principal cereals grown in the province.

  • Hay, of good quality of timothy (Phleum pratense), and also of timothy and clover, is grown over extensive areas.

  • Since 1899 a new form of pressing has been employed, whereby the hay is compressed to stow in about 70 cub.

  • The compact condition permits the hay to be kept with less deterioration of quality than under the old system of more loose baling.

  • Austrian brome grass (Bromus inermis) and western rye grass (Agropyrum tenerum) are both extensively grown for hay in the North-West Provinces.

  • Throughout other parts bullocks are fed on pasture land, and also in stables on nourishing and succulent feed such as hay, Indian corn fodder, Indian corn silage, turnips, carrots, mangels, ground oats, barley, peas, Indian corn, rye, bran and linseed oil cake.

  • Hay fever >>

  • In 1906, according to the Year-Book of the Department of Agriculture, the following were the acreages, yields and values of Alabama's more important crops (excepting cotton): - Indian corn, 2,990,387 acres, 47, 8 49,39 2 bushels, $30,623,611; wheat, 98,639 acres, 1,085,029 bushels, $1,019,927; oats, 184,179 acres, 3,167,879 bushels, $1,615,618; hay, 5 6, 35 o acres, 109,882 tons, $1,461,431.

  • It is used in the arts for weighting cotton fabrics, as a topdressing for clover hay in agriculture, and in dyeing.

  • Rio is also a distributing centre in the coasting trade, and many imported products, such as jerked beef (came secca), hay, flour, wines, &c., appear among the coastwise exports, as well as domestic manufactures.

  • Ogley Hay, the parish of which partly covers Brownhills, is a large adjoining village; there are also Great Wyrley and Norton-under-Cannock or Norton Canes to the N.W.

  • They hay e large heads, projecting incisors, no ears, almost functionless eyes and moderately long tails; the skin, with the exception of a few hairs on the body and frinr-es on the feet, being naked.

  • Histories; McCrie's Life of Melville; Hay Fleming's Mary, Queen of Scots; Bannatyne's Memorials.

  • The roof was highpitched and covered with straw, hay, reeds or tiles.

  • Hay, Indian corn, wheat, oats, potatoes, fruits, vegetables and tobacco are the principal crops.

  • Of the total crop acreage in 1899 nearly two-fifths was devoted to hay and forage, and the value of the hay crop in 1909 1 (when the crop was 3,74 2, 000 tons, valued at $54,633,000) was greater than that of any other state in the Union except New York.

  • Hay is grown in largest quantities in the north, and in the section south-east of Blue Mountain.

  • The dairy business, for which much of the hay crop is needed, has grown with the growth of the urban population as is shown in part by a steady increase in the number of dairy cows from 530,224 in 1850 to 1,140,000 in 1910; the value of the dairy products in 1899 ($35,86 0, 110) was exceeded only in New York.

  • Hay Fleming, Mary Stuart (2nd ed.

  • For a quarter of the year the flocks and herds are fed on the upper pastures; but the true limit of the wealth of a district is the number of animals that can be supported during the long winter, and while one part of the population is engaged in tending the beasts and in making cheese and butter, the remainder is busy cutting hay and storing up winter food for the cattle.

  • The hay or leaf mulching on the strawberry beds should be removed and the ground deeply hoed (if not removed in April in the more forward places), after which it may be placed on again to keep the fruit clean and the ground from drying.

  • - Strawberry beds should be covered (in cold sections) with hay, straw or leaf mulching, to a depth not exceeding 2 in.

  • Cover up onions, spinach, sprouts, cabbage or lettuce plants with a covering of 2 or 3 in of leaves, hay,.

  • In sections where it is an advantage to protect grape vines, raspberries, &c., from severe frost, these should be laid down as close to the ground as possible, and covered with leaves, straw or hay, or with a few inches of soil.

  • A force of 100 Hausa, with three white men (Captain Bishop, Mr Ralph and Dr Hay), was left behind in Kumasi fort with rations to last three weeks.

  • When the ambassadors of the senate in treating for peace tried to terrify him with their hints of what the despairing citizens might accomplish, he gave with a laugh his celebrated answer, "The thicker the hay, the easier mowed!"

  • Altogether nearly 16 million acres of Russian Poland, or almost one-half of the total area, are under crops, principally rye, oats, wheat, barley, potatoes and hay, with some flax, hemp, peas, buckwheat and hops.

  • The chief crops are rye, oats, wheat, potatoes and hay.

  • grain of all sorts, hay, wood and the like; mixed, or arising from things immediately nourished by the ground, e.g.

  • corn, hay and wood; or little, which embraced all others.

  • JOHN HAY (1838-1905), American statesman and author, was born at Salem, Indiana, on the 8th of October 1838.

  • Hay was secretary of the U.S. legation at Paris in 1865-1867, at Vienna in1867-1869and at Madrid in 1869-1870.

  • Upon the inauguration of President McKinley in 1897 Hay was appointed ambassador to Great Britain, from which post he was transferred in 1898 to that of secretary of state, succeeding W.

  • John Hay was a man of quiet and unassuming disposition, whose training in diplomacy gave a cool and judicious character to his statesmanship. As secretary of state under Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt his guidance was invaluable during a rather critical period in foreign affairs, and no man of his time did more to create confidence in the increased interest taken by the United States in international matters.

  • Hay was an excellent public speaker; some of his best addresses are In Praise of Omar; On the Unveiling of the Bust of Sir Walter Scott in Westminster Abbey, May 21, 1897; and a memorial address in honour of President McKinley.

  • The best of his previously unpublished speeches appeared in Addresses of John Hay (1906).

  • Hay, Australia >>

  • Should the work be finished as directed by August, a good crop of hay may be reaped in the succeeding summer.

  • The points which require constant attention are - the perfect freedom of all carriers, feeders and drains from every kind of obstruction, however minute; the state and amount of water in the river or stream, whether it be sufficient to irrigate the whole area properly or only a part of it; the length of time the water should be allowed to remain on the meadow at different periods of the season; the regulation of the depth of the water, its quantity and its rate of flow, in accordance with the temperature and the condition of the herbage; the proper times for the commencing and ending of pasturing and of shutting up for hay; the mechanical condition of the surface of the ground; the cutting out of any very large and coarse plants, as docks; and the improvement of the physical and chemical conditions of the soil by additions to it of sand, silt, loam, `` chalk, &c.

  • Nicolay and John Hay).

  • Nicolay and John Hay, Abraham Lincoln: A History (to vols., New York, 1890), a monumental work by his private secretaries who treat primarily his official life; John G.

  • The Yellow-knife, Hoarfrost, Lockhart (discharging the waters of Aylmer, ClintonColden and Artillery Lakes), Tchzudezeth, Du Rocher, Hay (400 m.

  • The authorities in Egypt, headed by General Stephenson, subsequently fupported by the Admiral Lord John Hay, who sent a naval)fflcer to examine the river as far as Dongola, were unanimous n favor of the Suakin-Berber route.

  • P.C. Scotland; Foxe's Acts and Monuments; Hay Fleming's Martyrs and Confessors of St Andrews; Cramond's Truth about Wishart (1898); and Dict.

  • He had married in July 1828 Lady Julia Tomlinson Hay, daughter of George, 7th marquess of Tweeddale, by whom he had three daughters, but being without heir male the barony lapsed on his death, the baronetcy passing to his nephew, Charles Parry Hobhouse.

  • The Wye is the chief river, and forms the boundary between the county and Radnorshire on the north and north-east, from Rhayader to Hay, a distance of upwards of 20 m.; its tributary, the Elan, till it receives the Claerwen, and then the latter river, continue the boundary between the two counties on the north, while the Towy separates the county from Cardigan on the north-west.

  • The other urban districts are Brynmawr, Builth Wells and Hay, with populations of 6833, of 1805 and of 1680 respectively in 1901.

  • In 1905 the yield of hay from clover, sainfoin and rotation grasses amounted to 666,985, tons, or 31.19 cwts.

  • to the acre, or 876,893 tons of all kinds of hay from 575,220 acres.

  • Hay Fleming; the Life of Knox, by P. Hume Brown, and John Knox and the Reformation, by A.

  • Hay is never mown on the true alps save in spots which are not easily accessible to cattle (in very high spots it belongs to the mower, and is then called Wildheu), but hay-crops are made on the Mayens or Voralpen, the lowest pastures, situated between the homesteads and the true alps; these Voralpen are individual (not communal) property, though probably in olden days cut out of the true Alpen.

  • In the winter the cattle consume the hay mown on these Voralpen (which, to a certain extent, are grazed in late spring and early autumn, that is, before and after the summer sojourn on the alps), either living in the huts on the Voralpen while they consume it, or in the stable attached to the dwelling-houses in the village; in the barn is stored the hay mown on the homestead and on the meadows near the village, which may belong to the owner of the cattle.

  • part of the state is especially suited to the cultivation of hay, the N.

  • Hay and forage are, after cereals, the most important crops; in 1907 2,664,000 acres produced 3,730,000 tons of hay valued at $41,030,000.

  • The freedom with which he fraternized with his Protestant neighbours called forth the rebuke of his bishop (George Hay), and ultimately, for hunting and for occasionally attending the parish church of Cullen, where one of his friends was minister, he was deprived of his charge and forbidden the exercise of ecclesiastical functions within the diocese.

  • The exports consist chiefly of livestock, jerked beef, hides, wool, and other animal products, wheat, flour, corn, linseed, barley, hay, tobacco, sealskins, fruit, vegetables, and some minor products.

  • Driven by his mother's Puritanism and his father's contempt for academic learning to outside society, he became intimate with Charles Hay Cameron, who strengthened him in his love of philosophy, and George W.

  • He gives it four-fifths of his land; while his white rival allows it only a quarter of his, less by half than the area he gives to live-stock, dairying, hay and grains.

  • Department of Agriculture reported the following statistics for Arkansas: - Indian corn, 52,802,659 bu., valued at $24,817,207; oats 3,783,706 bu., valued at $1,589,157; wheat, 1,915,250 bu., valued at $1,436,438; rice, 131,440 bu., valued at $111,724; rye, 23,652 bu., valued at $29,632; potatoes, 1,666,960 bu., valued at $1,116,863; hay, 113,491 tons, valued at $1,123,561.

  • As a result of these improvements land and timber values have markedly risen, and great impetus has been given to traffic on the rivers, which carry a large part of the cotton, lumber, coal, stone, hay and miscellaneous freights of the state.

  • In 1900 the chief crops were oats, barley, rye, wheat, potatoes, hay, beet (for sugar), flax and oil-yielding plants.

  • Small fruits, orchard fruits, hay, garden products and grains are decreasingly dependent on irrigation; wheat, which was once California's great staple, is (for good, but not for best results) comparatively independent of it, - hence its early predominance in Californian agriculture, due to this success on arid lands since taken over for more remunerative irrigated crops.

  • Stock ranches, tobacco plantations, and hay and grain farms, average from Boo to 530 acres, and counteract the tendency of dairy farms, beet plantations, orchards, vegetable gardens and nurseries to lower the size of the farm unit still further.

  • Wheat and other cereals are in part cut for hay, and the hay crop of 1906 was 1,133,465 tons, valued at $12,751,481.

  • In 1899 hay and grain represented slightly more than a third of the farm acreage and capital and also of the value of all farm products; live-stock and dairy farms represented slightly more than half the acreage, and slightly under 30% of the capital and produce; fruit farms absorbed 6.2% of the acreage and 27% of the capital, and returned 22.5% of the value of farm produce.

  • Day, who in turn was followed in September 1898 by John Hay; secretary of the treasury, Lyman J.

  • In the foreign relations of the United States, as directed by President McKinley, the most significant change was the cordial understanding established with the British government, to which much was contributed by his secretary of state, John Hay, appointed to that portfolio when he was ambassador to the court of St James, and which was due to some extent to the friendliness of the British press and even more markedly of the British navy in the Pacific during the Spanish War.

  • In 1909 the hay crop (alfalfa, native hay, timothy hay, &c.) was 665,000 tons, valued at $5,918,000 and raised on 277,000 acres.

  • There are still many cattle in the state, but they are divided up into small herds, no longer depending upon the open range for a precarious subsistence during the winter, but are sheltered and fed during winter storms on the hay ranches.

  • The breeds of cattle are far superior now to the old range stock, so that it pays to take care of them; many thousands are fed during the winter on alfalfa hay.

  • The production of Indian corn in 1909 was 47,328,000 bus., valued at $35,023,000; of wheat, 8,848,000 bus., valued at $10,175,000; of oats, 3,800,000 bus., valued at $2,052,000; of rye, 184,000 bus., valued at $155,000; of buckwheat, 378,000 bus., valued at $287,000; the hay crop was valued at $8,060,000 (606,000 tons).

  • Of the various elements in the value of all farm produce as shown by the federal census of 1900, live-stock, hay and grains, and dairying represented 87.2%.

  • The value of cereals ($4,700,271) - of which wheat and oats represent four-fifths - is much exceeded by that of hay and forage ($8,159,279 in 1899).

  • As a cerealproducing state Colorado is, however, relatively unimportant; nor in value of product is its hay and forage crop notable, except that of alfalfa, which greatly surpasses that of any other state.

  • In 1906 the state produced 3,157,136 bushels of Indian corn, valued at $1,J78,568; 8,266,538 bushels of wheat, valued at $5,373, 2 5 0; 5,9 62, 394 bushels of oats, valued at $2,683,077; 759,77 1 bushels of barley, valued at $4 10, 2 7 6; 43,5 80 bushels of rye, valued at $24,405; and 1,596,542 tons of hay, valued at $15,167,149.

  • Before the plains were fenced large herds drifted to the south in the winter, but now sufficient hay and alfalfa are cut to feed the cattle during the storms, which at longest are brief.

  • In this year 39.6% of the farms derived their principal income from hay and grain, 33.2% from live stock, 5.5% from dairy produce, 3.5% from vegetables, 2.8% from fruits.

  • In 1909 the values of the principal farm products (according to the Year Book of the U.S. Department of Agriculture) were as follows: hay, $5,339,000; wheat, $5,575,000; Indian corn, $5,915,000; oats, $634,000; and potatoes, $86,000.

  • the boundary between the counties of Radnor and Brecon before encountering English soil near Hay.

  • It has been discovered in seaweed; in the blood of certain Cephalopoda and Ascidia as haemocyanin, a substance resembling the ferruginous haemoglobin, and of a species of Limulus; in straw, hay, eggs, cheese, meat, and other food-stuffs; in the liver and kidneys, and, in traces, in the blood of man and other animals (as an entirely adventitious constituent, however); it has also been shown by A.

  • "The articles manufactured from jute are principally (I) gunny bags; (2) string, rope and cord; (3) kampa, a net-like bag for carrying wood or hay on bullocks; (4) chat, a strip of stuff for tying bales of cotton or cloth; (5) dola, a swing on which infants are rocked to sleep; (6) shika, a kind of hanging shelf for little earthen pots, &c.; (7) dulina, a floor-cloth; (8) beera, a small circular stand for wooden plates used particularly in poojahs; (9) painter's brush and brush for white-washing; (io) ghunsi, a waist-band worn next to the skin; (II) gochh-dari, a hair-band worn by women; (12) mukbar, a net bag used as muzzle for cattle; (13) parchula, false hair worn by players; (14) rakhi-bandhan, a slender arm-band worn at the Rakhi-poornima festival; and (15) dhup, small incense sticks burned at poojahs."

  • Endogenous spores of the hay bacillus.

  • Apart from numerous fermentation processes such as rotting, the soaking of skins for tanning, the preparation of indigo and of tobacco, hay, ensilage, &c., in all of which bacterial fermentations are concerned, attention may be especially directed to the following evidence of the supreme importance of Schizomycetes in agriculture and daily life.

  • A 2% solution used as a spray has been used with marked effect in hay fever and in whooping-cough.

  • Of the crops, hay and forage were the most valuable ($4,238,993), yielding 47.4% of the total value of crops, an increase of more than 200% over that of 1889, and in 1907, according to the Year-book of the Department of Agriculture, the crop was valued at $8,585,000.

  • Of the total acreage in 1900 of all crops 58' 3% was in cereals and 28'8% in hay and forage; of the acreage of cereals 40' 8% was in wheat, 31 8% in Indian corn, 21 6% in oats and 3.7% in rye.

  • In 1907 the buckwheat crop was 852,000 bushels; rye, 545 2, 000 bushels; the hay crop, 3,246,000 tons; oats, 30,534,000 bushels; barley, 1,496,000 bushels; wheat 12,731,000 bushels; and Indian corn 57,190,000 bushels.

  • The imports are French wines, spirits and liqueurs; silk and cotton stuffs, tobacco, hardware, glass, earthenware, clothing, preserved meat, fish, and vegetables, maize, flour, hay, bran, oils and cattle.

  • In this last year 27.5% of the farms derived their principal income from live stock, 20.3% from vegetables, 17.2% from dairy produce, 7.8% from fruits and 7.8% from hay and grain.

  • In 1907, according to the Year Book of the United States Department of Agriculture, the principal crops were: hay, 634,000 tons ($10,778,000); potatoes, 8,400,000 bushels ($6,216,000); Indian corn, 8,757,000 bushels ($5,517,000); wheat, 1,998,000 bushels ($1,958,000); rye, 1,372,000 bushels ($1,043,000); oats, 1,770,000 bushels ($991,000).

  • The most valuable field crop in 1907 was hay and forage, consisting mostly of clover and cultivated grasses; in 1899 the value of this crop was 20.2% of that of all crops.

Browse other sentences examples →